Marshall County, South Dakota

Biographies

 

Culbertson, S. B.

Davis, Lester M.

Donald, William

Dunton, George

Farley, L. T.

Gardner, Robert

Given, Walton

Hamilton, Charles

Heinz, Edwin

Jarvis, James

Jones, R. R.

Kaas, Otto

Karpen, Anton

Kelly, John F.

Mather, G. W.

Mackey, S. P.

Mohn, Carl

Odell, Myron

Odell, Frank

Parkin, James

Printup, David L.

Pritzkan, L.

Snyder, A.

Staven, Melvin J.

Widmann, Henry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

 LESTER M. DAVIS.

 Lester M. Davis, who was elected to the office of treasurer of Marshall county in 1914, was born in Waseca county, Minnesota, December 23, 1881, being one of the two children of David and Clara (Hinkley) Davis. The father was born in Wisconsin in 1853 and the mother in Minnesota in 1857. They were married in the latter state and he has devoted his attention to farming, whereby he has provided a comfortable living for his family. In 1883 he removed to Marshall county, where he took up a homestead on which he lived for a number of years. He now resides upon an eighty-acre tract of land near Britton, and although he had only two dollars and sixty cents when he reached South Dakota, he is now in possession of a comfortable competence. His political support is given to the republican party. James Davis, the paternal grandfather of Lester M. Davis, was born in New York and at an early period in the settlement of Wisconsin took up his abode in that state. At the time of the Civil war he put aside all business and personal considerations to aid his country in the defense of the Union. The maternal grandfather, Henry Hinkley, was born in Maine and after living for a time in Wisconsin removed to Minnesota, where he was living at the time of the Indian troubles. He afterward came to South Dakota, where he took up land and in this state spent his remaining days. It was his daughter Clara who became the wife of David Davis and they had a daughter. May, who  is now the wife of O. C. Sherburn, a farmer living at Britton. 

 The other child of that marriage is Lester M. Davis, who was in his second year when brought to Marshall county. His education was acquired in the schools of Britton and he devoted his time and  energies to general agricultural pursuits until he was elected to  office.  He has three hundred and fifty-four acres of valuable land in this county, upon which he has made excellent improvements, transforming it into one of the fine farms of the district.

 In 1903 Mr. Davis was united in marriage to Mtes Olive Russell, her father being Edward Russell, an agriculturist of Marshall county. They have one child, Dorothy, who is in school.

Mr. Davis is a well known representative of the Masonic fraternity in Marshall county, belonging to both the lodge and the chapter. He votes with the republican party and keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day. In the fall of 1914 he became his party's candidate for the office of county treasurer and the election proved that he had the support of the majority, so that he is now the incumbent in that position, in which he is proving most capable. He has been familiar with the history of this county for about a third of a century and is an interested witness of the changes which have occurred and of tbe progress which has been wrought. At all times he has been in sympathy with movements for the general good and his labors have been resultant factors in the  upbuilding of the community. 


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

WILLIAM R. DONALD. 

William R. Donald, editor and proprietor of the Sentinel, published at Britton, was born in County Down, province of Ulster, Ireland. November 8, 1854, a son of Robert and Catherine (Cunningham) Donald, also natives of the same locality. The father, who occupied a position as foreman, died in Ireland, January 17, 1861. The mother, who was born February 15, 1830, is still living at the advanced age of eighty-five years. They were married May 2, 1851, and became parents of four children, of whom two are living, the daughter being Mrs. John Mercer, whose husband has bad charge of a construction crew for the Michigan Central Railway Company since 1877. Mr. Donald was a member of the Presbyterian church, to which faith his widow still adheres. She came to America with three daughters in 1873 and is now living at Britton, South Dakota. 

William R. Donald, crossing the Atlantic in August, 1671, landed at Quebec, whence he made his way to Toronto and afterward to St. Marys, Canada, where he lived with an uncle. He began learning the printer's trade in 1870 and continued work along that line after coming to the new world. For a time he and his mother also conducted a little store at St. Marys, Ontario. After mastering the printer's trade he was employed at different places and in March, 1883, went to Andover, where he began work as a carpenter. Three months after his arrival be sent for his mother and sisters to join him. Various business interests have at different times claimed his attention. He established and conducted a hotel at Andover and took up a homestead in Marshall county which he proved up in 1889 following general farming upon that place from 1886 until 1899. He then went to Langford, where he established a small hardware store but afterward sold out and in the fall of 1902 purchased the Britton Sentinel, which he has since owned and published, the paper now having a circulation of ten hundred and fifty. He also conducts a job printing business and does good work in that line. Success has attended his efforts but has not been achieved without the cost of earnest, self-denying labor. That he is well known in newspaper circles in the state is indicated by the fact that in 1907 and 1908 he was honored with the presidency of the South Dakota Press Association. 

On the 20th of November, 1895, Mr. Donald was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Endera Byer, a native of Boundbrook, New Jersey, and a representative of a family of Prussian ancestry. Her parents spent their entire lives in Boundbrook, New Jersey, her father being a cabinetmaker and wheelwright by trade and very proficient in those lines. Mr. and Mrs. Donald are members of the Presbyterian church and he also belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, both lodge and encampment, the Modern  Brotherhood of America, the Modern Woodmen of America and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.  He is one of the charter members of the Elks lodge of Aberdeen, has been president and secretary of the Modern Brotherhood of America and has held all of the offices in the Woodmen camp, in which he is now consul. Politically he is an earnest democrat and is serving as chairman of the democratic county central  committee. On one occasion he was the party's candidate for representative to the state legislature and was defeated by only a small vote, although the party is largely in the minority in the district. Dependent upon his own resources from early boyhood, the life record of William R. Donald indicates that no matter what the advantages enjoyed in early life, the individual must essentially formulate, determine and shape his own character and make for himself a place in his community. By a well spent and honorable  life William R. Donald has gained the goodwill and kindly regard of his fellow citizens, many of whom are his warm friends.  


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

GEORGE C. DUNTON.

