Moody County BIOGRAPHIES

 

Bates, H. A.

Bidwell, D.

Bidwell, George

Blilie, J. A.

Boynton, E. G.

Bray, James

Brown, Alfred

Brown, R. L.

Bubb, A. D.

Cavalier, Louise

Caywood, W. W.

Clark, Philip

Clark, W. A.

Dahl, J. C.

 

DeGroff, George M.

Dickson, F. C.

Dunn, William

Elliott, J. A.

Few, George H.

Freeman, Thomas

Frink, A. S.

Gessell, W. E.

Hall, C. F.

Hamlin, Norman O.

Haugan, H. A.

Haxton, T. J.

Heath, S. A.

Helmey, James A.

Higgs, A.

Hobart, John

Huntington, E.

Hyde, W. R.

Jacobshagen, Henry J.

Jones, William

Kara, Enos

Kelly, John Edward

Kluge, John P.

Lanning, George R.

 

Lindsay, W. A.

Martin, C. C.

McDonnall, Michael

McMillan, J. H.

Millard, Frank

Moulton, A. S.

Neperud, S. N.

Neste, Peter

Olson, Hans

Peterson, Nels H.

Pettigrew, F. W.

Pettigrew, George A.

Pettigrew, M. D. L.

 

Ramsdell, Frank M.

Rice, George

Schneider, J. E.

Seaman, J. A.

Shields, T. J.

Simenson, R. J.

Taylor, S. S.

Thayer, C. E.

Vandergrift, T. H.

White, D. S.

Wyckoff, Benjamin

 

 

 

from Barb Z.
History of South Dakota by Doane Robinson 1901

NELS H. PETERSON is a native of Denmark, where he was born in 1854. He received his early education in his native land, where he was reared to the age of eighteen years, when he started forth to try his fortune in America, whither he came in the year 1872. He made his way westward to the city of Chicago and was for a time employed in railroad work and then turned his attention to farm work, in which he was engaged near Woodstock, Illinois, for two and one half years, having in the meanwhile secured a small farm of his own in that section. At the expiration of the period noted he disposed of his interests there and came as a pioneer to what is now Moody county, South Dakota. Here he took up a homestead claim of one hundred and sixty acres, and as the years have passed prosperity has attended his efforts and he has added to the area of his landed estate until he is now the owner of six hundred and forty acres of as fertile and valuable land as can be found in the state.

 


Who’s Who in South Dakota, Vol. 2
By O. W. Coursey
Educator School Supply Co., Publisher, 1916
Transcribed and Contributed by Jim Dezotell

GEORGE A. PETTIGREW

THE STATE'S LEADING MASON

Free Masonry stands for advancement. Free Masons are progressives. Every community that has a strong masonic order shows a healthy growth. The most substantial itizens in most communities are masons. They are the town's builders, the town's leaders and the town's bulwark.

In fact the history of South Dakota is in a large measure the history of the development of Free Masonry within the state. The first Masonic charter granted to a lodge in Dakota Territory was dated June 3, 1863. It was given to St. John's No. 166, of the jurisdiction of Iowa, for a lodge at Yankton. The second lodge was Incense No. 257, organized at Vermillion. From this time on, Free Masonry spread over the whole territory until today there are organizations of the order in every town of any considerable size throughout the state. Several magnificent temples have been built. The auxiliary organization of the Order of Eastern Star has taken firm root and grown quite as rapidly as the parent lodge itself. To subtract from Dakota what the Free and Accepted Masons have done to build it up, would be to turn backward the wheels of civic progress for over half a century.

Chief among this class of secret society people and public benefactors, is Dr. George A Pettigrew, of Sioux Falls, (One should not confuse him with R. F. Pettigrew, our ex-United States senator.) We do not have in the state another man with such numerous friends. What gained them ? Personality. If some one will explain what personality is, perhaps some of the rest of us might, to a certain extent, cultivate it. Dr. Pettigrew has more than personality. He has personality, plus a rich, ripe, ideal manhood.

Dr. Pettigrew is a typical easterner. He was born in Ludlow, Vermont, on April 6, 1858. For a boyhood playmate he had Dr. F. A. Spafford, of Flandreau. His early education was acquired in the public schools and at Black River Academy. Later he attended the New London Literary and Scientific Institution — now known as Colby Institute — at New London, New Hampshire. Then he entered the medical department of Dartmouth college and was graduated as an M. D. with the class of 1882. His parents were comparatively poor. His scholastic preparation required an heroic struggle. While at Dartmouth, he served as a waiter for three summers at a hotel in the White mountains; first as an individual waiter and then as head writer with 28 others under him.

COMES WEST

Upon the completion of his medical course, he decided that the best opportunities down east had been seized by older men, and that if he were to mount up rapidly in his chosen profession or in a monied career, it would be better for him to strike westward. Accordingly he came to Flandreau, South Dakota, and at once stuck out his local sign and began work. This was on February 2, 1883. The following June he was joined by his old boyhood chum, Dr. Spafford, and they formed a partnership for the practice of medicine and surgery. Dr. Spafford is at the "old stand" yet.

