Lyman County Biographies

 

Berry, Ellis Yarnal

Carlin, Douglas

Dirks, Peter B.

Freelove, Arthur L.

Keegan, Frank R.

Newman, Fred McPherson

Peterson, Albert H.

Pike, Henry Allen

Tobiassen, Anthony O.

Walker, Benjamin L.

Williamson, William

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BERRY, Ellis Yarnal, a Representative from South Dakota; born in Larchwood, Lyon County, Iowa, October 6, 1902; attended Philip (S.Dak.) High School; student in Morningside College, Sioux City, Iowa, 1920-1922; was graduated from the law school of the University of South Dakota at Vermillion in 1927; was admitted to the bar the same year and commenced the practice of law in Kennebec, Lyman County, S.Dak., and at McLaughlin, Corson County, in 1929; served as State’s attorney, mayor of McLaughlin, and judge of Probate Court, Corson County, 1931-1939; publisher of the McLaughlin Messenger since 1938, McIntosh News and Morristown World since 1952; delegate to State Republican Conventions in 1934, 1936, and 1938; editor of the State Bar Association Journal 1938-1950; member of the State senate in 1939 and 1941 legislative sessions, and legislative assistant to the Governor during the 1943 session; member of the Missouri River States Committee, 1940-1943; member of the State Board of Regents of Education, 1946-1950; elected as a Republican to the Eighty-second and to the nine succeeding Congresses (January 3, 1951-January 3, 1971); was not a candidate for reelection in 1970 to the Ninety-second Congress; was a resident of Rapid City, S.Dak., until his death there on April 1, 1999.
–Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774-Present; transcribed by A. Newell.


WILLIAMSON, William, a Representative from South Dakota; born near New Sharon, Mahaska County, Iowa, October 7, 1875; moved with his parents to Plankinton, Aurora County, S.Dak., in 1882; attended the public schools and the Wayne (Nebr.) Normal School; engaged in agricultural pursuits and also taught school for several years; was graduated from the University of South Dakota at Vermilion in 1903 and from the law department of that university in 1905; was admitted to the bar in 1905 and commenced practice in Oacoma, Lyman County, S.Dak.; founder, with his brother, of the Murdo Coyote and the Prairie Sun; prosecuting attorney of Lyman County 1905-1911; circuit judge of the eleventh judicial district 1911-1921; delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1912; elected as a Republican to the Sixty-seventh and to the five succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1921-March 3, 1933); chairman, Committee on Expenditures in the Department of the Interior (Sixty-eighth and Sixty-ninth Congresses), Committee on Expenditures in Executive Departments (Seventieth and Seventy-first Congresses); unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1932 to the Seventy-third Congress; resumed the practice of law in Rapid City, S.Dak.; special assistant attorney general of South Dakota and assigned as general counsel for the Public Utilities Commission 1939-1951, and also the Department of Insurance of South Dakota the last five years; officer with an insurance company, 1950-1972; member of the Mount Rushmore National Memorial Commission 1928-1972; died in Custer, S.Dak., July 15, 1972; interment in Pine Lawn Cemetery, Rapid City, S.Dak.
–Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774-Present; transcribed by A. Newell.


History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher
1904
Contributed by Jim Dezotell

PETER B. DIRKS, cashier of the Citizens' State Bank at Oacoma, the first banking institution incorporated in Lyman county, was born in Poland, on the 28th of September, 1869, being a son of Benjamin and Agnes (Schartner) Dirks, whose eleven children are all living. The parents came with their children to the United States in 1885, locating in Turner county, South Dakota, and there the father and mother still maintain their home.