 George C. Dunton, cashier of the First National Bank at Webster, was born in Naples, New York, February 8, 1865, and is a representative of one of the old families of the Empire state, his ancestors having come from England to the new world. His grandfather. John Dunton, born in New York, was a successful farmer of that state for many years and there occurred the birth of his son, Lemuel M., in the year 1834.   He was reared and educated at the place of his nativity and after attaining his majority wedded Harriett E. Oliver, who was born in New York in 1834, a daughter of George Culver, also a native of that state, who traced his ancestry back to the early Puritans who settled New England. Mr. and Mrs. Lemuel M. Dunton continued their residence in the east until 1870, when  they removed to Missouri and afterward to Kansas, Mr. Dunton devoting his attention to sheep raising in both states. While in New York he had handled both sheep and cattle. He won a very gratifying measure of success and was well-to-do at the time of his demise. He was well educated and well read and in his community exercised considerable influence over public thought and action. He died in the year 1910, having for a decade survived his wife, who passed away in 1900. She was a consistent member of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Dunton held membership with the Masons and belonged to both the blue lodge and chapter.

His political allegiance was given to the republican party. To him and his wife were born two children, George C. and Harry I., the latter a resident of Canandaigua, New York. George C. Dunton completed his education by graduation from the Canandaigua Academy of New York with the class of 1884 and for two years thereafter devoted his attention to merchandising in the Empire state. In 1886 he arrived in South Dakota, where he engaged in clerking for a time, and later established a store of his own at Langford. On disposing of that he lived retired for a short period and afterward purchased a hardware store. During his residence in Marshall county he served as treasurer for four years and was a prominent and influential resident of that community. In 1902 he removed to Webster and organized the First National Bank, which from the beginning has been a substantial and paying institution. It is capitalized for twenty-five thousand dollars, has a surplus of fifteen thousand dollars and its average deposits amount to one hundred and sixty-five thousand dollars. A general banking business is conducted and as its cashier Mr. Dunton has practically managed its affairs and contributed in a very large measure to its success. He also has farming interests in this state and is a representative business man, alert and enterprising.  

In December, 1898, occurred the marriage of Mr. Dunton and Miss Clara M. Deerson, a native of Illinois and a daughter of John Deerson, who was born in Germany but in early life came to the new world, settling in Illinois, where he followed the cabinetmaking trade. His daughter, Mrs. Dunton, is a member of the Episcopal church and occupies an enviable position in social circles of the city. 

Mr. Dunton is a prominent Mason, having taken the degrees of the Scottish Rite and of the Mystic Shrine. A republican in his political views, he has been active in the work of the party yet never sought office as a reward for party fealty. He has a strong attachment for the west, which has given him his opportunity, and he possesses the enterprising spirit which has ever characterized the development of this section of the country.  


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

 ROBERT D. GARDNER.

 Robert D. Gardner, occupying the bench of the county court of Marshall county, received indorsement of his first term's service in a reelection in 1914 and is bending his energies to a fair and impartial administration of the law, attempting to make his court the embodiment of equity and justice. He has practiced in Britton since 1902, previous to which time he was a member of the Indiana bar for several years. He is a native, however, of Michigan, his birth having occurred in Allegan county, May 19, 1868, his parents being James and Vere (Russell) Gardner, who were natives of Scotland, born in 1825 and 1827 respectively. Reared in the land of hills and heather, they were there married and on crossing the Atlantic settled in Canada, whence they removed to Michigan, where the father followed farming throughout his remaining days. Both he and his wife were members of the Presbyterian church, loyal to its teachings and its purposes.  Fraternally Mr. Gardner was a Mason, while politically he was a republican and filled some local offices. He died in the year 1912, having for three years survived his wife, who passed away in 1909. To them were born five children, four of whom survive, namely: William, a practicing attorney of Michigan; Vere, who also lives in Michigan, Robert D., of this review; and George, who is engaged in the lumber and coal business at Copemish, Michigan. 

After acquiring a common-school education Robert D. Gardner entered upon the study of law under private instruction and was later elected county surveyor of Allegan county, Michigan, which position he filled for several years. Subsequently he attended the law school of the Northern Indiana University at Valparaiso and upon the completion of his course was admitted to the bar in 1898. He began practice in South Bend, where he remained for two and one-half years. He removed to Britton, this state, in 1902, and there entered upon active practice independently, soon demonstrating his ability to handle intricate problems of the law and to win success in the trial of cases for his clients. He has been accorded a large private practice and in 1912 was elected to the office of county judge, since which time he has served upon the bench, having been reelected in 1914. His course has been marked by a masterful grasp of every problem presented for solution and his decisions have been strictly fair and impartial. 

In 1899 Mr. Gardner was united in marriage to Miss Emma L. Knudson, a native of Illinois.    Mrs. Gardner belongs to the Lutheran church.    She is also a member of the Eastern Star, and was grand Esther in 1914-15 in the Grand Lodge of South Dakota. She is also a musician of note, possessing a rich contralto voice, and has studied under several of the leading musical directors.

 Judge Gardner is well known in Masonic circles, having taken the degrees of the lodge, the consistory and the Mystic Shrine. He also has membership with the Independent Order of Odd fellows. He likewise belongs to the Elks lodge at Aberdeen. He gives his political support to the republican party but never allows political preference to interfere with the faithful performance of his judicial duties and his opinions are particularly free from personal bias or prejudice, so that he has made an excellent record upon the bench. 


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

WALTON S. GIVEN.