Dr. Pettigrew practiced for ten years at Flandreau. The country was new. Winters were severe. Travel was difficult. He lived thirty years instead of ten, during this period, if they could be measured by hardships and sacrifices. During one exceptionally hard blizzard, he lay out all night. His rugged manhood saved him.

While at Flandreau he also held the position of government surgeon to the Indians. Upon his retirement he turned this work over to Dr. Spafford. In addition to this, he was surgeon for the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway company for eight years; surgeon of the second regiment of territorial guards 1885-93; surgeon-general of South Dakota for two terms under Governor Sheldon; member of the board of U. S. pension examiners, 1884-1901, with the exception of one year; and he was surgeon of the first and the second regiments of South Dakota state guards (after their organization into a state guard), until the Spanish-American war. It will be recalled that Andrew E. Lee was our war governor. He was a rank democrat. Pettigrew was a radical republican. "Nuff said."

Dr. Pettigrew organized the Flandreau State bank in 1891, and he was elected its first president. This position he held until he resigned in September, 1903, to move to Sioux Falls. Away back in 1889, he had been elected grand secretary of the Grand Chapter (Masonic order). In 1893, he was elected grand secretary of the grand lodge; and in 1903 he was elected grand secretary of all the Masonic bodies in the state.

This made it advisable for him to move to Sioux Falls. At first he had his offices in the old Peck building. But he was very active in building the beautiful Masonic Temple in Sioux Falls, which was dedicated in June, 1906. In it he has accumulated the finest and costliest collection of ancient relics to be found in the state; also a library of ancient and modern literature without a parallel anywhere. He has it admirably classified into Theology (including an original copy of the famous "breeches" Bible), Sociology, Philosophy, Masonry and dozens of other sections. Every Mason has free access to this valuable collection of famous works.

After going to Sioux Falls, Dr. Pettigrew showed himself to be the same active business man and public spirited citizen that he was at Flandreau. In a short time he was made president of the Sioux Falls Union Savings association, which position he held until 1914 when he resigned. During 1909-11, he served on the board of education in Sioux Falls as president. In this position he made an enviable record. While he was on the board, by applying to school affairs the same business instinct that a man gives to other business affairs (a thing, by the way, that you can seldom get men to do), he helped to raise the teachers' salaries in Sioux Falls 40 per cent without increasing the levy, and the board, in addition to this splendid showing, paid off their old school debt at the rate of $1,500 per month. It is impossible to estimate the value to any community of a man of his temperament and sagacity. South Dakota could use several of them at other points to good advantage just now. In 1914, he was re-elected president for another five-year term.

MARRIAGE

Our subject had prospered so well out west, in four years, that he decided to take unto himself a helpmeet; so he went back to Troy, New York, in the fall of 1887, and on October 19th was united in marriage to Miss Eudora Zulette Stearns. She was born at Felchville, Vermont, July 28, 1858. By a comparison of dates it will at once be seen that he is but three months and twenty-one days her senior. To assume that they had never met in their "younger days" would be to impoverish one's own imagination. Their marital blessing is an only daughter, Miss Addie, born September 17, 1890.

MASONIC RECORD

Reverting again to Dr. Pettigrew's Masonic record (it is as a Mason that he is best known), we deem it advisable to give it in full, not only as a matter of information to all readers of the Argus-Leader, but as an inspiration to others. It is doubtful if there are a half dozen other men in the United States with a record equal to his.

King Solomon Lodge No. 14, New Hampshire. Entered apprentice July 2,1879; Fellow craft June 14, 1880; Master Mason, June 14, 1880; adimitted November 7, 1883.

Flandreau lodge No. 11, South Dakota. Admitted, January 5, 1884; secretary, 1884-1885; senior warden, 1886-1887; worshipful master, 1888-89; dimitted October 4, 1905.

Unity lodge No. 130, South Dakota, admitted November 3, 1905.

Minnehaha lodge No. 5, honorary member, April 8, 1908.

Grand lodge of South Dakota, A. F. and A. M., grand pursuivant, 1889 ; grand secretary, June 13, 1894, present time.

Chapter — Orient chapter No. 19, South Dakota — Mark master Mason, May 18, 1885; past master, May 21, 1885; most excellent master, May 22, 1885; Royal Arch Mason, May 27, 1885; secretary, 1886-87; principal sojourner, 1887-92; high priest, 1893; dimitted August 23, 1905.

Sioux Falls chapter No. 2, South Dakota — Admitted September 6, 1905.

Order of High Priesthood, South Dakota — Initiated June 11, 1896, at Huron.

Grand chapter of South Dakota, R. A. M. — Grand secretary,organization 1890 to June 1906; grand high priest, June, 1906-07; grand secretary, June, 1907,present time.

Grand representative grand chapter, Illinois since 1890.

Royal and Select Masters — Koda council, Flandreau, S. D. ; royal master, December 18, 1894; select master, December 18, 1894; super excellent master, December 18, 1894; dimitted December 2, 1896.

Alpha council No. 1, Sioux Falls — Admitted November 7, 1903; thrice illustrious master, 1896-97; deputy master, 1903-15.

