Roberts County Biographies

 
A


B

Babcock, Howard
Bobb, Earl V.
Bowler, John A.
C

Cook, Edmund


D



E


Eastman, David

F

Folkstad, Charles L.
Foss, L. William
G

Gamm, Edward C.
H

Harris, T. J.
Hill, Ira C.
I

Ingersoll, A. H.
J


K

Kennedy, Casper
L

Lane, Warren
LeCount, Wallace
Lien, Christian H.
Lindquist, A. W.
M

Marvick, Andrew
McNulty, Frank (1904)
McNulty, Frank (1916)
Metcalf, Homer A.
Monson, Elias
Morris, Henry
Munro, John A.
N

Norby, A. J.
O

Olson, Edgar C.
P

Peek, Lewis
Peever, T. H.
Porter, Clement F.
Q - R

Quilty, William F.
Rickert, J. A.
S

Smull, John D
Spackman, Harry
T


U


V


W


X


Y


Z

 

 


Smull, John D.

JOHN D. SMULL.

John D. Smull, because of his newspaper connections, seems to need no introduction to the readers of this volume, as he has a wide acquaintance, especially in Grant and Roberts counties. He is a native of Illinois, born in 1865, and a son of Joel W. and Jennie D. Smull. Before coming to South Dakota he was engaged in the wholesale machinery business in Chicago and in the year 1892 he made his way to this state, establishing his home in Blooming Valley township, Grant county. He was the first clerk of his town and was actively identified with public affairs there. In 1900 he removed to Milbank and was deputy postmaster at that place until 1909. He also edited the Grant County News for five years and in 1913 he removed to Summit, where he established a newspaper known as the Summit Independent. During the fight for free homes on the Sinton Reservation he was president of the settlers' association which materially assisted in getting the bill through congress rebating the two dollars and' a half per acre payment on all lands in that reservation. He is a stalwart champion of the west, an enthusiastic advocate of its opportunities and a firm believer in its future, and his efforts have been put forth along lines which have contributed to the development and advancement of his part of the state.

Mr. Smull was united in marriage, in 1892, to Anna C. Cloukey, of Greene, Iowa, and they have two children, Jane and Mary. Mr. Smull gives his political allegiance to the republican party.

Source: History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
Contributor: Karen Seeman


Olson, Edgar C.

EDGAR C. OLSON.

In all of his business career, progressive and successful as it has been, his has never been the command of the tyrant to go, but always the call of the leader to come, and thus Edgar C. Olson today occupies a conspicuous and enviable position in the commercial circles, not only of Sioux Falls, but of the northwest, being at the head of a company which owns a chain of clothing stores throughout this part of the country.

He is a native of Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, born April 6, 1874, his parents being Gabriel and Martha (Nelson) Olson. He was the seventh in order of birth in a family of three sons and five daughters, all of whom are yet living with the exception of the eldest son, John G., who died in 1004. The removal of the family in 1875 to Kasson, Minnesota, enabled Edgar C. Olson to there pursue his education in the public schools. He also attended high school at St. Paul, Minnesota, and spent three years as a student in a night school in that city in order to overcome what he regarded as a lack of early educational opportunities. He has ever been a student of life and in the school of experience he has learned many valuable lessons which he has put to good use.

Mr. Olson became a clerk in a clothing store in St. Paul in 1890, and there remained until 1900, when he went to Marshall, Minnesota, and in partnership with a brother, established a clothing store under the firm name of Olson Brothers. This was successfully
conducted for two years. In 1902 the firm of Olson Brothers opened a branch store at Brookings, South Dakota, which is still in operation and Edgar C. Olson continued in charge there until 1912, when he came to Sioux Falls, where the previous year he had been instrumental in organizing the firm of Olson, Delaney & Berdahl. This firm continued until July 15, 1913, at which time the business was taken over by the present E. C. Olson Company. Theirs is one of the leading clothing establishments, not only of the city, but also of this section of the country, and their store presents a most attractive appearance. The fixtures are of late design done in fumed oak. The big suit rack will accommodate twelve hundred men's and boys' suits and overcoats, and the stock includes clothing, hats, haberdashery and men's furnishings.

As the years have passed Edgar C. Olson has established business in various sections until he now has a chain of nine stores. The one at Watertown, South Dakota, established in 1907, which was conducted under the name of Olson-McCosham Company, is now under the name of The Olson-Lee Company. The business at Rapid City was started in 1909 and has always been conducted under the firm style of Olson & Company. M. G. Olson, brother of E. C. Olson, established stores at Montevideo, Minnesota; Wheaton, Minnesota; Sisseton, South Dakota, and Grand Forks, North Dakota. These are all owned by the E. C. Olson Company, together with the stores at Rapid City, at Brookings and at Sioux Falls. The business today is extensive, being one of the important commercial enterprises of the northwest and the capability, progressiveness and laudable ambition of E. C. Olson and his brother have constituted a substantial foundation upon which their success has been built.

On the 8th of January, 1905, at Brookings, South Dakota, Mr. Olson was united in marriage to Miss Callie T. Williams, a daughter of Edward Williams, and they have one son, Lyle Williams, born July 31, 1907. The parents are members of the Baptist church, while Mr. Olson belongs also to the Masonic fraternity, having taken the degrees of the York Rite and the Mystic Shrine. He is likewise connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and with the Commercial Club and his political allegiance is given to the republican party. While he is never neglectful of the duties of citizenship and in fact stands many times as a leader in support of public projects, he has never sought political preferment, giving to his business affairs that close attention which is largely the secret of success. He keeps in touch with the most modern commercial methods and conforms his interests to the highest requirements of commercial ethics.

Source: History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
Contributor: Karen Seeman


Lien, Christian H.

HON. CHRISTIAN H. LIEN.

The banking interests of Roberts county find a worthy representative in Christian H. Lien, who was the organizer and is the cashier of the Summit Bank of Summit. He is,
moreover, a recognized leader in political circles, having three times been called upon to represent his district in the state legislature. He is one of the worthy and substantial citizens that Norway has furnished to South Dakota. His birth occurred September 19, 1867, his parents being Hans and Kari (Peterson) Lien, who were also natives of Norway. The father, who was born in 1818, passed away in Norway in 1868. The mother, who was born November 5, 1820, reached the very advanced age of almost ninety-two years, dying on the 2d of November, 1912. She brought her son Christian to the United States in 1880 and settled at Willmar, Minnesota. She possessed good business ability and made a good living for her family, which numbered five children, of whom three are yet living: Marit, the wife of Bernt Jorgenson, a retired farmer of Summit; Oline, who married Per Lundgren, a farmer of Roberts county; and Christian H. The father throughout his active life was a farmer and laborer. His religious faith was that of the Lutheran church and his family were also connected with the church. Mrs. Lien certainly deserved great credit for what she accomplished in rearing her family as well as providing for her own support, and merited the love and gratitude of her children.

Christian H. Lien supplemented his early education acquired in the schools of Norway by study in the normal school at St. Cloud, Minnesota, after which he took up the profession of teaching. He worked on a farm and on a railroad in order to earn the money that would enable him to continue his education. He started in life a poor boy and never had a cent given him, earning all that he has possessed and enjoyed. He worked for a year in a general store and in connection with the grain business at Marvin, and the following year, 1893, he removed to Summit, where he established a small mercantile store. His capital was limited hut as his trade grew he increased his stock and conducted a very gratifying business until 1897, when he withdrew from commercial interests and established a private bank, known as the Summit Bank. In 1901 this was incorporated as the State Bank with a capital of ten thousand dollars. There is now a surplus and undivided profits of four thousand dollars, while the average deposits amount to one hundred and seventy-five thousand dollars. Mr. Lien is cashier of the bank and as such is the active manager of the institution, which is carefully conducted along conservative, yet progressive, lines and is bringing to him gratifying success. He is also a member of the Depositors Guaranty Fund Commission of South Dakota.

In 1895 Mr. Lien was married to Miss Carrie Brustuen, a native of Norway, and they have become parents of four children: Pearli, Helma, Carl and Alvin, now sixteen, fourteen, thirteen and eleven years of age respectively. In 1909 Mr. Lien took his family back to the old country for a visit, spending considerable time in Norway, Sweden and England.

He is a Lutheran in religious faith and is loyal to his professions. In politics he is a republican and has been honored with several offices, having been chosen to represent his district in the state legislature in 1897, 1899 and 1901, while in 1908 he was presidential elector. He keeps thoroughly informed concerning vital and significant problems and his support of any measure is the result of a firm belief in its value. He now devotes the greater part of his time to the bank and at the present the company is erecting a bank building, which will be thoroughly modern in its equipment in every respect. Laudable ambition and firm purpose have guided Mr. Lien at all points in his career, and the steps in his orderly progression are easily discernible.


Source: History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
Contributor: Karen Seeman


Bobb, Earl V.

EARL V. BOBB, M. D.. was born August 2. 1873, in Richland. Wisconsin, and is the son of Martin L. and Mary (Wafling) Bobb, the father a native of Pennsylvania, the mother of Wisconsin. Martin Bobb came to Dakota a number of years ago and settled in Davison county, with the public affairs of which part of the state he became quite actively identified; he served six years as clerk of the county court, took a
prominent part in advancing the material interests of his community, and was a man of intelligence and wide influence and withal a most excellent and praiseworthy citizen. As a leader of the Republican party he became prominent in state as well as in local affairs and in the private walks of life enjoyed the esteem of all classes. He died in Davison county. in October, 1902, at the age of sixty years, leaving to mourn his loss a widow, who is still living, and six children, of whom the subject of this review is the second in order of birth. Dr. B. A. Bobb, the oldest of the sons of Martin and Mary Bobb, is a distinguished
physician of South Dakota, practicing his profession in the city of Mitchell and at the present time he is president of the State Medical Association.

Dr. Earl V. Bobb was about nine years old when his parents moved from Wisconsin to South Dakota and since 1882 his life has been closely identified with the latter state. After attending the public schools
for some years, he entered the University of South Dakota, where he finished his literary education, and then became a student of the Northwestern University at Evanston, from the medical department of
which he was graduated with high honors in 1899. Preparatory to the general practice of his profession, the Doctor did a large amount of hospital work under the direction of some of the most distinguished medical talent of the day, after which he opened an office in Sisseton, South Dakota, where he has since built up a very extensive professional business, commanding at this time a patronage second in magnitude and importance to that of no other physician in the city or county.

Dr. Robb prepared himself for his life work by careful study and critical research, and being a close student, he keeps in touch with the trend of modern professional thought, is familiar with the latest investigations and discoveries in the profession and possesses the discernment and tact to select what is most valuable of this knowledge and use it in his practice.

In addition to his professional labors, Dr. Bobb, since coming west, has been actively identified with the public and business affairs of Sisseton and Roberts counties, and at the present time is holding the office of coroner. He is stanchly Republican in his political views, manifests a deep and abiding interest in his party and has contributed not a little to its success in the county, district and state. 

In the fall of 1902 Dr. Bobb purchased the leading drug store in Sisseton and is now conducting the same in connection with his practice and doing a very lucrative business. He is a member of the State Medical Society, the Aberdeen District Medical Society, and other organizations whose object is to promote a higher standard of efficiency in the medical ranks of South Dakota. He is also interested in secret fraternal and benevolent work, belonging to the Masonic lodge at Sisseton and the Knights of Pythias, in both of which orders he is recognized as an influential member and a zealous worker.