Peter B. Dirks acquired his early education in the German schools of his native land, his parents having been residents of that part of Poland which is under German dominion, and he was seventeen years of age at the time of the family emigration to America. He remained at the parental home for two years after they located in South Dakota and then secured a clerical position in a general store at Marion Junction, Turner county, where he was salesman for three years and bookkeeper for the concern for the ensuing four years, and the knowledge gained through this practical experience has enabled him to attain success and to be recognized as one of the able and progressive young business men of his adopted state. In 1893 Mr. Dirks came to Lyman county and became associated with his brother Isaac in establishing a general store at Dirkstown. Our subject was made postmaster at this point and the village which grew up about their store was named in honor of the two brothers, who were practically the founders of the town. In connection with their mercantile enterprise they became extensively interested in the livestock business, and soon gained a position of prominence in connection with the industrial affairs of this favored section of the state. In 1896 Isaac Dirks was elected county auditor, and the subject removed to Oacoma, the county seat, where he assumed charge of the office, as eputy to his brother. In 1898 he was elected county treasurer, serving one term and then withdrawing from active politics to engage in the real-estate loan business in company with his brother Isaac, under the firm name of Dirks Brothers. Upon him devolved the responsibility of supervising this enterprise, while his brother continued to have charge of their extensive ranching interests. In 1902 the Citizens' State Bank was organized and the subject was elected cashier of the same, and in this capacity he has since given efficient service, gaining to the institution a high standing and marked popularity in this part oŁ the county. He is a staunch advocate of the principles of the Republican party and is at the present time secretary of the county central committee. He was the prime mover in organizing the Old Settlers' Association of the county, of which he was president for the first two years, since which time he has served as secretary, having been one of the leading spirits in the organization, which now has about four hundred members. He is secretary of the Lyman Creamery Company, whose plant, in Dirkstown, was completed in May, 1903. He is also vice-president of the Bankers' Association of Lyman county and is one of the representative citizens of this section of the state. Fraternally he holds membership in Chamberlain Lodge, No. 126, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and Chamberlain Lodge, No. 88, Ancient Order of United Workmen. Mr. Dirks is still a bachelor, and enjoys marked popularity in business and social circles.


History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher
1904
Contributed by Jim Dezotell

BENJAMIN L. WALKER, farmer and stock raiser and since 1893 treasurer and tax collector of Lyman county, South Dakota, is a native of Pennsylvania and the son of Abner and Lucinda (Risling) Walker, now living in Hutchinson county, South Dakota, the father being a retired farmer and stock raiser. Abner Walker moved his family to South Dakota in 1870 and located on a homestead near Yankton, where he lived a few years, subsequently changing his abode to Bon Homme county. He became a large land holder and well-to-do farmer and stock raiser in Bon Homme and after acquiring a competence moved to the town of Olivet, where, as stated above, he is now passing the evening of a well-spent life in honorable retirement. Of his four children all are living.

Benjamin L. Walker was born March 26, 1866, in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, and at the age of four years was brought by his parents to South Dakota, where he grew to maturity and has since lived and in the public school of which he received a fair education. Reared amid the stirring scenes of farm life and early taught the varied duties of agriculture, his training has been mostly of a practical character, acquired in the stern school of experience, by coming in contact with the world in different business capacities. The family came to this state when scattering settlements were few and far between, and he experienced his full share of the vicissitudes incident to life on the frontier. He spent his youth on the homestead near Yankton, later assisted his father develop and improve the latter's land in the county of Bon Homme, and on reaching the age when young men are expected to leave home and form their own plans for the future, he turned his attention to agriculture and stock raising, both of which callings he followed with success and financial profit until 1900, when he was elected treasurer and tax-collector of Lyman county, since which time he has lived in the town of Oacoma, the county seat.

Mr. Walker owns a fine ranch of two hundred acres, a part of which is under cultivation, the rest being devoted to live stock, in the prosecution of which business he has met with most encouraging results, making a specialty of the noted Hereford breed of cattle, for which there is always a strong demand at liberal prices. He has made a number of substantial improvements on his place, having good buildings, including a comfortable and attractive residence, which while he occupied was furnished with all the comforts and conveniences calculated to make rural life desirable. The better to attend to the duties of his office, he changed his residence, shortly after his election, to the seat of justice, where he now has a commodious home and with the material growth and prosperity of which town he has been actively identified. Mr. Walker is one of the leading Republicans of Lyman county, and as an energetic and able counsellor he has contributed greatly to the success of Republican principles in the county of Lyman and elsewhere.

