LINCOLNS COUNTY S.D.

BIOGRAPHIES

Ashley, O. P.

Bailey, Maggie

Bennett, Millard

Berens, William F.

Bogert, John A.

Boynton, A.

Brown, A. R.

Butzer, Louis

Byrnes, William J.

Clark, M. M.

Conklin, George L.

Conklin, H. C.

Cuppett, W. M.

Cuppett, William M.

Dean, Edgar

Debelts, D. F.

Dixon, A. P.

Ferguson, J. F.

Filion, M. A.

Fitzgerald, J. Q.

Fitzgerald, William

Formis, John K.

Gage, Chauncey R.

Gedstad, Knudt O.

Gifford, Oscar S.

Gifford, Oscar Sherman

Gillmore, B.

Haas, P. F.

Harlan, G. W.

Hawn, D. H.

Helmey, James A.

Hoffman, Adam

Hoffmann, John G.

Hood, T. W.

Horn, J.

 

Ingham, Will S.

Isham, Chauncey B.

Jacobs, Bernard C.

Kennedy, B.

Kennedy, C. B.

Lee, John T.

Lindeman, Charles W.

Miles, E. M.

Munsil, John M.

Nash, N. C.

Nash, Newman Curtis

Opsal, Elling

Patnoe, Nelson

Pattee, J. B.

Quigley, Thomas B.

Ross, Charles Hembrey

Rudolph, M. E.

 

Schmid, Mathias Sr.

Skarloedt, G.

Slaman, Adolph

Smith, Nanno

Smith, Nanno

Thompson, Oley

Thorson, Thomas

Treat, Frank H.

Tschudi, Peter Rudolph Sr.

Tuve, A. G.

Vroman, A. R.

White, Walter Roy

Wilkinson, Walter H.

Willey, James

 

 

 

 


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

JOHN T. LEE.

John T. Lee, the period of whose residence in South Dakota covers forty-six years, is one of the well known and representative citizens of Minnehaha county and is actively identified with business interests as manager of the S. H. Bowman Lumber Company and of the Farmers Elevator Company of Brandon, this state. His birth occurred in Christiania, Norway, on the 11th of February, 1855, his parents being Thorsten and Anna (Okre) Lee, natives of Norway, who emigrated to the United States in 1867 and took up their abode in Allamakee county, Iowa. The father, a blacksmith by trade, opened a shop in the town of Waterville In the spring of 1870 he came to South Dakota, filing on a homestead in Split Rock township, Minnehaha county, on which he resided until his death, which occurred in 1898. The mother of our subject was called to her final rest in the year 1906.

John T. Lee, who was a lad of twelve years when he accompanied his father and mother on their emigration to the United States, left home at the age of thirteen and came to South Dakota in 1869—one year prior to the arrival of his parents. During the first winter here he lived with a brother in Canton and worked in a sawmill. When his parents came to this state he joined them on the home farm and assisted his father in the work of the fields until he had attained his majority. In 1876 he wedded Miss Christina Nelson, a native of Sweden, and after his marriage located on a farm which his brother had homesteaded. John T. Lee succeeding to the ownership of the property at his brother's death. He extended the boundaries of the place until it embraced two hundred and forty acres and continued its operation until 1891, when he left the farm and took up his abode in Brandon. There he was made buyer for the Farmers Association, serving in that capacity for six years. On the expiration of that period the Farmers Association sold out and Mr. Lee became agent for its successors, remaining with his new employers for about six years or until his election to the office of county treasurer in 1903. He served in that position for two terms or four years and some time after the expiration of his second term returned to Brandon. On the organization of the Farmers Elevator Company he was made manager, and subsequently, when his son resigned as manager of the Bowman Lumber Company, he was offered and accepted the management of the latter concern as well. In these connections he has manifested excellent executive ability and sound judgment, and his efforts are a recognized factor in the continued growth and success of the institutions with which he is identified.

To Mr. Lee and his first wife were born four children, as follows: Edward, who acts as manager for the S. H. Bowman Lumber Company at Canton; Anthon, a member of the Frank Hyde Jewelry Company, of Sioux Falls; Hannah, who is employed as bookkeeper by the Loonan Lumber Company of Sioux Falls; and Albert, an inspector of fruits and vegetables at Minneapolis. The wife and mother passed away in 1894, and on the 31st of December, 1903, Mr. Lee was again married, his second union being with Mrs. Mary Holmes, who was formerly a Miss Hustad and is a native of Norway. Mrs. Lee conducts a successful millinery establishment in Sioux Falls, her store adjoining the Sioux Falls National Bank.

For a number of years Mr. Lee has been a factor in the local councils of the republican party. He served for twelve years as county commissioner of Minnehaha county and in that connection made a most commendable and creditable record. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, belonging to the following organizations: Minnehaha Lodge, No. 5, A. F. & A. M., of Sioux Falls; Sioux Chapter, R. A. M.; St. Croix Commandery, No. 2, K. T.; the Consistory; and the Mystic Shrine. He likewise belongs to Lodge No. 262 of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, while his religious faith is indicated by Mb membership in the Lutheran church, with which his wife is also connected. During the long period of his residence in Minnehaha county he has proven himself a public-spirited, progressive citizen, a trustworthy business man and a stanch friend, and his salient qualities of character justly entitle him to the esteem of those who know him.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

JAMES A. HELMEY.

James A. Helmey, a well known and successful druggist of Sherman, South Dakota, was born in Rushford, Fillmore county, Minnesota, on the 25th of May, 1870, his parents being Lewis P. and Martha (Jackson) Helmey, natives of Norway. The father emigrated to the United States as a young man, while the mother came to this country with her parents as a girl. Their marriage was celebrated in Fillmore county, Minnesota. Lewis P. Helmey was for some years identified with the hotel business, conducting the Winona House at Winona, Minnesota, but subsequently turned his attention to agricultural pursuits. In 1878 his wife died and the following year he came to South Dakota, locating on a section of school land in Lincoln county, of which he later purchased a quarter section when it was put on the market. He has reached the venerable age of eighty and during the past several years has lived retired, now making his home at Humboldt, Minnehaha county. He gives his political allegiance to the republican party and, while never an office seeker, served for a number of years as justice of the peace in Rushford, Minnesota. The period of his residence in this state covers more than a third of a century and he is widely recognized as one of its honored pioneers and representative citizens.

James A. Helmey was reared under the parental roof and attended the common schools
in the acquirement of an education. On reaching his twentieth year he took up the study
of pharmacy, entering his brother's drug store in Canton, South Dakota. In the fall of 1895 he matriculated in the Minnesota Institute of Pharmacy at Minneapolis, Minnesota,
from which institution he was graduated with the class of 1896, and on April 8th of the same spring he passed his examination before the state board of examiners at Huron. He then worked as a pharmacist for his brother in Canton until 1898, when he established himself in the drug business at Dell Rapids. At the end of three years he removed his stock to Trent, South Dakota, but sold out shortly afterward and took charge of the Brandt Drug Company at Brandt, this state, which he managed for about two years. Subsequently he spent two years as traveling representative of Frederick Ingram & Company, of Detroit, dealers in pharmaceutical specialties, and in 1905 opened a drug store in Toronto, South Dakota, where he was engaged in business for three years. On the expiration of that period he removed his stock to Brentford, this state, but soon afterward sold out and during the following two years was employed in Pierre, South Dakota. In 1910 he located in Sherman as manager of his brother's drug business and there has since remained, conducting the enterprise in a manner that has won and held an extensive
patronage.

In 1898 Mr. Helmey was united in marriage to Miss Anna Paulson, of Kimball, South Dakota, by whom he had two children, Martha E. and James A., Jr. The wife and mother was called to her final rest on the 10th of July, 1902, passing away in Dell Rapids. In politics Mr. Helmey is a stanch republican, while his religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Norwegian Lutheran church. Fraternally he is connected with Sioux Falls Lodge, No. 262, B. P. O. E., and Sherman Lodge of the Knights of Pythias. In all relations of life he has proven himself upright, honorable and straightforward, well worthy of the high regard in which he is uniformly held.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
Contributed by Karen Seeman

CHAUNCEY R. GAGE.

Chauncey R. Gage is a worthy native son of South Dakota and a well known and enterprising agriculturist residing on section 17, Split Rock township, Minnehaha county, where he owns a tract of land comprising ninety acres. His birth occurred in Lincoln county, this state, on the 30th of January, 1874, his parents being George and Melinda (Morse) Gage, the former a native of Connecticut and the latter of Benton county, Illinois. Their marriage was celebrated in Benton county, Illinois, where George Gage had settled as a young man and where he was for some years a railroad employe. Through the period of the Civil war he served with the Union army as a member of Company K, Ninety-sixth Illinois Regiment of Cavalry. In 1870 he came to South Dakota, homesteading in Linn township, Lincoln county, where he spent the remainder of his life, passing away in 1897.

Chauncey R. Gage was reared to manhood under the parental roof and in the acquirement of an education attended the common schools. On reaching his majority, in 1895, he started out as an agriculturist on his own account and followed farming in Lincoln and McCook counties as a renter for about eight years. In 1903 he purchased his present home farm of ninety acres in Split Rock township, Minnehaha county, and has resided thereon continuously since, being actively engaged in its further cultivation and improvement. Success has come to him in reward of close application and modern ideas as to the best farming methods to employ.

On the 8th of October, 1895, Mr. Gage was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Wallace, of Lincoln county, by whom he has six children, namely: Grace, Lee, Lewis, Gladys, Edna and Lucille, all at home.

Mr. Gage gives his political allegiance to the republican party and now serves as chairman of the school board, the cause of education having ever found in him a stalwart friend. His entire life has been spent in South Dakota and his record well deserves a place in its annals.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
Contributed by Karen Seeman

JOHN K. FORMIS, M. D.

Dr. John K. Formis, an able and successful young physician and surgeon of Lennox, South Dakota, has practiced in that city since 1910 and has won an enviable reputation as a representative of the profession. His birth occurred in Germany on the 3d of July, 1880, his parents being Oscar and Mary (Cassilly) Formis. The father is deceased, but the mother survives and now makes her home in Florence, Italy.

John K. Formis acquired his education in the Real Gymnasium of his native country and subsequently studied chemistry for two years. Having determined upon a professional career and desiring to enjoy the greater opportunities of the new world, he crossed the Atlantic to the United States and matriculated in the Northwestern University Medical School of Chicago, Illinois, from which institution he was graduated in 1909. He began practice in that city but at the end of a year came to Lennox, South Dakota, which has since remained the scene of his professional labors. His practice has steadily grown with the increase of population, for he has demonstrated his skill and ability in successfully coping with the intricate problems that continually confront the physician in his efforts to restore health and prolong life. He writes the "Department of Health" for the local paper and has made it a valuable and instructive feature of the journal.