On September 25. 1900, Dr. Bobb and Miss Elizabeth Morton, of Chicago, Illinois, daughter of John Morton, of that city, were united in the bonds of wedlock. Dr. and Mrs. Bobbs have a beautiful and attractive home in Sisseton which is well known to the best society circles of the city, and both are popular with the people and have many warm friends and admirers, here and elsewhere.


Source:
History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904


Munro, John A.


JOHN A. MUNRO, president of the Wilmot Land and Loan Company, of Wilmot. was born in Nova Scotia, October 18, 1853, the son of Donald and Nancy Munro, the father a native of Scotland and by occupation a stone-mason and contractor. John A. attended the country schools, and later pursued the higher branches in the Pictou Academy and took up the study of pharmacy under the direction of a druggist of his native place. After becoming familiar with the business, he went to Minnesota, where he followed his chosen calling from 1878 to 1879, and in the latter year came to South Dakota, and established a drug house at Big Stone City, which he conducted very profitably during the six years following.

In 1883 Mr. Munro was appointed clerk of court for Roberts county, which office he held for four years. In 1885 he removed to Wilmot, where he has resided ever since. During his term as clerk of court he
devoted his leisure time to the study of law and was admitted to practice in 1888, but did not engage very actively in the practice, turning his attention rather to real estate and banking, which he
found more to his taste and much more profitable. He is a director of the First State Bank of Wilmot, and to him is due the credit of organizing the Wilmot Land and Loan Company, of Wilmot, of which he IS president at present, and which, as much as any other agency, has tended to the settlement and material development of Roberts county and other parts of eastern Dakota.

Mr. Munro ever since coming west has been actively identified with the affairs of Wilmot and Roberts county. He was sergeant-at-arms in the house of representatives during the legislative session of 1885, was largely instrumental in carrying his county and district that year for the Republican party, and as a politician his influence has been strong and far-reaching. As a citizen he is progressive and thoroughly
up to date, lends his encouragement and material support to everything making for the public good and having faith in the future of his adopted state, is manfully doing his part to make it come up to his high ideal of what a commonwealth should be.

Mr. Munro belongs to the Masonic fraternity, in which he now holds office of junior warden, and is also an active member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, being at this time district deputy of the last named organization. In the month of December, 1892, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Munro and Miss Carrie E. Phanso, of Pennsylvania, a union blessed with five offspring, namely : Kenneth Donald, Gladys Irene, Carroll Jean. Doris Ella and Myrtle Lucile.


Source:
History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904


Ingersoll, A. H.


HON. A. H. INGERSOLL, county judge of Roberts county, was born in Waupun, Wisconsin, October 12, 1837, and is the son of Artemedorous and Nancy (McNammard) Ingersoll, both parents natives of Pennsylvania, the father of English descent, the mother of Scotch-Irish. Artemedorus Ingersoll came from an old and respected New England family, was a man of intelligence and much more than ordinary culture and for a number of years served as official surveyor of Dodge county, Wisconsin, having been an educated and remarkably capable civil engineer. He reared a family of nine children, six sons and three daughters, the oldest son, a captain in the late Civil war, dying in a rebel prison, and two others have died since that time.

A. H. Ingersoll was reared in his native state, received a high-school education at Waupun, Wisconsin, and studied law at Preston, Minnesota, under the direction of Henry R. Wells, being admitted to the bar in 1878. In that year he came to South Dakota and, settling on a tree claim near Wilmot, began practicing in that town and upon the organization of Roberts county, in 1882, he was chosen state's attorney, which position he held for a term of two years, retiring at the expiration of that time to his farm. But a brief interval elapsed until he was again elected to the office and after discharging the duties of the same in an able and satisfactory manner for a period of six years, he was elected to the county judgeship, which with the exception of four years spent in agricultural pursuits, he has since held. Judge Ingersoll is an able lawyer, a judicious and successful practitioner, and as a judge his course has been creditable to himself and an honor to the county, fully meeting the expectations of his friends and the public and justifying the wisdom of his election. In the discharge of his official functions he is eminently fair and impartial, his rulings bear every evidence of a profound knowledge of the law, his decisions have been characterized by an intense desire to render justice in all matters submitted for his consideration, and thus far there has been little in his career to criticize and much to commend. He is not only one of the representative Republicans of Roberts county, but enjoys much more than local prestige as a judicious organizer and successful leader.

Judge Ingersoll is vice-president of the Citizens' Bank at this place, and a stockholder in the same, and is also identified with the Bank of Wilmot, besides having various other interests which tend to the
development of the country and the promotion of its prosperity. Fraternally he belongs to the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Knights of Pythias, in both of which brotherhoods he is an active worker, and at different times he has been honored with important official positions in the same.

The Judge was married on April 15, 1881, to Miss Ida F. Maydole, a native of Iowa and the daughter of Henry M. and Eliza (Wilson) Maydole, the father of German descent, the mother's lineage being
traceable to an old New England family that figured in the early history of Vermont.


Source:
History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904


Monson, Elias


ELIAS MONSON, ex-register of deeds of Roberts county and now president of and abstracter for the Roberts County Abstract and Title Company, is a native of Dodge county, Minnesota, and the son of Ole and Bertha (Kuntson) Monson, both parents born and reared in Norway. Ole Monson and wife came to the United States a number of years ago and were among the earliest settlers of Dodge county, Minnesota, locating there when the county was on the very outskirts of civilization. After a long residence in that state, they removed to near Grand Forks, North Dakota, where the father's death occurred in 1900, and the mother's two years previously. Ole Monson, a farmer by occupation, was a man of intelligence and sound judgment and was a most excellent and praiseworthy citizen. He was always deeply interested in the public affairs of the communities in which he lived, took an active part in politics and for years was one of the Republican leaders of Dodge county, Minnesota. Although of foreign birth and ever retaining a warm feeling for his native country, he became devotedly attached to the country of his adoption and was an ardent admirer and loyal upholder of the free institutions under which so many years of his life were spent and so much of his success achieved.

Elias Monson was born on July 4, 1864, spent his childhood and youth in his native county and state and after acquiring an elementary education in the public schools completed an academic and business
course in an academy at Portland, North Dakota. On quitting the academy he went to North Dakota in 1888 with the family, and after farming two years in Grand Forks county, changed his residence to the
county of Roberts, where, in 1892, he took up a fine claim, which he at once proceeded to improve. He continued to reside on his place and promote its development until the fall of 1898, when he was elected, on the Republican ticket, register of deeds for Roberts county, the duties of which office he discharged for two terms having been chosen his own successor in the year 1900. As a public official Mr. Monson demonstrated fine business capacity and became quite popular with the people. At the expiration of his second term he was prevailed upon by his successor to continue in charge of the office as deputy, being familiar with its varied duties and far better qualified to discharge the same than any other individual.

Mr. Monson is now identified with the Roberts County Abstract & Title Company, of which he is president, and also owns an interest in a hotel at White Rock. He gives his influence and encouragement to all
enterprises having for their object the material advancement of the community, being also a friend of education, religion and other civilizing agencies without which no commonwealth can truly prosper.
He belongs to the Improved Order of Red Men and Court of Honor at Sisseton, is a zealous worker in both organizations and at various times has been honored with responsible official positions
by his fellow members.

Mr. Monson's domestic history dates from 1895, on December 10th of which year was solemnized his marriage with Miss Carrie Stadstad, of Douglas county, Minnesota, a most excellent and amiable lady who has presented him with two children, Beatrice and Arthur A.


Source:
History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904


Folkstad, Charles L.


CHARLES L. FOLKSTAD, a prominent merchant of Sisseton and proprietor of one of the largest and finest general stores in the eastern part of South Dakota, is a native of Minnesota and the son of Levi Folkstad, who came to the United States from Norway sometime in the 'forties. Charles L. Folkstad was born on June 1, 1863, spent his early life in Dodge county, Minnesota, and enjoyed the advantages of a common-school education. When a young man he turned his attention to well digging, which arduous business he followed for three years in his native state and in 1891 came to South Dakota and, entering a tract of land in the southern part of Roberts county, lived on the same until receiving a patent from the government, when he returned to Minnesota. During the ensuing three years Mr. Folkstad clerked in a mercantile house, but at the expiration of that time resigned his position and in 1895 again came to Dakota and opened a gents' furnishing store in Sisseton. His business career since the above date presents a series of successes perhaps without parallel in this state, as his progress from a comparatively modest beginning to his present commanding position among the leading merchants of Dakota has been little less than phenomenal. Starting with a small stock of goods, in an indifferent building, fourteen by twenty feet in size, he soon secured a lucrative patronage and as the business continued to grow in magnitude more
commodious quarters became necessary. In 1897 he took in a partner, but in January following purchased the latter's interest and has since been sole proprietor, the business meanwhile increasing to such an
extent as to make his store the leading establishment of the kind in the city. Mr. Folkstad, in 1900, erected the fine brick building which he now occupies, the structure being twenty-four by one hundred and
twenty feet in size, handsomely finished with pressed brick front and large plate glass windows, the interior a model of beauty and convenience and perfectly adapted to the purposes for which intended.
This store is packed to repletion with full lines of clothing, gents' furnishings, and a first-class tailoring department. Mr. Folkstad has a well-established reputation for selling goods at low prices and for
square and honorable dealing with his patrons. Mr. Folkstad has been remarkably fortunate in all of his business affairs and now possesses a fortune of considerable magnitude, owning in addition to his large
mercantile house and other city property, an extensive tract of fine farm land, besides considerable stock in a number of local enterprises. He is a man of sterling worth, enjoys the confidence of the public and is held in high esteem by his fellow men of Sisseton and Roberts county. He holds membership with the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Knights of Pythias, and in politics supports
the Republican party.

Mr. Folkstad's wife, formerly Miss Anna Pederson, was born in Dodge county, Minnesota, but since five years of age has lived in South Dakota, where her marriage was solemnized on September 26, 1893. The following are the names of their children : Lloyd, Gordon, Alton, Anna Bernice and Charles Walter, a twin of the first born dying in infancy.


Source:
History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904

Marvick, Andrew



ANDREW MARVICK, treasurer and manager of the Iowa and Dakota Land Company, and stockholder in the Citizens' National Bank, Sisseton, is a native of Grundy county, Illinois, where his birth occurred on June 28, 1871. His parents, Seivert and Laura (Naadland) Marvick, were born in Norway and in 1854 came to the United States, settling in Illinois, where the father purchased land and became a successful tiller of the soil. Andrew grew up in close touch with the rugged duties of farm life, and after receiving an elementary education in the public schools of his native county entered the normal school at Morris, Illinois, where he pursued for some time the higher branches of learning. His education finished, he engaged in farming in Illinois and continued the same for some years, later embarking in the
real-estate business in Minnesota and South Dakota. In the spring of 1902 he opened a real-estate office in Sisseton and after conducting the same with marked success until the following fall, when
he helped to organize the Citizens' National Bank, of which his brother, Joseph Marvick, is president.