In the year 1894 Mr. Walker and Miss Leila Brown, of Iowa, were united in marriage, Mrs. Walker's parents at this time being residents of Lyman county, South Dakota. Her father is a farmer and stock raiser, owning a valuable ranch and devoting especial attention, not only to raising cattle and horses, but to the buying and shipping the same, doing a large and thriving business and rapidly becoming one of the wealthy men of the section of country in which he lives. Mr. and Mrs. Walker have an interesting family of six children whose names are Loretta, Maude, Edyth, Viola, Ivan and Florence, all living and those old enough attending the public schools of Oacoma.



History of Winnebago County and Hancock County, Iowa
1917
 

ANTHONY O. TOBIASSEN.


Anthony O. Tobiassen, who at different times has been connected with a variety of business interests in an important capacity but is now largely concentrating his energies upon the real estate business and upon selling silos, was born in Norway, May 22, 1853. He is the eldest of fire children, whose parents, Abraham and Torie (Anderson) Tobiassen, came to the United States in 1864 and settled in Legrand, Marshall county, Iowa. The father had fanned in Norway but followed the stone mason's trade in Iowa. In 1885 he removed to the state of Washington, locating near Lynden, and there he engaged in farming until his death in 1913 at the age of eighty-nine years. He is buried there but his wife is interred in the North cemetery at Lake Mills, as she passed away in 1902 when visiting her son Anthony. The rest of the children all live in Lynden, Washington.
Anthony O. Tobiassen received his early education in the common schools and worked for others until he was twenty-one years old, when he went to Chicago and engaged in the nursery business. In 1874, realizing that a better education would be of great value to him, he entered Grinnell College, where he was a student for two terms. In 1876 he came to Lake Mills, which he had visited in 1869, and for five years he taught school in Winnebago county. In 1881 he began working in an implement store in Lake Mills and later turned his attention to cattle raising, taking up his residence on a farm which he owned in Norway township. While living there ho also served as deputy sheriff for three terms under Jacob Twito and he made an excellent record in that capacity. In 1888 he became connected with a lumber company in Lake Mills and three years later became president of the local creamery company and also secretary of the Winnebago County Mutual Insurance Company. In 1892 he was one of the incorporators of the Lake Mills Lumber Company, of which he was manager and treasurer until 1903, during which time the business was very ably conducted and yielded a good profit to its stockholders. In 1903 he formed a partnership with A. A. Sanden for the conduct of a real estate business, but in 1906 went to Lyman county, South Dakota, where he homesteaded land. He became active in the real estate field there, dealing in lands in that state until 1911, when he returned to Lake Mills and again became manager and treasurer of the Lake Mills Lumber Company, serving in those capacities until 1915. He has since given his time and attention to selling silos and to his interests as a real estate and insurance agent and for the past thirty-two years he-has been a representative of the Fidelity Phoenix Fire Insurance Company. He still owns several valuable tracts of land in South Dakota.
In September, 1879, Mr. Tobiassen was married to Miss Clara Twito, a daughter of Hans and Aslaug (Jacobson) Twito, who in 1846 removed from Norway to the United States. Both settled in Muskego, Wisconsin, where they were married, and later they removed to Spring Grove, Minnesota, where the father died in 1866 and where he was buried. The mother and her children removed to Estherville, Iowa, and in 1871 came to Lake Mills, where Mrs. Twito's death occurred in 1914. She was buried in the North cemetery here. To Mr. and Mrs. Tobiassen were born four children, one of whom died in infancy, the others being: J. Ben, who is married and is engaged in the hardware business in Draper, South Dakota; A, Homer, who is married and is a general merchant of Draper, South Dakota; and Lottie, the wife of Joseph Beach, a banker of Draper.
Mr. Tobiassen has been a lifelong republican and has always discharged to the full all the duties devolving upon him as a good citizen. He held the office of township clerk for several years and has also served as township assessor and his official record is highly creditable to his ability and public spirit. In religious faith he is a Lutheran, and fraternally is a charter member of the Modern Woodmen of America lodge at Lake Mills. His has been a life of intense and well directed industry and although he began his independent career empty handed he is now financially independent. He naturally finds satisfaction in his material prosperity, but values even more the high place which he has won in the esteem of his fellow citizens through his strict adherence to high moral standards in all relations of life.



