Yankton County


BIOGRAPHIES

 

Alseth, Charles A.

Anderwson, Edgar J.
Ashley, J. B.
Balmat, J. H.
Beadle, Gen. William H.
Bartlett, Owen
Bates, John O.
Burleigh, Dr. Walter Atwood
Becker, John
Biermeyer, Leo
Boyles, Hon. S. A.
Bader, Joseph
Baker, George A.

Blodgett, James N.

Bowen, Wheeler S. (1915)

Bowen, Wheeler S. (1913)
Bramsen, John
Brauch, Jacob
Brennan, Michael
Bristol, W. M.
Brown, W. H. H.
Broderson, Chas.
Brisbine, H. J.
Burgi, F.
Burgi, Gottfried
Campbell, John
Campbell, Joseph

Cariveau, Felix
Carr, Walter H.
Congleton, Hon. L.
Cooley, D. B.

Crane, Ernest
Crawford, Coe Isaac
Curtis, W. H.

Cusick, W. L.
Dean, W. B.

DeLong, F. K.
Dickson, T. S.
Dickson, R. A.
Dillon, Charles Hall
Dodge, H. D.
Donahue, James
Dudley, E. C.

Ede, Ernest D.
Edmunds, Hon. Newton
Eickhoff, Miss B.
Eiseman, Chas
Eliot, L. H.
Epstein, Ephriam M.
Etter, D. Frank

Evans, J. W.
Faulk, Hon. Andrew J.
Faulk, Phil. K.
 

Fellows, R. H.
Fogarty, John M.
Foskett, J. L.

Frick, Joseph
Gamble, R. J.
Gamble, J. R.
Gillespie, John E.
Goodwin, Wilson S.
Hammond, Fred
Hand, Hon Geo. H.

Hanson, Joseph R.
Harris, C. J. B.
Hove, Nils O.
Hawley, George E.

Hoyt, Mel T.
Hoyt, R. T.
Jencks, H. F.
Jensen, Carl

Jenkinson, E. J.

Keating, John L.

Keem, L. M.

Klemme, John C.
Lauman, W. F.
Lerch, Fred.

Lloyd, David Emanuel
Lowell, D. M.
Lyons, Capt. W. S.

Magner, Patrick M.
Martin, John
Max, Jacob
 

Maxwell, W. J.
McDevitt, D.

Miner, Ephraim
Moldenheauel, P. W.
Mosher, E. S.
Mormann, J. C.
Munroe, W. H.
Morrow, S. J.
Neubauer, Frederick
Nyberg, P. J.
Odiorne, E. A.

Ordway, Hon. Nehemiah

Osborn, Warren

Phelan, John R.
Pike, H. W.
Piles, I.
Pisek, Thaddeus
Redaelli, J. P.
Reinhardt, William
Reitzell, C. J.
Richenberger, Jacob
Richards, John A.
Roantree, William
Royem, Peter
Satori, John
 

Schoreggee, H. A.
Schnell, John
Schneider, Robert
Schroder, A. H.
Scougal, George R.
Semple, B. M.

Smith, E. G.
Smith, H. V.
Spink, Hon. S. L.
Steffen, Peter
Stier, William

Stoddart, George H.

Summers, John William
Thomas, S. J.

Tripp, Bartlett

Van Tassel, Frank L.
Ward, William

Ward, William

Warren, Henry Kimball
Wedell, C.

Welby, Timothy J.
White, H. W.
White, E. T.
Williams, Thomas J.
Wilson, John
Wright, C. N.
Wyman, Frank D.
Zemlicka, A.
Ziebach, F. H.
Ziebach, F. M.
Ziebach, J. E.

 

“History of Dakota Territory”, George W. Kingsbury, 1915

COLONEL WHEELER S. BOWEN.

During practically the entire period of his active life Colonel Wheeler S. Bowen has been identified with the newspaper business and since 1909 has been editor of the Huronite, published at Huron. As such he has exerted a great influence over the development of the city along many lines and his work has won him an important place among the men of ability and worth in the community. Colonel Bowen is a veteran of the Civil war, having served as a member of the Twelfth Wisconsin Battery. He was born in Ohio, April 8, 1843, and is a son of Hiram and Martha (Wheeler) Bowen, who moved to Wisconsin in 1849, settling at Janesville. The father conducted a newspaper there for many years, having previously been in the newspaper business at Akron, Ohio, as founder and editor of the Summit County Beacon. Hiram Bowen edited the Janesville Gazette and later the Milwaukee Sentinel. He came to South Dakota in 1876 and moved from this state to California, where his death occurred.

Colonel Wheeler S. Bowen acquired his education in the public schools of Janesville In 1862 he enlisted in the Twelfth Wisconsin Battery and served in the army until the close of the Civil war. Following his honorable discharge he returned to Janesville, where he became connected with the newspaper business, editing the Gazette until 1873. In that year he moved to Yankton, this state, and bought the Press and the Dakotan, starting the first daily in the Dakotas. Colonel Bowen moved to Sioux Falls in 1901 and edited the Press there until 1907, after which he spent one year in Boise City, Idaho. In 1909 he located in Huron and bought the Huronite and the State Spirit which he merged under one management with the former name. Since that time he has edited the paper, making it one of the leading influences for progress in the community. It has become an excellent news and advertising medium and its popularity is evident in a large and growing circulation.

In 1874 Colonel Bowen was united in marriage to Miss Ella Davis of Janesville, Wisconsin, and they have become the parents of a son, George H., who is in business with his father. Colonel Bowen is well known in the local post of the Grand Army of the Republic and in this way keeps in touch with his comrades of fifty years ago. He is progressive and public-spirited in matters of citizenship and has held a number of offices of public trust and responsibility, serving as postmaster of Yankton under Presidents Arthur and Harrison and as clerk of the senate committee on Indian affairs in Washington under Pettigrew. Since taking up his residence in Huron his influence has been a tangible force for good in the community and he is held in high honor and esteem wherever he is known.