Mr. Marvick is an accomplished business man and although but recently identified with banking, he has demonstrated abilities and resourcefulness as a financier such as few attain after a much longer
and more varied experience. Under his able management the Citizens' National Bank has become not only one of the leading institutions of the kind in Roberts county, but in the northeastern part of the state,
and, being backed by safe and conservative men, it bids fair to achieve ere long an honorable reputation among the popular and successful banks of the great northwest. In addition to his connection
with the banking interests of Sisseton, Mr. Marvick is identified with various other business enterprises that have had a decided influence upon development of the country, notably among which being the Iowa
and Dakota Land Company, which he is now serving in the twofold capacity of manager and treasurer.

Mr. Marvick ranks with the intelligent and level-headed men of the city of his residence and in every relation of life has made a reputation for probity and correct conduct that has become proverbial. His impulses, always earnest and generous, are invariably in the right direction, and the encouraging success with which his business career has been crowned is mainly due to his industry, fidelity and the spirit of courtesy characteristic of the well-bred, broad-minded gentleman.

Mr. Marvick was married on February 20, 1895, to Miss Linnie Bjelland, a native of Illinois, but of Norwegian parentage, the union resulting in the birth of three children, Lydia, Raymond O. and Amos S.  Mr. and Mrs. Marvick have one of the most beautiful modern residences in Sisseton, and their pleasant home is noted for the hospitality and spirit of good fellowship that welcome all who enter its precincts. In
private life the subject is quiet and unobtrusive, but warm-hearted and affable in his relations with his fellow men. He numbers his friends by the score, stands high in public esteem and the prominent position which he has already reached in business and social circles is indicative of the still greater and more influential career that awaits him in the future. Religiously Mr. Marvick and wife are Lutherans, being among the leading members of the church of that denomination in Sisseton.


Source:
History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904

Rickert, J. A.


J. A. RICKERT, a financier of more than 'local reputation', is a native of Trumbull county, Ohio, and the oldest in a family of twelve children, whose father and mother were of German and Irish descent
respectively. Mr. Rickert was born September 21, 1852, and four years later, with his parents, emigrated to Olmsted county, Minnesota, where he grew to manhood on a farm, meanwhile receiving his preliminary education in the district schools of that county. In 1871 he entered St. Vincent's College, Wheeling, West Virginia, where he pursued his studies for two years, meanwhile attending night school at the Bryant & Stratton Business College, of that city, completing the full commercial course at that institution. For the six years following Mr. Rickert was engaged as clerk, timekeeper and bookkeeper, in Wheeling, West Virginia, and in towns in Minnesota. In 1879 he came to South Dakota and took up a homestead in Grant county, near Milbank. In 1881 he disposed of his claim and with the proceeds engaged in the general merchandise business two years later at Corona, this state, where he carried on a very successful business during the ensuing sixteen years, all of which time he served as postmaster
of the town, besides holding various township and municipal offices.

In 1896 Mr. Rickert was elected treasurer of Roberts county, and upon taking charge of the office moved to Wilmot, where he resided until the seat of justice was changed to Sisseton, when he took up his abode at the latter place and has since made it his home. He was re-elected in 1898 and served both terms in an able and satisfactory manner, proving a painstaking, obliging and popular public servant. During his last term he built an elevator at Sisseton and engaged in the grain business, and about the same time associated himself with H. S. Morris and Howard Babcock and organized the First National Bank of Sisseton, becoming president of the institution, which position he still holds. Still later he became one of the organizers, stockholders and officers of three new banks, known as the Citizens' State Bank of White Rock, the First State Bank of Summit, and the Roberts County State Bank, of Corona, and is a stockholder in the Sisseton Loan and Title Company and the Roberts County Land and Loan Company.

Mr. Rickert owns a fine business property at Corona and a nice residence in Sisseton. He has charge and the management of the extensive farm properties of the Sisseton Loan and Title Company, of
which they own about thirty farms in Roberts and neighboring counties.

Mr. Rickert was married in December, 1882, the union being blessed with one child, a son, Paul M., who is now pursuing his studies in Pillsbury Academy at Owatonna, Minnesota.

Mr. Rickert is a Mason and a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. In politics he has always been an enthusiastic Republican. The distinction which he has achieved in financial and business
circles has given him considerable reputation, and as a public-spirited citizen he is deeply interested in all that tends to the material development and general prosperity of his city, county and state.


Source:
History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904

Porter, Clement F.



CLEMENT F. PORTER, president of the Farmers' State Bank of Wilmot, is a native of Addison county, Vermont, born in the city of New Haven, on the 24th day of October, 1861. His parents were Clement and Elizabeth (Como) Porter, both natives of the province of Quebec, Canada, and he is one of nine children, seven sons and two daughters, being the fifth of the family. His early life was beset with many discouraging vicissitudes and not a few hardships, and at the tender age of seven years he was thrown upon his own resources, from which time to the present day he has been obliged to make his own way in the world. When about eleven years old he went to West Boylston, Massachusetts, where he learned the shoemaker's trade, and after working at the same in that city until 1878 went to St. Paul, Minnesota, where during the ensuing four years he was employed in the shoe factory of Forepaugh & Tarbox.

Severing his connection with that firm at the expiration of that time noted, Mr. Porter came to Roberts county, South Dakota, and in 1882 engaged in general merchandising at Wilmot, in company with Edmund Cook, where he did a fairly successful business for a short time, finally disposing of his establishment to take a business course in a commercial college in St. Paul, Minnesota. Finishing the course, he
returned to Wilmot and opened a hardware store, which he conducted with profitable results until 1888, when he engaged in the livery business, later turning his attention to real estate, banking and to
dealing in agricultural implements. Mr. Porter took a leading part in establishing the Farmers' State Bank of Wilmot, and was made president of the same immediately after its organization, being also a director
of the Citizens' National Bank at Sisseton and of the Iowa and Dakota Land and Loan Company, also of Sisseton. A few years ago he sold his implement business, and has since devoted his attention to his financial interests and to agriculture, being quite extensively engaged in the latter, owning a finely improved and valuable farm in Roberts county, which is cultivated under his personal management.

Mr. Porter has been an active participant in public affairs ever since coming to South Dakota, and in 1902 was elected to the upper house of the general assembly as representative from the thirty-fourth
senatorial district. A Republican of the most orthodox style, he has been a zealous worker in the party, a leader in its councils in Roberts county, and it was in recognition of his valuable services that the above official honor was conferred upon, him. Mr. Porter has served on the Republican central committee of Roberts county, in which capacities he was largely instrumental in formulating the policy of the party and in leading it to victory in local campaigns. Mr. Porter is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and is also identified with the Modern Woodmen of America and the Knights of Pythias fraternities,
having represented both the last named organizations in the grand lodge.

Mr. Porter is a married man and owns one of the beautiful and refined homes of Wilmot, the presiding genius of which is a lady of intelligence and culture, who formerly bore the name of Nathalie DeNomme, but who changed it to the one she now so worthily bears on February 14, 1886. Mrs. Porter is a native of Massachusetts and of French descent, and has borne her husband children as follows : Flora
M., George W., Clement F., Charles S., Thurman, Harry and Irene, all living but Harry, who died January 12, 1902, aged two years and eleven months.


Source:
History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904

Quilty, William F.


REV. WILLIAM F. QUILTY, who since the year 1900 has been the efficient pastor of St. Peter's Catholic church of Sisseton, was born in Madison, Wisconsin, on the 12th of November, 1872. He received his preliminary educational training in Dubuque, Iowa, later became a student of St. Joseph's College, and after finishing the prescribed course of that institution was prepared for holy orders in St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio, where he completed his theological studies in 1898. Father Quilty entered upon the duties of his holy office in Wisconsin, but after a short pastorate there was appointed, in 1900, to St. Peter's church of Sisseton. where he has since remained and which under his able management and aggressive work has grown into one of the strongest and most influential Catholic congregations in the
northeastern part of the state. Since taking charge of the work at this point the church has prospered along all lines of activity and he has won golden opinions and high respect from all classes of society, irrespective of creed or nationality. His labors for the good of his people have been constant and unwearied, and his unswerving fidelity to the interests of his parish has met with an approbation of his superiors that will be more manifest as the years roll by.

In addition to the church at Sisseton, Father Quilty has charge of the mission points at Wilmot and Effington, both of which have progressed greatly under his pastorate, and it is not too much to predict that
ere long these congregations will be self-supporting. Father Quilty is a gentleman of scholarly tastes and, as already stated, his earnest and consecrated efforts have endeared him not only to the people to whom he ministers, but to the public at large. His labors for the spiritual and temporal welfare of his flock have been zealous and unceasing and, being an orator by nature and thoroughly trained by education in pulpit eloquence, his success in performing the duties of his pastorate and winning the love and admiration of his parishioners has been little less than phenomenal. Conscious of the dignity of his mission and losing sight of self in his efforts to extend the Master's kingdom and win souls thereto, his life thus far has been consecrated to duty and the future awaits him with abundant rewards. His scholarly accomplishments, as well as his unfeigned piety and many personal virtues, have made him popular with all classes and conditions of his fellow men, and whatever the future may have in store for him, his name will always be cherished in the hearts of the people among whom he is now laboring with such beneficial results.


Source:
History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904

McNulty, Frank



FRANK McNULTY. attorney and counsellor at law, of Sisseton, is a native of Minnesota and one of a family of six children, whose parents were born and reared in Ireland. His father came to the United States in the early 'fifties and settling in Illinois, followed stock raising until the breaking out of the Great Rebellion, when he enlisted in the Thirty-third Illinois Infantry, with which he served with an honorable
record until the close of the war. Later he moved to Minnesota, where he spent the remainder of his life, dying in the city of St. Cloud in 1896, at the age of fifty-six, his widow being still a resident of that place.

Frank McNulty was born December 1, 1873, in the city of St. Paul and after finishing the public-school course pursued his studies for some time in the University of Minnesota, subsequently, 1900, being graduated from that institution with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. Meantime, 1895, he came to South Dakota as principal of the schools of Wilmot and after filling the position one year was elected
superintendent of the Roberts county public schools, the duties of which he discharged two terms, having been re-elected in 1898. Retiring from the superintendency, Mr. McNulty resumed his legal studies in the University of Minnesota, and after finishing the same, as stated above, opened an office in Sisseton, where his legal abilities soon won public recognition, as is attested by the lucrative practice which he has since built up and now commands. Although a young man with a comparatively brief experience at the bar, he is recognized as a lawyer of high rank and scholarly attainments, well equipped in every branch of the profession and since locating in his present field of labor he has appeared either for the prosecution or defense in many of the most noted cases tried in the courts of Roberts county.