Cyrene Commandery No. 2, K. T. — Red Cross February 28, 1888; Knights Templar February 28, 1888 ; Knights of Malta — February 28, 1888; admitted November 2, 1892.
a Ivanhoe Commandery No. 13, Flandreau, S. D. — Charter member, June 30, 1893; captain general 1893-95; generalissimo, 1896; eminent commander, 1897; dimitted November 27, 1905.

Cyrene Commandery No. 2, Sioux Falls — Admitted December 5, 1905.

Grand Commandery K. T., South Dakota — Grand standard bearer 1892-3,grand recorder June, 1895-1906 ; grand commander, June 1907-08; grand recorder, 1908-present time.

Honorary member Grand Commandery of Iowa, August 9, 1907.

A. A. A. Scottish Rite, Alpha lodge of Perfection No. 1. Yankton, S. D., February 14, 1894; Mackey chapter, Yankton, February 15, 1894 ; Robert de Bruce council No. 2, February 16, 1894; Oriental Consistory No. 2, Yankton, February 17, 1894; master of ceremonies, 1897; chancellor, 1899-1900; preceptor, 1901.

Khurum lodge of Perfection, charter member; Albert Pike chapter, Sioux Falls, charter member; Coeur de Leon council, Sioux Falls, charter member; Occidental Consistory No. 2, Sioux Falls, charter member.

K. C. C. H. at Washington October 19, 1897.

Honorary thirty-third degree January 16, 1900.

Deputy inspector general for Sioux Falls, November 28, 1902.

Royal Order of Scotland October 19, 1903.

A. A. O. N. M. S.— El Riad temple, Sioux Falls, June 8, 1899; held all intermediate offices, and elected potentate December 12, 1908; re-elected potentate December 15, 1909 ; grand representative New Orleans 1910; grand representative, Rochester, July 11, 1911.

Masonic Veteran's Association South Dakota, June 1, 1901, elected
secretary June 14, 1911.

Order Eastern Star, Beulah chapter No. 2, Flandreau, charter member February, 1885; worthy patron 1885-6.

Grand chapter O. E. S., of South Dakota — The second grand patron,May, 1890; third grand patron, 1891; fourth grand patron, 1892.

Jasper chapter O. E. S. No. 4, Sioux Falls, admitted 1905.

General grand chapter O. E. S. -chairman board trustees 1907-10; right worthy associate grand patron, November, 1910.

Most worthy Grand Patron 1913 to present time.

St. George's Conclave No. 6, Red Cross of Constantine at St. Paul, Minn., April 25, 1911.
 



History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher
1904
Contributed by Jim Dezotell

LOUISE CAVALIER is a native of the city of Janesville, Wisconsin, and was reared and educated in Wisconsin, and in 1881 became identified with educational work among the Indians, having first been assigned to the Cheyenne agency, in Dewey county, this state, where she labored faithfully and acceptably for a long period. She accomplished a most noble work in the agency, where her services were such as to entitle them to perpetual recognition and commendation. She continued to be the principal teacher at the Cheyenne agency until 1895, when she was sent to an agency in Nebraska, where she was superintendent of the schools for the ensuing three years, at the expiration of which she was assigned by the department of the interior to her present position as principal of the Riggs Institute, the admirable Indian school at Flandreau, Moody county. South Dakota. She finds pleasure in her work, is kind and considerate and gains the affection of her pupils, and these are the elements which have contributed to the marked success which has been hers.
 

 

Geo. Bidwell—deputy postmaster; born in Indiana, in 1855; moved to Iowa in 1876; the following year he came to Dakota and settled in Moody county.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

D. Bidwell—merchant; born in Wayne county, Ohio, in 1822; moved to Mich, in 1836; thence to Indiana and thence to Iowa; came to Moody county in 1878; married to Abbie Roberts, and has two children, a son and daughter.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

E. G. Boynton—agent for John Paul, lumber; born in Cortlandt county, N. Y.in 1847; moved to Palmyra, Wis., in 1865; thence to Chicago, Ills., where he remained ten years in the lumber business, and was there during the Chicago fire; came to Dakota in Feb., 1879; married to Abbie E. Graves, of Cortlandt county, N. Y.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

Alfred Brown—farmer; born in Huron county, Ohio, in 1820; located in Illinois, thence to Green Lake, Wis.; thence to Dodds county, Minn., and came to Moody county in 1878; married Mary Gilbert, of Conn., and has four children, A. L., F. D., Mary and A. G. Brown.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

Geo. M. DeGroff—attorney. Was born in Green Lake county, Wisconsin, in 1850. Came to Dakota in June, 1881, and settled in Egan; he is a graduate of the law department of Kansas State University.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

W. E. Gessell—restauranteur; born in Indiana in 1858; came to Egan, November, 1880.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

John Hobart—hardware; born in N. H., in 1832; moved to Fillmore county, Minn., in 1861; thence to Moody county, Dakota, in 1878; married Rebecca Miller, of Canada, and has one daughter Nellie L..