 

History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915

TIMOTHY J. WELBY.

Timothy J. Welby, who is deputy state game warden, has discharged his duties ably and conscientiously, vigorously enforcing the law protecting game and prosecuting offenders. He has been connected with what is now South Dakota since 1867 and has witnessed a change which would have been pronounced impossible if it had been predicted a half century ago.

He was born in County Galway, Ireland, on the 26th of March, 1848, a son of Patrick and Catherine (Little) Welby, who died while he was still a child. In 1865, when seventeen years of age, he emigrated to America with the intention of joining his brothers who were located at Louisville, Kentucky. He sailed from Queenstown, Ireland, on the ship Iberia, which reached New York after a three weeks' voyage. He made his way to Louisville and not long after arriving there secured employment on a boat running from that city to New Orleans and thence to St. Louis. He worked on steamers plying the lower Mississippi and Ohio rivers until he took ship on the Imperial, bound for Fort Benton, Montana. While working on that boat he first visited the present state of South Dakota. The boat docked south of Jefferson near the Big Sioux for a supply of wood and Mr. Welby took advantage of this opportunity and went ashore, thus setting foot on Dakota soil in the middle of May, 1867. On the return of the boat late in the fall it was frozen in the ice at Bon Homme on the 7th of November and was abandoned by Captain Smith and the other officers, who took all of the money with them, leaving the employes without pay. The latter went to Yankton and there filed claims against the boat. The federal court decided in their favor and the machinery and bell of the steamer were sold, the proceeds being given to the employes is satisfaction of their claims. The bell of the Imperial was purchased by Judge Brookings, who had it placed on the old capitol building, where it remained until the removal of the capital, when Judge Brookings gave the bell to Dr. Joseph Ward for use in the academy. He subsequently presented the bell to the Central high school, where it is still in use. While waiting for the decision of the federal court Mr. Welby and others secured board with John Owen, at Bon Homme, paying six dollars a week for two meals a day, payment being made after the settlement of their claims on the boat. Subsequently Mr. Welby worked for six weeks for Jacob Ruefner, receiving only his board for his labor, as work was scarce and board expensive during the winter. Later Mr. Welby worked for Judge Brookings, being employed in the latter's sawmill six miles west of Yankton. In July, 1868, he entered the employ of General J. B. S. Todd, with whom he remained for several years. During this time he drove the first wagon across the first government bridge over the James river which was also the first bridge in the territory. Filing on a homestead claim northwest of Mission Hill, he at length took up his residence upon that place. In 1876, during the hard times that followed the prolonged drought and the grasshopper scourge, he again went to work on the river in order to provide for the support of his family. In that year he went as far as Standing Rock on the boat, Fontanelle, and two years later went with Captain Clark on the Benton as far as Fort Sully. He still retained his homestead, however, and when times improved gave his entire attention to the cultivation of his land. He made many improvements upon his place and as the years passed his property increased steadily in value. He continued to follow agricultural pursuits until 1903, when he put aside the active labor of the fields, but still owns the homestead, which comprises one hundred and sixty acres of land, and also holds title to forty acres near Volin and a fifteen acre tract along the north bank of the James river, which he purchased with soldiers script. In 1909 he was appointed county game warden and served in that capacity until 1913 when he was appointed deputy
state game warden and has proved an excellent man for the place.

Mr. Welby was married in Yankton, by Joseph Ward, at the residence of General Todd, on the 15th of January, 1870, to Miss Caroline Hanson. She was born about sixty miles from Christiania, Norway, and remained in her native land until 1867, when she sailed from Christiania for America on the ship, Noah, which arrived at Quebec, Canada, after a voyage of seven weeks. She made her way to La Crosse, Wisconsin, where there was a Norwegian colony, and the following year joined a party bound for Yankton county, Dakota territory, under the leadership of Iver Bagstad. Their transportation, which amounted to eighteen dollars, was to be paid after it had been earned by labor on reaching Dakota. The journey was made with ox-teams and the progress was so slow that Mrs. Welby and most of the other young people walked the greater part of the way by preference, although they had bound themselves to pay for riding. To Mr. and Mrs. Welby have been born the following children. Mattie is the wife of Sampson Erickson, who is farming two miles west of Gayville. James is farming land which he owns adjoining the homestead. Harry is a painter and decorator of Yankton. Tillie gave her hand in marriage to E. V. Cowman, a merchant of Gayville, also serving as postmaster. Alma is now the wife of Clyde McPeake and resides in Spencer, Iowa. Mark is engaged in agricultural pursuits and resides three miles west of Gayville. Mary is the wife of Ambrose Means, of New York, a noted African traveler and hunter and a well known writer. Mrs. Means accompanies her husband on some of his journeys. Emmet is farming the homestead. Mr. Welby is a member of the Congregational church at Mission Hill, although now a resident of Yankton. His wife belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church of Yankton.

Mr. Welby is a stalwart republican and in all matters where the interests of the community are involved and where public improvements are under consideration he manifests a sincere devotion to the general welfare, subordinating his private affairs to the advancement of his city and county. He has unbounded faith in the development of South Dakota and takes justifiable pride in the fact that he had a part in laying the foundation for her present and future greatness.