Mr. McNulty is not only well versed in the basic principles of jurisprudence, but is familiar with the devious methods of practice and, being apt and resourceful, is quick to detect weak points or flaws on the part of opposing counsel and turn them to his own advantage. A close and critical student, he has earned the reputation of an able and honorable adviser, as well as that of a judicious practitioner, and the energy and spirit manifested in cases intrusted to him demonstrate his ability to maintain the justness of his causes. Mr. McNulty is pronounced in his allegiance to the Republican party and has done much to promote its success in Roberts county and throughout South Dakota. He served one year as secretary of the state central committee, in which capacity his labors were duly recognized and appreciated, and he has used his influence in many other ways to insure victory for the cause which has always been very close to his heart. Prominent in local affairs and untiring in his efforts to advance the interests of his city and county, he encourages every legitimate enterprise to these ends, and ever since taking up his residence in South Dakota his name has been very closely identified with movements and measures having for their object the advancement of the state and the prosperity of its people. Mr. McNulty is a director of the Citizens' National Bank of Sisseton and a stockholder in the same, also a director and vice-president of the Iowa Land and Loan Company. In addition to his individual interests as represented by his law practice, he owns considerable land and devotes no little attention to agriculture and stock raising, for both of which he has always manifested a decided liking. Fraternally Mr. McNulty is a member of the Knights of Pythias, in which he now holds the title of past grand chancellor, and he has at different times represented the local lodge in the grand lodge of the state. While in college he was an active worker in the Phi Delta Phi fraternity and still manifests a lively interest in the same, retaining his membership and keeping himself in close touch with its deliberations.


Source:
History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904

Foss, L. William



L. WILLIAM FOSS, clerk of the Roberts county courts, is a native of Dodge county, Minnesota, where his birth occurred on July 12, 1878. His parents, Anton and Emma (Folkstadt) Foss, were born in Norway and Minnesota, respectively, both being of Scandinavian origin. Anton Foss lived in Minnesota for a number of years and was a man of considerable prominence in his community. He came to South Dakota in 1880, took a leading part in the public affairs of Roberts county and from 1890 to 1894, inclusive, held the office of register of deeds. His home at the present time is on a farm near Wilmot, but he is interested in the abstract business at Milbank, in the Grant County Abstract and Title Company.
 
L. William Foss was about two years old when his parents moved to South Dakota, and since that time the greater part of his life has been spent in Roberts county. He has reared on a farm near Wilmot,
attended the public schools of that town until finishing the prescribed course of study and in 1896 was appointed deputy register of deeds, which office he held until engaging in the mercantile business at Summit, in September of the following year. Mr. Foss sold goods until 1901, when he disposed of his establishment and accepted the position of committee clerk in the house of representatives in the session of 1901. He then came to Sisseton and entered the employ of the Roberts County Abstract and Title Company, with which he remained about one and a half years, when he was elected in 1902 clerk of the circuit and county courts, which office he has since held. Mr. Foss's previous training and experience fitted him to discharge acceptably the duties of the clerkship and his management of the office has fully
justified the people in the wisdom of his election. He is an accomplished business man, a ready accountant, and by his courteous treatment of those having business to transact in the office, he has won a warm and permanent place in the hearts of his fellow citizens. A Republican in politics and zealous in upholding his principles, he is nevertheless popular with the people of the county, regardless of party ties and numbers among his warm friends many who hold opinions directly the opposite of his own.

Mr. Foss. on November 25, 1901, was united in marriage with Miss Angie M. Tenney, of Spring Valley, Minnesota, the accomplished daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D. H. Tenney, who are among the well-known and highly respected people of that town. Fraternally Mr. Foss is identified with the Modem Woodmen of America and the Improved Order of Red Men, being at this time chief of records in the local lodge of the latter organization in Sisseton. Mr. Foss is one of the rising young men of Roberts county, and his honorable career thus far is prophetic of a much wider sphere of action and greater achievements in years to come.


Source:
History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904

Metcalf, Homer A.



HOMER A. METCALF, for twenty-two years a resident of South Dakota and since 1900 auditor of Roberts county, is a native of the dominion of Canada, born near the city of London, Ontario, on April  13, of the year 1865, being one of eight children, three sons and five daughters, that constituted the family of Anthony and Catherine (Haley) Metcalf, the father of English birth, the mother of German-English descent, but born and reared in Canada. Anthony Metcalf, a carpenter by trade, and later a large and successful contractor, immigrated to South Dakota in 1881 and settled near Wilmot, Roberts county, where he engaged in farming, which vocation he followed until retiring from active life a few years ago and, removing to the town of Wilmot. While following building he displayed great energy and acquired an honorable reputation as mechanic and contractor. He was also successful as an agriculturist, and is now enjoying the fruits of his many years of honest toil in the quiet, restful life, which only such busy men as he know how to appreciate fully. Mrs. Catherine Metcalf died in Roberts county in the month of March, 1887.

Homer A. Metcalf spent his childhood and youth on the family homestead near London, Canada, attended the public schools there until about his sixteenth year and in 1881 accompanied his parents to Roberts county, South Dakota, where he has since resided. He continued his studies for some time after coming to this state and when a young man engaged in teaching, which profession he followed of winter seasons for three years. He also pre-empted land, from which in due time he developed a good farm, and after retiring from educational work devoted his entire attention to agriculture until the fall of 1900, when he was elected by the Republican party to the office of county auditor. The better to discharge the duties of his office Mr. Metcalf turned his farm over to other hands and removed to the county seat, where he has since lived, having been chosen his own successor in the year 1902.

Mr. Metcalf has administered his office in an able and praiseworthy manner and his record since taking possession of the same has been eminently creditable to himself and an honor to the county. He keeps
in close touch with public affairs, is active as a politician and has contributed much to the success of the Republican party in his section of the state. He retained his landed interests until quite recently, when he disposed of the same, and is now prominently identified with the growth and development of Sisseton, encouraging all efforts making for the city's material prosperity and lending his influence to all enterprises having for their object the social, educational and moral advancement of the community.

On November 20, 1890, Mr. Metcalf entered the marriage relation with Miss Ella Frymire, of Canada, daughter of Philip Frymire, who moved some years ago to Roberts county. South Dakota, where the father is still living, her mother being deceased. Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Metcalf, namely: Harold H., Donald C, Paul W., Ray C, Edith May and Winfield, all living and, with their parents,
constituting a happy household. The religious belief of Mr. Metcalf is represented by the Methodist church, of which he has been a faithful and consistent member for a number of years. Mrs. Metcalf is also a
Methodist, and with her husband belongs to the congregation worshiping at Sisseton.


Source:
History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904

Gamm, Edward C.



EDWARD C. GAMM, the leading lumber dealer of Sisseton, was born in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, on August 24, 1844, being one of the five children of Christopher Gamm, a miller by trade, who came to America in 1865, and departed this life four years later in the state of Connecticut. E. C. was reared and educated in his native country and when a youth learned cabinetmaking, which trade he followed in Germany until 1865, when he came to the United States and secured employment in an organ and piano factory in the city of New York. Subsequently he engaged in the manufacture of doors, sash and other building material at that place, but later, in 1875, went to Stillwater, Minnesota, where he carried on the same line of business for some time in connection with the general lumber trade. In 1885 Mr. Gamm went to St. Paul as agent for the St. Croix Lumber Company, and continued to manage the firm's large interests in that city during the ensuing several years, resigning his position as manager in 1896. In the latter year he came to Sisseton, South Dakota, and started the lumber yard of which he is now general manager, the meanwhile building up an extensive business in lumber and all kinds of building material, such as doors, sash, lath, etc., his establishment being one of the largest of the kind in this part of the state. Since coming west Mr. Gamm has manifested a decided interest in the affairs of Sisseton and Roberts
county, being public spirited in all the term implies and ever ready and willing to lend his influence and support to enterprises and measures for the general welfare of the community. He served six years as alderman and could have had almost any local office within the gift of the people had he not positively refused to accept such evidence of public confidence.

Mr. Gamm holds membership with the Knights of Pythias, Improved Order of Red Men, Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Sons of Hermann, and in politics votes the Republican ticket. He has been twice married, the first time, in May, 1869, to Miss Amelia Huhnke, of Germany, who died in 1889 at the age of forty-eight years, leaving three children: Charles, Emma and Edward. Mr. Gamm, on October 23. 1890, contracted a matrimonial alliance with Miss Louisa Hohlmann, a native of St. Paul, but of German parentage, the union being blessed with two children, a son, William H. and a daughter by the name of Irene. As stated in a preceding paragraph, Mr. Gamm is classed with the most energetic and progressive citizens of Roberts county and in even-walk of life he is respected as a courteous, kind-hearted gentleman of sterling integrity and genuine moral worth. He has been quite successful in business, but has other than this to recommend him to the favorable consideration of the community, being interested in
everything pertaining to the welfare of his fellow men, a liberal donor to all public and private benevolences, and a supporter of agencies that make for the advancement of his city, county and state. Few stand as high in general esteem and no man in Sisseton enjoys greater popularity or is more worthy of the success he has achieved.


Source:
History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904

Peever, T. H.



T. H. PEEVER is a native of Canada, and the son of David and Eliza (Huffman) Peever, who came from Ireland about 1860 and settled in Canada where the father purchased land and engaged in agricultural
pursuits. Of a family of nine children, six sons and three daughters, T. H. is the eldest in order of birth. He was born August 4, 1862, receiving a good practical education in the public schools of Canada, and in 1881 came to the United States, locating for one year in Michigan, where he engaged in the lumber business. At the expiration of the time noted he went to Wisconsin, where he dealt in lumber during the ensuing nine years, and then sold out and came to Roberts county. South Dakota, arriving at Wilmot on the 25th of March, 1892, before the opening of the reservation. After running a locating office at the above place for a short time. Mr. Peever settled on the present site of Sisseton, where he took up a homestead and later when the town was laid out he assisted in the enterprise, took an active interest in disposing of the lots and was largely instrumental in attracting a thrifty class of people to the place. Shortly after locating at Sisseton, he began dealing in farm machinery, in connection with which he also opened a real estate office, and in due time built up a large and lucrative patronage in both lines of business, continuing the same with encouraging success for a period of six years.

Mr. Peever was the second postmaster of Sisseton. having been appointed to the position by President Cleveland, during whose administration he managed the office in a manner highly satisfactory to the public. He was the first chairman of Sisseton and Sisseton township before incorporation and did much to advance the interests of the community and promote its material growth and development. Mr. Peever has always been an ardent Democrat and since old enough to exercise the rights of citizenship has taken active interest in party politics. In 1899 he was nominated for the senate, but by reason of the county's being overwhelmingly Republican he failed of election, although he made a gallant fight and greatly reduced the normal majority of the opposition. In February, 1900, Mr. Peever organized the Peever-Gorham Mercantile Company of Sisseton, which was incorporated with a capital of fifty thousand dollars for the purpose of establishing and carrying on a general mercantile business, and of which he has since been president and business manager. The company carries full lines of merchandise, demanded by the general trade, owns large and commodious store rooms and does a much more extensive business than any establishment of the kind in the city or county. In addition to this enterprise the subject is president of the First State Bank of Peever, is interested in the Peever Loan Company, and owns a large and valuable farm adjoining Sisseton, which is operated under his direction. Mr. Peever is one of the wide-awake, energetic men of Roberts county, and his ability to carry on successfully large and important enterprises is attested by the financial prosperity that has crowned all of his undertakings. Mr. Peever is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Ancient Order United Workmen and Masonic fraternities, and in the last named organization he holds the office of treasurer at the present time. His domestic life dates from January 22, 1895, at which time he was united in marriage with Miss Agnes P. Rice, who died in
1897, leaving one child, a son by the name of David B. Subsequently. May 18, 1901, Mr. Peever was united in the bonds of wedlock with Miss Emma E. Schindler, a native of Minnesota, and a sister of the
Schindler brothers, of Sisseton.