 Walton S. Given, cashier of the First National Bank of Britton, was born in Woodstock, Illinois, February 4, 1879, and is descended from early American ancestry represented in the Revolutionary war among the Virginian troops with Pitkin and Sumter. His parents, C. A. and Elizabeth (Ryder) Given, were both natives of Woodstock, Illinois, although their parents were Virginians. C. A. Given made farming his life work and thus provided a comfortable living for his family. He was a well read and broad-minded man and the salient traits of his character were such as commended him to the confidence and high regard of all. His early political support was given to the democratic party but later he joined the ranks of the republican party. Fraternally he was connected with the Masons and religiously with the Presbyterian church, while his wife was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Walton S. Given completed a high-school course in Elgin, Illinois, by graduation with the class of 1897, being then a youth of eighteen years. Soon afterward he made his way to Watertown, South Dakota, and for two years engaged in teaching in the country schools near that place. He afterward attended the State Normal School at Madison, from which he was graduated in 1900, and then accepted the position of principal of the schools of  South Shore, South Dakota. A year later he removed to Britton, where he was city superintendent of schools from 1901 until 1910, and from 1905 until 1910 he spent his summers in teachers' institute work all over Dakota. He was particularly able in that field, as well as in the regular work of the schoolroom, where his ability to impart clearly and readily to others the knowledge that he bad acquired made him a most valued educator.  His efforts have been an important force in the development of the school system of his part of the state, for he was largely instrumental in advancing the standards of the schools. He promoted his own knowledge through attendance for several seasons at the University of Chicago, and broad reading, study and investigation have continually augmented his intellectual force. In 1910 he was elected assistant cashier of the First National Bank of Britton, of which he was made cashier in January, 1911, and has since been identified with this institution, to which he gives his undivided attention.

 In 1906 Mr. Given was united in marriage to Miss Annie Sheridan, a native of Madison, South Dakota, and a daughter of Elmer Sheridan, who is engaged in the abstract and insurance business. They have one child, Elmer S. Mrs. Given belongs to the Presbyterian church, while Mr. Given is a member of the Masonic fraternity. In politics he is a republican but has never sought nor desired office, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his business duties. He is now making good in the position of cashier of the First National Bank of Britton and is accorded the high regard and confidence of his colleagues and contemporaries. 


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

 CHARLES HAMILTON.

 The business interests of Britton find an active representative in Charles Hamilton, who is proprietor of a lumberyard and the vice president of the First National Bank. He is wide- wake, alert, energetic and resourceful and carries forward to successful completion whatever he undertakes. He is a typical western man in spirit and interests, ever manifesting that progressiveness which has been the dominant factor in the development   of this section of the country. He was born at Winona, Minnesota, March 1, 1863, a son of Andrew and Mary (Whitten) Hamilton, natives of Ireland, the former born in 1828 and the latter in 1832. When a young man Andrew Hamilton crossed the Atlantic, and Mary Whitten came with her mother to the new world. They were married in Albany, New York, and remained in that state for some time, Mr. Hamilton working as a silversmith. In 1850 he removed to Winona, Minnesota, where he established a lumberyard and in the conduct of his business met with substantial success, becoming one of the well-to-do citizens of that place. He was also prominent and influential in public affairs and was three times elected mayor of the city on the democratic ticket, his reelection being proof of his capability, his fidelity in office and the confidence reposed in him. He died in the year 1898, while his wife passed away in 1907, in the faith of the Methodist Episcopal  church, in which she held membership. Of their family of eight children only two are now living, the daughter being Mrs. A. H. Reed, a widow. 

Charles Hamilton was educated in the Winona high school and the Winona Normal School and when seventeen years of age became the active associate of his father in the lumber business, in which he has since continued. Removing to Dakota territory in 1886, he established the Dakota Lumber Company of Britton, conducting business under that style until 1913, when he purchased his partner's interest and changed the name to the Hamilton Lumber Company. This business is incorporated with a capital stock of one hundred thousand dollars and Mr. Hamilton, as president and chief stockholder of the company, is operating six yards in South Dakota and one in North Dakota. His trade has now reached extensive proportions, marking him as one of the most active and  representative business men of his section. He is also the vice president of the First National Bank and has extensive landed interests, having made judicious investment in  real estate. 

Mr. Hamilton has been married twice. In 1889 he wedded Miss Maude Aplin, a native of Iowa, and to them were born four children, as follows: Shepard, a practicing attorney who received his education in Cornell University of Ithaca, New York; and Marion, Gail and S. W., all at home. The wife and mother passed away in 1900 and in the year 1902 Mr. Hamilton was again married, his second union being with Miss Glendora M. Davidson, who was born at Reeds Landing, Minnesota, and by whom he has a daughter, Lucile, now eight years of age.  Mrs. Hamilton and the children are members of the Presbyterian church.  

Mr. Hamilton is an exemplary representative of the Masonic  fraternity, belonging to the lodge, chapter and consistory, and is also connected with the Workmen, the Woodmen and the Royal Neighbors.   In politics he is a republican, well versed on the questions and issues of the day but never an office seeker. He is not remiss in the duties of citizenship, however, and cooperates in many plans and projects for the general good, while for fifteen years he has served on the school board, the cause of education finding in him a stalwart champion. The major part of his attention has naturally been concentrated upon his business affairs and he has ever displayed marked ability in discriminating between the essential and the nonessential. His plans are ever carefully formulated, and while he has never been actuated by the spirit of vaulting ambition, he has never feared to venture where favoring opportunity has led the way. Moreover, his success has never been won at the sacrifice of others' interests, for he has always followed constructive methods, winning his prosperity through close application, careful management and indefatigable energy. 


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

EDWIN HEINZ.

 Edwin Heinz is filling the position of county clerk of Marshall county with office in Britton. He was born in Lowell, Wisconsin, October 25, 1865, and is a son of Jacob and Helen (Beatner) Heinz. The father was born in Germany in 1829, while the mother's birth occurred in Pennsylvania in 1840. Mr. Heinz, who crossed the Atlantic to the new world when a young man of twenty-one years, settled in Wisconsin and it was in Watertown, that state, that he was married. Although a wagon maker by trade he removed to a farm following his marriage and for a number of years continued the cultivation of that place, but the property was sold in 1877, at which time the family went to Cambria, Wisconsin. There Mr. Heinz purchased another farm, upon which he resided until 1904, when he sold out and built a home at Randolph, Wisconsin, where he lived retired until his death, which occurred November 20, 1911, when he was eighty-two years of age. His life was governed by his religious belief as a member of the Lutheran church and his political faith was that of the democratic party.  His widow survives. 