In August, 1907, Dr. Formis was united in marriage to Miss Avis Thompson, a daughter of Thomas Thompson, of Utah. He is a Protestant in religious faith and politically a progressive republican. Fraternally he is identified with Lennox Lodge, No. 35, A. F. & . M., and the Modern Woodmen of America, acting as examining physician for the local organization of the latter order. Dr. Formis is popular in both professional and social circles of his community and has many friends who esteem him highly.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
Contributed by Karen Seeman

WILLIAM F. BERENS.

William F. Berens, editor and owner of the Worthing Enterprise of Worthing, Lincoln county, is recognized not only as an able journalist but also as a public-spirited citizen. He was born in Perry township, Lincoln county, on the 31st of March, 1892, and is a son of Frank and Jessie (Sabin) Berens. The father removed to South Dakota in 1884 and settled north of Lennox upon a farm, which he operated continuously for twenty years. While engaged in agricultural pursuits be met his future wife, who was a daughter of George Sabin, one of the first settlers of that section and who homesteaded land there in the early days. Previous to his demise, which occurred in 1905, Mr. Berens was engaged in the newspaper business in Irene and Humboldt. His wife died in 1896.

William F. Berens was educated in the high school of Lennox and made an unusual record. When but nine years of age he began to learn the printing business and at the age of sixteen purchased the Worthing Enterprise, becoming the youngest newspaper owner and editor in the state. He has gained a gratifying measure of success in his venture and has increased the circulation of his paper four times, even though the population of the town has decreased. The paper now has six hundred subscribers. He does all of the work of the office, being at once printer, editor and business manager, and is very efficient in the discharge of his varied duties. His plant is well equipped and the typographical work is well done. The paper, which is a weekly, is absolutely independent in politics and is at the forefront in advocating improvements in the community. Worthing has the distinction of shipping more pram than any other town on the Milwaukee system and there are six large elevators in the town.

Mr. Berens was married on the 9th of January, 1913, to Miss Laura Donahue, a daughter of Roger O. Donahue, who was very prominent in public affairs in the state. He served twice in the legislature and proved a valuable member of that body. Mr. and Mrs. Berens have a son, Joseph.

Mr. Berens is a Catholic in his religious faith and fraternally is connected with Marquette Council, K. C, at Sioux Falls. He is very fond of outdoor life and finds a great deal of pleasure and needed recreation in an occasional outing. However, his work as editor and business manager of the Enterprise makes heavy demands upon his time and leaves him little opportunity for vacations. He has passed his entire life in Lincoln county and the fact that those who have known him from boyhood hold him in high esteem is proof of his integrity and uprightness.


Memorial and Biographical Record of
Turner, Lincoln, Union and Clay Counties, South Dakota
Geo. A. Ogle & CO., Chicago, 1897
Contributed by Jim Dezotell

EDWARD W. OWENS. As an all around prominent man of Lincoln county, there is probably no one of its citizens who more justly deserves the title than Mr. Owens. He is yet in the prime of vigorous manhood, intelligent and well educated, and as such is highly esteemed and respected.

The gentleman, whose name introduces these brief paragraphs, is of Irish descent, but was born at sea, on board ship lying off the coast of Newfoundland. His father and mother, William and Jane (Byrnes) Owens, were both natives of the Emerald isle, but emigrated from the down-trodden country of their birth in 1850, and located for the first three years in eastern Canada, at the expiration of which time they removed to Green county, Wis., and settled upon government land. Mr. Owens died there, but his good wife still survives, and makes her home in Hudson, Iowa.

William Owens was born near Tillehany, Wexford county, Ireland. His father, Edward, was a native of the same county, and married Miss Nancy Nail, who was of a literary family. Eight children came to bless their union, viz.: William, James, Joseph, Edward, Matthew, Jane, Ann, and Ellen. He was a carpenter by trade and died in about the seventieth year of his age. His son William, inheriting his genius, at a very early age constructed a cradle for Jane, the first-born child of James Byrnes, who twenty-two years later became his wife. For seventeen years William Owens was in the employ of a wealthy Episcopal minister. His principal duties consisted in taking care of his horses, and driving his carriage for him when he attended divine service. At about thirty-five years of age, having saved a small fortune, Mr. Owens embarked in the grocery business, but, having too much confidence in his fellow men, he trusted largely and failed. He then engaged in dairy farming, but rent being very high he found it difficult to support his family, and resolved to seek his fortune in America, coming to this country in 1850, as stated above. He was an Episcopalian, of a deeply religious and highly literary nature, and died at Postville, Wis., in 1889, in his eighty-fourth year, in the hope of a glorious immortality. His last words were, "Lamb of God." Twelve children were born to Mr. Owens and his wife, but three have since passed from time to eternity. The living are Mary Ann Keen, James, Edward W., William, Richard, Joseph, Ellen Steadman, Lena Peebles and Emma Horn.

Our subject is the fourth child in order of birth, and first opened his eyes to the light May 22, 1850. He passed his early life on his father's farm, in Green county, Wis., and, after becoming proficient in the elementary branches taught in the district schools, he became a student in a select school, taking a teacher's course. After qualifying as an instructor he began his labors as a pedagogue in Plymouth county, Iowa, and taught there for two terms. March 12, 1873, he came to Lincoln county, Dak. Ter., and settled upon a farm, on section 10, of Pleasant township. The land was, of course, unimproved, and the country surrounding one vast wilderness, the dug-out, which he built for shelter, being the only one in the township at that time. The privations and hardships of those pioneer days would fill volumes; but suffice it to say that his crops having been destroyed by hail and grasshoppers in September, 1876, he returned to Iowa with his family, and in Sioux county, taught school for about a year and a half in the vicinity of Sioux Center. In the fall of 1877, his timber culture entry being contested, he employed Hon. R. F. Pettigrew (afterward United States senator) as counsel, and the contest resulted in his favor. The spring of the following year his homestead was contested, and, in view of this, he decided to resign his position as teacher, and return to his claim, where he taught district school in his own house. When the day arrived to appear at the United States land office he took his witnesses to Sioux Falls, but he found on arrival that the contest had been abandoned, which left him in undisputed possession of his claim. He and Mrs. Owens own 320 acres, all of which is improved and in a fine state of cultivation. The old homestead he rents out and conducts his farming operations on the farm on which he located five years ago. During that time he had erected a fine set of substantial, well-arranged buildings, including a neat, commodious residence that is nicely furnished, and which is the seat of that true hospitality that "welcomes the coming and speeds the parting guest."  Mr. Owens was fortunate in securing for his companion Miss Louisa D.

Mead, the lady who so graciously presides over his household affairs. She possesses a fine character, cultured mind and pleasing manners, and is a true wife and helpmate. The natal day of Mrs. Owens was April 4, 1846, and her birthplace New London, Huron Co., Ohio. She is the fifth in order of birth of a family of ten children born to Bradford L. and Deborah (Lyon) Mead, but five of whom still survive, viz.: Lucian, of Fitchville, Ohio; Levi and Mrs. W. H. Goltry, who both live near Beresford, S. Dak.; Mrs. Ellen Porter, who resides in Beresford; and Mrs. Owens. Bradford L. Mead was born in Greenwich township, Fairfield Co., Conn., November 29, 1804, one of a family of three sons born to Jonathan and Hannah (Lyon) Mead, who were married March 5, 1800. Mr. Mead's two brothers were named Zachariah and Luther, and he also had two half-brothers — Luther and John. Bradford L. grew to maturity, and July 1, 1828, was united in wedlock to Miss Deborah Lyon, a native of New York and of English descent. Mr. Mead was a well-educated man — a teacher by profession — and a descendant of one of Queen Elizabeth's physicians. Many of his relatives possessed considerable genius, one of his cousins being mainly instrumental in the invention of the cylinder printing press; and another cousin invented the "American chinaware." Mrs. Owens' uncle, Zachariah Mead, was a graduate of New Haven college, a distinguished Episcopal minister, who preached in the city of Boston and also edited a religious journal at Richmond, Va.

The maternal grandparents of Mrs. Owens were Charles and Deborah (Palmer) Lyon. They had a family of eleven children, only one of whom survives — Mrs. Abigail Johnson, of Fitchville, Ohio. The deceased are Charles, Seely, Daniel, Levi, Betsy, Luzetta, Melinda, Marcus, and two who died in infancy. One of Mrs. Owens' deceased sisters left an only daughter — Mattie L. Laughlin by name — who is a graduate of a medical college and now a prominent physician of Oakland, Neb. She married J. G. Arthur, an attorney of that place, who is a second cousin of the late President Arthur.

The marriage of Mr. Owens and Miss Mead occurred May 22, 1876, and two children have come to bless their union — Ella M. and Arthur M. Both daughter and son have been the recipients of every advantage in the shape of educational facilities from their indulgent parents, and are now students at the State university at Vermillion. Miss Ella has natural talent for music, and particular attention has been paid to the development of this branch of her education, in which she has made rapid progress. Mrs. Owens was educated in the common schools and attended high schools at Colesburg and Garnavillo, Iowa. She became a teacher at the age of eighteen, and up to her thirty-fourth year was very successful in the prosecution of that profession, having taught as many as six successive terms in the same school. She also taught four terms after her marriage. The family are members of the Baptist church, in the affairs of which Mr. Owens has taken an active part. He has served in the capacity of deacon, and has been superintendent of the Sunday school.

Mr. Owens was one of the moving spirits in the organization of Pleasant township, was its first clerk, and served as such for three terms. The progress of the community in general he is closely identified with, having come to the territory with nothing except his physical and mental powers, and growing up with the country, prospering as it prospered. As a justice of the peace he has served for eight years, and various other public offices it has been his fortune to occupy. As secretary of the Republican central committee, he joined in a call for a non-partisan county convention to nominate candidates to the Sioux Falls convention which framed the present state constitution. In 1886, without any solicitation on his part, he became the farmers' candidate for nomination for the legislature, and received twenty-two votes, being within eight votes of the requisite number to nominate. Again, in 1888, he was the leading farmers' candidate for the same office, but was defeated by means of fraudulent caucuses and proxies. In September of the same year he was nominated at the "farmers' Republican convention" for county superintendent of schools, but, in an article given to the press a few days afterward, declined to be a candidate for the position. 