Source:
History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904


Babcock, Howard


HOWARD BABCOCK, attorney-at-law, and for a number of years a leading member of the Sisseton bar, and the present mayor of Sisseton, was born in Waterloo, Wisconsin. December 21, 1867, being the son of Seth C. and Sarah C. (Cole) Babcock, both natives of New York. Seth C. Babcock, a farmer by occupation, was descended from old colonial stock, his family having been among the earliest settlers of York State, and not a few of the name participating in the struggle for independence. He was a veteran of the late Civil war, serving in Company H, Twenty-ninth Wisconsin Infantry, and made an honorable record as a brave and gallant soldier. The Coles also belong to an old family, the early history of which dates from a remote period in the time of the colonies, and the name is still familiar in New York, where they originally located. Seth and Sarah Babcock were the parents of four children who grew to maturity, three sons and one daughter, all living.

Howard Babcock remained in his native town until about eight years of age and in 1875 removed with his parents to Racine, Mower county, Minnesota, where he worked on a farm and attended the public schools and the Spring Valley high school until his eighteenth year. After teaching two terms of school, he spent the ensuing three years in the Cedar Valley Seminary at Osage, Iowa, and at the expiration of that time began the study of law with Judge C. C. Willson. of Rochester, Minnesota, under whose instruction he continued until his admission to the bar in 1892. Mr. Babcock began the practice of his profession at Wilmot, South Dakota, in 1892, and two years later was elected state's attorney, which position he held the constitutional term of four years, proving an able, faithful and untiring official. Retiring from office, he resumed the general practice and when the county seat was moved to Sisseton he changed his residence to that place, and has built up a large and lucrative practice in the courts of Roberts and
neighboring counties. Mr. Babcock is one of the leading lawyers of the Sisseton bar, stands high in the esteem of his professional associates and the public, and has earned an enviable reputation in his chosen
calling. His success has been as pronounced financially as professionally and he is today one of the well-to-do men of his city and county, owning valuable real estate, besides his interests in the First National Bank and Reservation State Bank, of Sisseton, the First State Bank of Summit and the Citizens' Bank at White Rock. He helped to organize these institutions and has been a member of the directorate of each bank ever since, and at this time he is president of the First State Bank of Summit. He also organized the Sisseton Loan and Title Company and is heavily interested in the Roberts County Land and Loan Company, being president of both institutions. Mr. Babcock owns one of the finest residence properties in Sisseton and a half section in Roberts county, which is under a high state of cultivation and well improved in the way of buildings, fences, etc. He is essentially a self-made man, his professional success and financial prosperity being the result of his own untiring efforts and industry, and it is eminently fitting to claim for him a prominent place among the representative citizens of his adopted state. Mr. Babcock is a member of the Masonic fraternity and at the present time holds the office of junior warden in Sisseton Lodge. No. 31; he is also identified with the Pythian brotherhood, belonging to Reservation Lodge, No. 66.

Mr. Babcock, on January 22, 1895, contracted a matrimonial alliance with Miss Ella Jones, of Mitchell, Iowa, and their union has been blessed by three children, Dana B.. Gordon C. and Carroll H., who are
sturdy examples of the boys they raise in South Dakota.


Source:
History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904


Hill, Ira C.


IRA C. HILL, county treasurer of Roberts county and a gentleman of high standing in the business and social circles of Sisseton. is a native of New York, born in the city of Elmira, on March 9, 1848. His father, Felix Hill, was also a New Yorker by birth, being descended from one of the old families of that commonwealth, and his mother, who bore the maiden name of Julia Hoover, came of old New England stock, her father having served with distinction in the war of 1812. Felix and Julia Hill were the parents of eight children, five sons and three daughters, all living, the majority well settled in life and greatly
esteemed in their respective places of residence.

Ira C. Hill spent the first eight years of his life in the state of his birth and in 1856 accompanied his parents on their removal to Wisconsin, where he lived until 1863. He was reared on a farm, with the rugged duties and wholesome discipline of which he early became familiar, and when old enough he entered the district schools which he attended of winter seasons until a youth in his teens. In 1863 he went with the family to Minnesota, where a little later he tendered his services to the government to help put down the rebellion, enlisting in Company D. Ninth Minnesota Infantry, with which he shared the fortunes and vicissitudes of war for a period of eighteen months, the meanwhile taking part in several campaigns and in a number of hard-fought battles. At the expiration of his period of service he returned to Minnesota, where he followed agricultural pursuits until 1892, when he disposed of his interests in that state and came to Roberts county, South Dakota, where he purchased land and engaged in farming. Later, 1897, he moved to Sisseton, and started a hardware store, to which line of business he devoted his attention until 1900, when he was elected treasurer of Roberts county, which position he still holds, having been re-elected in 1902. Mr. Hill's career has been eminently satisfactory and it is universally conceded that the countv has never been served by a more capable or obliging official. He has handled the public funds judiciously, and as a custodian of one of the people's most important trusts has so deported himself as to gain the confidence of his fellow citizens of all parties and shades of political opinion. He has also served two terms as county commissioner and during his incumbency in that office was untiring in his efforts to promote public improvements, but at all times careful and even conservative in the matter of expenditures.

Mr. Hill is still engaged in agriculture on an extensive scale, owning a finely improved farm of four hundred acres in the northern part of Roberts county, all under cultivation, in addition to which he has various other interests, being a heavy stockholder in the First National Bank of Sisseton and in the Citizens' State Bank at White Rock. He has been quite successful in all of his enterprises and is now regarded as one of the financially strong and reliable men of his city and county. He is a member of Sisseton Lodge, No. 31. Free and Accepted Masons, and his name is also found on the records of Reservation Lodge, No. 66, Knights of Pythias, being a zealous worker in both orders, besides at all times exemplifying their principles and precepts in his relations with his fellow men.

Mr. Hill was married in Minnesota, May 27, 1878, to Miss Jennie Rhodes, daughter of Elica Rhodes, of New York, the union resulting in the birth of a daughter, Susie J., at home, and Felix, who is married
and lives on the home farm.


Source:
History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904



Spackman, Harry

HARRY L. SPACKMAN, president of the Reservation State Bank, Sisseton, and manager of the Roberts County Land and Loan Company, was born in Stephenson county, Illinois, May 3, 1866, the son of Jonathan W. Spackman, a native of Pennsylvania and by occupation a contractor and builder. Harry L., who is one of six children, three sons and three daughters, was reared to his seventeenth year in the town of Dakota, Illinois, the meantime acquiring a good education in the public schools. He came to this state in 1883, and from the latter year until 1888 he lived in St. Lawrence, Hand county, devoting the greater part of the time to agricultural pursuits, and then went to Sioux Falls, where he clerked in a store until his removal to Sisseton in 1892. Mr. Spackman was one of the proprietors of Sisseton, and to him also belongs the credit of being the pioneer merchant of the town. He opened a general store shortly after his arrival and conducted a very profitable business until 1896, when he disposed of his mercantile
interests and engaged in banking and real estate. He was one of the organizers of the Reservation State Bank of Sisseton, and has since been president of the same, and also took a leading part in
establishing the Sisseton State Bank, of which he is still an official and heavy stockholder. In addition to this enterprise he is connected with the Roberts County Land and Loan Company, being its business
manager, and to his energies and executive ability is due much of the success which has marked the history of the company from its organization to the present time. As already indicated, Mr. Spackman
was one of the founders of Sisseton and to him as much as to any other individual may be attributed the rapid growth of the town and its favorable prospects of becoming at no distant day one of the most important commercial and industrial centers in the northeastern part of the state.

Mr. Spackman is a Republican in politics, and a faithful worker for the success of his party. He was chairman of the Republican county committee four years and served six years as county commissioner, to
which office he was elected by an overwhelming vote irrespective of party. He is a clear-headed, far-sighted man, knows how to take advantage of opportunities and bend them to suit his purposes, and all of his undertakings have resulted greatly to his financial advantages.

Mr. Spackman holds membership with Sisseton Lodge, No. 38, Ancient Order of United Workmen, Reservation Lodge, No. 66, Knights of Pythias, and is also a zealous worker in the Odd Fellows order,
besides lending his influence to other organized agencies for the promotion of benevolence, charity and fraternal relationships. Public-spirited, he hesitates at no difficulty and, optimistic in all the term implies, he has an abiding faith in himself and in his fellow citizens to make South Dakota one of the greatest commonwealths in the galaxy of states.

Mr. Spackman was married, April 10, 1889, to Miss Dora Wampler, or Elsworth, Illinois, daughter of A. J. Wampler, who is now an honored resident of Sisseton. To Mr. and Mrs. Spackman have been born three children, namely: Vera A., Hazel M. and Harrold B.


Source:
History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904


Lindquist, A. W.


A. W. LINDOUIST — As the name indicates, the subject of this sketch is of foreign blood, although a native of the United States, having been born near Alma, Wisconsin, on the 4th day of September,  1869. John and Christina (Westling) Lindquist, his parents, both natives of Sweden, came to America in 1850 and settled in Wabasha county, Minnesota. Later he moved to Alma, Wisconsin, and from there to Ortonville, Minnesota, in 1877, where the father engaged in farming. He died December 24, 1902, at the age of seventy-two years, the mother being still a resident of Ortonville. John and Christina Lindquist reared a family of six children, five living, the subject of this review being the oldest of the number. A. W. spent his early years on the homestead near Ortonville. and received his education in the public schools of that place, after which he accepted a clerkship in a mercantile house, holding the same for a period of eight years. Resigning his position at Ortonville in 1891, Mr. Lindquist came to Roberts county, South Dakota, and in February of the same year estabhshed himself in the mercantile business at Wilmot, which line of trade he has since conducted, the meanwhile greatly enlarging his stock by adding a general assortment of goods, including all kinds of agricultural implements and farm machinery, and meeting with most gratifying success in his undertaking. His patronage, which includes a wide
range, is quite lucrative, and in his well-stocked establishment is found every article of merchandise demanded by the general trade. As a business man he is familiar with the underlying principles of
commercial life, being a careful buyer, an accomplished salesman and progressive in the management of his affairs, yet sufficiently conservative as to make few errors of judgment, steering clear of
unwise speculations and being satisfied with the sure gains that come from legitimate trading.

In addition to his commercial interests, Mr. Lindquist is a large real-estate holder, owning and personally managing the farms in Roberts county, besides holding a half interest in the old family homestead in Big Stone county, Minnesota. He belongs to the public-spirited class of men that have done much to promote the material advancement of Wilmot and Roberts counties, and he has also achieved considerable reputation as a shrewd, resourceful and far-seeing politician, having borne quite a prominent part in bringing about the re-election of Hon. J. H. Kyle to the United States senate. His influence in municipal, county and state politics has given him considerable prestige among the leaders of his party, not only in the county and district in which he resides but throughout the state as well. Mr. Lindquist is a thirty-second-degree Scottish-rite Mason, belonging to the blue lodge at Wilmot, the consistory at Aberdeen and the Mystic Shrine at Minneapolis, Minnesota. He is a zealous member of this ancient and honorable brotherhood, is well versed in its mystic work and his sterling manhood proves that its principles and precepts had not a little to do in guiding and controlling his daily life and conduct.