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

Enos Kara—meat market; born in Lansing, N. YM in 1847. Located in Kansas in 1806; thence to Minnesota; thence in spring, of 1880 to Egan. Married to Matella D. Thrall, of N. Y., and has one daughter.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

Geo. R Lanning—editor Express; born at Belvidere, N. J., Aug. 14th, 1844; moved to Iowa City, Iowa, in 1857; thence to Janesville, Clear Lake and Mason City; served two years and eight months during the war; returned to Mason City in 1870; thence to Garner, Iowa; thence back to Mason City; from the latter place to Lime Springs, Iowa, and from there to Roscoe, Moody county, D. T., in 1878, where he started the Eagan Express. Has been engaged in the newspaper business twelve years. Married to Mary Knadler, at Mason City, Iowa, and has one son and three daughters.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

J. E. Schneider—physician and surgeon; born in France in 1846; his first location was in Milwaukee; thence to Utica, Minn., where he lived fifteen years. Came to Moody county in 1877. Married to Olive E. Nash, of Ohio, and has three sons and one daughter.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

S. S. Taylor—proprietor Taylor House; born in Bedford county, Pa. Came west in 1855 and settled in Blackhawk county, Iowa; thence to Jessup, Iowa, where he was for 22 years in the hotel business. Came to Egan, Nov. 25, 1880. Married to Anna Margaret Clark, of Pennsylvania, and has eight children, five sons and three daughters.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

T. H. Vandergrift—agent for Corgil Bros., grain dealers. Born in Philadelphia, Pa., in 1842. Moved to Austin, Minn., in 1857; came to Sioux Falls in 1874; thence to Egan in the spring of 1881. Married to Agnes Dodge, of Wisconsin, and has two daughters.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

H. A. Bates—barber and hairdresser; born in Otsego county, N. Y., in 1856; moved to Grant county, Wisconsin, in 1864; thence to Dakota, in September, 1880.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

J. A. Blilie—Lutheran clergy; born in Norway, in 1852, came to America in 1867 and located in Winneshiek county, Iowa. He attended the Norwegian Luth. College at Decorah and a St. Louis Theological Seminary; in September, 1880, he came to this town,. He was married to Lena Faegre.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

James Bray—druggist; born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1855, and is a graduate of the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy; engaged in the drug business in Flandreau in 1878.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

R. L. Brown—hardware; born in Lafayette county, Wisconsin, in 1851; came to Flandreau, in 1878, and immediately engaged in his present business.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

A. D. Bubb—attorney; born in Pennsylvania, in 1853; came to Flandreau in December, 1880.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

W. W. Caywood—carpenter; born in Kentucky, in 1824, and located at Danville, Indiana, in 1845; came west to Delaware county, to Iowa, in 1848; came to Dakota, in March, 1880. Married to Sarah McVey, a native of Missouri; have six children, four sons and two daughters,

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

W. A. Clark—harness maker; born in New Hampshire, in 1840; came to Wisconsin in 1868; in 1878 he came to Flandreau; he married Sarah Coburn, a native of the same state.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

Philip Clark—sheriff of Moody county; born in Scotland, in 1845; when he was twelve years old his parents emigrated to America and settled in Brooklyn N. Y.; in 1865 he came west, and has lived in different places, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and St. Charles, Minn.; in 1877 he came to this county; in the fall of 1880 he was elected to office of sheriff; he married Sophrona Harding, a native of Indiana.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

J. C. Dahl—blacksmith and wagon maker; born in Denmark, in 1852; came to America in 1877, and settled in Chicago; moved to Olmstead county, Minn., in 1878; the following year lie moved to Flandreau. Married to Mary Holden, of Norway; have one son.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

F. C. Dickson—merchant; born in Pennsylvania, in 1855; came west in 1866, and settled in Independence, Iowa; he came here in 1878.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

William Dunn—blacksmith; born in Ottawa, Canada, in 1846; moved to Eau Claire, Wis., in 1867; came to Flandreau in 1878. Married to Mary A. Barlow; have two sons.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

J. A. Elliott—Employe in Coleman's lumber yard; born in Winona county, Minn., in 1856; came to Flandreau in 1878, and has been in Mr. Coleman's employ for the past year and a half.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

George H. Few—hardware; born in Orleans county, N. Y., in 1855; moved to Independence, Iowa, in 1867, where he resided until 1878, when he tame to Flandreau. Married to Ella Marinus, of Independence, Iowa.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

A. S. Frink—restauranteur; born in Chautauqua county, N. Y., in 1837; located in Winona county, Minn., in 1854; thence to Dell Rapids in 1877; came to Flandreau in September, 1881. Married Jane Wood, of Indiana; have two children.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

Thomas Freeman—merchant tailor; born in England, in 1829, and came to America in 1857; located in New York, thence to Long Island, thence to Chatfield, Fillmore county, Minn.; moved to Flandreau in 1878. Married to Sarah Kennady, also of England; have ten children, five sons and five daughters.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

C. F. Hall—grocer; born in Vermont, in 1854; came west in 1879, and located in Flandreau. Married Levina R. Clark, a native of Vermont; have a son.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

H. A. Haugan—merchant; born in Norway in 1853; came to America in 1873; settled in Winnesheik county, Iowa; came to Flandreau September 30, 1879, and engaged in the business of general merchandise.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

T. J. Haxton—liveryman; born in Indiana, in 1840; moved to Illinois in 1865, thence to Madison county, Iowa, thence to Flandreau. Married to Millie A. Hayden, and has two sons and three daughters.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

S. A. Heath—harness maker; born in Loraine county, Ohio, in 1845; came west in 1872, and settled in Monroe county, Wis.; thence to Sioux Falls, and in April, 1880, came to Flandreau. Married Mattie Blaker, a native of Illinois; they have two children, a son and daughter.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

A. Higgs—shoe store; born in Berlin, Wis., in 1855; came to Flandreau in 1881. He married Med. Hill, a native of Pennsylvania.