"History of Dakota Territory"
Kingsbury, George W.
1915
 

HENRY ALLEN PIKE.

The demise of Henry Allen Pike, of Tyndall, was not only an occasion of ranch sorrow to his family and personal friends, but was also a matter of deep regret in the journalistic circles of the state, as he had been for years one of the prominent editors of South Dakota. He was a descendant of an old and well known New England family, his grandmother being a cousin of Ethan Allen of Ticonderoga fame. The subject of this review was born in the state of New York, but when he was but a lad his parents moved to Iowa and he early learned the printer's trade in that state. At the age of seventeen he became an editor, and from that time until his death, which occurred in 1912, he never vacated the editorial chair. In 1S83 he came to Tyndall, Bon Homme county, Dakota territory, and purchased the Register, from Bradford &, Richmond. He made this paper an organ of the democratic party and it became one of the influential journals of this section of the state. His editorials were not only potent forces in advancing the cause of the democratic party, but they were also important factors in the promotion of many movements for the community welfare of Tyndall. The news columns gave to subscribers of the paper reliable accounts of current happenings in the locality and also in the world at large, while the wide circulation of the Register made it an excellent advertising medium. In Cleveland's second term Mr. Pike was appointed postmaster of Tyndall and held the office for four years. While still a resident of Iowa, in connection with his journalistic work he served as superintendent of schools for Palo Alto county and throughout his life manifested a deep interest in everything pertaining to educational advancement. He was also prominent in Iowa in the councils of the democratic party, and was for several terms chairman of the state central committee, in addition to serving as delegate to many county and state conventions. His fraternal allegiance was given to the Masonic order, his membership being in the lodge at Tyndall.
Mr. Pike was married June 4, 1895, to Miss Mary Cullen. a native of Cedar county, Nebraska, and a daughter of Martin and Catherine (Sullivan) Cullen, natives of County Wexford and County Waterford, Ireland, respectively. They were among the early settlers of Cedar county, but since the death of his wife Mr. Cullen has made his home with a son, W. V. Cullen, who resides in Lyman county, South Dakota. A son, Stillman, was born to Mr. and Mrs. Pike November 26, 1996. From the time of her marriage the latter has taken a lively interest in journalism and, as she learned all the details of the printer's art thoroughly, she is well qualified to publish the Register. She has continued its publication since the demise of her husband in 1912 and edits the paper as well as oversees its printing. She has maintained the high standard set by Mr. Pike, and not only is the paper an excellent purveyor of news, but it is also a stanch and effective advocate of democratic principles. She is a Presbyterian in her religious belief and takes an active interest in the work of that church. After the blizzard of January 12, 1888, which left so much death and destruction in its wake, the remains of nineteen who had perished in the storm were laid out in the office of Mr. Pike. Over on the south side of the river Mr. Cullen, father of Mrs. Pike, made his way to the schoolhouse through the blinding and suffocating storm and took the teacher and four children home with him and kept them throughout the night. Mr. Pike did a great deal to advance the material and moral welfare of his county, and the results of his well spent life are increasingly apparent, even though he himself has passed to his reward. His memory is held in high honor by all who were privileged to call him friend.



History of Winnebago County and Hancock County, Iowa
1917
 

ALBERT H. PETERSON.