In a family of ten children Edwin Heinz was the fourth in order of birth. He pursued his education in the schools of Cambria, Wisconsin, until graduated from the high school with the class of 1884. He was early trained to farm work, becoming familiar with the duties and labors that fall to the lot of the agriculturist. In 1886 he came to South Dakota, settling on a farm on which he lived for four months, after which he became a clerk in a general store. Almost from the beginning he acted as manager of the business as the proprietor was in ill health and was forced to seek a change of climate. After the store passed to other ownership Mr. Heinz remained with the new proprietor for two years and later engaged in clerking in the New York Cash Store for two years. At the end of that time he and his brother, Emil Heinz, established a business on their own account at Langford, where they conducted a general store from May, 1892, until the wide-spread financial panic of 1893, when they sold out. Again Mr. Heinz engaged in clerking until 1906 when he turned his attention to carpenter work, which he followed until 1911. In 1910 he was elected clerk of the court of Marshall county and has twice been reelected, so that he is now serving for the third term. He has been accorded a large vote, which indicates his personal popularity and the confidence reposed in him by his fellow townsmen. He devotes almost his entire time to the office although he also owns a dray line in Britton.  

On the 24th of January, 1894, Mr. Heinz was married to Miss Mary Elma Woodruff, who was born in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, and they have become the parents of six children: Genevieve, Vivian, Albert, Emerson W., Newton Edwin, Dalza and Joyce. The eldest daughter is through school and the next two children are attending school. 

In his political views Mr. Heinz has always been an earnest republican and keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day. He and his family attend the Presbyterian church and he holds membership with the Odd Fellows and Workmen lodges, in which he has passed through all of the chairs, being representative to the grand lodge of Odd Fellows. Sterling traits of character have won him high esteem and he is regarded as one of the most efficient, capable and trustworthy officers that Marshall county has ever had.  


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

JAMES L. JARVIS. 

Business enterprise finds a worthy, alert and energetic representative in James L. Jarvis, a hardware dealer of Brookings, who is also chairman of the board of county commissioners of Brookings county. He recognizes the duties and obligations as well as the privileges of citizenship and thus can find time from a growing business to devote to public service. He was born in South Bend, Indiana, on the 7th of January, 1860, a son of Eli and Lovina (Wyland) Jarvis, the former a native of Virginia and the latter of the Hoosier state. The father has been a lifelong farmer.   After leaving the south he removed to Indiana and in 1860 went to Kansas but in 1862 took up his abode in Shelby county, Iowa, where he and his wife still make their home.  

James L. Jarvis was educated in the public schools of Harlan, Iowa, and in the high school there and remained upon the home farm until he reached his twenty-first year. He then went to Wauseca [sic], Minnesota, and a year later removed to Winona, Minnesota, where he worked at the carpenter's trade through the summer months, while in the winter he taught school. In 1881 he took up railroading and was employed by the Northwestern Railroad Company until 1883. In the fall of 1886 he came to South Dakota, settling at Langford, where he entered the service of the Dakota Lumber Company as manager of the yards, remaining in that position of trust and responsibility for five years. In 1891 he resigned his position and entered into partnership with J. C. Bassett of Aberdeen, South Dakota, opening a hardware store at Langford. Mr. Bassett, recognizing the ability of Mr. Jarvis, furnished him the requisite capital and for ten years the firm of Jarvis &, Company did a prosperous business at that point. In 1901 Mr. Jarvis disposed of his interests there and removed to Brookings, where he established his present business, which has since been developed into one of the leading hardware houses of Brookings. He carries a large line of both shelf and heavy hardware and his patronage has grown from the beginning until his business has now reached large and gratifying proportions. 

In the spring of 1883 Mr. Jarvis was united in marriage to Miss Vesta V. Sanford, of Winona, Minnesota, by whom he has one child, Ruth, now a high-school pupil of  Brookings.

Politically Mr. Jarvis is a republican, stanch in his advocacy of the principles of the party, and in 1908 he was elected to the board of county commissioners, where he made a creditable record, so that he was reelected to the board in 1912 and was made its chairman in 1913. Mr. Jarvis is well known in fraternal circles, holding membership in Brookings Lodge, No. 34, F. & A. M., while he and his wife are members of Brookings Chapter, No. 15, O. E. S., of which he is the present patron. He likewise belongs to Brookings Lodge, No. 40, I. O. O. F., and has membership with the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Modern Woodmen. He is likewise a member of the Brookings Commercial Club and is in full sympathy with its purposes to further the business interests of the city, extend its trade relations and uphold its municipal honor. He and his wife have been members of the First Presbyterian church for many years and Mr. Jarvis is serving as one of its elders. His life has been characterized by high and honorable principles and the record which he has made in every relation marks him as a man who never lowers his standards and one who pursues a course not because it is policy to do so, but because he believes in the value and efficacy of the path that he has marked out. 


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

R. R JONES, M. D. 

Dr. R. R. Jones, engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery at Britton, was born at Cambria, Wisconsin, September 19, 1862. His father, Hugh R. Jones, a native of Wales, was born in 1837 and about 1850 became a resident of Cambria, settling on a farm in that locality on which he lived for a number of years. Later he removed to Colorado but died in 1913, at Britton, while visiting his son. In Cambria he had married Laura Williams, who was born in Wales in 1840 and survives. His religious belief was that of the Presbyterian church, to which his widow also belongs. Fraternally he was connected with the Woodmen and in political faith was a republican. To him and his wife were born three children, namely: R. R., of this review; Emma, who is married and resides in Denver, Colorado; and Mary Jane, deceased. 

R. R. Jones supplemented his early education by study in Downer College at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in which he pursued his academic course. Later he entered Rush Medical  College of Chicago, from which he was graduated with the class of 1888, after which he returned to Cambria. Wisconsin, but in the fall of that year he removed to Britton, where he has since remained, being now the oldest practitioner in the county. From the beginning a liberal patronage has been accorded him and at all points in his professional career he has demonstrated his ability to cope with the intricate problems that continually confront the physician.   He is careful in diagnosing his cases and is continually  promoting his knowledge by further reading and study. His property holdings include farm lands and he is today in very comfortable circumstances as the result of his judicious investments and the success he has won in his profession. 