Early in 1890 he began the preparation of a pamphlet on political reform, entitled "A Definite System of Organization and Co-operation, by which the Producing and Laboring Classes may Obtain their Share of Representation and Procure the Reforms they Demand." It was read with interest by many prominent members of the Farmers' alliance, and commended by the Hon. J. B. Furrow, president of the Iowa State alliance, in the following language: "I thank you for the pamphlet and the doctrine it advocates; I shall use it in my office — a brighter star in the good work of illuminating the farmers of Iowa." Mr. Owens was the first to conceive the idea and recommended the establishment of a political paper at Canton, S. Dak., on the cooperative plan, for the purpose of advocating the National and State Farmers' alliances, and which culminated in the establishment of the Dakota Farmers' Leader. He was one of the incorporators, and, as secretary of the company, negotiated a contract with city of Pierre, through Mayor Ward, by which the sum of $390 was received for sending out a campaign edition of 15,000 copies, over the various counties of the state, for the purpose of influencing the location of the capital at that city. He was also one of the incorporators of the Farmers' Mutual Insurance company, of Lincoln county, and a member of the first board of directors.

In 1890 Mr. Owens opposed the formation of a new party, but when the Independent party of South Dakota was brought into existence at Huron, he felt it his duty to cast his fortunes with that organization, and earnestly advocating its principles he was sent as a delegate to the first Independent convention ever held in Lincoln county. In the fall of the same year he was nominated for the state legislature and entered actively into the campaign, making several speeches, but the time had not yet arrived for reform principles to win. In 1896 he was elected a delegate to the Populist state convention at Huron, which endorsed the candidacy of Hon. Wm. J. Bryan for president. Mr. Owens is an ardent admirer of Mr. Bryan, and believes he is destined to lead the reform forces to victory in 1900. In January, 1897, he was recommended to Gov. Lee by many of the leading Populists of his county for membership on the board of regents. He has attained quite a reputation as a literary man, and has contributed both prose and poetry for local publications, besides having written much on the subject of political economy, etc., for the various papers printed in the county. Take him all in all, he is, without doubt, one of the best known citizens of Lincoln county, well-posted on current topics, and a fluent conversationalist.

He has made law a special study for several years, and intends shortly to apply for admission to the bar.


Memorial and Biographical Record of
Turner, Lincoln, Union and Clay Counties, South Dakota
Geo. A. Ogle & CO., Chicago, 1897
transcribed by Jim Dezotell

MILLARD BENNETT, auditor of Lincoln county, is a native of Allegany county, N. Y., and was born June 5, 1853. His father and mother, Daniel and Sylvia (Hatch) Bennet were natives of England and New York state respectively, and the former is now a resident of Plano, Ill., where he is spending the evening of a useful life.

Millard was reared in the place of his nativity and given during his life the advantages of a liberal education. After he had mastered the rudiments of learning in the common schools he subsequently became a student at Pike seminary, Wyoming county, N. Y. Until he had attained the age of twenty years he continued to make his home in the Empire State, a member of the parental household, and then he struck out for himself. He located first in Kane county, Ill., where he secured employment at teaching for a year, and then in March, 1874, he came to Dakota territory and homesteaded a farm in Lincoln county. He did not stay here long at that time, but the following autumn returned to Illinois and resumed teaching in Kane and Kendall counties until the spring of 1881, at that time coming to Lincoln county and locating here permanently. He now owns 560 acres in Grant township and always devoted his attention to the farming business since being a resident of the county until the spring of 1895, when he assumed the duties of county auditor, to which responsible position he had been elected the fall of the previous year on the Republican ticket. He is a keen observer and a man who keeps well abreast of the times, always being in full sympathy with and a stanch supporter of any feasible scheme that will tend to enhance the public welfare. While a resident of Grant township he held many of the offices in the gift of his fellow townsmen, among them being township clerk and assessor. He has always taken much interest in local affairs and is one of the prominent and rising citizens of the county.

Our subject was united in marriage March 17, 1879, in Aurora, Ill., to Miss Mary E. Davis, who is a native of De Kalb county, that state. Their household is completed by six children on whom have been bestowed the following names: Ethel, Claude, Wynn, Lyle, Mabel and Bonnie. Mr. Bennett is in all respects an upright, straightforward man, sincere and conscientious in all his dealings, and no one can bring aught against his character, or can impeach his standing, which is of the highest in this community where he is well known and respected.


Memorial and Biographical Record of
Turner, Lincoln, Union and Clay Counties, South Dakota
Geo. A. Ogle & CO., Chicago, 1897
transcribed by Jim Dezotell

JAMES WILLEY is the owner of 320 acres of fine farming land, one-half in section 1 of Prairie township, and the balance in Norway township, Lincoln county, the entire amount of which is improved. He devotes his energies to mixed farming, and the neat and tasty surroundings combined with the fine appearance of the farm indicate the owner to be a man of enterprise and thrift. As Mr. Willey is well and popularly known throughout the community, a sketch of his life will be received with interest by our readers. He is a native of the province of Quebec, Canada, and was born October 8, 1843. His early life was spent in his mother country on a farm, and the common schools of the district afforded him the rudiments of education. In the spring of 1865 he came to the "States," locating in Jackson county, Iowa, where he worked in a blacksmith shop for two years, and then settled on a farm in Clinton county of the same state, which he operated for a period of three years longer. Woodbury county next claimed him as a resident for a year and then he removed to Sioux county, settling on a homestead. That land was all wild and had never seen the plow, but under the skillful management of our subject it was improved and made his home until the spring of 1881, when he sold out and came to Union county, Dak. Ter. Here again he was confronted with practically raw land which he has brought to a high state of cultivation. To his original purchase he added another quarter section in Norway township, and this makes up his total landed possessions of 320 acres as stated above. All the outbuildings and both of his barns he has erected himself, and his two pieces of property are among the best in the townships in which they are located. Politically he is and always has been a stanch supporter of Republican principles, and takes an active interest in all local matters. He has served as clerk of his school district for three terms and also as road supervisor, and has frequently attended both county and state conventions of the party with which he is in sympathy as a delegate. He is distinctly a self-made man, starting in his battle for existence without a dollar, and by thrift, enterprise and frugality has made his mark as a well-to-do and prominent citizen.

Mr. Willey was united in the holy bonds of wedlock to the lady who so graciously presides over his home, in 1885. Her maiden name was Miss Sarah Armstrong, and she was a native of Upper Canada. The union has been blessed with the birth of four children, but two of whom are living, viz.: Earnest E. and Lottie. Mrs. Willey is a woman of Christian character, and a member of the local missionary society.


Memorial and Biographical Record of
Turner, Lincoln, Union and Clay Counties, South Dakota
Geo. A. Ogle & CO., Chicago, 1897
transcribed by Jim Dezotell

HON. WALTER H. WILKINSON, of Lennox, Lincoln county, is a native of Wisconsin and was born near Oshkosh in 1851. His father, Jebus Wilkinson, was a native of Somersetshire, England, where he was reared to maturity and married, bringing his wife to the new world about 1848, and becoming a pioneer in the state where our subject was born. He was subsequently married after the death of his first wife, by whom he was the parent of three children, and from the latter union there was one daughter, Ada, now the wife of Galen B. Young, of Lincoln county.

Walter was the second child, and but four years old when he was deprived of a mother's care. In 1854 his father removed to Dubuque county, Iowa, and located at Dyersville, and there our subject grew to manhood and received a practical education in the common schools. In 1872, when he had attained his majority, he came to Lincoln county, Dak. Ter., and homesteaded a quarter section of land which he improved and farmed on for ten years. He is now the owner of over two sections, all of which has been accumulated by his own industry since coming to the county. He has been actively engaged in the grain business since 1883 and has handled his share of that commodity coming to the town of Lennox. In 1882 he established a hardware store but sold out in February, 1890, and started a lumber yard, which is now known as and conducted by the F. M. Slagle Lumber company. He was engaged in the lumber trade for about a year when he sold out and has since then devoted his time to the buying and selling of real estate and the loan business, in the latter, however, he handles only his own capital. Mr. Wilkinson politically has at all times affiliated with the Democratic party, and under President Cleveland's first administration served as postmaster of Lennox. In 1896 he was nominated for state senator on the Democratic ticket, secured the endorsement of the People's party, and was elected by a good majority. He is a member of the Democratic state central committee and in all political matters takes an active part. Socially he belongs to the Masonic fraternity, and Lennox lodge No. 35, A.F. & A.M.

In July, 1877, Mr. Wilkinson was married, Miss Lena Schultz, a daughter of John Schultz, being the bride, and this union has been blessed by the advent of two children—Harry B. and Ella M.


Memorial and Biographical Record of
Turner, Lincoln, Union and Clay Counties, South Dakota
Geo. A. Ogle & CO., Chicago, 1897
transcribed by Jim Dezotell

PROF. A. G. TUVE, president. In the year 1869, in the interest of higher education and for the special purpose of preparing young men for the ministry, the Norwegian branch of the Lutheran Augustana synod established at Marshall, Wis., an educational institution maintaining collegiate and theological courses of study, termed The Augustana college and Theological seminary.

Owing to the constant westward trend of emigration, and in hopes of extending its usefulness, it was decided to remove the school and locate it more centrally in the west. The offer of twenty acres of land and a chool building by the town of Beloit, Iowa, was accepted, and the Augustana College and Theological seminary was removed and established in its new location in the spring of 1881. The school there enjoyed moderate success and prosperity, and it soon became evident that the accommodations at Beloit were not sufficient to receive all students that sought entrance at the college. At this juncture the enterprising city of Canton offered to donate grounds and a spacious building for the use of the college department if the synod would remove the same to that city and maintain a college course for a period of at least ten years. The offer was accepted, and in the fall of 1884, Augustana college began its career in its present location under the principalship of Prof. M. D. Miller, while the Theological seminary continued as before with Prof. D. Lysnes at its head. In the fall of 1889 Prof. Miller resigned his position at the head of the faculty of the college, and the board of trustees elected Prof. C. S. Salverson as his successor.

In June, 1890, an important change took place in the management of these institutions; the Augustana synod (by whom these schools were maintained), the conference and the Anti-Missourian brotherhood were united in one body called the United Norwegian Lutheran church of America. The theological school at Beloit was removed to Minneapolis and consolidated with the Augsburg seminary in that city, and the grounds and buildings which it occupied in Beloit are now used for the beneficent purpose of an orphans' home. Shortly after the organization of the United Norwegian Lutheran church of America, Prof. Salverson resigned his position as president of Augustana college to resume his work in the ministry, and the present incumbent, Prof. Anthony G. Tuve, was then elected as his successor.

The college building is a three-story structure, ninety-six feet long and sixty feet front, and besides class rooms, chapel and music rooms, has accommodations for sixty students. The building is so arranged that all portions have an abundance of light, the rooms are neatly papered, and water is supplied from the Canton water-works.