Albert H. Peterson, who carries on general farming on section 18, Norway township, Winnebago county, has a good tract of land which responds readily to the care and labor that he bestows upon it, and by reason of his practical and progressive methods he has come to rank with the substantial farmers of Winnebago county. He was born in Winneshiek county, Iowa, October 1, 1869, a son of Hans and Anna (Twito) Peterson, the former a native of Norway, while the latter was born near Muskego, Wisconsin, which was the first Norwegian settlement in the United States. The father was but a young lad when brought by his parents to the new world, the family home being established in Winnebago county, Wisconsin, where his parents followed farming until called to the home beyond. They were laid to rest near Winchester in that county. Hans Peterson acquired his education in the pioneer schools of the Badger state, and after the outbreak of the Civil war joined Company K of the Eleventh Wisconsin Infantry. He saw active service throughout the period of hostilities, and after peace was declared he removed to Fillmore county, Minnesota, where he married Anna Twito, a daughter of Hans Twito, who came from Nom-ay in 1843 and settled in Muskego, Wisconsin, but later removed to Fillmore county, Minnesota. Mr. and Mrs. Peterson began their domestic life upon a rented farm, upon which they lived for a short time, and later they removed to Emmet county, Iowa, where Mr. Peterson endeavored to develop a homestead, but the crops were destroyed by grasshoppers, and in 1876 they removed to Winnebago county. At one time Mr. Peterson served as deputy sheriff of the county. He lived at Lake Mills until a few years ago, but he and his wife are now residents of Perkins county, South Dakota, making their home with their daughter Nettie, who is the wife of Peter Larson. They have a family of five children: Albert H.; Hilda, who is now the widow of Isaac Larson and makes her home in Freeborn county, Minnesota; Mollie, the wife of Martin
Dakken, of Lake Mills; Nettie, now Mrs. Peter Larson; and Amanda, the wife of J. S. Hood, of Perkins county, South Dakota.
Albert H. Peterson attended the common schools until he reached the age of sixteen years and then began earning his living as a farm hand. He was thus employed until he attained his majority, when he began farming on his own account on rented land in Newton township. He spent four years in that way, during which period he carefully saved his earnings until the sum was sufficient to enable him to purchase property. He invested in land in Lyon county, Minnesota, on which he lived for a year, and when twenty-seven years of age he bought eighty acres on section 18, Norway township, which he has since owned and cultivated save that in the year 1907 he resided upon a quarter section of land in Lyman county, South Dakota, in order to obtain that property under the homestead act. He exercises great care and thought in the management of his farm and annually gathers golden harvests as a reward for the care and labor which he bestows upon the fields.
Mr. Peterson was united in marriage to Miss Gertie Kvale, a daughter of Engebret and Berit (Kvale) Kvale, who came to this country from Norway, and after residing in Winneshiek county, Iowa, for four years, removed to Winnebago county about 1875, settling in Norway township. Mrs. Kvale died in 1908, but Mr. Kvale is still living on the home farm. Mr. and Mrs. Peterson have become the parents of eight children, as follows: Alpha B., Hamlet E., Hilda M., Alice G., Melvin Reuben, Isabelle M., Marie G. and Henry T., all at home.
Mr. and Mrs. Peterson hold membership in the Synod Lutheran church and he votes with the republican party. For twelve years or more he served on the school board as a director from the time the school district was organized. He has never sought nor desired office, however, preferring to concentrate his time and energies upon his business affairs. All that he possesses he has made through his own efforts, for he started out empty handed- Today he is the owner of a splendidly improved farm and is a stockholder of the Farmers Elevator Company and the creamery company of Scarville. He stands as a representative of that type of citizens of whom Iowa has reason to be proud—men whose force of character and ability is sufficient to enable them to overcome difficulties and obstacles and steadily work their way upward to success.


"History of Dakota Territory"
Kingsbury, George W.
1915
 

Fred McPherson Newman, M. D.