Fred. C. Holden—blacksmith; born in Norway, in 1852; came to America in 1870; first settled in Wisconsin, thence to Minnesota, and came to Dakota in the spring of 1880.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

E. Huntington—real estate dealer; born in Norwich. Conn., in 1845; came west in 1856, and settled in Osage, Iowa; in 1878 he came here. Married Miss A. Button, a native of New York; they have four children, three daughters and one son.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

W. R. Hyde—agent for Cargill& Bro., grain dealers; born in Fond du Lac, Wis., in 1856; removed to Albert Lea.|Minn.,1868, thence to Fairmont, and in December, 1880, came to Flandreau. Married Lena Pfefer, of Wisconsin, and has one daughter, Emma.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

Henry J. Jacobshagen—manager of Flandreau Flouring Mill; born in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1854. When he was two years of age his parents removed to Mankato, Minn.; he came to Flandreau, in July, 1880.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

R. J. Simenson—attorney at law; born in Norway, in 1848; removed with his parents to America in 1851, and settled in Winnesheik county, Iowa; came to Dakota in 1871; first located in Yankton, where he was admitted to the practice of law; removed to Flandreau in June, 1880. Married to Julia Knudson, also of Norway; have two children.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

T. J. Shields—agricultural implements; born in McHenry county, Illinois, in 1856; came to Flandreau in 1877; from Flandreau he moved to Tracy, Minn.; returned with his family and relocated in Flandreau in 1880. Married to Alice Chatfield, also of Illinois.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

C. E. Thayer—cashier O. D. Brown & Co.'s bank, established in 1879; born in Sandusky Ohio, in 1854; came west in infancy with his parents and settled in Minneapolis, where he lived until May, 1881, when he removed to this point—Flandreau.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

D. S. White—druggist; born in Vermont, in 1837; moved to Jefferson county, Wis., in 1874, thence to Flandreau in Aug., 1879. Married to Maria Howe, of Ludlow, Vermont,
and has one son.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

Benjamin Wyckoff—assistant county treasurer; born in New York city, in 1849; moved to Minneapolis, Minn., in 1876, and was employed as assistant superintendent of the Minneapolis Harvester Works. In 1878, removed to Flandreau; has a large farm ten miles northwest of town, which is under his personal management. Married to Helen I. Arey, of Quincy, Mass.; have two children, a son and daughter.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

William Jones—general merchandise; born in Canada in 1849; came to Richland Co., Wis., in 1859; thence to Moody Co., Dakota, in 1869, and engaged in hunting and trapping until 1874, when he engaged in the mercantile business in Flandreau. Mr. Jones has lived longer continuously in Moody Co., than any other resident thereof. Married to Miss One Wait.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

W. A. Lindsay—firm of Bates & Lindsay Bros, proprs. Flandreau Flouring Mill; born in Canada West in 1823; located at St. Charles, Ill., in 1840; thence to Sycamore, Ill.. Came to Flandreau August 23, 1881, Married to B. J. Collins, of New York; have two daughters.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881
 

C. C. Martin—hardware; born in Jefferson Co., N. Y., in 1839; moved to Austin, Minn., in 1865; thence to Flandreau, where he engaged in the hardware business. Married to Celestine Lowe, and has one son and two daughters.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

J. H. McMillan—grain dealer; born in Franklin Co., N. Y., in 1837; came to Houstin Co., Minn., in 1857; removed to Flandreau in 1879. Married to J. A. Prentiss, of Illinois, and has one son and two daughters.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

Michael McDonnall—butcher; born in Canada in 1843; located in Fillmore Co., Minn., in 1855; came to Flandreau in April, 1880.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

Frank Millard—livery, feed and sale stable; born in Steuben Co., N. Y., in 1853; settled in Winona Co., Minn., 1865; came to Flandreau in 1873. Married to Lillie J. Parrott, of Illinois; have one child.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

A. S. Moulton—furniture and groceries; born in Caledonia Co., Vt.,; came west in September, 1878, and settled in Flandreau, immediately engaging in his present business. Married Susan Clark, a native of New Hampshire; they have one daughter.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

S. N. Neperud—merchant; born in Vernon Co., Wis., in 1856; came to Flandreau in 1877; engaged in farming until 1880, when in company with his brother he engaged in the business of general merchandise. Married Mollie E. Martinson, a native of the same county in Wis.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

Hans Olson—register of deeds and county clerk; born in Clayton Co., Iowa, in 1852; came to D. T., in 1876 and settled in this county; elected to present office in 1879.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