Mr. Lindquist was married on May 31, 1893, to Miss Edna Knappen, of Minneapolis, and is the father of two children, Muriel and Phyllis.


Source:
History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904


Bowler, John A.


JOHN A. BOWLER was born April 8, 1861, in North Adams, Massachusetts, and at the age of six years removed with his parents, William and Bridget (Malvey) Bowler, to Sparta, Wisconsin, near which place he grew to maturity on a farm, and in the public schools of which he received his educational training. He remained at home assisting his father until his twentieth year, and then engaged in the implement
business at Sparta, but after spending about one year in that town, he, in 1882, came to South Dakota, locating at Groton, where he became a member of the well-known implement and machinery firm of Short & Bowler. This relationship continued until 1884, when the subject purchased his partner's interest and since that time he has carried on business at the old stand, in connection with which he also conducted a branch establishment at Sioux Falls from 1896 to 1899. In 1903 Mr. Bowler bought an interest in the Western Security Company, of Sioux Falls, and from that time to the present he has been actively engaged with the enterprise as president and general manager, its continued success and prosperity being largely the result of his energy and correct business methods.

Mr. Bowler has won a conspicuous place in the business circles of Sioux Falls and Groton and has also been influential in all that concerns the material advancement of the two places, being a forceful factor in promoting all legitimate enterprises and to no small degree a leader in public affairs. He is a zealous and uncompromising Democrat and for a number of years has been prominent in the councils of his party, both locally and throughout the state, his ability as an organizer together with his judicious leadership gaining him such wide and favorable recognition that in 1894 he was chosen chairman of the state central committee. In this responsible and exacting position he demonstrated ability and resourcefulness of a high order and so thoroughly was the party organized under his management and so earnestly and effectively did he conduct the campaign of the above year, that for the first time in its history the state was carried by the Democracy. In the year 1902 Mr. Bowler was the choice of his party for United States senator, and received the full vote of the Democratic side of both houses of the legislature, but failed of election by reason of the large Republican majority. He made a gallant
and dignified fight, however, and in addition to receiving the endorsement of the Democracy of the state, won many warm friends among those opposed to him by political ties. He held the chairmanship for a period of six years and the meantime. May, 1899, was appointed by Governor Lee warden of the state penitentiary, the duties of which position he discharged in an able and business-like manner until 1901, his administration being one of the most creditable and satisfactory in the history of the institution.

Mr. Bowler is a man without an enemy, for his large humanity embraces all his race and neither party feuds nor religious differences are able to separate him from his kind nor mar the cordiality of his
social relations. Fraternally he is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, belonging to the lodge at Sioux Falls, and at various times he has held important official positions in the
organization. He is also a Knight of Columbus, at Sioux Falls, being grand knight of the local lodge, and district deputy.

Mr. Bowler was married at Sparta. Wisconsin. December 31, 1883, to Miss Mary F. Linehan, of that place, a lady of valued culture and sterling character and a favorite in the best social circles of her
present place of residence.


Source:
History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904

Peek, Lewis


LEWIS VICTOR PEEK, of Wilmot, was born near Portage City, Columbia county, Wisconsin, September 26, 1862, being one of a family of four children, whose father, William H. Peek, a native of New York, was an early settler of Wisconsin, and by occupation a tiller of the soil. Lewis V. was reared to agricultural pursuits, acquired a strong physique under the rugged but wholesome discipline of the farm and grew to young manhood in Minnesota, to which state his parents removed when he was but a child. Later, in 1882, he accompanied the family to South Dakota and subsequently began clerking in a store at Milbank, but after spending a short time in that town he accepted a similar position in Wilmot, where he sold goods for one year.

In 1887 Mr. Peek was appointed deputy county treasurer and two years later succeeded to the office of treasurer to fill out the unexpired term of William McKissick, discharging the duties of the position
until 1893, having been elected for a full term 1891. Retiring from the office at the expiration of his period of service, he took a claim in the northern part of the county, where the name Victor was given to
a township in compliment to him, and a little later he secured the postoffice at Vernon, to accommodate people of that locality. After residing on his claim until the fall of 1894 Mr. Peek was elected cashier of the First State Bank of Wilmot, accordingly he returned to the town and entered upon his duties, discharging the same to the satisfaction of all concerned until January, 1902, when he resigned. He is still interested in the bank, however, being a stockholder and a member of the board of directors, in addition to which he is secretary and treasurer of the Wilmot Land and Loan Company, the organization of
which was brought about mainly through his agency and influence. He is also interested in agriculture and stock raising, and owns considerable valuable farm land in Roberts county, which he personally
manages, also a fine residence in Wilmot and other city property, his various enterprises having succeeded so well that he is now numbered with the financially strong and reliable men of the community honored
by his citizenship.

Mr. Peek has been and is still one of the leading men of Wilmot and since locating in the city he has been very closely identified with its history and development. He served several terms as trustee and
mayor under the original municipal government and after a city charter was secured he was also honored with official station, being mayor at the present time. Like the majority of enterprising men, Mr. Peek is a Mason and stands high in the order, belonging to the blue lodge at Wilmot, the chapter at Milbank, the commandery at Watertown, the Scottish Rite at Aberdeen and the Mystic Shrine, which holds its session in the city of Sioux Falls. He is also a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias, and their several auxiliaries, and an active worker in the local lodge of the Modern Woodmen of America, with which he is connected.

Mr. Peek, on February 17, 1887, was married to Miss Ida C. Bailly, daughter of Alexander P. Bailly, of Minnesota, and is the father of one child, Stewart Irving Peek, whose birth occurred on April 18, 1896. As already indicated, Mr. Peek is one of Wilmot's valued and highly esteemed citizens. He has borne well his part in life and is now conducting a flourishing business and meeting with the success that is justly deserved.


Source:
History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904

Harris, T. J.


T. J. HARRIS, postmaster of Wilmot. and one of the early settlers of Roberts county, was born in Illinois, July 28, 1848. His father, Thomas Harris, a native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, emigrated to
Illinois in 1830, became prominently identified with the community in which he lived and spent the remainder of his life in that state, dying some years ago at the advanced age of ninety-three. T. J. Harris is the youngest of nine children that grew to maturity, six of whom are still living. He was reared in his native state, enjoyed the advantages of a common-school education and after beginning life for himself followed different occupations in Illinois and Minnesota until the year 1880, when he came to South Dakota, locating in Roberts county, where he engaged in buying and shipping wheat for several firms, continuing the business until the fall of 1889, at which time he took charge of a large elevator at Wilmot. After managing the latter enterprise for a period of eight years, he resigned his position for the purpose of entering upon his duties as postmaster of Wilmot, to which office he was appointed in 1897 and which he has since held, proving an efficient and popular official and performing his functions creditably to himself and satisfactorily to the public.

In addition to his official relations, Mr. Harris has large agricultural interests in Roberts county, owning two finely improved farms six miles south of Wilmot. He devotes considerable attention to these places, has reduced the greater part of his land to cultivation and realizes from it no small share of his income. Energetic and public-spirited he manifests a lively regard in the affairs of his city and county and being one of the leading Republicans of the same, has achieved much more than local repute as a politician, being widely and favorably known as a judicious party organizer and successful campaigner.

Mr. Harris is a member of the Pythian fraternity, but his acts of charity and benevolence are by no means confined to this order, being a liberal donor to all worthy objects and free to assist those who have met with misfortune or discouragements. Mr. Harris has a fine home in Wilmot and, with his wife, moves in the best social circles of the city. He was married in September, 1900, to Miss Emma A. Stowell, of Massachusetts, whose father, J. T. Stowell, was one of the pioneers of South Dakota, moving his family to the territory in 1880 and taking a prominent part in its subsequent history.


Source:
History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904

LeCount, Wallace


WALLACE S. LeCOUNT, like many of the best citizens of this country, traces his ancestry to early French Huguenots, who, leaving their native home to escape religious prosecution, found a refuge in New
England. His paternal grandfather was a Revolutionary veteran and also served in the war of 1812. On the mother's side, Mr. LeCount is also of colonial stock, being descended from the old Stark family of
Glasgow, Scotland, representatives of which became closely identified with the history of New England, especially of Vermont, where the name of Gen. John Stark, who added luster to the American arms during the Revolution by his signal victory at Bennington, is still held in reverence and respect. W. J. LeCount is a resident of Wisconsin, and for a number of years has been revenue collector for the first district of that state. Nellie Fowler, who became his wife, bore him six children, two sons and four daughters, five of the number still living, Wallace L. being the eldest of the family.

Wallace S. LeCount was born January 9, 1869, in Hartford, Wisconsin. After finishing the high-school course he engaged in newspaper work in Wisconsin, came to South Dakota, and in 1884 established, at Wilmot, the Roberts County Republican. He has a well-equipped office, and issues one of the best and most popular local sheets in the state, it being Republican in politics and an able and fearless party organ.
Typographically it is a creditable example of the art preservative, neat in its mechanical makeup, and is devoted to local and state happenings, and is a clean and exceedingly interesting family paper. The circulation is constantly increasing, the advertising patronage is liberal, and with a valuable plant its future influence and prosperity appear fully assured.

Through the medium of his paper, as well as by personal influence, Mr. LeCount has become known as a politician, and has been a member of the Republican state executive committee since 1899.

Mr. LeCount lives in the thriving town of Wilmot and is active in the interests of the municipality and the general welfare. He is a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias, being past chancellor of the last named.

Mr. LeCount was married on May 2, 1891, to Miss Emily M. Heimes. of Michigan, daughter of August Heimes.


Source:
History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904

Kennedy, Casper


CASPER KENNEDY, editor and proprietor of the Sisseton Standard, also postmaster of Sisseton, was born in Aylmer, Ontario, December 5, 1863, and is one of six children, four sons and two daughters, whose parents, James and Phoebe Kennedy, were also natives of Canada. He was reared in the town of Aylmer, received a high school education there and in 1882 came to Watertown, South Dakota, and accepted a position on the Courier-News, published by Doane Robinson, remaining with that paper until 1892. When the reservation was opened that year he became a citizen of Sisseton and began the publication of the Standard, which is recognized as one of the best and most influential local newspapers in South Dakota, and which under his able management has contributed greatly to the building up of the town. Mr. Kennedy is a politician of much more than local repute, and through the medium of his paper has done much to promote the success of the Republican party in Roberts county and throughout the northeastern part of the state. In recognition of valuable services rendered his party, he was appointed postmaster by President McKinley in 1898, and has since discharged the duties of the position to the satisfaction of all concerned, proving a capable, accommodating and most obliging public official. Mr. Kennedy is deeply interested in the welfare of the community in which he resides and is untiring in his efforts to advance the interests and prosperity of his fellow citizens of Sisseton and Roberts county. He served several years on the local board of education, during which time the schools of Sisseton were brought to a high standard of efficiency, and he has also given his influence and encouragement to all enterprises making for the public good along social, intellectual and moral lines, as well as in material affairs. Fraternally he is an active worker in the Masonic order, Ancient Order of United Workmen, Modern Woodmen of America and Knights of Pythias, and religiously is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church of Sisseton and deeply interested in all of the congregation's activities.