In 1890 Dr. Jones was united in marriage to Miss Florence Thayer, a daughter of Alonzo Thayer, who was born in New York and on coming to this state purchased a farm in  Marshall county, where the remainder of his life was spent. The Doctor and his wife have two children, Gracene and Marion, both high-school students.

 The religious faith of the family is that of the Presbyterian church and in social circles the members of the household occupy an enviable position. Fraternally Dr. Jones is a Royal Arch and Scottish Rite Mason and is also identified with the Mystic Shrine at Aberdeen. He is likewise connected with the Odd Fellows, the United Workmen and the Maccabees and is medical examiner for a number of fraternal orders. Politically an earnest republican, he was elected on that ticket to the office of mayor in 1909 and has since been the chief executive of the city, covering a period of six years, during which time his activities have largely furthered the public welfare because his administration has been both businesslike and progressive. For twenty years he has been president of the school board and is ever seeking to advance the best interests of education in his city. He has served on the county central committee, but while active in political circles and public affairs, his interest chiefly centers in his profession, in which he meets every duty with a  sense of conscientious obligation. He is now a member of both the district and state medical societies and thus keeps in touch with the progressive thought of the medical fraternity.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

 OTTO L. KAAS. 

Otto L. Kaas, actively engaged in the practice of law at Britton, his ability having gained for him a large and distinctively representative clientage, was born at Grand Meadow, in Mower county, Minnesota, February 14, 1877, a Bon of Johannes J. and Christine (Lundberg) Haas. The father was born near Christiania, Norway, in 1835, and in Stockholm, Sweden, in 1864, was married, the lady of his choice being a native of that city, born in 1844. Six years after their marriage, or in 1870, they came to the United States, settling at Grand Meadow, Minnesota, where Mr. Kaas was employed as a clerk and bookkeeper.

In his native country he had been an army officer. In 1883 he removed to Dakota territory and secured a homestead claim in Marshall county in 1884, after which he gave his attention to general agricultural pursuits for a number of years but retired from that life twenty- two years ago. In politics he was always a republican until 1892, when he was elected county auditor of Marshall county on the populist ticket. He belonged to the Lutheran church and in that faith passed away in 1904. To him and his wife, who is still living, were born sixteen children, of whom four survive, as follows: Otto L., of this review; Therese, who gave her hand in marriage to Ole J. Johnson, a farmer residing at Staples, Minnesota; Elmer who was the first white child born in Marshall county, this state, and is employed in bank in Stanley county; and Emily, who is employed as clerk in a store at Veblen, South Dakota. 

After acquiring a common-school education Otto L. Kaas became a student in the St. Paul College of Law. He was elected register of deeds of Marshall county in 1898, serving for four years, and while acting in that capacity he devoted the hours which are usually termed leisure to preparation for the bar, being admitted to practice in 1905, in which year he immediately entered upon the active work of the profession. In 1906 he was elected states attorney and filled that position for four years. In 1910 still higher political honors came to him in his election as representative to the state legislature, in which he served for one term. Upon his retirement from that office he resumed the practice of law, in which he has since continued actively, and his ability to handle intricate legal problems has brought to him a large and growing clientage. He also has extensive landed interests, having made judicious investments in property which now return to him a gratifying annual income.  

On the 13th of June, 1900, Mr. Kaas was united in marriage to Miss Mildred E. Miller, her father being James E. Miller, a retired agriculturist. To them has been born a son, Durward O., whose natal day was June 11, 1907. 

Mr. Kaas has always been a republican in his political views and has taken an active interest in political work throughout his entire life.   As a Mason he is connected with the blue lodge, the chapter, the consistory and with the Mystic Shrine at Aberdeen, and he is now serving for the second term as master of the lodge at Britton. He also belongs to the Elks Lodge No. 1046 at Aberdeen. His religious belief is that of the Lutheran church, while his wife holds membership in the Presbyterian church. They are highly esteemed as people of sterling worth, their many good traits of heart and mind establishing them in a high position in social circles where character and intelligence constitute the passports to good society. 


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

ANTON KARPEN.

 Anton Karpen is secretary and manager of the Farmers Lumber Company of Webster and his progressive spirit and devotion to the general good is further indicated in the fact that he is president of the Commercial Club of the town. Minnesota claims him as a native son, his birth having occurred in Nicollet county, that state, on the 9th of October, 1877, his parents being Valentine and Magdalena (Dorn) Karpen, both of whom were natives of Germany. The former was born April 30, 1846, and was a son of Peter Karpen, who passed away in Nicollet county at the age of eighty-six years. The mother of Anton Karpen was also born in 1846 and was a daughter of Mathias Dorn, who also passed away in Nicollet county when he had reached the venerable age of eighty-six. Both Valentine Karpen and Magdalena Dorn had come to the United States in childhood with their respective parents, who settled in Wisconsin. They were both educated in that state and there remained until after their marriage, removing to Minnesota in the early '70s. Mr. Karpen purchased a farm in Nicollet county and there engaged in general agricultural pursuits until his death. He was active in community affairs, was a stalwart supporter of the democratic party and held various township and school offices. His religious faith was that of the Catholic church. He was a self-made and self-educated man, became widely known throughout his county and was highly respected by all He died in 1908, while his wife passed away in 1879. They were the parents of six children: Mathias, a well-to-do citizen now living at New Ulm, Minnesota; Mary, the wife of William Miller, a retired farmer, now proprietor of a restaurant and pool hall at Webster, South Dakota;  Hubert, living on the old homestead in Minnesota; Anna Lucy, the wife of L.Giefer, a Minnesota farmer; Anton; and Peter, who is a general merchant and postmaster at  Medina, North Dakota. 