M. D. L. Pettigrew—proprietor of Flandreau House; born in Ludlow, Windsor Co., Vt., in 1834; came west in 1855 and settled in Dane Co., Wis.; he removed from there to Kenosha; thence to Fillmore Co., Minn. In June 1872 he came to D. T. and located in this locality; in 1876 he built the Flandreau House, which he has kept since. He has enlarged same within the last year, and now has a large, commodious house.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

F. W. Pettigrew—real estate and loan agency; born in Vermont in 1850; came west in 1854, and located with his parents at Madison, Wis.; thence they removed to Evansville. Came to Dakota in 1871, and settled on the present town site of Flandreau, which location he took up as a homestead. Married to Jennie S. Pettigrew, and has one daughter. Is Clerk of the District court, has been county surveyor, postmaster, president of the village board, and is closely identified with the progress of the community.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

George Rice—attorney at law and loan agent; born in Butler Co., Iowa in 1855; came here in 1879 and engaged in practicing law; in fall of 1880 he was elected to the office of county treasurer of Moody Co.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881

 

J. A. Seaman, M. D.—born in Canada in 1851; came to Detroit, Mich., in 1872; is a graduate of the Detroit Medical College; came to Flandreau in April, 1878. Married D. L. Kendall, of Minn. Dr. Seaman is the government physician for the Indians of this locality, and has otherwise an extensive and lucrative practice.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915

 

FRANK M. RAMSDELL.

Frank M. Ramsdell is proprietor of a meat market at Faulkton and in connection with the conduct of a successful business of that character derives a good income from farm property which he owns in Faulk county. He was born at Osage, Iowa, August 18, 1862, and is a son of William and Mary A. (Nixon) Ramsdell, the former born near Lake Erie, New York, and the latter at Three Rivers, Michigan. In early life the father engaged in merchandising at Osage, Iowa, and in the year 1878 he became one of the pioneer settlers of Moody county, South Dakota, where he took up the occupation of farming, which he followed until, having become possessed of a comfortable competence, he retired from active business life, spending his last days in the enjoyment of well earned rest in Flandreau. He took an active and helpful interest in public affairs and was a member of the last territorial legislature. He also filled various county offices and while in Iowa acted as county sheriff for eight years. He likewise was called to various positions of public trust in South Dakota and proved most loyal and capable, doing all in his power to advance public progress and improvement. His widow yet survives and still makes her home in Flandreau.

In a family of eight children Frank M. Ramsdell was the third in order of birth. He attended the public schools of Osage, Iowa, and resided at home to the time of his marriage. He afterward secured a preemption claim in Miner county, South Dakota, where he resided for a year and then went to Faulk county, where he obtained a homestead and tree claim. With characteristic energy he began to develop his land, breaking the sod and cultivating the fields until rich crops rewarded his labors. Year after year the work of improving his farm was carried steadily forward and success attended his efforts. In 1902, however, he removed to Faulkton, having been elected to office, and later he purchased the meat market of which he is still proprietor, conducting a good business in that line, having built up a large and gratifying trade. He still owns three hundred and twenty acres of farm land in Faulk county and is likewise the owner of city property.

On the 25th of December, 1882, Mr. Ramsdell wedded Miss Laura A. Smith, a native of Batavia, Iowa, and a daughter of John D. and Julia A. Smith. The father, who was a farmer by occupation, removed from Iowa to South Dakota with his family, settling in Miner county, where the family were living when his daughter became the wife of Mr. Ramsdell. In 1884 Mr. and Mrs. Smith removed to Faulk county, taking up their abode upon a claim near the Ramsdell farm. Mr. Smith served as county commissioner and in matters of citizenship proved his loyalty and progressive spirit in many ways. He died on the old homestead January 6, 1906, and his widow now makes her home with Mr. and Mrs. Ramsdell. Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Ramsdell: William F., an agriculturist residing in Faulkton; Claud, who resides in Faulkton, is married and assists his father in the conduct of his meat market; Leone, the wife of C. K. Brooks, of Manchester, South Dakota, who is connected with the Atlas Elevator Company; and John, Delia and Verne, all at home.

Mr. Ramsdell is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Modem Brotherhood of America and the Modern Woodmen of America. His political indorsement is given to the republican party and for four years he served as register of deeds of Faulk county. He was likewise a member of the board of education for a number of years and he discharged his duties m a most prompt and capable manner. His religious faith is evidenced in his membership in the Christian church, but as there is no church of that denomination in Faulkton, he attends the Methodist Episcopal church. His salient characteristics are commendable, for he has been found progressive and reliable in business, loyal in citizenship and faithful to the ties of home and friendship.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915

PETER NESTE.

Peter Neste, one of the enterprising agriculturists and substantial citizens of Split Rock township, residing on section 16, owns three hundred and twenty acres of valuable land and is busily engaged in its cultivation. His birth occurred in Winneshiek county, Iowa, on the 14th of April, 1868, his parents being Ole S. and Carrie (Wren) Neste, who were born, reared and married in Norway. In 1865 they crossed the Atlantic to the United States and took up their abode in Winneshiek county, Iowa. It was in 1877 that the father came to South Dakota, his family following a year later. He filed on a preemption in Moody county and after living thereon for six months in order to prove up, came to Minnehaha county and purchased a farm in Split Rock township. During the past fifteen years, however, he has made his home with our subject. The period of his residence in this state covers thirty-seven years, and he has long been numbered among the representative and esteemed citizens of his community.