Source:
History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904

Norby, A. J.


A. J. NORBY is a native of Appleton, Minnesota, and the son of John J. and Sarah (Thompson) Norby. He is one of a family of five children, two sons and three daughters, and was born January 3, 1877. At the age of four years he was brought to Wilmot, South Dakota, where he spent his childhood and youth and received his preliminary education. After attending the public schools until finishing the usual studies, he fitted himself for active life by taking a full commercial course in a business college, later attending a school of pharmacy in Minneapolis, Minnesota, after which he engaged in the drug business at South Shore, South Dakota.  After a short experience at that place he disposed of his establishment and accepted the position of cashier with the Warren Scharf Asphalt Paving Company, of Cleveland, Ohio,  holding the same for only a brief time, when he resigned and came to Sisseton, where he was soon chosen bookkeeper and assistant cashier of the State Bank at this place, which relation he sustained until promoted cashier. He held the latter position until August 14, 1902, when he resigned and organized the Citizens' National Bank, of which he was made cashier and a member of the directorate, both of which places he still holds, and in addition thereto is also stockholder in the Farmers' State Bank of Wilmot. While primarily interested in banking, Mr. Norby is connected with several other important business enterprises, notable among which are the Iowa and Dakota Land and Loan Company, the Roberts County Abstract and Title Company and the Sisseton Lumber Company, being secretary and manager of the first named organization, treasurer and director of the second, and vice-president and a director and large stockholder in the lumber company. Although a young man, Mr. Norby has forged rapidly to the
front in business circles and now occupies a position in the world of affairs such as few of his age and experience attain. Aside from his relations already referred to, Mr. Norby has been an influential factor in the general business and industrial affairs of Sisseton, every movement calculated to advance the city, materially or otherwise, receiving his co-operation and support. All agencies for the promotion of education find in him a friend and patron, and he is unwavering in upholding whatever he believes to be right and for the best interests of the community. Mr. Norby belongs to the' Knights of Pythias, in which he holds the position of chancellor commander, and is also a member of the Modern Woodmen of America and the Improved Order of Red Men. His married life dates from the 13th of January, 1900, at which time he was united in the bonds of wedlock with Miss Effie Brown, of Minneapolis, Minnesota, a union blessed with two children, Rocheford J. and Ruth.


Source:
History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904

Morris, Henry


HENRY S. MORRIS is not only one of the leading business men and representative citizens of Roberts county, but also one of the earliest settlers of this part of the state and, as his father, W. K. Morris, bore an important part in the early history of eastern Dakota and was one of the first white men to locate within the present limits of Roberts county, it is appropriate that a brief review of his life be given in this connection. W. K. Morris was born in Hartford. Connecticut, September 11, 1842, the son of a city missionary who moved to Washington county, New York, when his son was an infant. In the latter state Mr. Morris grew to maturity and received his education and he moved thence to Minnesota, in 1864, locating in Blue Earth county, where he made his home until 1870. In that year he was selected to take charge of the Good Will Mission in South Dakota, and on December 1st he set forth with two yoke of oxen and a yoke of cows hitched to two wagons containing his family and a modest outfit of household goods. After a journey of fourteen days he arrived at his destination, seeing no white men after passing the town of New Ulin until reaching the mission. Mr. Morris had never seen any Sioux Indians until he reached his field of labor, and at that time could neither speak nor understand their language. In due time, however, he acquired a thorough knowledge of the same and from the beginning his work among the Indians was blessed with beneficial results. He taught at Good Will Mission under the supervision of Rev. S. R. Reggs until 1873, when he was placed in full charge of the school, holding the position during the ensuing seventeen years. In 1890 he went to the Omaha and Winnebago reservation, where he had charge of a school until 1894, at which time he transferred to the church at Pine Ridge agency, when he was licensed a minister. After preaching at the latter place until July, 1897, he gave up his missionary work and settled at Sisseton, Roberts county, near which town he engaged in farming and stock raising, but is now living a life of retirement. Mr. Morris was married in 1876 to Miss Martha T. Riggs, sister of Thomas Lawrence Riggs, of the South Dakota State Historical Society, the union being blessed with five children, of whom Henry S. of this review is the first in order of birth. Mr. Morris is a man of intelligence and culture, and having devoted much attention to South Dakota, its settlement and various interests, he is considered an authority on all matters relating to the history of the state.

Henry Morris, cashier of the First National Bank of Sisseton and president of the Citizens' Bank at White Rock, was born at Stirling, Minnesota, June 21, 1868. At the age of two years he was brought to
South Dakota and from that time until a youth in his teens lived with his parents at Good Will Mission, where he received his early educational training. Later he entered the State University of Minnesota and after being graduated from the academic department of that institution in 1891, spent one year as special agent of the government, making land allotments to the Indians on the reservation. At the expiration of the time he was elected clerk of the Roberts county court, which position he held four years, and then came to Sisseton and organized the State Bank, serving as cashier of the same until April, 1900. In the latter year he resigned his position and established the First National Bank of Sisseton, of which he has since been cashier, and is now its vice-president, and in addition thereto he is president of the Citizens' Bank at White Water, an institution he also helped to organize. Politically Mr. Morris is a zealous supporter of the Republican party, and as such has been prominent in its councils and a successful leader in a number of campaigns, He was chairman of the Roberts county central committee in 1896, and rendered valuable service in that capacity.

Mr. Morris is identified with the time-honored Masonic order, and still retains membership with a college fraternity which he joined while pursuing his studies in the State University.

On December 20, 1892, he was united in the bonds of wedlock with Miss Mary Strangsway, and is now the father of four children, whose names are Martha D., Wyllys K., Esther F. and Elizabeth R.


Source:
History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904

Cook, Edmund


EDMUND COOK was born in the province of Saxony, Germany, on the 20th of March, 1847. After receiving a thorough academic training he entered a commercial establishment and later became a bookkeeper until entering the Prussian army in 1865. In common with all able-bodied young men of Germany, he was obliged to devote a certain number of years to military service, and it so happened that shortly after entering the army the war between Prussia and Austria broke out and it fell to him to take an active and by no means unimportant part in that celebrated struggle. He went through the one campaign of the war, that of 1866, during the greater part of which he was on the staff of General Von Barneco, commanding the Twelfth Regiment of Hussars, and saw much active service. When hostilities ceased Mr. Cook was honorably discharged, after which he re-entered mercantile life and continued to give it his attention as long as he remained in the fatherland. According to the custom which requires every soldier to report for duty at certain times, young Cook, at the age of twenty, was thus called upon and in due time presented himself at the proper place. To the great surprise and astonishment of the officers, however, the young man came into their presence decorated with the cross of honor, won for brave and meritorious conduct, and with a discharge in his pocket, which fact exempted him from further military duty. Shortly after this he came to the United States, intending to be absent but one year, but after spending some months in this country he became so attached to it and so pleased with the advantages it held out to young men with ambition to rise in the world, that he concluded not to return to Germany. Mr. Cook reached America in 1868 and some time afterwards located at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where he accepted the position of traveling salesman for a wholesale house. He later represented a St. Paul firm on the road for several years. In 1882 he came to Wilmot, South Dakota, and established the general store which he has conducted with success and financial profit to the present time. Recently he began closing out this establishment, the better to devote his attention to his other business enterprises, being
vice-president of the First State Bank of Wilmot and a director of the Wilmot Land and Loan Company, besides having large landed interests in various parts of Roberts county.

For several years Mr. Cook devoted considerable attention to live stock and farming and achieved quite a reputation as an importer and breeder of Oxford-down sheep and other high-grade domestic animals.
While not so much interested in stock raising as formerly, he now farms quite extensively and to this vocation he proposes to devote the greater part of his time hereafter, finding it not only greatly to his taste, but quite profitable as a source of income. Among his lands is a fine farm of three hundred and thirty acres, contiguous to Wilmot, ten acres within the city limits, and on this place he has made many valuable improvements, including one of the handsomest modern residences in the county, which, surrounded by beautiful grounds, tastefully laid out in gardens, shade trees, walks, smooth lawns, interspersed with flowers, etc., bespeaks the home of a man of wealth, elegant leisure, refined taste and decidedly progressive ideas.

Mr. Cook was married in Plainview, Minnesota, June 1, 1875, to Miss Martha Brooks, daughter of Reuben Brooks, a pioneer of that state and for many years a leading citizen of his community. Mr. and Mrs. Cook have one child, a son by the name of Arthur W. They are among the most highly esteemed people of Wilmot, take an active interest in everything pertaining to the growth and development of the city, are
alive to all charitable and benevolent enterprises, and the hospitality of their beautiful home is unbounded.

In his political affiliations Mr. Cook is a prominent Democrat and has perhaps as much influence in his party as any man in northeastern Dakota. He has been a delegate to nearly every county, district and state convention in the last twenty years, and in 1896 was a delegate to the Chicago national convention, in addition to which he has also been nominated for a number of important offices, his election being
made impossible by reason of normally overwhelming Republican majorities. Mr. Cook is a thirty-second-degree Scottish-rite Mason, also a Knight Templar, besides belonging to various other branches of
the order and he has long been a familiar figure at all the meetings of the grand lodge.


Source:
History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904

McNulty, Frank


FRANK McNULTY

OUR TEACHER-LAWYER

Where are our experienced teachers? Echo answers: "In other professions, where the salary is larger, the opportunities greater, and where they do not need to seek employment at the end of each nine months."

Just so with Frank McNulty, the newly-appointed judge of the fifth judicial circuit. He was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, December 1, 1873; was educated at the University of Minnesota, and at Valpariso University.

Judge McNulty was formerly principal of schools at the little town of Wilmot in the southern part of Roberts county. Then he was elected superintendent of Roberts county and served in this capacity 1897-1900, inclusive. The last year of his supervision he was secretary of the republican state central committee. This position associated him very closely with the mighty Kittredge, and imbued his young mind with the possibilities in the field of law and of politics.

At the expiration of his two terms in office, like practically all other teachers who find their way into the office of county superintendent and thereby come in touch with a larger and more open life, he saw the jumping off place, and in order to gratify his newly-formed desires, he went to the University of Minnesota and took his law course. Returning to Roberts county, he was elected states attorney and served with distinction in this position for four years, 1905-1908.

Judge McNulty is one of the best political campaigners in the state. On the stump he is a genuine young Demosthenes, In 1906, he was selected as chairman of the last republican state convention held at Sioux Falls. It was a trying position. The republican party, divided against itself, was willing to adopt any kind of tactics to defeat itself. The rulings of the chair (McNulty's) were appealed to the convention time and again, but the chair was always sustained. McNulty, the young lawyer who was presiding, was chosen by the insurgent crowd, who were greatly in the majority, and in the heated factional fight that was  seething on the floor of the convention like a prospective eruption of Vesuvius, he was sure of being sustained — no matter what his rulings might be. But let it be said that although his decisions on  parliamentary usages came like a flash from the chair, they were sane and showed his keenness of intellect, and his ability to "hold his head" and meet emergencies with astonishing rapidity.