Anton Karpen was educated in the common schools of his county and the high school of Glencoe, Minnesota, and was graduated with the class of 1898. He followed teaching for three years after which he entered the lumber business, accepting a position with the  Lampert Lumber Company as manager of their Cleveland, Minnesota, yard. On the 8th of January, 1906, he arrived in South Dakota, where he assumed the management of the business of the Lam pert Lumber Company, in which connection he continued for three years, when he resigned and entered into partnership with Mr. Mohs in the conduct of a  furniture business. Some time later, however, he sold his interest in that connection and bought out the lumber company in October, 1911, now conducting his interests under the name of the Farmers Lumber Company, of which he is the secretary and treasurer. He also owns another yard at Eden, South Dakota, and is enjoying a liberal patronage, his business having now reached extensive and gratifying proportions. He is always reliable in his dealings and progressive In his methods and his unfailing enterprise has brought him growing success.  

In 1898 Mr. Karpen was united in marriage to Miss Mary A. Albers, who was born at Shakopee, Minnesota, and was educated in the schools of Glencoe, that state, to which place her parents removed when she was but a year old. Mr. and Mrs. Karpen have a family of five children: Esther, attending the high school; Genevieve Anna, Antonio and Helen Marie, all in school; and Alice.

 Mr. and Mrs. Karpen are members of the Catholic church and he holds membership in the Knights of Columbus and the Catholic Order of Foresters. He belongs also to the German Society of Minnesota. In politics he is a democrat and when a candidate for the office of county clerk in Nicollet county, Minnesota, he received every vote in his township save two but was defeated by a majority of forty-eight although the republicans usually polled a majority of about eight hundred. The vote which he received was certainly very flattering and indicated his personal popularity and the confidence reposed in him. Mr. Karpen is greatly interested in the good roads movement and is the executive member for the state of the Yellowstone Trail, giving generously of his time and money to the project of building this road, which is a connecting highway between the Falls of St. Anthony and the Falls of the Yellowstone and which is now being extended from coast to coast. His interest in the welfare of his home city is indicated in the fact that he is president of the Commercial Club. He is a capable business man and above all a public-spirited citizen and is making his work and his influence count for good. 


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

 JOHN F. KELLY.

 John F. Kelly is cashier of the Marshall County Bank and one of the large landowners of Britton. Quick discernment and the faculty of separating the important features of any subject from its incidental or accidental circumstances have been strong points in his business career. Longfellow has said: "The talent of success is nothing more than doing what you can do well, without a thought of fame." Such has been the career of Mr. Kelly, now one of the most prosperous and leading residents of Marshall county. He was born in
Ireland, September 29, 1856, a son of Edward and Mary (Tully) Kelly, both of whom were natives of the "Green Isle of Erin," the former born in 1833 and the latter in 1831. They were married in 1856 and began their domestic life in Ireland, but in 1867 came to the United States, settling at Lansing, Iowa. The father was a woodworker and followed his trade at Lansing for a number of years, but is now living retired upon a farm at Elkader, Iowa. He has met with a fair measure of success, winning prosperity entirely through his own efforts. His political indorsement is given to the republican party, while in religious faith he and his wife are Catholics. Their family numbered seven children, of whom five are living; John F.; Edward, who is living retired in Minneapolis, Minnesota; Mary, a teacher in the schools of Buffalo, New York; Maggie, the widow of James Fitzgerald, of Jamestown, North Dakota; and William J., a farmer of Iowa.  

John F. Kelly spent the first eleven years of his life in his native country and then accompanied his parents on their emigration to the new world. He continued his education in the public and high schools of Iowa until 1875. He afterward learned the woodworking trade under the direction of his father, with whom he remained for some time, but later turned his attention to the grain business in North Dakota and in 1888 arrived in Britton, South Dakota. For a time he was connected with the grain trade at Kidder and later began dealing in grain at Britton, winning substantial success in that business.    He was also connected with mercantile interests at Kidder and for sixteen years filled the position of postmaster there. As his financial resources have increased he has made judicious investments in land from time to time and is now the owner of one thousand acres in South Dakota and also owns some valuable property at Ogden, Utah, including fifty-five acres within the city limits. After returning to Britton he assisted in organizing the Marshall County Bank, of which he became cashier in 1908. He has since served in that capacity, taking a helpful part in the management and successful conduct of the institution, which is capitalized for twenty-five thousand dollars, has a surplus and undivided profits of eleven thousand dollars and average deposits of one hundred and fifteen thousand dollars.  

In July, 1890, Mr. Kelly married Miss Ellen O'Donell, who was born in McGregor, Iowa, and after completing a high-school course there engaged in teaching for a number of  years. They became the parents of ten children, of whom six are living: John, who is engaged in the real-estate business in Virginia; Genevieve, the wife of H. H. James, a banker living in Ogden, Utah; Walter, assistant cashier of the Marshall County Bank of Britton; Ambrose, who is attending Columbus College at Chamberlain, South Dakota; and Louis and Francis, both in school. 

The parents belong to the Catholic church and Mr. Kelly is also identified with the Knights of Columbus. His political allegiance is given the democratic party. The story of his life is the story of honesty, industry and thrift. His rules of business have been simple, for he early realized that the simple processes are those which win results—not the intricate, involved plans. In his entire career there has been nothing sinister and nothing to conceal and, being a man of well balanced capacities and powers, he is now one of the  foremost representatives of business life in Marshall county. 


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

HON. DAVID L. PRINTUP. 

Hon. David L. Printup is the present representative of his district in the state senate and is doing effective work for the benefit of the commonwealth. In Britton, where he makes his home, he is engaged in the real-estate, insurance and abstract business and he has so directed his efforts as to win an enviable and creditable position in business circles. He belongs to that class of men who while promoting individual success also contribute to the general prosperity and, moreover, is a self-made man, having started out in life with a capital of only about two thousand dollars. 