Dr. Fred McPherson Newman, a leading and prosperous citizen of Lyman county, South Dakota, has been actively engaged in the practice of medicine at Presho during the past decade, also owns the city's largest drug store and is now serving as its mayor. His birth occurred in Clarksville, Iowa, on the 25th of January, 1873, his parents being Hiram and Euphemia (Gabby) Newman, who were natives of Ohio and Pennsylvania respectively. The lather made his way to Iowa in 185S, covering the distance of ninety miles from Dubuque to his homestead on foot and becoming one of the pioneer agriculturists of the state. His demise occurred in 1909, when he had attained the age of eighty-two years, while his wife passed away in 1912, when sixty-nine years old. They became the parents of five children, of whom our subject was the fourth born. His surviving sister, Mary, is the wife of Oscar Heiserman, of West Union, Iowa, and he also had two half brothers: Frank, who is deceased; and Granville, a resident of Vienna, South Dakota.
Fred McPherson Newman acquired his early education in the grammar and high schools of his native town and subsequently attended the University of Iowa for two years, while later he spent a similar period as a student in the Northwestern University of Chicago, which institution conferred upon him the degree of M. D, in 1903. He had devoted two years to preparatory work in Darnell College of Mount Vernon, Iowa, and acquired a liberal education through his own efforts, earning the money with which to pay his expenses. Well qualified for the practice of his chosen profession, he opened an office at Rembrandt and at the end of a year went to Stacyville, Iowa, where he spent another period of twelve months. In 1905 he removed to Presho, South Dakota, which place has since remained the scene of his professional labors and where he has been accorded a gratifying and growing practice that now covers a territory many miles in extent. He is widely recognized as an able and successful representative of the profession and keeps in close touch with its steady advance through his membership in the district and state medical societies and the American Medical Association. The financial success that has come to him is indicated in the fact that he is now the proprietor of Presho's largest drug store and also owns a half section of land in Lyman county.
On the 29th of June, 1904, Dr. Newman was united in marriage to Miss Maggiebell, daughter of Edward Lonie, of Stacyville, Iowa, They have two children, Fred Kenneth and Ruth Nedra. Politically the Doctor is a progressive republican but at local elections casts an independent ballot. His fellow townsmen have honored him by election to the office of mayor and his administration has brought many needed reforms and improvements. He is a worthy exemplar of the Masonic fraternity, belonging to Butler Lodge, No. 84, A. F. & A. M., of Clarksville, Butler county, Iowa, and he is also a charter member of Alpha Omega Alpha. In both professional and social circles of the community he enjoys an enviable reputation.
 



“Omaha, the Gate City, and Douglas County, Nebraska”
1917

FRANK R. KEEGAN.

Frank R. Keegan, of the firm of Baldwin & Keegan, is recognized as one of the most capable and successful of the younger lawyers practicing at the Omaha bar. He was born in Spalding, Nebraska, October 31, 1885. a son of John and Jane (Roch) Keegan, both of whom are natives of Ireland but became pioneer settlers of Illinois, casting in their lot with the early residents of Iroquois county, where the father engaged in farming. Later he was in the employ of the government and afterward became a ranchman in Nebraska, while eventually he retired from active business life. He came to this state in 1884 and settled on a farm in Greeley county, where he continued to reside until he removed to Boone county. In 1889 he brought his family to South Omaha, where he has since made his home, although from 1904 until 1909 he was prominently connected with ranching and cattle raising in Lyman county, South Dakota. At the present time he is located in South Omaha, enjoying a rest which he has justly earned and richly deserves. His wife, whom he married in Iroquois county, Illinois, also survives. In their family were seven children, of whom two are now deceased, Jennie and Elizabeth having passed away. The others are John, Mary, Daniel, Arthur and Frank R., all residing in Omaha.
The last named, who was the youngest child of the family, attended the St. Agnes parochial school of South Omaha to the age of nine years and afterward spent six years as a pupil in Creighton University, in which he pursued the literary and arts courses. He next attended the St. Thomas Military Academy in St. Paul and won the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1904. For three years he was a student in the Fribourg University of Switzerland and upon his return to his native state in 1907 he secured a position in the clerical department of the Cudahy Packing Company of South Omaha. There he remained until 1911, when he again entered Creighton University, winning the LL. B. degree. In 1914 he began the practice of law in South Omaha and has been one of the most successful young attorneys of this section of the state. On the 1st of December, 1916, he formed a partnership with John N. Baldwin, mentioned elsewhere in this work, and they now maintain a fine suite of offices in the World-Herald building and constitute a strong combination of legal advisers.
Mr. Keegan votes with the democratic party and on the 7th of November, 1916, he was elected a member of the state legislature. He has marked ability in his profession, a fact recognized by public opinion, and he is well known and popular both in his social and professional connections.
 