When Mr. Welby first came to this state Sioux City was the western outpost of civilization and all beyond was wilderness. At one point above Fort Thompson the steamer Imperial, on which he was employed, was stopped in midchannel to allow a herd of buffalo, crossing the river, to pass on. Although the boat could have forced its way through them, the paddles of its wheels might have been broken off in so doing. The Indians at that time were so hostile that they frequently fired at passing boats and the pilot house was usually encased in boiler iron to protect the helmsman. The few white men who ventured into the territory were obliged to rely upon themselves for everything and if one was injured the only medical or surgical assistance which could be given him was that which his fellows were capable of rendering. On one occasion a man on the boat had his leg broken and badly mashed and, as it was imperative that it be amputated, the steward performed the operation with a meat saw from the kitchen and the man soon recovered. On the return trip down the river there were many passengers, most of them miners with stores of gold, and before civilization was reached the meat supply ran short. While crossing a bar two passengers asked permission to go ashore to try and kill some game, but about three-quarters of an hour after leaving the boat one of the men came running and shouting to the river and jumped in, remaining there with only his face showing until he was taken aboard a yawl sent to his rescue from the boat. He told them they had shot an antelope and the shots attracted Indians who succeeded in shooting the other man with arrows. On the captain being assured the other man was killed, he tied up to the opposite bank to prevent a surprise attack at night and the next day. A party went ashore to investigate and found the mutilated body. The Indians had removed the man's scalp, his eyebrows and his tongue and the body was as full of arrows as it was possible to stick them. The antelope had been left by the Indians, but the white men feared to eat it, as they thought the Indians might have poisoned it. There were many severe storms during the early part of Mr. Welby's residence in the territory and there was one memorable hail storm which lasted for two hours and covered the prairie with hailstones to a depth of twelve inches. In 1876 the grasshoppers destroyed all of the crops and in other years did great damage and there were also a number of bad droughts which caused great loss to the settlers. On the 12th of January, 1888, occurred the worst blizzard in the experience of the white settlers in Dakota, but Mr. Welby braved the storm to take food and hot coffee to the children, who were of necessity detained at school. In company with his neighbor, Torger Nelsen, he made a second trip to the school and they nearly missed the building, so blinding was the storm. They had passed it when they heard voices which guided them to the school in safety. The two men took their children with them on returning from the second trip and all remained at the Welby home during the night.

During the first years of her residence in Dakota Mrs. Welby walked to Yankton to market her butter, for which she received from five to seven cents a pound. At the same time corn brought only eleven cents a bushel. It was difficult to secure coffee and, moreover, it was very expensive, and Mr. and Mrs. Welby at times made a substitute for it from parched potato cakes ground and steeped. Mr. Welby recalls with pleasure that he drove the team the Christmas morning that General Todd called for E. Miner and Dr. Ward and told them he was going to present six lots to the Congregational church and for them to select the property.

Mr. Welby had revisited his old home land, making a trip to Ireland in 1882, and in 1902 he and his wife went to Norway and visited the scenes of her girlhood. One of the relics of her native land which she prizes highly is a spinning wheel which she inherited from her grandmother and which, in all probability, had been in the family for many generations before it came into the possession of the latter. It is still in perfect condition and Mrs. Welby still uses it. She has a dress which is well preserved that she spun, dyed and wove when a girl living in Norway.

History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915

WILLIAM WARD.

William Ward, as senior member of the firm of Ward & Trux, doing business at No. 337 Douglas street in Yankton, is conducting the largest meat business in the city. He is a native of Cambridgeshire, England, born on the 17th of February, 1852, a Bon of Daniel and Ann (Sherman) Ward, both natives of that section of the country, where the father carried on agricultural pursuits. He is deceased but the mother survives.

William Ward, the eldest in a family of four children, received his education in the public schools of his native land and was there reared to the age of sixteen years, at which time he emigrated to the new world, the year of his arrival here being 1868. Landing in New York he made his way to Little Falls, that state, where his uncles were located. He secured employment on a farm and was thus engaged until he had attained his majority, when he made his way to Bay City, Michigan, and there became apprenticed to the butcher's trade. In 1877 after learning the business he removed to Yankton, South Dakota, where he has since been located. His first employment there was with the firm of Wooley & Wyman and in the fall of 1879 Mr. Wooley having retired Mr. Ward purchased his interest and the firm then did business under the style of Wyman & Ward, their concern being situated at Third and Douglas streets. The business was thus continued until the fall of 1898 when the partnership was dissolved, Mr. Ward retiring from the firm. For a brief period he visited Chicago and points in Colorado and then once more returned to Yankton to again engage in the meat business. This time he bought a half interest with Mr. Branch but after a short time the latter retired from the firm and Mr. Ward continued business alone until 1906, when Mr. Trux purchased a half interest, the establishment being now conducted under the firm style of Ward & Trux. They are the largest meat dealers in the city and keep on hand at all times the best grade of meats, doing all their own killing. Mr. Ward understands the business to the minutest detail and this coupled with his excellent management has constituted the foundation for his splendid success.

In 1884 Mr. Ward married Miss Mary Alice Parsons, a native of Illinois. He belongs to Dakota Lodge, No. 1, I. O. O. F. and to Yankton Encampment, No. 2. He is also prominent in Masonic circles, belonging to St. John's Lodge, No. 1, A. F. & A. M., having attained the thirty-second degree in Oriental Consistory, No. 1, and being a member of Yelduz Temple of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine at Aberdeen. His many excellent characteristics have given him high standing in the city which has been his home for almost four decades.

History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915

FRANK L. VAN TASSEL.

Between the ages of nine and eleven years—boy that he was—Frank L. Van Tassel was teaching writing and in that way partially earned the money that paid for his later education. Today he stands as one of the foremost business men in the state of South Dakota. He has made his home since 1868 in Yankton, where he is secretary and manager of the Excelsior Mill Company, president of the First National Bank of Yankton and a partner in the ownership and control of many other important business enterprises which have been chief factors in the growth and development of city and state.

