South Dakota Newspaper Articles
 

 

 

 

 


The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, January 25, 1879
Contributed by Jim Dezotell

Mrs. Wallace, who left Coos Bay with Frenchy for the Black Hills, committed suicide there.


San Francisco Chronicle

Saturday, December 27, 1890

Submitted by Karen Seeman

 

COMING INTO CAMP.

 

Hostiles Showing a Desire for Peace

 

The Indian War Coming to an End

 

A Denial of Sensational Reports Received From the Bad Lands

 

Camp Near Battle Creek (S.D.) – December 26 – The weather is cold and the rivers are frozen solid. A company of Cheyenne scouts are encamped at the mouth of Battle creek. Two attempts have been made by the hostiles, who number about eighty, to break their camp. The first attack was made by only a few of the Indians, who were quickly repulsed with a loss of two killed and several wounded, and it is thought one was fatally hurt. The second attack was made after dark by the whole band, led by Kicking Bear.   Volley after volley was fired on both sides, and a desultory fire was kept up for an hour or more. It is not known how many hostiles were killed, but judging from the reports of scouts there must have been several slain.  Troops sent to the scene report everything quiet and no hostiles in sight.

 


 

 

San Francisco Chronicle

Saturday, December 27, 1890

Submitted by Karen Seeman

 

Rapid City (S. D.), December 26.—General Miles, who has been waiting several days to hear the result of the friendly mission of the Pine Ridge Indians to the hostile camp in the Bad Lands, to-day received word from General Brooks that couriers in from his emissaries reported that the hostiles were ready and about to come in.   Several small parties are already moving into the agency, and the balky Indians are expected there within a day or two.  Word was also received that Big Foot and his band, who have been missing since their escape from Colonel Sumner, have been found in Porcupine creek moving toward Pine Ridge.  No details are given, but Big Foot has certainly evaded for several days all the forces in search of him.

 


 

San Francisco Chronicle

Saturday, December 27, 1890

Submitted by Karen Seeman

 

Pine Ridge Agency, December 26.—Two battalions of the Seventh Cavalry, with two Hotchkiss guns and a pack-train, have left for Wounded Knee, about thirty miles away. The Indian council in the Bad Lands has decided in favor of the hostiles returning to the agency. The authorities feel that the Indian war is practically over, though there is still danger of trouble in case an attempt is made to disarm the hostiles.

 


Execution of John McCall
At a quarter past 10 o’clock, a.m., March 1, 1877, John McCall was executed near Yankton, South Dakota, under the direction of the United States Marshal, for the murder of John B. Hickock “Wild Bill” in the Black Hills, on the 2nd of August last. McCall was a young man about 25 years old. He behaved throughout with the almost coolness and nerve, and went to his death as gaily as if to a dinner party. He was attended by a Catholic priest, and appeared to regard his sentence as just. He evidently endeavored to enter the next world in a proper spirit.
Contributed by Marie Miller - Pomeroy’s Democrat ( March 10, 1877)




Laura Ingalls Wilder 1867 - 1957
Noted author Laura Ingalls Wilder came to De Smet, South Dakota, from Wisconsin in time to experience the hard winter of 1880-1881. At the age of fifteen, she taught in rural schools in Kingsbury County. In 1894, she and her husband Almanzo Wilder moved to Mansfield, Missouri. Wilder's only daughter, novelist Rose Lane, persuaded her mother to write stories about her childhood, and Wilder's Little House in the Big Woods was published in 1932. Its immediate success led to the writing and publishing of seven more "Little House" books, four of which are set in South Dakota. Wilder retired from writing at age seventy-six. The Laura Ingalls Wilder Award for contributions to children's literature was established in her honor.
Contributed by Marie Miller




James ("Scotty") Philip 1858-1911
Scottish-born James Philip was a successful rancher and prominent cattleman. He served as guide, scout, and dispatch rider at Fort Robinson. In 1881, he began ranching and soon became involved in real estate, banking and politics as well. Philip is credited with helping to save the bison from extinction. His herd of fifty-seven buffalo grew to nine hundred and formed the basis for several herds in the country, including the herd now at Custer State Park. Eulogized as "a man of large stature, large plans and large heart," Philip was one of the first South Dakotans named to the National Cowboy Hall of Fame.
Contributed by Marie Miller




Gabriel Renville 1824-1892
Gabriel Renville, head chief of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux, served as chief of scouts with General Sibley's 1863-1865 expedition against the hostile Sioux. The War Department appointed Renville as head chief of the Sisseton-Wahpeton tribe in 1866. The following year, after Lake Traverse Reservation was established, his people elected him head chief for life. At Fort Wadsworth, he became a diligent farmer as well as chief of scouts. Renville helped his people make the transition to reservation living without forsaking all cultural traditions. Indians and non-Indians alike respected him for his great mental force and integrity.
Contributed by Marie Miller




Spotted Tail (Sinte Gleska)
Spotted Tail (Sinte Gleska), a Brule Sioux, attained chieftainship by proving his prowess in battle. He worked hard to keep his people together after the signing of the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1868 and the band's relocation to Whetstone Agency in Dakota Territory. A skilled negotiator, Spotted Tail visited Black Hills mining camps after the discovery of gold to learn the value of the mineral, which resulted in the Indian demand of $60 million for the sale of the hills. During the Sioux War of 1876-1877, Spotted Tail and his people remained on the reservation, and the chief used his influence to persuade government officials to make the inevitable cultural changes as gradual as possible. (all of the historical information of the above comes from the history of the state of South Dakota
Submitted by Marie Miller


 

Mitchell Daily Republican, Mitchell SD
December 24, 1885, page 1.

Contributed by Suzanne Folk

Abe Boynton is nothing if not modest. When asked the other day if Gov. Pierce would probably resign, he said
“No. not likely. Yet I believe his resignation could be easily had if the right man were selected by the president as his successor—such a man as myself.”
And yet it goes to the world that such an unmitigated ass as this is a representative Dakotan. If the democratic party of the territory has a particle of respect it should call this windy blatherskite home at once.




 

 

 

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