"History of Dakota Territory"
Kingsbury, George W.
1915
 

ARTHUR L. FREELOVE.

In any community there are a few men who are generally recognized as leaders and among that number in Lyman county is Arthur L. Free love, of Kennebec, who has played an important part in the financial development of the county and also in the advancement of dairying and farming interests. A native of Iowa, he was born in Arcadia, on the 24th of November, 1876, a son of Madison B. and Mary (Gaundry) Freelove. The father was born in Vermont, but in his early manhood removed to Iowa, where he engaged in farming until his demise in 1896, at the age of fifty-six years. He was one of the pioneer settlers of Manning, Iowa, and was highly esteemed by all who knew him. The mother is of English and Dutch parentage. She is still living at Manning and has reached the age of sixty-six years, while her mother, who also resides at that place, is eighty-six years of age.
Arthur L. Freelove, who is the second in order of birth in a family of five children, attended the graded and high schools of Manning and subsequently entered the College of Law of Valparaiso University at Valparaiso, Indiana, from which he was graduated with the class of 1897. The business ability and energy which have enabled him to gain a foremost place in financial and business circles of his county were demonstrated during his student days as he worked his way through college. He first located for practice at Britt, Iowa, where he remained for a year and a half, after which he removed to Sioux Rapids, Iowa, practicing there until 1908. While residing in that city he also became connected with banking and with the real-estate business and proved successful in those lines. In 1910 he located in Kennebec, Lyman county, South Dakota, where he has since remained, and purchased the controlling interest in the Security State Bank, which he converted by charter into the First National Bank of Kennebec in 1911. This institution is the largest bank and the only national bank in Lyman county and the excellent condition of its affairs is chiefly due to the wise management of its president, Mr. Freelove. He is also president of the First National Bank of Oldham, which he purchased in 1911 as the State Bank of Oldham, and of the Reliance Savings Bank of Reliance, South Dakota. His high standing among bankers is indicated by the fact that he has served as vice president of the State Bankers Association. His activity, however, is not confined to banking, as he is a member of the Freelove & Coster Land Company, who own extensive tracts of land and operate the largest ranch in the county devoted to stock-raising and alfalfa growing. They breed shorthorn and Hereford cattle and have played an important part in the development of the stock-raising interests of the county. It is acknowledged that no other man in the county has done so much to further the stock-raising and dairy development of the county as Mr. Freelove, as he is not only one of the county's largest stock-raisers, but has also assisted many others to get a start in stock-raising and especially in dairying through the giving of advice and of financial assistance. He is also president of the Lyman Agricultural Extension Association, which promotes cooperation in the purchase and distribution of seeds and in the breeding and exchange of registered stock and disseminates information as to the scientific methods of farming, dairying and stock-raising.
On the 11th of January, 1898, Mr. Freelove was married at Manning, Iowa, to Miss Alma D. Franke, a daughter of Gustav and Dorothy Franke. To this union two children have been born, Arthur Franke and Dorothy Louisa. Mrs. Freelove is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and takes an active part in the work of the church and of the Ladies Aid Society. Mr. Freelove also attends the Methodist Episcopal, church and contributes liberally to its support. In his political belief be is a stalwart republican and while living in Sioux Rapids, Iowa, took a leading part in politics and served for one term as mayor. He has always greatly enjoyed outdoor life and sports and while in college was class representative on the running track and also played on the class baseball team. He is characterized by untiring energy and his enterprise and resourcefulness have enabled him to accomplish much for his town and county at the same time that he has achieved individual success. He is quick to recognize opportunities, uses sound judgment in formulating his plans and is prompt in carrying them out. It is to such men as he that the prosperity and development of the county are due.