Mr. Van Tassel was born in Conneautville, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, January 29, 1851. His father, E. B. Van Tassel, was a practicing attorney, very prominent in the locality in which he made his home. He was born in Mayfield, Chautauqua county, New York, and was a representative of an old American family. He wedded Rachel Litchfield, who was born in Massachusetts and belonged to one of the old and prominent New England families. Both are now deceased. Their son, Frank L. Van Tassel, was the third in order of birth in a family of ten children, of whom six are yet living, namely: Mrs. Anna Adella Brown, the widow of Dr. W. H. H. Brown, who was a dentist of Los Angeles, California; Mina, the wife of Dr. Alva Johnston, of Meadville, Pennsylvania; William, a resident of Prescott, Arizona; Harry, who makes his home at Moosejaw, Saskatchewan; and Nettie, the wife of James Van Summers, of Bath, England.

Frank L. Van Tassel, who is the oldest of the surviving members of the family, was reared in his native town and when a very young lad took writing lessons of Spencer, the originator of the Spencerian system. This was during the period of the Civil war. So proficient did he become that between the ages of nine and eleven years he taught the Spencerian system of penmanship and, saving his money, was thus enabled to attend the Meadville Commercial College at Meadville, Pennsylvania, for about a year. His fame as a writer had spread and he soon received a call from Hummiston's (Cleveland) Institute at Cleveland, Ohio, where he was to teach writing in exchange for tuition, board, clothing, etc. He there remained from 1866 until June, 1868, when the school was sold and Mr. Van Tassel then came to the territory of Dakota, where his uncle, Laban H. Litchfield, was filling the position of United States marshal. He made his way direct to Yankton, arriving on the 26th of June, and soon found employment as a bookkeeper in the pioneer general merchandise store owned by the firm of Bramble & Miner. He applied himself earnestly to the mastery of the business and proved so efficient and capable as a salesman, that he was admitted to a partnership in 1876, remaining active in the management and control of the store until the firm passed out of existence in 1883, owing to the cessation of river traffic.

In the meantime Mr. Van Tassel had become interested in other enterprises. In 1872, in connection with William Bordens, the firm of Bramble & Miner built the Excelsior Mill and in 1875 Mr. Van Tassel was made secretary of the company, at which time the business was incorporated. This mill from its inception has done a splendid business and has been enlarged from time to time to meet the growing demands of the trade, becoming one of the foremost productive industries of the state. Mr. Van Tassel has been identified with the business since 1872 and throughout the entire period to the present time has bent his energies largely to the further development and upbuilding of the trade. He is now a heavy stockholder in the company, of which he is secretary and general manager, and in these connections he bends his energies to administrative direction and executive control. The capacity of the mill is one hundred and seventy-five barrels per day, and he was one of the pioneers in advertising and introducing its products, making this a means of outfitting concerns for the Black Hills country. His recognition of opportunities, his unfaltering energy, his unflagging determination and his reliable business methods have been the salient features in the upbuilding of a most extensive and successful milling enterprise.

Not alone, however, has his attention been confined to this line, for other interests have felt the stimulus of his activity, have profited by his insight and benefited by his control. He has been a director of the First National Bank of Yankton for many years and in 1907 was elected to its presidency, so that he now has important voice in its management. In the spring of 1873 he was made the first agent of the first railroad in South Dakota—the Dakota Southern—serving in that capacity for a short period. In 1906 he became a director in the Schwenk-Barth Brewing Company of Yankton, and he is secretary of the Yankton Telephone Company, being the promoter of the first company that built lines into Sioux Falls, Pierre, Mitchell, Huron, Watertown and Yankton. Eventually he sold out the business at a great profit to himself and his associates. In 1904 he and his associates organized the present Yankton Telephone Company. He was also a director in the first artesian well company in the state, and indeed has been a pioneer and promoter in many lines of activity which have led to the present development, growth and prosperity of South Dakota.

Not alone along individual lines has Mr. Van Tassel put forth his efforts, for his labors have been a salient feature in advancing the welfare of the state in directions from which he has derived no individual profit. For example, he was a member of the board of trustees of the State Hospital for the Insane at Yankton, serving under Governors Pierce and Church. In politics he has always been a democrat, but his interest is merely that of a progressive citizen and not of one who seeks office.

On the 19th of October, 1875, Mr. Van Tassel was united in marriage to Mrs. Sarah Bordens, of Yankton, and they have one daughter, Frances, the wife of B. F. Dudley, of Yankton. Mr. Van Tassel and his family occupy a prominent social position and he ranks high in Masotiry, belonging to St. John's Lodge, No. 1, F. & A. M.; Yankton Chapter, No. 1, R. A. M., of which he is a past high priest; De Molay Commandery, No. 3, K. T., of which he is a past eminent commander; and Oriental Consistory, No. 1, A. A. S. R., of which he is the present master af Kadosh. He is likewise a member of El Riad Temple of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine at Sioux Falls, and he belongs to the Elks Lodge, No. 994. He is temperate in all things and there is an even balance in his life which has been one of the strong features in his success. He is conservative, yet not to the point of blocking progress, and attention to business has been one of the strong features in his advancement. He has always been willing to assist young men to get a start in life and has done real philanthropic work along that line. His efforts have been an element in the growth of city, county and state, his influence has been far-reaching and beneficial, and the worth of his example is widely recognized, for it indicates what may be accomplished when determination and laudable ambition lead the way.

History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915

JOHN WILLIAM SUMMERS.

John William Summers, filling the office of city auditor at Yankton, was born in Kent, England, May 21, 1845. His father, John William Summers, was a native of the county of Essex, England, born July 18, 1821, but at an early age accompanied his parents on their removal to Kent county, the family settling in the town of Dartford, where John William Summers, Sr., was reared and spent his remaining days. His life was devoted to general agricultural pursuits. He reached the very advanced age of ninety years, passing away in 1909. In early manhood he had wedded Jane Allchin, a native of Horton Kirby, Kent county, England, born in 1828. She is still living at Dartford at the age of eighty-seven years.