Prof. Anthony G. Tuve, the able and efficient president of Augustana college, is a native of Winona county, Minn. and was born January 21, 1864. He was reared to manhood on a farm near Decorah, Iowa, and after completing his education, for obtaining which he was afforded liberal advantages, he became a teacher in the public schools in Winneshiek county, Iowa. Such proficiency did he attain in his labors that in the fall of 1889 he was called to Augustana college as an instructor in mathematics and rhetoric, and a year later was elected president of the institution. As principal, he has labored earnestly to carry out plans which have been proven wise, and to introduce improved methods of instruction wherever the efficiency of the college could be thus advanced. All teachers who love their work, and are anxious to excel therein, find in him a firm friend and wise counselor, while to the pupils he acts the part of a father, rather than a ruler, being in sympathy with the aspirations and desires of all students, and anxious to increase their opportunities. Under his able management the college has increased in attendance and usefulness, and is to-day in a prosperous and flourishing condition.


Memorial and Biographical Record of
Turner, Lincoln, Union and Clay Counties, South Dakota
Geo. A. Ogle & CO., Chicago, 1897
transcribed by Jim Dezotell

PETER RUDOLPH TSCHUDI, Sr. Among the men who are conducting the farming interests of Lincoln county are many old soldiers, and and our subject is one of the brave men who volunteered during the late war to help defend the country, and served long and honorably in defense of the stars and stripes. He is a native of picturesque Switzerland, and was born in April, 1843. He grew to maturity in his native land, where, also, he received his education, and in 1861 emigrated to America. Upon landing, he came direct to Green county, Wis., but after six months' residence there, the patriotic spirit which characterizes his countrymen asserted itself, when the rebellion broke out, and, although an alien, he was one of the first to offer his services as a soldier. He was enrolled in September, 1861, in company K, Ninth Wisconsin regiment, infantry, and was mustered into the service of the United States at Milwaukee, Wis. The regiment was first ordered to Leavenworth, Kans., thence to Fort Scott and the Indian territory, and later to northwestern Arkansas and southwestern Missouri. During this time our subject participated with his regiment in the battles of Newtonia, Prairie Grove and Kane Hill, and after two months spent in St. Louis, went with his company to Little Rock, where they joined Gen. Steele's army. The following spring they took part in the Red river campaign, under the command of Gen. Banks, but got only as far as Compton, when they returned to the rendezvous at Little Rock, participating in a few engagements with the rebel forces under Price, going, and the battle of Saline river when returning to Little Rock. Our subject remained with his regiment in the latter place until the expiration of his term of service, taking part in several minor expeditions, and was mustered out and discharged at Little Rock the latter part of 1864, after three years of faithful duty in the service of his adopted country. Mr. Tschudi was never wounded during his entire term of enlistment; but when on his way home, on board a boat on the Mississippi, he fell down the hatchway. From the effects of this accident he has never fully recovered, which, coupled with the inroads made on his health by the hardships and privations he endured as a soldier, incapacitated him for hard physical labor.

After the cessation of hostilities Mr. Tschudi returned to his home in the Badger state, and in the spring of 1865, removed to and settled on a farm in Goodhue county, Minn. After twelve years spent in farming pursuits there he came to Dakota territory, settling on his present farm in section 18, of Pleasant township, in 1877. For a time he lived in a dug out and applied himself industriously to improving his farm, and his estate, which now comprises 250 acres, is all under cultivation, and nearly all of this he has done himself, besides building all the present structures. He is exclusively a farmer, and his reputation as a skillful and practical griculturist is second to none.

In 1865 Mr. Tschudi was united in marriage in Dodge county, Minn., to Miss Annie Legler, a native of Green county, Wis., and a daughter of Casper Legler, deceased, who was one of the early settlers of that county. Mrs. Tschudi was born in 1847, and to her and Mr. Tschudi have come ten children, nine of whom are living, viz.: Fred, John Casper, Rosie, deceased; Peter Rudolph, Jr.; Agatha, the wife of Melchior Schieser, of this township, and the mother of one son, Jacob; Edward, Samuel Emil, Rosie, and Otto. The family are members in good standing of the Calvinist church, and the children have all been given good school educations.

Mr. Tschudi, politically, is a Republican, and has taken an active part in all local matters of interest. Although he has frequently been importuned to accept office by his fellow-townsmen, he has always declined the nomination, preferring to allow others who, though probably no better fitted for civic life than he, are more anxious to serve.


Memorial and Biographical Record of
Turner, Lincoln, Union and Clay Counties, South Dakota
Geo. A. Ogle & CO., Chicago, 1897
transcribed by Jim Dezotell

NANNO SMITH, who carries on the most extensive general merchandise business conducted in the town of Lennox, is a native of Hanover, Germany, and was born in 1850. He remained in the "fatherland" until 1872, when he sought in free America the chance of achieving a competence denied in the land of his birth, so down-trodden is it by military despotism. His first stopping place in this country was in Freeport, Ills., where he stayed a short time and then went further west and located in Grundy county, Iowa. In 1881 he arrived in Lennox, Lincoln Co., Dak. Ter., and at once engaged in merchandising, and by tact and perseverance at his chosen vocation, has built up the most extensive business carried on in Lennox. He also owns a valuable section of choice land adjoining that town. In political faith Mr. Smith strongly adheres to the doctrines of the Republican party, the candidates of which he supports with his vote.

In 1873 Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Miss Anna Freerichs, and to them have been born eight children, six of whom are living, viz.; Joseph, in business with his father; Kate, Benjamin, Otto, Simon and Ella.

The subject of this biography is a son of Benjamin and Katrina (Weirenga) Smith, both natives of Hanover, Germany, where they grew to mature years and were married. They raised a family of five children, our subject being the eldest, then, in the order of their birth, as follows: William B., Talka, Benjamin and Tina. William B. was the first of the family to emigrate to America, crossing the broad Atlantic in 1869, when he was but fifteen years of age, Nanno following in 1872. In 1878 the father, mother, and balance of the family, took passage for the new world, coming to Grundy county, Iowa, where the two sons had preceded them. The father died three years after coming to America; by trade he was a cabinet-maker, but owing to his ill health was unable to follow his vocation in this country. The mother survived until the spring of 1894, when she also passed to her reward beyond the grave.


Memorial and Biographical Record of
Turner, Lincoln, Union and Clay Counties, South Dakota
Geo. A. Ogle & CO., Chicago, 1897
transcribed by Jim Dezotell

ADOLPH SLAMAN, M. D., a prominent and well-known physician and surgeon of Lennox, was born in the state of Moravia, Austria, and when nine years of age emigrated with his parents to America, locating in St. Paul, Minn., where he grew to manhood and learned the trade of locksmith. When eighteen years old he entered the Rush Medical college, of Chicago, from which he graduated with the class of '82. The Doctor almost immediately after receiving his diploma came to Lennox, and has continued here ever since, with the exception of one year which he spent as house physician at the Yankton hospital for the insane. He has built up a large and lucrative practice which he deservedly merits. He has been a close student all these years, keeping pace with the rapid strides of medical science, and is known throughout South Dakota as a skillful and successful operator in surgery. He is a member of the South Dakota State Medical Society and has been since its organization; he is also a member of the Iowa, Minnesota and South Dakota Tri-State Medical association, which was founded in 1896.

Dr. Slaman has an interesting family history of which the following is a digest. He was one of a family of ten children, born to Thomas and Annie Slaman, nine of whom are still living, viz.: Frank, married and a resident of Brainard, Neb. ; Annie, wife of Antoine Bowers, of Milwaukee, Wis.; Aloiz, married and lives in St. Paul, Minn.; Emily, the wife of Charles Blazener; Frances, in Wisconsin; Thomas remained in Austria and became a soldier there, being killed in a military charge while in Turkey; Josie, wife of John Huisick, of St. Paul, Minn.; Ludwig; Adolph, the subject of this narrative; and Joseph, married and a resident of St. Paul, Minn. The father, Thomas Slaman, is still living, aged ninety-one years, and makes his home in St. Paul; his father, Francis Slama, was a son of Karel Slama, one of four brothers—French soldiers—who severed their connection with France and purchased an estate in Kuklik, in the province of Moravia, Austria. These men were all long lived, and it is a remarkable fact that their descendants have all crowded the century mark very close.

Dr. A. Slaman and Miss Matilda Schultz were married in Lennox in 1886, and to them have been born two children, viz: Lamont and Corinne. They occupy a beautiful home and enjoy all the pleasures of a well-conducted household. The Doctor is a member of no social orders, neither is he identified with any church societies. His church is humanity, and where suffering calls quickly responds.


Memorial and Biographical Record of
Turner, Lincoln, Union and Clay Counties, South Dakota
Geo. A. Ogle & CO., Chicago, 1897
transcribed by Jim Dezotell

MATHIAS SCHMID, SR. This highly respected gentleman is one of the early settlers of Lincoln county, and a prominent, and successful agriculturist of Pleasant township. He is a native of Switzerland, was born June 14, 1830, and is the eldest of the six members of the family now living, the others being Henry, Adam, Catherine, Thomas and Milicher. He was reared in the picturesque land of his birth, gleaning his education in the common schools, and when he had attained the age of fifteen years he accompanied his parents to America. That was in 1845, and the family immediately settled in Green county, Wis., where both the parents passed from time to eternity.

Our subject grew to manhood in the Badger state, and having been bred to the life of a farmer, adopted that calling as his life work. He was industrious, and during his more mature years owned a farm near his father's. This land, however, he sold and with the money purchased a mill which he operated for five years. In the spring of 1873, he came to Lincoln county, Dak. Ter., taking up a claim in section 14, of Pleasant township, which he improved and in due course proved upon. When he arrived the township was yet unorganized, no roads existed, but here and there could be seen the cabins of the pioneers. Our subject was poor when he arrived, and saw some pretty hard times during his early residence in the county. He was unfortunate, like many others, in having his crops destroyed by the grasshoppers, and for a time had a hard struggle for existence. Those times have passed, however, and he is now considered one of the substantial citizens of the county. His attention has been devoted exclusively to farming, and by applying himself strictly to his business, carefully calculating receipts and expenditures, he has succeeded, and is now the fortunate owner of a whole section of land, all improved. He has been supervisor of roads, and served as school treasurer for many years, always discharging the duties imposed with marked ability. Politically he is, and has been, an ardent and steadfast Republican, and supports the candidates of that party with his vote. He is interested, as all good citizens are, in whatever will promote the welfare of the community, and in his own quiet way assists in all worthy enterprises.

The marriage of Mr. Schmid and Miss Magdalena Duerst occurred in 1854, and by this union he became the father of ten children, nine of whom survive, viz.: Bathasar, married Miss Anna Kundert, and has three children; Katie is the wife of Henry Kundert, and the mother of eight children; Mathias, Jr., married Miss Mary Duerst, and is the father of four children; Joshua; Lena is the wife of John Messner, and has seven children; Margarite married Andrew Johnson, and is the mother of three children; Anna became the wife of Jacob Vogeli, and has three children; John Henry married Miss Bell Arnesen, and has two children; and Fannie married John Bovill, and is the mother of two children. Mrs. Schmid passed to her last resting place October 25, 1893, at the age of fifty-seven years, while on a visit to Wisconsin, and is buried in the cemetery in Pleasant township. The family are members of the Evangelical Association church, of which Mr. Schmid has been trustee for some years.