History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher
1904
Contributed by Jim Dezotell

DOUGLAS CARLIN, representative of Stanley and Lyman counties in the state senate, and one of the successful farmers and stock growers of this section of the state, is a native of the state of Illinois, having been born in Greene county, on the 20th of August, 1855, and being a son of Thomas J. and Mary (Kelly) Carlin, who were likewise
born and reared in that state. William Garland, the grandfather of the subject, was born in the old Dominion state, where the family was established in the colonial days, and he became one of the early pioneers of Illinois, where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death. He was associated with his brother Thomas, who later became one of the early governors of the state. The parents of the subject of this review are still living in Illinois, and the father, who has attained the venerable age of seventy-five years, has devoted his active life to farming. He served as register of deeds and clerk of the circuit court for a period of twelve years and is now living retired, in the town of Carrollton. His three children are all living, and the subject of this review is the only son.

Douglas Carlin passed his boyhood days in his native county, and received his rudimentary education in the public schools, after which he continued his studies in a school conducted by the Christian Brothers in the city of St. Louis, Missouri, entering the institution at the age of fifteen and remaining in the same for a period of four
years. He then returned to his home and there attended school until he had attained his legal majority, when he was appointed deputy sheriff of Greene county, in which capacity he served one year, at the expiration of which, in 1877, he came to Bismarck, Dakota territory, and thence proceeded down the Missouri river to Fort Yates, where he joined his uncle, General William P. Carlin, who was in command of that military post. The General served with distinction during the war of the Rebellion, with the rank of major general, and was retired a number of years ago with the rank of brigadier general, while he now resides in the city of Spokane, Washington, in which state he has extensive real-estate interests. Upon reaching Fort Yates the subject was appointed quartermaster's clerk, and there served in that capacity until June, 1881, when he was ordered to Pierre by the chief quartermaster and there assigned to the supervision of the shipping department, issuing supplies to the different military posts up and down the Missouri river, including Fort Meade. He retained this position until 1885, when he was given a clerical office in the
department of the interior and assigned to the Cheyenne Indian agency, where he continued in active service until the autumn of 1890. He then resigned his position and located on the Cheyenne river, where he has since been successfully engaged in the raising of cattle and horses, having a ranch of open range, well-improved and carrying on his enterprise on a large scale. He gives preference to the Hereford breed of cattle, keeping an average herd of about five hundred head, while he also raises an excellent grade of draft and road horses. In politics Mr. Carlin gives an unwavering allegiance to the Democratic party, and in 1899 he was elected a member of the board of commissioners of Sterling county, while in 1902 he was elected to represent his county in the state senate, in which body he has proved a valuable working member. Fraternally the Senator is identified with the Masonic order and the Ancient Order of United Workmen.

On the 27th of August, 1887, Mr. Carlin was united in marriage to Miss Marcelle Dupree, who was born at Fort Sully, this state, being a daughter of Frederick Dupree, who resided in this section of the Union for sixty years, being a prominent and influential figure in the pioneer history of the state. He died in June, 1898, on his ranch, in Sterling county, at the advanced age of seventy-nine years. Of him individual mention is made on other pages of this work.

Mr. and Mrs. Carlin have six children, namely: Lilly, Thomas, Walter, Laura, Bessie and Ruth.


 




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