John William Summers, whose name introduces this review, is the eldest in a family of eight children and was born, reared and educated in the town of Dartford. He left school at the age of sixteen years and for some time thereafter assisted his father in farm work but turned from agricultural pursuits to industrial interests and while yet a young man became a foreman with the Isaac Charles Cement Manufacturing Company. As time passed on he rose in the esteem and confidence of his employers, as he demonstrated his worth, his industry, energy and reliability, and was made manager of the branch plant at West Dreyton, Middlesex, where he continued for three and a half years. He next erected a lime manufacturing plant near Dunstavale, in the county of Middlesex, and managed that business until 1889, when he decided to come to the United States. He was commissioned by William Plankington to come to Yankton, South Dakota, to build the Yankton Portland cement plant and after this was completed he was made superintendent and continued to act in that capacity until March, 1909, when a change was effected in ownership, the plant passing into other hands after the death of Mr. Plankington. Mr. Summers continued as an employe but not as superintendent until May, 1910, when he was elected city auditor for a five years' term under the commission form of government. His work in this connection is highly efficient and satisfactory to all concerned. He devotes his time to the duties of the office and is making a most creditable record therein.

In 1867 Mr. Summers was united in marriage to Miss Julia Elizabeth Tolhurst, a native of Dartford, Kent county, England, and they have become parents of the following children: two who died in infancy; Mary Louise, who passed away while pursuing her education in Yankton; Elsie Kate, who died at the age of eighteen years; Florence, the wife of Charles Gaughran, a resident of Omaha, Nebraska; Maud Mary, also living in Omaha; Grace, the wife of Guy Livingston, of Yankton; Christina Julia, who is engaged in teaching kindergarten in Yankton; Dorothy, at home; John William, now of Arlington, Minnesota; and Ruth, who is also under the parental roof. Mr. Summers has a military chapter in his life record, inasmuch as he served as a member of the Twelfth Kent Volunteers while in England. Following his arrival in the new world he began studying political situations and questions and has since given his vote to the republican party. He is a member of St. John's Lodge, No. 1, A. F. & A. M.; Yankton Chapter, No. 1, R. A. M.; Robert De Molay Commandery, No. 3, K. T.; and Oriental Consistory, No. 1, S. P. R. S. He has thus advanced far in Masonry and is in thorough sympathy with the purposes and teachings of the craft. He likewise has membership with the Knights of the Maccabees and with the Elks, while his religious faith is that of the Episcopal church. High and honorable principles have actuated him in all of his relations and have won for him the high regard of those with whom he has been brought in contact. Starting out in life for himself empty-handed at the age of sixteen years, he can truly be called a self-made man, for he has been both the architect and builder of his own fortune. He has worked earnestly and untiringly and, advancing step by step, his course has brought him to a creditable place.

History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915

GEORGE H. STODDART.

George H. Stoddart, city auditor of Brookings, was born in Shullsburg, Wisconsin, on the 29th of July, 1854, his parents being William and Sophia (Hatt) Stoddart, the former a native of Glasgow, Scotland, and the latter probably of New York city. William Stoddart was but a young lad at the time his parents died and he and his four brothers were reared by their grandparents. In his young manhood he and two of his brothers came to the United States and William Stoddart settled at West Point, New York, where he pursued a seven years' medical course under one of the government surgeons at that place, eventually winning his M. D. degree. At that time Lee, McClellan and Burnside were all at the West Point Military Academy and Mr. Stoddart knew them well. Following his graduation he went to Shullsburg, Wisconsin, where he practiced for several years, and subsequently removed to Minersville, afterward to Jamestown and still later to Boscobel, Wisconsin. In the meantime he had entered upon the work of the ministry of the Congregational church and gave his later life to Christian service. He passed away at Black Earth, Wisconsin, where he was occupying a pulpit at the time.

George H. Stoddart spent his youth in Wisconsin and was educated in the public schools. He left the parental roof at the age of nineteen years and in 1873 made his way to Yankton, South Dakota, where he became identified with the government survey work, with which he was connected for five years. In the spring of 1878 he removed to Codington county and took up a homestead on the shores of Lake Kampeska. In 1880 he proved up on the land, for which be paid a dollar and a quarter per acre, and that year he went to work in the engineering department of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad Company, working with the surveying force of that road for eight years, during which period he gradually advanced and in 1888 became roadmaster of that division, in which important capacity he served for ten years. During that time, or in 1891, he transferred his headquarters to Brookings, where he has since resided, and in 1898 he resigned his position, but the following year ran the transit for the surveying gang on the location of the road from Tyler to Astoria and subsequently did special work for the road at different times. In 1903 he was elected city clerk of Brookings, which was then acting under a special charter. After the city came under the general laws he continued his work, but the name of the office was changed to that of city auditor, in which position he has continued to serve. From the fact that the city owns its electric light, heat and power plant, heating the business section of the city, and also owns its telephone line, the position is one of importance and Mr. Stoddart has been most faithful and efficient in the discharge of his duties.

In 1891 Mr. Stoddart was united in marriage to Miss Marie Marrow, of Redfield, South Dakota, and they became the parents of three children, of whom two are yet living: Mattie, who is attending the South Dakota State College at Brookings; and Harriett. Mr. Stoddart is a member of Brookings Lodge, No. 24, A. F. A A. M.; Brookings Chapter, No. 18, R. A. M.; Brookings Commandery, No. 14, K. T.; and he and his wife are members of Brookings Chapter, No. 15, O. E. S. He also belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America and the Ancient Order of United Workmen and he has membership in the Brookings Commercial Club, while his wife and daughters are members of the First Presbyterian church. He is one of the representative citizens of Brookings and in an analyzation of his life work it will be found that loyalty .to duty has been one of his strong characteristics. If study and work can make for efficiency—and it always does—there is no doubt that he has displayed efficiency in every position to which he has been called. Another proof of this is found in the fact that he has been continuously promoted and that his life work has been of constantly increasing responsibility and value.

“History of Dakota Territory”, George W. Kingsbury, 1915

PATRICK M. MAGNER.