Memorial and Biographical Record of
Turner, Lincoln, Union and Clay Counties, South Dakota
Geo. A. Ogle & CO., Chicago, 1897
transcribed by Jim Dezotell

NELSON PATNOE. This gentleman occupies an excellent station among the farmers of Pleasant township, Lincoln county, to which he is fairly entitled by the success with which he has met in the
prosecution of his chosen vocation.

Mr. Patnoe is a native of Franklin county, N. Y., and of French descent. His natal day was December 30, 1847, and he passed his early life on the home farm, attending school duringthe winter terms. When the great Civil war broke out our subject was fourteen years of age, and he decided that he would be a soldier. He enlisted in the First New York regiment, engineer corps, but was so small that all he could handle was a drum, and as a drummer boy he served all through the war. The regiment was first ordered to South Carolina, and was stationed on James Island for nine months; later they went to Virginia and joined Gen. Grant's army. The regiment was on the James river from that time to the close of hostilities, and after the surrender at Richmond our subject was mustered out in June, 1865, being honorably discharged at New York city.

After the war Mr. Patnoe returned to his home in Franklin county, N. Y., and the next year was married to Miss Allie Jean St. Andre, a native of Montreal, Canada. He sold a colt which he owned for $48, and with this as a nest-egg he and his young bride began their domestic life. They first settled in Prairie-du-Chien, Wis., where Mr. Patnoe secured employment for four years, and then in 1870, removed to Winneshiek county, Iowa, and rented a farm which he operated for two years more. During the winter of 1873 he moved to Sioux City, Iowa, and then in March following came to Dakota territory and located a homestead in Norway township, Lincoln county. The township at that time was populated wholly by Norwegians, he being the only American born person in the locality. This farm he improved and made his home for eight years, that is during the warm months, as every summer for five years straight he had his crops destroyed by grasshoppers, and on this account had to move to Sioux City every fall, and then back to the farm in the spring. He eventually sold that property for $800, and with half the proceeds bought and removed to his present farm in section 3 5, of Pleasant township, where he has been living with his family the past fourteen years. He has 240 acres, all under improvement, enclosed and subdivided by neat and well kept fences. He has been a hardworker, and all that he now possesses is the result of well-applied energy and sound management in his affairs, as when he arrived in the territory all he could call his own was his good wife and family, a team and wagon and about five dollars in currency. 

For thirty years the joys and sorrows of Mr. Patnoe have been shared by his faithful wife, and to them have been born thirteen children, but two of these have been removed by the hand of death. The living are: John, Mrs. Josephine Fillian, Mrs. Ida La Barge, Mrs. Minnie Grandrau, Mrs. Matilda Montague, Willie, Napoleon, Zoa, Eda, Alice and Henry. Mr. Patnoe is a friend of education, having served as a member of the school board, and gives his children good facilities for obtaining an education. The family belongs to the Catholic church at Beresford, and in politics Mr. Patnoe is independent, although he formerly affiliated with the Republican party. He has served as road supervisor and in many other ways has been identified with the public life of the community where he resides.


Memorial and Biographical Record of
Turner, Lincoln, Union and Clay Counties, South Dakota
Geo. A. Ogle & CO., Chicago, 1897
transcribed by Jim Dezotell

N. C. NASH. It will be unnecessary to inform any citizen of Canton, or any newspaper reader of Lincoln county, and the surrounding country, that this gentleman is the editor and proprietor of the Sioux Valley News, one of the pioneer publications of the state. He is a native of Orleans county, N. Y., born February 15, 1843, and a son of Francis and Catherine V. (Curtis) Nash, the former also a native of the Empire state, born in Genesee county, of English and Holland-Dutch descent, and by occupation a farmer. Mrs. Nash, the mother of our subject, first saw the light in Berkshire, Mass., and was of Holland- utch ancestry on her father's side, her mother being a direct descendant of early New England families.

Of nine children born to the above couple, the gentleman whose name introduces this sketch was the eldest son and second child, his sister, the only daughter, being the first-born. He passed his early childhood in the place of his nativity, and at the age of seven years he accompanied his parents to Rock county, Wis., where he was educated and grew up a sturdy youth. He was still a member of the parental household when the Civil war began, and was one of the first to offer his services to the cause, enlisting when but seventeen years of age as a private in company A, Thirteenth Wisconsin regiment, infantry. He served his country faithfully a period of four years and three months, and participated with his regiment in all their service during that time, receiving an honorable discharge December 28, 1865.

As soon as he was mustered out of the army, Mr. Nash returned to Janesville, Wis., near where he engaged in general farming until 1871, at which time he made his appearance in the territory of Dakota. His first location was in Lincoln county, in Canton township, of which he entered a homestead of 160 acres, and this property he improved and made his home on until the fall of 1876, when he removed to the city of Canton. In January following, he began his career in "the art preservative of all arts," purchasing a half interest in the Sioux Valley News, and in April he became the sole proprietor of the newspaper which he now edits and publishes. The journal is neatly printed, discrimination is displayed in the news columns, and those devoted to general reading, while the editorial work is seen at a glance to be under the control of a man who keeps himself well informed regarding matters of public moment, and speaks readily and to the point regarding them. The sheet has a circulation of 1,100 copies, and is a welcome guest in many households of the county, containing much valuable information for its readers.

Our subject was married June 26, 1865, while home on a furlough, to Miss Jennie E. Williston, a native of Janesville, Wis., and this union has proved a mutually felicitous and happy one. Of the five children born to this couple, we note the following: Nina M. is a teacher in the Elk Point public schools; George W. is a professor in Yankton college; Clara W. is a graduate of the same institution; Marion, deceased; and Francis F. is a student at Yankton college. Mr. and Mrs. Nash belong to the Congregational church, in which Mr. Nash has been one of the trustees for sixteen years.

As a valuable acquisition to the citizenship of Canton, our subject has done good service in various official capacities. He served as postmaster from April, 1890, to June, 1894, and has been a member of the board of education for the past three years, of which body he is now president. He is prominent among the G.A.R. men, having served them as commander of the department of South Dakota from June, 1893, to June, 1894, and is past grand master of the I.O.O.F., also holding membership in the Masonic fraternity, as well as the Modern Woodmen of America. As a newspaper man he belongs to the South Dakota Press association, two years of his membership therein being as president, and politically he advocates the platform and the principles of the Republican party, using his elective franchise regularly in supporting its candidates. 

It is with pleasure that we present the portrait of Mr. Nash as that of a representative citizen of Lincoln county.


Memorial and Biographical Record of
Turner, Lincoln, Union and Clay Counties, South Dakota
Geo. A. Ogle & CO., Chicago, 1897
transcribed by Jim Dezotell

CHARLES W. LINDEMAN. The farming interests of Highland township, Lincoln county, have a worthy exponent in the person of the gentleman above named, who operates 400 acres in sections 10 and 11. Most of the tract is improved and tillable, and altogether makes up an estate whereon a remunerative business may well be done by a man who devotes himself closely and intelligently to his work. In the way of buildings some very substantial structures have been erected for the shelter of the crops and stock, and the comfort of the family, while good fences subdivide and enclose the land.

The kingdom of Prussia, an important part of the great Germanic confederation, is the ancestral home of the Lindemans, and there his parents, Martin and Minnie (Grape) Lindeman, were born, grew to maturity and married, and where also Charles W. Lindeman first saw the light of day, August 23, 1843. He accompanied his father and mother when they came to America and settled in Jefferson county, Wis., and while living there Mrs. Lindeman died. The father came to Lincoln county, Dak. Ter., in 1867, and in Highland township he also passed away early in April, 1885. Charles W. grew to manhood on his father's farm in Wisconsin, he being the youngest in a family of seven children and twelve years old when he saw the shores of the fatherland receding as the family started for their new home. In 1867 he started from the Badger state for Dakota territory, and on arrival located in Highland township, where he still makes his home. He is, therefore, one of the very earliest settlers of the county. He has always attended strictly to his business, exerting all his energy and labor in the development of his property; that he has succeeded is but the natural result of close application to the management of his farm and sound and mature judgment in all transactions.

The lady to whose housewifely skill the neatness and order of the home are due, and whose amiability makes her a charming companion, became the wife of our subject March 19, 1885, in Highland township. She bore the maiden name of Miss Isabella Hanson, and was born in Norway, May 29, 1862, coming to America when she was twenty years of age. Their household is completed by four children, Henry W., Minnie B., Matilda S. and Rosa P.


Memorial and Biographical Record of
Turner, Lincoln, Union and Clay Counties, South Dakota
Geo. A. Ogle & CO., Chicago, 1897
transcribed by Jim Dezotell

HON. BERNARD C. JACOBS, one of the prominent, substantial and influential business men of Lennox, Lincoln county, where he is engaged in the banking business, was born in Saxony, Germany, in 1832. He is a son of Christopher G. and Elizabeth (Steiner) Jacobs, both natives of the "Fatherland," and the parents of nine children. They all reside in Germany with the exception of our subject, he being the only one who came to this country. 

Bernard grew to manhood in his native land, where he received the advantage of a collegiate education which thoroughly equipped him for the battle of life, and in his twenty-first year came to America alone. He first located at Akron, Ohio, where he remained two years and then settled at Pecatonica, Winnebago Co., Ill., buying an interest in a drugstore there. He had been married in 1856 and was the parent of one daughter, Emma, now the wife of L. Clark, of Elmira, Ohio. Mrs. Jacobs died in 1861, and in 1862 our subject sold out his drug store expecting to enlist in the late war. By a combination of circumstances he was prevented from doing so, and he then went to Chicago where he lived until 1863, that year locating at Evansville, Wis., securing an engagement there as instructor in the Evansville seminary. He remained in Evansville until 1876 when he came to Perry township, Lincoln Co., Dak. Ter., preempted a quarter section of land and returned for his family. He followed general farming on the farm for six years and in 1882 removed to Lennox, where he has since resided. In 1884 he organized a private bank and for the accommodation of his business erected the beautiful and commodious brick structure he now occupies, which is a credit to his enterprising methods. He is held in high esteem as a financier and a man possessed of sound and mature judgment, and among the offices in the gift of the people which he was elected to and filled with due credit, is that of county superintendent of schools, the responsibility of which position he assumed in the spring of 1877. He was re-elected in 1878 and served one year, when he was appointed county treasurer to fill an unexpired term. In 1884 he was elected to the latter office and discharged the duties imposed satisfactorily to all. In 1894 Mr. Jacobs was elected to the state legislature from the district in which he resides, and as a senator in that body has a clean and unimpeachable record. Politically he affiliates with the Republican party and is a strict adherent to its principles. 