Mr. Printup was born in Fultonville, New York, December 29, 1857, a son of William H. and Martha (Putnam) Printup, who were natives of Fultonville, New York, the former born in 1836 and the latter in 1841.   The Printup family were French Huguenots and the American branch was founded at an early period in the development of this country. Representatives of the name were pioneer residents of New York and it was there that William Printup, grandfather of our subject, was born and lived.   The Putnam family were among the early residents of New England.   William H. Printup and Martha Putnam were reared in the Empire state and following their marriage he engaged in civil engineering and surveying, being employed by the state government, by the New York Central Railroad and by the Federal government, laying out the line between Canada and New York.   At the time of the Civil war Mr. Printup became a captain of the One Hundred and Fifty-third New York Volunteer Infantry and was promoted to the rank of lieutenant colonel.   He served for a year and a half, when illness compelled his return home.   His political indorsement was given to the republican party, of which he was an earnest advocate.   He died in 1873, while his wife passed away in 1870, in the faith of the Methodist Episcopal church. Their family numbered four children, of whom three are living, as follows:    David L., of this review; Emma, the wife of John B. Card, who is engaged in the hardware business in Silver City, New Mexico; and Charles E., assistant cashier of the First National Bank of Britton.  

David L. Printup pursued his education in the public schools of Fultonville, also in a collegiate institute at Fort Edwards, New York, and afterward at Schoharie, New York. In 1877 he entered the United States Naval Academy, from which he was graduated in 1881, and for two years he remained in the service, going to Europe, Africa and Asia. In 1883 he made his way to Lisbon, Dakota territory, teaching school one year, and in 1885 removed to Britton.   He purchased a well outfit first and engaged in drilling wells in the territory.   After locating in Britton he was appointed to the position of deputy register of deeds and did other work at the courthouse for four years.  He was then elected register of deeds and held that position for four years, at the end of which time he became cashier of the state bank of J. Vought & Company.  Still later he traveled for the Perkins Brothers Company of Sioux City for two years and since 1898 he has been engaged in the real-estate, insurance and abstract business.   He is now heavily interested in farming lands  and owns personally an entire section.  He started in life with little capital but has won success through persistent purpose and straightforward dealing. 

In political circles Mr. Printup has long been an active factor and for sixteen years was chairman of the republican central committee of Marshall county. For one term he was clerk of the court and in 1914 was elected to represent his district in the state senate, so that he is now a member of the upper house of the general assembly. He gives careful consideration to all the questions which come up for settlement and is conscientious in the discharge of his duties, ever regarding a public office as a public trust. 

In 1890 Mr. Printup was joined in wedlock to Miss Marion H. Gamsby, a native of Dodge City, Minnesota. They have a daughter, Dorothy, who was graduated with honors from Oberlin College, won a scholarship at Radcliffe College and is a member of Phi  Beta Kappa. Mrs. Printup and her daughter are members of the Presbyterian church and the family occupies a prominent social position. Mr. Printup belongs to the Elks Lodge No. 1046 at Aberdeen and is also connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Sons of Veterans, in which he has filled the office of colonel. He likewise belongs to the United Commercial Travelers. He was the organizer of the Odd Fellows lodge at Britton, in which he has passed through all of the chairs, and has also filled all of the offices in the encampment. He has many qualities which render him personally popular and his circle of friends is therefore almost coextensive with the circle of his acquaintance. His political activity has made him widely known in the state and he merits and receives the esteem and goodwill of many with whom he has been brought in contact. 


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

CARL MOHN. 

Realizing fully the responsibilities that devolve upon him as a public official and always regarding a public office as a public trust, Carl Mohn has made an excellent record as auditor of Marshall county. He dates his residence in Britton from 1884, arriving here when about thirty-two years of age. His birth occurred in Norway on the 11th of January, 1852, his parents being Carl and Hannah (Risberg) Mohn, who were also natives of Norway, the former born in 1832 and the latter June 22, 1834. They had two children, the younger being Christian, who is a member of the police force in Norway. The father was a fisherman and was a son of Frederick Mohn, who was a miner. Carl Mohn, Sr., held membership in the Lutheran church and in that faith passed away in 1881. His widow,  who was a daughter of Ole Risberg, is now living at the advanced age of eighty-one years.  

Carl Mohn, whose name introduces this review, spent his boyhood and youth in Norway, where he pursued his education. In 1884 he made his way to Britton, South Dakota, and thereafter worked as a farm hand for a time but later engaged in cultivating rented land for four years. He then took up a quarter section but did not prove up on it. Turning his attention to railroad work, he became a section hand, afterward section foreman and still later assistant roadmaster and chief clerk in the superintendent's office. He was filling the last named position when he was elected county auditor on the republican ticket on the 5th of November, 1912. He made such an acceptable record in office that he was  selected in 1914 and is the present incumbent in the position. 

Mr. Mohn was married in Norway in 1875 to Miss Karen Opoin and they became the parents of nine children: Ella, deceased; Carl J., who is engaged in the real-estate business at Kidder; Lena, the wife of Heier Hagen, living on a farm; John and Hannah, who have passed away; Gertrude, who is acting as deputy county auditor; Ole, a railway conductor living at Andover; Inga, deceased; and Martin, a telegraph operator at Aberdeen.  

The family hold membership in the Lutheran church and Mr. Mohn is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the American Yeomen. He has many of the sterling characteristics of the Norwegian race—the perseverance, the determination and the reliability—and he has never had occasion to regret his decision to come to the new   world, for in the utilization of the opportunities here offered he has worked his way upward, gaining a good living and making for his family a comfortable home, at the same time winning the regard and friendship of many with whom he has been brought into contact. 


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

MELVIN J. STAVEN.

 Melvin J. Staven, member of the Britton bar, now filling the office of states attorney, was born in Vernon county, Wisconsin, May 11, 1875, a son of O. E. and Ser Janna (Peterson) Staven, who are natives of Norway, born in 1830 and 1834 respectively. They were married in that country and came to the United States in 1857, making their way to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and thence driving with ox teams over the state to La Crosse. In that district the father homesteaded and there developed a farm upon which he lived until 1877, when he went to Brookings county, South Dakota, where he also secured a homestead claim which he developed into a valuable and productive farm, residing there until 1900. He has now retired from active business life and makes his home in Brookings. At the time of the Civil war he gave evidence of his patriotic loyalty to his adopted country by enlisting in 1804 and serving until the close of hostilities. He went with Sherman on the celebrated march to the sea.   His political allegiance has always been given to the republican party, which was the defense of the Union during the dark days of the Civil war. His religious faith is that of the Norwegian Lutheran church. Both he and his wife still survive at the ages, respectively, of eighty-five and eighty-one years. 