Patrick M. Magner, who is engaged in farming on section 5, in Yankton precinct of Yankton county, is a son of David and Mary (Creighion) Magner. Tlie father was born in Cork, Ireland, and brought by his parents to the state of New York. His wife was born in Dublin, Ireland, and with a brother and a friend came to the United States and settled at Woodstock, Illinois, where she was married to David Magner, having previously removed westward to the locality. In 1S74 the parents of our subject came to South Dakota The father, who was a shoemaker, worked at his trade in Woodstock and also in Yankton up to the time of his death, which occurred in 1876. His widow survived him and reared their two sons. Michael and Patrick, the former now a business man of Yankton. The mother passed away in Council Bluffs, Iowa, in 1908.

Patrick M. Magner grew to manhood in Yankton and in early life became interested in athletics, especially in boxing. He became a professional and in about thirty matches in the featherweight class lost but one. Since retiring from the ring he has been engaged in farming. He first purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land in 1902 and since that time has added to his holdings until his home ranch comprises five hundred and twenty acres, on which he has one of the finest sets of farm buildings in Yankton county or in South Dakota. He is continually adding to his buildings and to his property as the increase of his business demands. He is exclusively a stockman, selling no grain, and often buying some to feed upon the home ranch. He also has a farm of more than ten hundred and twenty acres ten miles west of Yankton, on which he raises large quantities of grain. His farming operations are conducted on an extensive scale. A large farm traction engine is used in the heavy plowing and hauling and in the threshing and other operations on the farm. Seventy-five horses are necessary on the two farms. The annual output includes three or four hundred cattle and one thousand hogs, and is equalled by but few producers in the state. Mr. Magner follows dvanced scientific methods and seems to have discovered the secret of preventing disease among hogs by feeding them while they are growing on oats, giving them no corn except for the finish a month or two before sending them to the market. His herds have been at all times free from the usual ravages of disease. He is also a believer in alfalfa, having out about one hundred and seventy-five acres of it. Since becoming well established in his others lines he has added dairying to his business. He started by selling milk and now supplies a large part of the milk and cream used in Yankton.

Mr. Magner was married October 21, 1905, to Miss Maude A. Paul, who was born near Iowa City, Iowa, November 21, 1871, a daughter of William L. and Alice (Carney) Paul, who in 1878 removed westward to Buffalo county, Nebraska, settling half way between Kearney and Orleans. Mr. Paul, having served as a soldier throughout the Civil war, was compelled to live on his claim for only about a year, when he received title to it. The family resided on the claim while Mr. Paul followed his vocation of contracting and building in Kearney and Orleans and as soon as he received a patent to the land he moved his family to Kearney, where the children were educated. While upon the claim the family lived in a sod house and the school which the children attended during that period was also a sod structure. The mother died a few years after the removal to Kearney and the family afterward scattered. Mrs. Magner came to Yankton and made her home with old family friends until her marriage. She became interested in farming before her marriage and for several years after had charge of the place before Mr. Magner took an active part in running the business. Her knowledge of agriculture and stock-raising is equal to that of her husband's and theirs are among the most important and extensive interests of Yankton county and that section of the state. They have four big silos holding over one thousand tons and furnishing ensilage for the large number of cattle and hogs annually fed and marketed on the Magner farm.

Mr. Magner is a republican in his political views but does not seek nor desire office, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his agricultural and stock-raising interests, which have brought him to a prominent position among the successful farmers of his part of the state.

History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915

DAVID EMANUEL LLOYD.

David Emanuel Lloyd has for an extended period been active in business circles and in the public life of Yankton. He was born September 27, 1856, in Red Wing, Goodhue county, Minnesota, a son of Walrath and Johannah (Anderson) Lloyd, who emigrated to the United States in 1852 from Sweden, settling at La Crosse, Wisconsin. The father afterward removed with his family to Red Wing, Minnesota, and preempted land in that district, but lived again at La Crosse for some years. In 1863 he removed to Lansing, Iowa, and in 1878 became a resident of Sioux Falls, South Dakota, where his remaining days were passed, his death occurring in 1899, while his wife survived until 1903. Throughout the entire period of his residence in America he was identified with pioneer life and with the early development of various sections of the west. To him and his wife were born nine sons and a daughter, of whom the daughter, Clara V. Lloyd of Sioux Falls, and four sons survive.

David Emanuel Lloyd attended the district schools until thirteen years of age and the following year became a clerk in the postoffice. He held the position of accountant in the First National Rank at Yankton from 1881 until 1895. In 1891 he was elected a director of the Yankton Building & Loan Association and has continued to be reelected each year since that time, being still a member of the board. He has been called to various public offices, the duties of which he has discharged in a most capable and commendable manner.

In 1887 he became city clerk of Yankton and was city treasurer from 1890 until 1894 inclusive. The following year he was elected county treasurer and filled that position for two years. In 1898 he was again called to public office in appointment to the position of postmaster, in which he served for four years. In 1909 he was made a member of the board of education for a term of four years and was reelected in 1913, so that he is now active in directing the management of the schools of the city. He served as treasurer of the board of education from 1890 until 1895 and in 1903 he was made a member of the city council for a two years' term.

On the 14th of June, 1882, at Mason City, Iowa, Mr. Lloyd was united in marriage to Miss Dorothea Elizabeth Kumpf, a daughter of Jacob and Mary (Eming) Kumpf, who emigrated to America from Germany in the late '50s, settling in Allamakee county, Iowa, Mrs. Lloyd being born at Dorchester, that county, in 1860. To Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd have been born the following named: Clara D., James M., Dorothea E. and William W., who are yet living; and David E., who died in December, 1900, at the age of nearly four years. All were born in Yankton, South Dakota.