Mr. Jacobs was united in marriage the second time in Evansville, Wis., to Mary Christ of that city, the ceremony occurring in 1864, and to them have been born four children—Arthur, Lewis, Maud and Henry. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and at present is treasurer of the grand chapter of South Dakota of that order. 


Memorial and Biographical Record of
Turner, Lincoln, Union and Clay Counties, South Dakota
Geo. A. Ogle & CO., Chicago, 1897
transcribed by Jim Dezotell

CHAUNCEY B. ISHAM. Next to the home in its effect upon the future of the rising generation stands the school, and in many cases where poverty or ignorance is the heritage of a family it is even a more important factor than the home in determining the weal or woe of the youth. The selection of teachers is therefore a subject of vast importance, and no one is better deserving of representation in a biographical record than he who has shown his fitness for the work of an instructor. It is therefore with pleasure that we incorporate the principal facts in the life of Mr. Chauncey B. Isham, superintendent of schools for Lincoln county, in this volume.

The natal day of our subject was December 21, 1841, and his birthplace Janesville, Rock Co., Wis. His father, Elijah Isham, was a farmer by occupation, and soon after the birth of Chauncey he removed with his family and settled in Dane county, of the same state. There our subject grew to manhood and passed uneventfully the earlier years of his life. He was educated in the public schools during his boyhood, and after mastering the elementary branches became a student at Milton college, in his native county in the Badger state, taking a teacher's course, from which department he graduated in 1866. He began his career as a teacher in Kilbourn City, Wis., becoming principal of the schools there. He next was located in Oconomowoc, Wis., for a couple of years, then in Council Grove, Kans., where he served as principal of the schools for three years. The next two years he spent in the capacity of county superintendent of schools of Morris county, Kans., having been elected to that office, and from that time until August, 1882, was located at various times in the following places, viz.: Burlington, Kans.; Rolla, Pacific, De Sota, and Ironton, Mo. In August, 1882, he came to Canton, and has been actively interested in educational matters ever since in that city. He first served as principal of the Canton public schools for two years, and in 1886 was elected county superintendent; in the latter capacity he spent four years, the limit of time permitted by law, and then became principal of the schools located in Hudson, S. Dak. After a year there he again returned to Canton and resumed his labors as teacher, operating in connection a flour and feed store, until the fall of 1893, when he was re-elected to the office of county superintendent. The schools of the county under his skillful and experienced hands have risen to the front rank. A carefully prepared curriculum is followed, and the diplomas granted to students completing the common-school course are evidence of excellent scholarship and meritorious conduct. He is certainly one of the prominent men of the county, and one who will long be held in respectful remembrance by those who have been under his care and training and by all friends of education.

Mr. Isham chose for his companion on life's journey the estimable and cultured lady who now presides over his household. She bore the maiden name of Miss A. Miranda Fenner, and is a native of Allegany county, N. Y., where the marriage ceremony uniting her life and that of Mr. Isham was performed. They have one son, Alfred F.


Memorial and Biographical Record of
Turner, Lincoln, Union and Clay Counties, South Dakota
Geo. A. Ogle & CO., Chicago, 1897

WILL S. INGHAM, the popular and efficient editor of the Canton Advocate, daily and weekly, is a native of Tama City, Iowa, and was born November 25, 1866. When he was two years of age his parents  removed to Fort Dodge, of the same state, and a year later to Pomeroy, Iowa, where Mrs. Ingham passed to her last resting place. His father, Cyrus B. Ingham, was the founder Calhoun County Times, and at Fort Dodge became the owner of the Fort Dodge Times. After his wife died Mr. Ingham returned to Fort Dodge from Pomeroy and established the Fort Dodge Messenger. That was in 1873, and the paper was discontinued in the spring of the following year, Mr. Ingham removing with his family to Beloit, Iowa, where he founded the Beloit Times. In the office of this publication at the age of eight years, our subject was initiated into and began his first work at the "art preservative of all arts."

In 1876 Mr. Cyrus B. Ingham removed to Firesteel, Dak. Ter., where the city of Mitchell is now situated, and there established the Jim River Advocate. This paper continued to live for about six months and then its publication was stopped, our subject and his father having decided to locate a farm two miles north of Firesteel. Here they remained until 1878 and then removed to Aurelia, a postoffice 5 miles north of Forestburg, residing in the latter place until the spring of 1881, when they returned to Beloit, Iowa, and re-established the Times. Here W. S. resumed his work at the case until early in the spring of 1883, when he removed with his father to Eden (now Hudson), Lincoln Co., Dak. Ter., and established the Eden Times; from there they went to Forestburg in July, 1883, and while there our subject began his career in the newspaper business on his own account. November 23, 1883, at the age of seventeen years, in company with Mr. N. J. Dunham, now an attorney at Woonsocket, S. Dak., our subject founded the Jerauld County News, at Wessington Springs, in Jerauld county. This publication was disposed of to Mr. J. W. McNamara, in the spring of 1884, and in July, of the same year our subject removed with his father to Fielder, situated about fifteen miles north of Pierre, in Hughes county, and established the Fielder Times. The printing outfit was removed to the Winnebago reservation in the spring of 1885, as the reservation had been opened to settlement by order of President Arthur, and it was intended to start a paper there. On President Cleveland's inaguration that order was annulled the latter part of April, and the outfit was practically destroyed by the Indian police.

Mr. Ingham next worked on a farm for a couple of months and then went to Forest City, where he secured employment in the office of the Press of that city, Mr. Aloys Bilz being the editor, until the spring, of 1887. While he was a resident there he became acquainted with the estimable lady who became his wife in 1886. She bore the maiden name of Miss Mary Sorflaton, and soon after her marriage with our subject they located on a farm in Hughes county, and there Mr. Ingham tilled the soil for six months. At the expiration of that time he was offered the managership of the Press, at Forest City, and this position he accepted and filled until the fall of 1888, when he purchased the Blunt Advocate from Mr. George Schlosser, now manager of the South Dakota Newspaper Union, of Sioux Falls. He removed with his family to Blunt and took up actively the publication of that paper, and while a resident there was appointed messenger of the house of representatives at Pierre during the 1893 session of the legislature. 

April 1, 1893, Mr. Ingham bought and took possession of the Canton Weekly Advocate, and on May 22 of the same year inaugurated the daily edition of the paper, which has, under his careful management, increased both in reputation and circulation, wonderfully. The paper has a large following in the city and adjacent districts. It has been the property of many different concerns and parties since the first copy was printed, among the owners being J. W. Taylor, now deceased, C. A. South, Carter Brothers, Y. E. & A. L. Carter—now blank book manufacturers of Pierre—and D. A. Garver.


Memorial and Biographical Record of
Turner, Lincoln, Union and Clay Counties, South Dakota
Geo. A. Ogle & CO., Chicago, 1897
transcribed by Jim Dezotell

JOHN G. HOFFMANN, whose portrait will be noticed on another page, is a farmer of Delapre township, Lincoln county, and stands among the foremost men of his calling in this county. He is another one of the many sons of the German empire who, by thrift and industry since coming to this land of the free, have acquired a competence.

Mr. Hoffmann was born in the kingdom of Prussia, December 3, 1827, and was raised on a farm until he was fourteen years of age, receiving his education in the excellent schools of the fatherland. During his more mature years he learned the trade of milling, and this vocation he followed as long as he continued to make his residence in the land of his birth. In 1854 he decided to emigrate to America, as he had heard glowing tales of this country's resources, which were being rapidly developed by enterprising and industrious sons of almost every country in Europe. He accordingly embarked on a sailing vessel, which consumed six weeks in crossing the Atlantic, and, after landing at New York, came direct to Sheboygan county, Wis. He worked for a year at farm labor, and then for the next twenty years was employed at his trade of miller. In the year 1875 he made his appearance in Dakota territory, and took up a homestead of 160 acres in section No. 34 of Delapre township, Lincoln county, and a timber claim of the same number of acres in the section adjoining, No. 33. Since his arrival in Dakota he has been chiefly engaged in the occupation of farming, but he has also, a portion of the time, followed his trade of milling, though not making that vocation his constant work.

Mr. Hoffmann's farm is a fine piece of property, and its condition of cultivation and general appearance shows undisputedly the thrift and enterprise of the owner. The buildings are all of solid construction, well arranged for the economic prosecution of agriculture. Among the adornments are numerous shade and fruit trees, all of which he has planted himself, that serve greatly to increase the value of the property and make its appearance home-like. Mr. Hoffmann is a man of more than ordinary intelligence, and brains and business tact, combined with steady industry, have brought him to the front. His fellow-citizens, recognizing his ability and superior qualifications for civic life, have called him to many positions of responsibility within their gift. Among the offices he has held are treasurer of Delapre township ten years, and treasurer of the local school board twenty years. He has also served as a member of the town board.

While a resident of Sheboygan county, Wis., Mr. Hoffmann won for his helpmate Miss Caroline Schwartz, who is a native of Germany, and their happy married life has been productive of a family of thirteen children, nine of whom are still living, viz.: Emma, Robert, Albert, August, Alma, Ida, Charles, Anna, and William. Of the deceased members of the family, Selma died when eighteen years old, Clara when she was seven, and the other two children in infancy.


Memorial and Biographical Record of
Turner, Lincoln, Union and Clay Counties, South Dakota
Geo. A. Ogle & CO., Chicago, 1897
transcribed by Jim Dezotell

HON. OSCAR S. GIFFORD is a noted lawyer of Canton and a gentleman who holds a conspicuous position among the most eminent members of the Bar of South Dakota, both for his legal ability and forensic power. His residence in South Dakota extends over a period of a quarter of a century, and his record as an honorable and upright citizen is without a blemish.

The natal day of Judge Gifford was October 20, 1842, and his birth place Watertown, N. Y. When he had attained the age of five years his parents removed to Rock county, Wis.; but five years later he returned to New York to take up his residence with his maternal grandfather, David Resseguie, for two years. In the meantime his parents had removed to Boone county, Ill., from Wisconsin, and in the latter place our subject joined them and continued to make his home much of the time until 1871, although in the meantime he was in the employ of the government for about a year and a half in the engineer corps.