Peter Neste was reared to manhood under the parental roof and attended the, common schools in the acquirement of an education. He continued on the home farm and assisted in its operation until 1899, when be purchased one hundred and sixty acres of his present place and took up his abode thereon. In 1905 he bought an adjoining tract of similar size, so that his farm now embraces three hundred and twenty acres. He specializes in the raising of horses, cattle and hogs and has been very successful in both his farming and live stock interests, enjoying an enviable reputation as one of the prosperous and progressive citizens of Split Rock township.

Mr. Neste is a member of the Lutheran synod and fraternally is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, belonging to Valley Springs Lodge, No. 143. In all relations of life he has maintained a high standard of honor and integrity and has won the respect and confidence of those who have come in contact with him.

 


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915

 

JOHN P. KLUGE.

John P. Kluge is enjoying a well earned and well merited rest after long years of close and active connection with agricultural interests. Success came to him in substantial measure as the result of his industry and close application and with a handsome competence he retired to enjoy the fruits of his former toil. He was born in Norway, November 16, 1854, and is a son of P. O. and Mathea Flatten. The family came to the United States in 1871 and arrived in South Dakota in 1876, settling six miles north of Dell Rapids. The father secured a homestead claim and also a timber claim and devoted his energies to the development and improvement of his property until the time of his death, which occurred in 1902. His wife lived till 1910. They were among the pioneer settlers of South Dakota and took an active and helpful interest in promoting the work of general improvement and in reclaiming the district in which they settled for purposes of civilization.

John P. Kluge was a youth of about seventeen years when the family came to the new world. In early manhood he learned the wagon maker's trade, which he followed in La Crosse, Wisconsin, until he came to South Dakota in 1877. The section of the state in which he settled was just being opened up to civilization and improvement. Much of the land was still in the possession of the government and the district gave little evidence of being soon transformed into a rich agricultural region. Like his father, John P. Kluge acquired a homestead and a timber claim in Moody county and concentrated his efforts upon general agricultural pursuits, continuing to farm and develop that place until 1905. The result of his efforts was seen in well tilled fields productive of good crops. He saved his earnings, carefully and systematically managed the farm work and as the years went on a substantial competence accrued. In 1905 he retired to his present home in Colman, but still owns his farm and has added to his original holdings. He also has property in Clark county. Success in substantial measure has crowned his labors and he now gives his supervision merely to his invested interests and spends some time in working in his garden plot of three acres. Indolence and idleness are utterly foreign to his nature so that he could not content himself without some occupation and thus he whiles away the hours, finding pleasure in the cultivation and production of garden produce. He is financially interested in important business projects and is now vice president and one of the directors of the Citizens State Bank of Colman, in which he owns considerable stock, and is also president of the Farmers Elevator Company.

In 1880 Mr. Kluge was united in marriage to Miss Hannah Hagen, a daughter of John G. and Helen Hagen, the former a soldier of the Civil war who was with Sherman in the Atlanta campaign and on the march to the sea. In the family of Mr. and Mrs. Kluge are seven children: Julia, now the wife of O. Hilmoe; Millie, the wife of E. P. Olson; Emma, who married D. L. Firestone; Ida, at home; Clara, the wife of M. Stevenson; Matilda, at home; and Julius, who is attending school at Humboldt College in Iowa.

The religious faith of the family is that of the Lutheran church and Mr. Kluge's political belief is that of the republican party. He has served as chairman of the township board of supervisors and as assessor of Colman. He is now treasurer of the school board and for many years served in the same capacity on the township board. Having retired from business, he has leisure for public duties, which he discharges in a most prompt, and efficient manner. He and his wife have led active, busy and useful lives, crowned with a measure of success that is the merited reward of their earnest and intelligently directed effort. They certainly deserve much credit for what they have accomplished and they are highly esteemed by all who know them.


JOHN EDWARD KELLEY

John Edward Kelley (1853—1941)
A Representative from South Dakota; born near Portage City, Columbia County, Wis., March 27, 1853; attended the public schools; moved to Moody County, Dak. (now South Dakota), in 1878 and engaged in agricultural pursuits; engaged in the newspaper business at Flandreau; member of the State house of representatives in 1890 and 1891; unsuccessful Populist candidate for election to the Fifty-third and Fifty-fourth Congresses; elected as a Populist to the Fifty-fifth Congress (March 4, 1897-March 3, 1899); unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1898; resumed agricultural pursuits near Coleman, S.Dak.; delegate to the Democratic National Convention in 1912; register of the United States land office at Pierre 1915-1918; moved to St. Paul, Minn., and became editor of the Cooperative Herald; died in Minneapolis, Minn., August 5, 1941; interment in St. Mary’s Cemetery.
Source: Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1771-Present; contributed by A. Newell.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915


NORMAN O. HAMLIN.