Mr. Lloyd has been a Mason since 1879, always maintaining his affiliation with the craft. He is now secretary of St. John's Lodge, No. 1, A. F. & A. M., of Yankton; is a past high priest of Yankton Chapter, No. 1, R. A. M.; and is the present preceptor of Oriental Consistory, No. 1, A. & A. S. R., also of Yankton. He likewise belongs to the Knights of Pythias fraternity and with his family attends the Congregational church.

History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915

JOHN C. KLEMME.

For many years John C. Klemme figured as one of the most prominent insurance men of Huron and his section of the state, and the agency which he established is still conducted under his name, although he has retired from active connection therewith. He is a well known figure in fraternal circles and is everywhere mentioned as one of the valued residents of Huron. His birth occurred in Franklin county, Indiana, in 1852, and in his youthful days he attended the country schools, but his education and training have been largely acquired in the school of experience. His father was Henry W. Klemme, a resident farmer of Indiana, who, in 1860, removed to Winneshiek county, Iowa, where he owned large tracts of land, being one of the leading farmers of that district. His last years were spent in Elma, Iowa, where he owned a fine residence. A native of Germany, he crossed the Atlantic in a sailing vessel, eight weeks being required in making the voyage. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Catherine Gasell, was also a native of Germany, having been born on the banks of the Rhine in Prussia. They became the parents of fourteen children, of whom thirteen, eleven sons and two daughters, are yet living.

John C. Klemme was a little lad of eight years when the family removed to Iowa, and in the usual manner of farm lads his boyhood and youth were spent. In 1878, when twenty-six years of age, he came to South Dakota from Vinton, Iowa, for the purpose of looking over the country. He made his way to Springfield, this state, and was well pleased with its prospects. He returned to Vinton for the winter, but in the spring of 1879 again went to Springfield, where he established a real-estate and insurance office, conducting business there for eight years. In 1886 he located in Huron, having taken up a tree claim that included what is now the southern part of the city. For many years he conducted an extensive insurance, real-estate and loan business in that city, having a very large and gratifying clientage. For thirty-four years he represented the Phoenix Insurance Company and established the Calumet agency in South Dakota and in Iowa. For twenty-two years he was special agent and adjuster for the Phoenix Insurance Company in North and South Dakota, and there is no phase of the insurance business with which he is not familiar. His agency was known as the Klemme Agency, and the business is still carried on under that name, although he has retired. The name has become a synonym for the highest standard of service along insurance and real-estate lines.

While at Springfield, South Dakota, Mr. Klemme was united in marriage to Miss Florence Sandison, of Vinton, Iowa, who passed away thirteen years later. A few years subsequent to her death Mr. Klemme wedded Mrs. L. E. Choate, of Yankton, South Dakota, who in her maidenhood was Miss Annie E. Edwards. Her father was one of the pioneers of the state, settling at Elk Point, Dakota, in 1860. Subsequently he moved to Yankton, where he established a dray line. His first home was a log cabin and the family met the usual experiences and hardships of pioneer life, but his business grew with the settlement of this state.

Mr. Klemme has always taken a very active part in the affairs of the city, is a public-spirited man and one whose interest has been of a most helpful character. He is prominently known in fraternal circles, holding membership with the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Masons. He was largely instrumental in building the Masonic Temple in Huron and became one of its largest stockholders. He is ever loyal and true to the teachings of these organizations, exemplifying in his life the spirit of fraternity. He belongs to the Episcopal church, and he gives his political allegiance to the republican party. For four years he filled the office of register of deeds in his county and for five or six years was city treasurer of Huron, discharging the duties of both offices with promptness and fidelity. In every relation of life he has measured up to high standards of manhood and citizenship and in business his record is indeed an enviable one, winning for him the regard and confidence of colleagues and contemporaries. The rest which has come to him in his retirement from business is well merited, but, while he has put aside the more arduous cares of business life, he is by no means a recluse, for he takes a most active and helpful interest in the fraternal organizations with wrhich he is connected and gives generous, hearty and helpful support to all those measures which are a matter of civic virtue and civic pride.

History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915

JOHN L. KEATING

John L. Keating is secretary and treasurer of the Keating Creamery Company of Yankton and as such is a well known and enterprising business man of the city. He was born in Janesville, Wisconsin, on the 1st of October, 1886, a son of Edward and Mary E. (Breen) Keating. The father was a contractor, devoting his life to that work. He has passed away, but the mother survives and makes her home in Yankton. The ancestors of the family came from Ireland.

In the graded schools of Janesville John L. Keating pursued his education until he reached the age of fourteen years, when he started out in life on his own account, entering the office of the Sioux Falls Press. He was afterward with the Argus Leader of Sioux Falls for three years and in 1913 he came to Yankton to join his brother in the conduct of a creamery business. He was made secretary and treasurer of the company and so continues. This is a leading enterprise of Yankton and its trade is constantly expanding, owing to the capable direction and wise business management of the partners.

On the 23d of August, 1909, Mr. Keating was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth C. Cross, a daughter of Kirkwood Colin and Agnes (Rugg) Cross, both of whom are deceased. Mrs. Keating was reared and educated in Sioux Falls and by her marriage have been born a son and daughter, Austin Brown and Mary Jane. The religious faith of the family is that of the Catholic church and Mr. and Mrs. Keating are active in its charities. In politics he is a republican, but, while interested in all matters of progressive citizenship, is not an office seeker. He finds recreation in an occasional game of golf, but business claims the greater part of his attention. He is a member of the Commercial Association and acts in connection with that organization for the upbuilding and progress of the city.

“History of Dakota Territory”, George W. Kingsbury, 1915

MAJOR JOSEPH R. HANSON.