Judge Gifford enlisted in the cause of the preservation of the Union in September, 1864, and served in the Elgin (Ill.) battery until July, 1865, when he received an honorable discharge. After the war was over he decided to study for the legal profession, as he had a natural aptitude for that calling, and, with this objective point in view, he became a student at the Beloit academy at Beloit, Wis., and also taught school. In 1868 he took up his law studies in earnest in an office at Belvidere, Ill., and in 1870 was admitted to the bar. In 1871 he came to Lincoln county, and the first year of his residence here was spent in the mercantile business, and was later engaged for a time in surveying. He did not enter into the practice of his profession exclusively until 1873, and that year was elected a justice of the peace, the following year enjoyed election to the responsible position of district attorney, but did not qualify. Early during 1875 he formed a partnership with the late Mark W. Bailey, which continued till the death of the latter, in the fall of 1878. Since 1873 Mr. Gifford has given close attention to his professional duties and those of official life, continuing the habit of study which he formed in youth, and necessary to the remembrance of the precedents established under the great principles of law and equity. As a citizen judge Gifford has been constantly before the public. In 1882 and '83 he served as mayor of Canton, and was a delegate to the constitutional convention, which convened at Sioux Falls September 7, 1883. He was elected territorial delegate to the Forty-ninth and Fiftieth congresses, and enjoyed re-election to the Fifty-first congress on the Republican ticket, receiving 51,136 votes, against 22,153 cast for his opponent, Mr. J. M. Booth, on the Democratic ticket. He was also a candidate for the nomination of governor before the Republican state convention at Aberdeen, S. Dak., which assembled July 7, 1896.

While in congress Mr. Gifford served upon the committees of agriculture, Indian affairs, and public buildings and grounds, which had charge of the more important measures in which the people of Dakota were interested. It was largely through his efforts that the great Sioux and Sisseton and Wahpeton Indian reservations were opened to settlement, and Indian industrial schools were established at Pierre and Flandreau, and a large number of day schools opened in the Indian country.

Mr. Gifford also reported to the house of representatives and had full charge of the measure for the construction of the public building at Sioux Falls. The question concerning the division of Dakota and the admission of North and South Dakota as states was the most important measure before congress while Mr. Gifford was a member thereof, and it was largely through his efforts, aided by the sentiment of his constituents, that Dakota was divided and two states formed from the immense territory. The measure known as the omnibus bill, by which North and South Dakota, Montana and Washington became states, was approved by the president and became a law February 22, 1889, and at the first election thereafter, held in October, 1889, Mr. Gifford was elected one of the representatives for South Dakota.  From  the above record it will be seen that Judge Gifford has been actively identified with the affairs of the state, and it is with pleasure that we give to the readers of this volume, a brief history of his life work. None know him but to respect him for his honorable, just, and straightforward manners, and his character is above reproach.

The interesting ceremony which united the lives of Mr. 0. S. Gifford and Miss Phoebe M. Fuller, was performed in Canton, May 14, 1874. This estimable lady is a native of Ohio, and her domestic life, with our subject, has been brightened by the birth of one son, on whom has been bestowed the name of Oscar Bailey. Mr. Gifford holds the commission of attorney for the C., M. & St. P. railroad company, and socially belongs to the Masonic fraternity. In this order he has served as grand master of the Blue Lodge, in which he holds membership. From 1882 to 1884 he was grand master of the territory of Dakota. Our subject also belongs to the Knights of Pythias, and commemorates his service as soldier in the late war, by membership in Gen. Lyon post, G.A.R. 


Memorial and Biographical Record of
Turner, Lincoln, Union and Clay Counties, South Dakota
Geo. A. Ogle & CO., Chicago, 1897
transcribed by Jim Dezotell

KNUDT O. GEDSTAD. The story of the wonderful physical resources of America, of the opportunities afforded honest industry to gain a footing in business and society, has attracted hither many natives of the scandanivian peninsula. They are found wielding the implements of the trades, opening up unsettled regions and bringing the farm lands into high cultivation. Lincoln county is not without her share of these men, and it affords us pleasure to give in a few brief paragraphs a record of the life of one of them who is now a resident of section 34, Grant township.

The gentleman whose name introduces this sketch was born in Norway, and came with his parents to America, locating with them at Houston, Minn., where they made their home for six years. In 1873 the family moved to Lincoln county, Dak. Ter., the father and sons taking up a section of government land. Knudt entered the quarter section on which he now lives and devoted his time to the improvement of his claim. There is now no better equipped nor more desirable farm in the township than his, on which he has erected a complete and commodious set of barn buildings and a good, substantial dwelling, in which he and his family are living a happy life.

Ole A. Gedstad, the venerable father of our subject, is an old settler of Lincoln county, where he still continues to make his home. He was born in Christiana county, Norway, where he grew to manhood and was married to Miss Tilda Gryte. To them were born the following children: Alex, a resident of Washington; Knudt 0.; Ole, of Grant township; Kittle, who follows his trade of blacksmith in the village of Lennox, S. Dak.; Sena, wife of O. H. Lier; Hattie, who married Lewis Larson; and Edwin, who still lives with the old folks on the homestead.

Mr. Knudt O. Gedstad, in 1876, was married to Miss Carrie Larsen, a young lady who has been a resident of the county since 1873. Their home life is bright and filled with comfort, their household being completed by six children, viz.: Thea, Bertha, Oscar, Theodore, Arthur and Kilmer. All the family are members of the Lutheran church, and in political issues Mr. Gedstad gives his allegiance to the Republican party. He is classed among the most desirable citizens of his locality, and has done good service as supervisor and assessor of Grant township, and also as clerk of his school district.


Memorial and Biographical Record of
Turner, Lincoln, Union and Clay Counties, South Dakota
Geo. A. Ogle & CO., Chicago, 1897
transcribed by Jim Dezotell

WILLIAM FITZGERALD. Among the men who are conducting the farming interests of Lincoln county are many old soldiers who helped save the Union in the late war. Our subject occupies an honorable place as one of this class, and the farm on section 3 of Perry township, compares favorably with others in its vicinity.

Mr. Fitzgerald was born in Wayne county, N. Y., in 1845, and when a lad, with his parents located in Greene county, Wis., where he passed the boyhood days and in the common-schools of his district, acquired the rudiments of an education. He was one of a family of thirteen children born to Michael and Ellen (Corcoran) Fitzgerald, both the latter being natives of Ireland and born near the city of Dublin, where they grew to mature years and were married. They came at once to America after this event and settled in Wayne county, N. Y., where the husband and father was engaged in railroad contracting, assisting in the construction of some of the first railways in this country. Of the children born to Mr. and Mrs. Fitzgerald, we note the following: Maurice, served in the Civil war, and during an engagement at Mobile, Ala., was wounded, from the effects of which he died in 1866, he left two sons and one daughter, all residing in Philadelphia; Elizabeth, married Alfred Clark, of Monroe, Wis.; Ellen, married George Degroth, of Whitewater, Wis.; Stephen also served in the late war and now lives in Butler county, Iowa; Mary, is the wife of Washington Lenhart, of Minneapolis; Michael lives in North Dakota; Sylvia resides at Lake Geneva, Wis.; and the balance of the family died in infancy.

Our subject was the fourth child in the order of their birth and was just in the opening years of a vigorous manhood when the war broke out. In 1862 he offered his services to his country and enlisted in the Twenty- eighth Wisconsin regiment, infantry, which regiment was transferred to the front and attached to the western army. Mr. Fitzgerald served under Gen. Banks in the Red river campaign, participated in the engagements at Helena, Pine Bluff and other small battles in Arkansas and vicinity, and fought in his last engagement at Spanish Fort, Ala. In 1865 he was mustered out with an honorable discharge and immediately returned to his home in Wisconsin to follow the occupation of a farmer. Shortly after, however, He removed to Butler county, Iowa, and while attending to his duties as an agriculturist found time to woo and win Miss Sarah, a daughter of Winfield and Elmira (Calkins) Sutherland, both natives of Genesee county, N. Y. With his young wife, in 1877, Mr. Fitzgerald took up his residence in Lincoln county, Dak. Ter., where he now owns a half section of land. He cleared the ground, turned the first furrows thereon, planted crops and in the course of time fertile fields were yielding abundant harvests. In 1878 his labor was expended for the benefit of the grasshoppers, and all the hardships and privations that settlers in the county experienced fell equally hard on the shoulders of our subject. It will thus be seen that Mr. Fitzgerald had his share of adversity; but he was a hard worker and an industrious man, and has met, by perseverence at his labor, with unqualified success in his business as a farmer. He belongs to the G.A.R., and in the companionship of his comrades lives over again the excitement and trying experiences of war times. In his political views he is a decided Republican, and has been ever since he became a voter. Mrs. Fitzgerald is a member of the Woman's Relief corps.

The family of the gentleman of whom this sketch is written consists of Albert M., Earl W., Fred, Nellie, George D. and Sylvia M. Earl W. was the first male child born in Perry township.


Memorial and Biographical Record of
Turner, Lincoln, Union and Clay Counties, South Dakota
Geo. A. Ogle & CO., Chicago, 1897
transcribed by Jim Dezotell

HON. EDGAR DEAN, secretary and manager of the Farmers' Lumber company, of Canton, is the subject of this sketch. No man stands higher in the regard of his fellow-citizens than Mr. Dean, who is in every way worthy of the estimation in which he is held. In his career as a farmer, public officer and merchant, he has displayed an excellent capacity for business, possessing sound judgment, forethought and wise calculation, which have brought him to the front rank among the most prosperous members of the township. He has been influential in public affairs, taking an intelligent interest in all that concerned his locality, and his public-spirit has helped forward many plans devised for its advancement. Especially is this true in regard to education, as he has been one of the most prominent members of the school board for four years, and is now treasurer of the Canton board of education.

Mr. Dean is still in the prime of life, having been born May 26, 1851, in Sullivan county, N. Y., where he continued to live until he attained the age of eight years. His parents then removed to Ulster county of the same state, and there our subject spent eight years more of his boyhood. Edgar was sixteen years old then, and in De Kalb county, Ill., where his parents then located, he grew to maturity. His education was acquired in the common schools in the districts wherein he resided, and in the graded schools of Sycamore, Ill. In May, 1874, he came to Lincoln county, Dak. Ter., and engaged in farming for himself, in Norway township, where he took up a claim of 160 acres as a homestead, and an eighty-acre timber claim. His farm he improved and brought to a high state of cultivation, making it his home until 1887, when he was elected to the responsible position of treasurer of Lincoln county, and in order to give his entire time and attention to the discharge of the duties of that office, he removed to Canton. He served in that capacity for four years, having also, prior to his election to the position, been a member of the board of county commissioners four years. After spending two years on his farm, he then established himself in the lumber business in Canton, and has since continued to conduct a thriving and successful enterprise. Many of the more important offices of Norway township Mr. Dean held while a resident within its borders, and in the fall of 1891 he was elected to the state senate, in which capacity he served one term; in fact, in all affairs of a public nature Mr. Dean is an active participant, and is looked upon as a well-informed and prominent citizen of the county. He also owns 320 acres of land situated in Norway and Pleasant townships, which he conducts in connection with his lumber interests in Canton.