Melvin J. Staven was the ninth in order of birth in a family of ten children, nine of whom are yet living. After attending the common schools he attended the college in Brookings, South Dakota, and later entered upon the study of law at Vermillion, where he won his LL. B. degree upon graduation from the State University with the class of 1907. Immediately afterward he located for practice in Britton, where he has since remained. For a year he was a partner of Otto L. Kaas, who was then states attorney, and in 1909 he was made assistant states attorney. In 1914 he was elected to the position of states attorney on the republican ticket and is making a creditable record in that office. He is also president of the city council and for a number of years was a member of the board of aldermen. He keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day and his position upon political questions is the result of careful thought and study. 

In 1902 Mr. Staven was united in marriage to Miss Ovedia D. Keland, her father being John Keland, a retired agriculturist of this state. To them have been born three children, as follows: Alvin Jerome, whose birth occurred in 1903; Leonora Irene, born in 1909; and Marcella Dorothea, who was born in February, 1914. Mr. and Mrs. Staven hold membership in the Lutheran church and he is also identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in which he has passed through all the chairs. His interests are those of the broad-minded, progressive citizen who is never so engrossed in individual interests that he cannot find time to discharge his public duties and obligations. At the same time Mr. Staven is most active in his profession and his allegiance to his clients' interests has become proverbial.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

 HENRY WIDMANN.

 Henry Widmann, proprietor of a hardware store at Britton, was born in Lowell, Dodge county, Wisconsin, November 23, 1865, a son of John Conrad and Margaret (Wanner) Widmann, who were natives of Wittenburg, Germany, and in 1841 came to the United States, settling in Dane county Wisconsin. The father was a butcher by trade and followed that business at Beaver Dam and at Lowell. He afterward took up his abode in Madison, Wisconsin. He was not in straitened financial circumstances when he came to the new world but brought with him a fair capital and accumulated a goodly estate here. In politics he was a democrat and both he and his wife were members of the Lutheran church. They had a family of eleven children but only two are now living, the elder being John G. Widmann, who is living at Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin.  

The younger, Henry Widmann, pursued his education at Madison, Wisconsin, where he completed the work of the eighth grade in the public schools. Later he was connected with the drug business at Kendall, Wisconsin, where he built up a good trade. Subsequently he engaged in railroading for six months as a brakeman and in 1886 he arrived in Langford, South Dakota, where he followed carpentering and also did tin work, assisting materially in the early building of the town. He learned the trades of a tinner and sheet metal worker in Milwaukee and is a splendid mechanic. In 1889 he arrived in Britton, where he was employed in the hardware store of S. S. Lawrence for six years. He then bought out the hardware business of S. A. Bell and has since conducted his store, carrying a large and well selected line of both shelf and heavy hardware. His reasonable prices, straightforward dealing and earnest desire to please his customers are the qualities which have brought to him substantial and growing success. This enables him to take life somewhat easy and he has traveled quite extensively over the United States. He owns a farm near Jacksonville, Florida, but devotes the greater part of his attention to mercantile pursuits. 

On the 18th of June, 1906, Mr. Widmann was united in marriage to Miss Johanna Helseth, a native of Norway, and a daughter of Jacob Helseth, who was a miner of Norway and passed away in that country. Our subject and his wife have one child, Bernice Henrietta, who is now eight years of age.  

Mrs. Widmann and her daughter are members of the Lutheran church, and Mr. Widmann belongs to the Elks lodge at Aberdeen. His political indorsement is given to the republican party, but while well informed on the questions and issues of the day, he has never been an office seeker. In 1907 he erected a beautiful residence at Britton, having one of the best homes in the town, and its warm-hearted hospitality is greatly appreciated by the many friends of Mr. and Mrs. Widmann, who entertain for them warm regard and who accord them a prominent position in local social circles. 


 S. B. Culbertson, P. M.—born in Danville, Livingston county, N. Y., in 1830; came west in 1856 to Decorah, Ia.; moved from there to Sioux Falls in 1872, and in 1874 came to Eden and established business; has been postmaster for six years. ["History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth", Sioux City, Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881]


L. T. Farley—born in Genesee county, N. Y., in 1836; came from Wisconsin here in 1868; he married Cora A. Warner; they have seven children, Roselle, Lillian, Corlie, Mabel, Florence, Luman and Wilford. ["History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth", Sioux City, Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881]


G. W. Mather—born in Bremer county, la., in 1858; came to this county in 1870; he married Ida Willmarth.  ["History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth", Sioux City, Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881]


S. P. Mackey—born in Dayton, Ohio, in 1852; been in this Territory since 1877, and came to Eden in 1881; be married Carle Batchel, of Lincoln county, D. T.; she died 30th of July, 1881.  ["History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth", Sioux City, Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881]


Myron Odell—born in Troy, N. Y., in 1854; came here from Fondulac, Wis., June 19, 1874; he married Rosa C. Farley, March 24, 1880; they have one child, Roy.  ["History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth", Sioux City, Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881]


Frank Odell—born in Fondulac, Wis., in 1857; came here in 1874. ["History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth", Sioux City, Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881]


James Parkin—P. M., Eden; farmer; born in England in 1839; came to America in November, 1867; he married Amanda Allen, who was a native of Chautauqua county, N. Y., in 1860; they have three children, Ollies, Stella and Roy. ["History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth", Sioux City, Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881]


L. Pritzkan—born in Russia June 26, 1855; came to America December 1, 1876; came to D. T. April, 1874; he married Elizabeth Grad. ["History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth", Sioux City, Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881]


A. Snyder—born in Niagara county, N. Y., June, 1837; came to this place November, 1878; he married Hattie Allen, who was born in Allegheny county, N. Y.; they were married at Shell Rock, Ia., in February, 1871.["History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth", Sioux City, Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881]



BACK
©Genealogy Trails