The traits exhibited by him as presiding officer of a turbulent political convention, are the identical traits which are needed to make a great judge. It requires a much keener and more rapidly moving mind — one susceptible of classifying facts and formulating concepts — to act as circuit judge than it does to serve on the supreme bench. In the latter position a judge takes his technical points of law under the most deliberate advisement. Not so with a circuit judge. In common vernacular, he has got to be right there with the goods on the spur of the moment. There is no waiting for after-thought. A shrewd lawyer, with his client's interests at heart and his own reputation at stake, has challenged a question put to the witness. There are no "ifs" or "ands." The judge must decide with suddenness and precision whether or not the witness shall or must reply. On his decision the fate of a life may depend. It requires a wonderful mind: Judge McNulty has it.

When Judge McCoy was promoted to the supreme bench, the governor and his advisers began to scan the circuit to find a young lawyer with scholastic preparation, decision, judgment and courage, to take  his place. Through the ranks of the republican party one name was whispered above the others — it was the name of Frank McNulty of Sisseton — our young teacher-lawyer.

In his selection the governor made no mistake. We are proud to see a school man rewarded — even if he is compelled to seek the recognition in a new profession. Judge Fuller of the supreme bench (deceased) was also an old teacher and county superintendent. Judge Whiting, now on the bench, was formerly a teacher. These men, when they reached a ripened manhood, saw that the law furnished much greater opportunities than the teaching profession, and so they swapped. Had McNulty remained in the teaching world, he would never have been heard of outside of some small locality. In the legal profession but four years and a few months, and we behold him on the circuit bench — sending sinners to the penitentiary.

And yet there are some people who will criticise us for showing up to our teachers from actual facts the comparative advantages in other fields.

Where are our teachers? Ask the legal profession to unfold its records. In addition to those previously mentioned, add the name of Abner E. Hitchcock, mayor of Mitchell, % and a former principal of schools in an Iowa town. Yes! don't stop! Add the names of one-third of the successful lawyers of the state.

Where are our teachers? Ask the ministry to open its books. A young fellow was attending school at Dakota Wesleyan university. He was brilliant, to be sure. He won the state oratorical contest and gave the Chalcedony slab to his alma mater. After his graduation, the board of education in the city of Mitchell elected him principal of their high school. In two years he resigned to enter the minisiry and today Arthur Shepherd is a shining light in the Methodist Episcopal church. Another young fellow married, his Latin teacher at Cornell college, taught school briefly, gave it up for the ministry and today Elder Dobson, formerly of Mitchell, but now of Mt. Vernon, Iowa, astounds a state with his eloquence and influence. Halt! the record is too lengthy for perusal. Call the roll! Seventy-two per cent of the ministers of our state at some time taught school.

Where are our teachers? Ask the Bankers' association. Place at the head of the list O. L. Branson, of Mitchell, president of the First National bank of that place, an old normal school teacher. Turn over a page. There you will see the name of Colonel J. H. Holmes of Aberdeen, president of a newly-organized bank in that city, and a former normal school teacher. Go through the list to your heart's content and see what the teachers' profession has given to the bankers' career.

Where are our teachers? Let the insurance companies be investigated once more! We see the brilliant Charley Holmes, principal at Howard, then at Sioux Falls, then writing life insurance, and today, with peace of mind and heart he sits in his comfortable chair in his private office in the New York Mutual company's magnificent structure in Sioux Falls, as their state manager, and draws the princely salary of $7,000 per year. (Our normal school presidents receive less than half this amount.)

Don't stop! Call up the record of William P. Dunlevy, a Harvard man; city superintendent at Pierre, then at Aberdeen; next year to take up insurance. A half dozen other prominent educators might be  mentioned in the same category.

Where are our teachers? Ask the medical profession! Heavens! They, too have impoverished our ranks. Begin with Dr. Rock of Aberdeen, formerly city superintendent at Webster, this state, drawing a  piccininsh little starvation salary — today head of the medical profession in this state — doing more surgery than any other man in South Dakota, with an income away up in the thousands.

And so on down the list. Two hundred more might be mentioned.

It will thus be seen that the teachers' profession is simply being used as a stepping stone to all other professions, trades and occupations. Why? Simply because any other field offers greater opportunities. It is so with both sexes. Telephone exchange offices all over the state are filled with nervous little schoolma'ams. At $25 per month for twelve months in the year — year in and year out — they can save much more money than they can in the teaching business, and escape spanking other people's children and taking those barbarous examinations.

We regret that this little seance on comparative opportunities and swapping professions got hitched on to the life of Judge McNulty, but he made such an ideal character with which to introduce it, and his own life made such exemplification of the principle under discussion, that we just simply could not resist the temptation.

Reverting to our original topic, we glory in the wisdom of the judge. We would not admonish others to attempt to follow in his steps — not all have the same native ability. But in the years to come we shall watch his career with eager expectations, and if the supreme bench fails to reward his after years, we miss our guess entirely.

This being one of the first of this series of articles to have been published, several changes have since taken place among those alluded to in it. Judge McNulty, himself, has since resigned to enter the practice of law where the remuneration is much greater than on the bench.

Source: Who’s Who in South Dakota, Vol. 2; By O. W. Coursey; Educator School Supply Co., Publisher, 1916
Contributor: Jim Dezotell

Lane, Warren

 WARREN D. LANE, one of the successful attorneys of the Roberts county bar and member of the well-known law firm of Barrington & Lane, Sisseton, was born near Cresco. Iowa, May 10, 1867, the son of Abraham and Sarah (Darling) Lane, natives of Pennsylvania and New York respectively. Abraham Lane was a farmer and public-spirited citizen, and for many years enjoyed distinctive prestige in his community as an enterprising man of affairs. Of his family of seven children only three are living. Rev. Louis L. Lane, pastor of the First Methodist Episcopal church of Sisseton; Theron W., an attorney practicing his profession at Bridgeport, Washington, and Warren D., whose name furnishes the caption of this review. Mr. Lane moved to Iowa in 1851 and died in that state in 1879, at the age of forty-eight; his widow subsequently came to South Dakota and settled on a claim east of Wilmot, later changing her residence to the town of Bristol, where he departed this life in the year 1897.

The early life of Warren D. Lane was spent in Iowa, and his youthful experiences were similar to those of the majority of lads reared in close touch with nature on the farm. After attending the public schools of Cresco until the age of sixteen, finishing the high-school course the meantime, he accompanied his mother to South Dakota, settling in 1883 on the claim in Roberts county, alluded to in the preceding paragraph, where he devoted his attention to agricultural pursuits, until engaging with his brother in the furniture business at Wilmot two years later. Actuated by a laudable ambition to increase his scholastic training, he and his brother disposed of their furniture business in 1892, and entered the Northwestern University at Evanston, Illinois, from which institution he was graduated four years later with the degree of Bachelor of Science. Subsequently he took the degree of Master of Science at the University of Minnesota, and in 1898 was graduated from the same institution with the degree of Bachelor of Laws, after which he began the practice of his profession at Sisseton, where in due time he forged to the front as an able and energetic attorney, winning a conspicuous place among the leading members of the Roberts county bar. Since then he has been admitted to practice in the higher courts of South Dakota and the supreme court of the United States, and by unflagging industry has built up a large and lucrative legal business.

While well grounded in the principals of the law and familiar with every branch of his profession. Mr. Lane has won especial distinction as an advocate, being regarded as one of the strong, logical and eloquent public speakers of the west, in consequence of which his services are eagerly sought in important jury trials and in cases requiring clear exposition of technical points of law and profound discussion before courts. While a student of the University of Minnesota, he represented that institution in the inter-collegiate debate with the Iowa University and at the Northwestern University he was elected class orator and won the Lyman F. Gage prize for extemporaneous debate, and was elected to membership in the Phi Beta Kappa Society, besides gaining various other honors for public discourse and scholarship.

The same year in which he opened an office in Sisseton, Mr. Lane was nominated by the Republican party of Roberts county for state's attorney to which office he was triumphantly elected and the duties of which he discharged for two consecutive terms. He has always manifested a deep and abiding interest in political questions, and since coming west has been actively identified with the Republican party, being one of its leaders in this part of South Dakota, while as an organizer and campaigner his reputation is widely known throughout the state.

Primarily devoted to his law practice, and making every other consideration subordinate thereto, Mr. Lane is also interested in various business and industrial enterprises, being president of the Iowa and Dakota Land and Loan Company, vice-president of the Roberts County Abstract and Title Company, and a stockholder in the Citizens' National Bank, besides having large and valuable real-estate interests, owning a valuable homestead near Sisseton and considerable property within the corporation. Mr. Lane belongs to several secret and benevolent organizations, notable among which are the Masonic fraternity, Knights of Pythias and Improved Order of Red Men, in all of which he has held important official station.

Mr. Lane and Miss Maude Cross, of Wilmot, South Dakota, daughter of Edwin and Lyle (Smith) Cross, of Minnesota, were united in the bonds of wedlock on June 28, 1899, the marriage resulting in the birth of two children, Everett, who died September 5, 1900, at the age of five months, and Frances F., born August 25. 1902.

Source:
History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904


Eastman, David

DAVID EASTMAN, one of the prominent and influential citizens of Wilmot, Roberts county, was born in Allegany county. New York, on the 1st of June, 1847, being a son of Tilton and Ann (Palmer) Eastman, both of whom were born and reared in Steuben county. The family lineage is of English, German, Scotch and Irish extraction. The Eastmans are English, the paternal grandmother was German, the maternal grandfather, Joshua Palmer, was Irish, and his wife was Scotch. Tilton and Ann Eastman removed in 1864 to Blue Earth county, Minnesota, where he was a farmer known for integrity and ability. Both died in South Dakota. David Eastman was about seventeen years of age at the removal to Minnesota, where he grew to manhood under the effective discipline of the farm, while he attended the common schools and the graded school at Plainview. He was associated with his father until he had attained the age of twenty-five years, when he engaged in teaching at Belleview, Minnesota, and was identified with the profession for five years, when he was for two years engaged in farming in Blue Earth county, Minnesota. In 1878 he located six miles south of the site of Wilmot where he entered government land, devoting himself to its reclamation and cultivation. In 1884 he was elected register of deeds and county clerk, remaining incumbent of the dual office for four years, having removed to Wilmot. He then engaged in the farm implement business and to the negotiating of farm loans and represented leading fire-insurance companies. In April, 1895, he was appointed deputy state commissioner of school and public lands, being elected commissioner in 1898. He rendered valuable service in this important office four years, when he retired to his pleasant home in Wilmot, where he has since given his attention principally to the supervision of farming interests, while he is president of the Farmers' State Bank of Wilmot, and also does a general real-estate business. Mr. Eastman has ever accorded allegiance to the Republican party, and was a member of the state central committee for a number of years. He was sergeant-at-arms of the state senate during the sessions of 1893 and 1895. He and his family attend the Presbyterian church and fraternally he is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the Dramatic Order of Knights of Khorassan.

On the 24th of May, 1884, Mr. Eastman was united in marriage to Miss Eliza Wilson, who was born in Columbia county, Wisconsin, on the 3d of January, 1851, being a daughter of William L. and Janette Wilson. Mr. and Mrs. Eastman have two daughters, Jessie May and Florence I.

Source:
History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904



 


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