July 12, 1871, the rites of wedlock were celebrated between Edgar Dean and Miss Lavina Parker, the latter a native of Perry county, Ind. This lady is a woman of much intelligence, who looks carefully after the family interests in the management of household affairs, is social and hospitable, and sympathizes in the good works promulgated in the community. Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Dean, on whom have been bestowed the following names: Ralph, George, Effie, Edna, Ella and Edgar M. He is socially affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, 1. O. O. F., and also belongs to the chapter. His personal character is such as to win universal esteem, and his business career promises fine results.


Memorial and Biographical Record of
Turner, Lincoln, Union and Clay Counties, South Dakota
Geo. A. Ogle & CO., Chicago, 1897

HON. WILLIAM M. CUPPETT is a man of progressive, enlightened views, and his standing as an old settler of the county and a citizen of prominence of Canton is well known. There are few more  energetic or wide-awake men to be found among the population, of the state than this gentleman, and he is deservedly held in high esteem and respect by his fellowmen. 

Our subject is a Pennsylvanian by birth and was born in Bedford county, December 26, 1843. His father was a blacksmith by trade, and in 1850 removed with his family to Delaware county, Iowa, settling in the village of Colesburg. Our subject there grew to manhood, learning from his father during his boyhood the vocation of blacksmith, and spending part of his more mature years as an apprentice to a wagon maker. He was serving as his father's assistant when the great civil war broke out, and as his sympathies were with the Union cause he decided that it was his duty to help uphold the national honor. He accordingly enlisted September 22, 1862, in company G, Sixth Iowa regiment, cavalry, and served faithfully until November, 1865, when he was mustered out. The regiment was stationed in the western country, guarding frontier settlers from the depredations of the Indians, and participated in various engagements during the war. Mr. Cuppett was commissary sergeant of his company, and as such received an honorable discharge after being mustered out of service.

After the war was over our subject returned to Colesburg, Iowa, and during the winters of 1865 and '66 taught school, at the expiration of which time he established himself in the wagon and carriage manufacturing business in Colesburg. For two years he carried on this enterprise, and then in the spring of 1868 he came to Lincoln county, Dak. Ter., and pre-empted a claim of 160 acres, which is located near where the city of Canton is now situated. He also homesteaded 160 acres adjoining his pre-emption claim, and in company with others purchased another forty acres, which is now a portion of the Canton town site. He settled on this forty-acre tract in the Summer of 1868, building a log house, and the following fall engaged in the mercantile business, which he shortly after sold out. At the general election that fall he was elected register of deeds, he being the first gentleman to fill that office of Lincoln county, and in that capacity he served for two years. At the fall election of 1869 he was elected a member of the territorial legislature, which office he held for two years, and in the fall of 1878 was again elected to the same position for another two years. Mr. Cuppett was appointed postmaster of Canton in 1868, by President Grant, and three years later, at the expiration of his postmastership, in April, 1871, he was appointed by Judge Kidder, clerk of the district court, and this position he served in until 1885. It will be seen by this record that Mr. Cuppett has had quite a little experience as a civic official, and it is with pleasure that we incorporate in this volume the history of a man who has been so closely and thoroughly identified with the progress and upbuilding of the community. In all the offices which he has held by the grace of his fellow townsmen, he has discharged the duties imposed with characteristic dignity, impartiality, and never failing justice and honesty. He was a leading spirit in the organization and management of the Canton Building association, of which he was secretary, and was instrumental in having the old court house built; this structure is still used as a court room. He served as a member of the local school board for a number of years, and held the positions of president, treasurer and clerk of that body at different times. He is liberal in his religious views, not being a member of any denomination in particular, but using his influence in common with all sects. He was one of a company which organized the first Sunday school in Canton, it being a union school attended by members of all denominations. Socially he belongs to the Silver Star Lodge NO. 4, and is a member of Siroc Chapter No. 11, F. & A. M., besides holding membership in General Lyon post, No. 11, Grand Army of the Republic. 

The marriage of our subject to Miss N. E. Martin was celebrated September 1, 1870. Mrs. Cuppett was born in Ashland county, Ohio, February 10, 1849, and she is a daughter of Mr. Isaac N. Martin, one of the early settlers of LincoIn county, whose biography will be found in another part of this record. Four children have been horn to this union, but one, a son, William E., died when six years of age. Those living are known by the following names, viz.: Eva A., who is the wife of Mr. J. H. Luers; Mark W. and Frank P.


Memorial and Biographical Record of
Turner, Lincoln, Union and Clay Counties, South Dakota
Geo. A. Ogle & CO., Chicago, 1897
transcribed by Jim Dezotell

WILLIAM J. BYRNES, treasurer of Lincoln county, who resides in Canton, is one of the most prominent and enterprising young men of the county.

The parents of our subject were James and Martha (Oliver) Byrnes, the former a farmer by occupation who died in Green county, Wis., in 1869. Mrs. Byrnes (now Mrs. Owens) still survives. To this couple was born a family of five children, viz.: William J., Emma, deceased; Mary J., George W. and Emma. William J., the eldest and the gentleman of whom we write, first opened his eyes to the light in Green county, Wis., June 19, 1861, and passed his early life on his father's farm. He was educated in the common schools and remained a member of the parental household until the fall of 1879, when he purchased a team with his savings and drove alone to Lincoln county, Dak. Ter. The following spring he bought 160 acres in Pleasant township, it being the farm on which he spent the first night after his arrival in the territory, and for the next six years he devoted his attention to the cultivation of his property, working in the field during the summer months and teaching school in the winter.

Mr. Byrnes has been twice married. His first wife bore the maiden name of Miss Rose Kundert, a native of Green county, Wis., and daughter of Fridolin and Salome Kundert, to whom he was wedded December 29, 1881. After marriage the young couple took up their domestic life on the farm, and continued to reside there until the summer of 1883, when they removed to Beresford, Union county. Mr. Byrnes there built a
hotel, which he operated for a period of six months, at the expiration of that time selling out and removing back to his homestead in Pleasant township. From that time he continued to devote his attention exclusively to agriculture and stock raising until August, 1887, when his wife died. He then rented the farm, although he still made his residence thereon. October 13, 1888, Mr. Byrnes contracted his second marriage, this time the bride being Miss Helen Matts, who was born in Dane county, Wis., a daughter of John and Lovina Matts. From the date of this event until November, 1894, he operated his farm property, and then, on being elected county treasurer, removed to Canton. During 1895 he erected an elegant residence on Broadway, and here he and his wife and family now live. He was re-elected treasurer November 3, 1896.

Our subject has always taken an interest in local affairs, and has filled various of the public offices of Pleasant township. Politically he affiliated with the Republican party, and stanchly supports its principles by voice and vote. Socially he is an Odd Fellow, and belongs to the Centennial lodge. No. 10, of that order. He has been, since eighteen years of age, a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and during his whole career has never forgot his duties as a Christian and a member of that denomination. By his first wife he became the parent of two sons, Clarence W. and Ralph Ray — the latter is deceased — and his union with Miss Matts has been productive of three children, viz.: Emma L., Verlyn M. and Wavy L.


Memorial and Biographical Record of
Turner, Lincoln, Union and Clay Counties, South Dakota
Geo. A. Ogle & CO., Chicago, 1897
transcribed by Jim Dezotell

JOHN A. BOGERT. The maturer years of this gentleman have been devoted almost entirely to the toil and labor pertaining to the calling of a farmer, and he has acquired a knowledge of times and seasons, means and methods, that make him a source of information to others less favored by nature or less observing. He owns and occupies a pleasant and remunerative tract of land in Grant township, Lincoln county, and here pursues the even tenor of his way, gaining worldly goods and enjoying the comfort of a happy household and home.

Peter Bogert, the father of our subject, was a son of Cornelius Bogert, the latter a native of Hackensack, N. J., his father being a Revolutionary war soldier, and of Holland descent. The mother of our subject bore the maiden name of Sylvia Cudback, and she and her husband in 1836 removed from Niagara county, N. Y., where John A. was born in 1835, and located at Adrian, Mich. In the latter place they made their home until the grim visaged traveller, death, overtook them, Mr. Bogert dying at the age of eighty-two, and the partner of his life at seventy-eight. They were the parents of six children, of whom we note the following: Roxanna, wife of Frank Graves; Catherine, married to J. H. Hitchcock; John A.; Adelia, wife of John Savers; Peter T.; and Addie, wife of Dwight Snedeker; all of whom, with the exception of the subject of our sketch, reside in or near Adrian, Mich.

John A. passed the days of his childhood and youth and grew to mature years on the farm which he assisted in cultivating. Under the care of his Christian parents he early learned by what principles his life should be governed, and at school and at home gained knowledge of importance, especially such as pertained to the calling which he chose. He was frugal and industrious, and eventually found himself the possessor of a fine piece of farming property, which he disposed of in 1883, and then came to Dakota territory. He bought a timber claim which he in time proved up on, and the many improvements in the shape of substantial barns, a good dwelling, etc., reflect credit on his persistent and progressive enterprise. Besides general farming he also engages in stock breeding and raises a good grade of animals.

The marriage of Mr. Bogert three or four years after his arrival in Dakota to Mrs. Mattie Peterson, a native of Norway, was celebrated September 29, 1888, and this union has been blest by the advent of four children— Hettie, Anna Maud, John P., and Cora May. Politically he has been a Democrat all his life; and socially is a member of the Masonic fraternity.


GIFFORD, Oscar Sherman (1842—1913)
a Delegate from the Territory of Dakota and a Representative from South Dakota; born in Watertown, Jefferson County, N.Y., October 20, 1842; moved with his parents to Wisconsin, who settled in Rock County, thence to Brown County, Ill., in 1853; attended the common schools and the local academy at Beloit, Wis.; served in the Union Army as a private in the Elgin (Ill.) Battery 1863-1865; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1871 and commenced practice in Canton, Territory of Dakota (now South Dakota); district attorney for Lincoln County in 1874; mayor of Canton in 1881 and 1882; member of the State constitutional convention of South Dakota which convened at Sioux Falls September 7, 1883; elected as a Republican a Delegate to the Forty-ninth and Fiftieth Congresses (March 4, 1885-March 3, 1889); upon the admission of South Dakota as a State into the Union was elected as a Representative to the Fifty-first Congress and served from November 2, 1889, to March 3, 1891; was not a candidate for renomination in 1890; resumed the practice of law in Canton, S.Dak., where he died on January 16, 1913; interment in Forest Hill Cemetery.
Source: Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1771-Present; contributed by A. Newell.

 



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