Norman O. Hamlin, one of the foremost citizens and enterprising agriculturists of Sioux Falls township, Minnehaha county, residing on section 34, is busily engaged in the cultivation of about four hundred and sixty acres of land and also conducts a dairy business. His birth occurred in Toledo, Ohio, on the 23d of October, 1871, his parents being William B. and Eva A. (Barney) Hamlin, who were born, reared and married in the state of New York. About 1870 they removed to Toledo, Ohio, where the father was employed as foreman in a planing mill for about five years. On the expiration of that period he removed to Chicago, where for about eight years he was identified with the retail grocery business. In 1883 he located in Hyde county, South Dakota, and there entered a homestead, took up a tree claim and also preempted a quarter section of land. In 1895 or 1896, however, he sold his holdings and took up his abode in Highmore, where he has since made his home. William B. Hamlin is a veteran of the Civil war, serving for two years in the Twenty-fourth New York Infantry and subsequently reenlisting with the First New York Veteran Cavalry. He remained with the army during the entire period of hostilities between the north and the south and held the rank of first sergeant of his troop at the time of his discharge. For a number of years he served as police justice and chief of police at Highmore, Hyde county, where he is most widely and favorably known, having now lived in the county for more than three decades.

Norman O. Hamlin was reared at home and acquired a common-school education in his youth, also pursuing a commercial course in the Sioux Falls Business College. Following the completion of his studies he secured a position with the Dempster Mill Manufacturing Company as cashier and bookkeeper, remaining with that concern for two years and being appointed assistant manager of the Sioux Falls branch shortly prior to his resignation in 1903. In that year he rented a tract of land near Colman, in Moody county, and turned his attention to general agricultural pursuits, farming there for four years. In 1908 he located in Minnehaha county and has since resided in Sioux Falls township, where he is engaged in farming on an extensive scale, cultivating a tract of rented land comprising about four hundred and sixty acres. He also conducts a dairy business, milking about twenty-five cows, and in both branches of his business has met with a gratifying measure of success. He has recently purchased a farm of forty acres one mile south of the city limits of Sioux Falls.

On the 17th of August, 1901, Mr. Hamlin was united in marriage to Miss Nellie A. Dunlap, a native of Colman, South Dakota, and a daughter of R. J. Dunlap, Jr. The latter is a prominent stock buyer and farmer of Colman who came to this state in 1877. Our subject and his wife have two children, Gladys E. and Norman William. Mr. Hamlin gives his political allegiance to the republican party and is identified fraternally with the Brotherhood of American Yeomen. He has many attractive social qualities which have gained him warm friends, and he deserves to be ranked among the representative citizens of the state.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915

JAMES A. HELMEY.

James A. Helmey, a well known and successful druggist of Sherman, South Dakota, was born in Rushford, Fillmore county, Minnesota, on the 25th of May, 1870, his parents being Lewis P. and Martha (Jackson) Helmey, natives of Norway. The father emigrated to the United States as a young man, while the mother came to this country with her parents as a girl. Their marriage was celebrated in Fillmore county, Minnesota. Lewis P. Helmey was for some years identified with the hotel business, conducting the Winona House at Winona, Minnesota, but subsequently turned his attention to agricultural pursuits. In 1878 his wife died and the following year he came to South Dakota, locating on a section of school land in Lincoln county, of which he later purchased a quarter section when it was put on the market. He has reached the venerable age of eighty and during the past several years has lived retired, now making his home at Humboldt, Minnehaha county. He gives his political allegiance to the republican party and, while never an office seeker, served for a number of years as justice of the peace in Rushford, Minnesota. The period of his residence in this state covers more than a third of a century and he is widely recognized as one of its honored pioneers and representative citizens.

James A. Helmey was reared under the parental roof and attended the common schools in the acquirement of an education. On reaching his twentieth year he took up the study of pharmacy, entering his brother's drug store in Canton, South Dakota. In the fall of 1895 he matriculated in the Minnesota Institute of Pharmacy at Minneapolis, Minnesota, from which institution he was graduated with the class of 1896, and on April 8th of the same spring he passed his examination before the state board of examiners at Huron. He then worked as a pharmacist for his brother in Canton until 1898, when he established himself in the drug business at Dell Rapids. At the end of three years he removed his stock to Trent, South Dakota, but sold out shortly afterward and took charge of the Brandt Drug Company at Brandt, this state, which he managed for about two years. Subsequently he spent two years as traveling representative of Frederick Ingram & Company, of Detroit, dealers in pharmaceutical specialties, and in 1905 opened a drug store in Toronto, South Dakota, where he was engaged in business for three years. On the expiration of that period he removed his stock to Brentford, this state, but soon afterward sold out and during the following two years was employed in Pierre, South Dakota. In 1910 he located in Sherman as manager of his brother's drug business and there has since remained, conducting the enterprise in a manner that has won and held an extensive
patronage.

In 1898 Mr. Helmey was united in marriage to Miss Anna Paulson, of Kimball, South Dakota, by whom he had two children, Martha E. and James A., Jr. The wife and mother was called to her final rest on the 10th of July, 1902, passing away in Dell Rapids. In politics Mr. Helmey is a stanch republican, while his religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Norwegian Lutheran church. Fraternally he is connected with Sioux Falls Lodge, No. 262, B. P. O. E., and Sherman Lodge of the Knights of Pythias. In all relations of life he has proven himself upright, honorable and straightforward, well worthy of the high regard in which he is uniformly held.


 

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