Major Joseph R. Hanson, of Yankton, is one of South Dakota's earliest pioneers and his name is indelibly inscribed upon the pages of its history. He aided in shaping events which figure prominently in its annals along both military and legislative lines, and for an extended period of about three decades has been a factor in the agricultural progress of his county and state. He was born in Lancaster, New Hampshire, a son of Joseph Hanson, who was likewise born in that state, and a grandson of Isaac Hanson, who came from England and was one of the first settlers of the White Mountain district. He is also a descendant of John Hanson, who was a delegate to congress under the Articles of Confederation from 1781 to 1783, and served as president of that congress in 1781-2. The father, Joseph Hanson, was united in marriage to Ann Pinkham. a daughter of Daniel Pinkham, builder of the Mount Washington turnpike, for which he received a grant of land, and a part of that grant became the homestead property upon which Major
Hanson was born.

The last named attended the grammar and high schools of his native city and also pursued a short course of study in the academy at Salem, Massachusetts. In 1856, thinking to find better business opportunities in the middle west, he made his way to Illinois, settling for a time in Chicago, where he was in the employ of his brother, who was engaged in the furniture business. In 1857 he removed to Winona, Minnesota, where he continued in active connection with the furniture trade, but the following year he and three companions started with ox teams for the territory of Dakota. They arrived at the present site of Sioux City, Iowa, and there crossed the Missouri river into Nebraska, finally reaching a point in the Missouri directly opposite Yankton, where they prepared their camp for the winter. During that season Major Hanson crossed the river and located a piece of land adjoining the present corporate limits of the city and that tract is still in his possession. He located permanently in Yankton in 1858, and at that time there were but four white people in the settlement, all employed at the trading post of Frost Todd & Company. The following year, however, emigration having begun, Mr. Hanson embarked in the real estate business and has been so engaged from that date to the present. Of the actual settlers of Yankton, Mr. Hanson was the second, having been preceded only by John C. Holman, who had built his cabin about a month prior to Major Hanson's arrival.

From the time that Yankton numbered him among its citizens to the present, Mr. Hanson has borne an active and helpful part in the work of general improvement and development and his name is indelibly inscribed upon the pages of Yankton's history. In 1862 he became chief clerk of the territorial legislature and served for two years. He
was then chosen to represent his county in the fourth session of the territorial council and was also appointed territorial auditor and judge advocate. In military circles his name became well known, for in the Home Guards, organized for protection against the Indian raids, be served with the rank of colonel. He was also made a member of the commission formed to adjust claims for Indian depredations and took charge of building of fortifications known as the Yankton stockade in 1862. The survey of the government road from the Minnesota state line to Old Fort Pierre was made under his direction in 1865 and the same year he was appointed by President Lincoln as Indian agent for the upper Missouri region, and as such had supervision over all the various branches of the Sioux nation, there being more than twenty thousand Indians under his charge. Before his appointment was confirmed by the senate President Lincoln was assassinated and he was reappointed by President Johnson, continuing to fill that important position until 1870, with headquarters at Crow Creek Agency and with sub-agencies at Fort Sully and Fort Rice. His administration covered a period when the Indians were in constant revolt against the armv and the white settlers and it was members of these same tribes who later perpetrated the historic Custer massacre.

Mr. Hanson was a member of the first constitutional convention held at Sioux Falls in 1885 and the code, with slight modifications, as ratified by the second convention, was adopted by the people and is the present organic law of South Dakota. Important and numerous as have been the connections of Mr. Hanson already mentioned, he has figured actively in other pursuits. He was secretary and member of the board of directors of the first railway, known as the Dakota Southern, built within Dakota territory. He has lived to see the state covered by a great net work of railway lines, bringing it into close connection with north, south, east and west. In October, 1872, Mr. Hanson was united in marriage to Miss Annie M. G. Mills, a daughter of Abraham Mills, a member of the Long Island family of that name, and they had one son, Joseph Mills Hanson, who is widely known as a writer and magazine contributor. Soon after coming to this territory Major Hanson secured a farm of two hundred acres two miles from Yankton and thereon later established the homestead upon which he has lived for more than thirty years, being now most comfortably situated in life. In politics Mr. Hanson has been consistently a republican from the birth of the party,
and in 1859 organized the first republican caucus held in Dakota territory. Few men among Dakota's pioneers are more widely and favorably known and there are few chapters of Yankton county's early annals but contain his name as one of the active participants in events recorded. He is able, genial and kindly, is prosperous and is rightly numbered among the sterling characters who have shaped the destinies of the vast country embraced in Dakota territory. His has been an active life and his is the satisfaction of having done a man's work in the transformation of the wilderness as he found it into one of the fairest states in the Union. Hanson county is named in his honor. Fraternally be is connected with the Masons and in his life has exemplified the beneficent spirit of the craft, which is
based upon mutual helpfulness and brotherly kindness. His memory forms a connecting link between the primitive past and the progressive present and he relates many interesting incidents concerning the early days when only here and there had the seeds of civilization been planted and the work of development begun. He has lived to see this become a prosperous state, enjoying all of the opportunities and equipped with all of the conveniences of the older east and his influence and his labors have been potent elements in bringing it to its present condition.
 

History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915

ERNEST D. EDE.

Ernest D. Ede, well known as a representative of the legal profession in Huron, possesses the studious habits and the analytical mind which are indispensable factors of success to him who would devote his life to law practice. He is now accorded a liberal clientage and handles his cases most ably.

Mr. Ede is a Native of Lynn county, Kansas, born in 1876. The removal of the family to Earlville, Iowa, led him to become a pupil in the public schools of that place and he afterward attended college at Dixon, Illinois, and continued his studies at Cedar Falls, Iowa. After spending some time in the Iowa State University he entered the Chicago University and thus his studies were continued along broadening lines, bringing him a comprehensive knowledge of general and professional questions. The year 1902 was that of his graduation from the Iowa State University. He read law under Allan Bogue at Centerville, South Dakota, and for some time he was identified with educational interests in this state. He was a teacher in the high school of Yankton in 1901-2 and from 1902 until 1906 had charge of the schools of Centerville. It was during this period that he devoted his leisure hours to reading law and thus qualified for the bar. In 1906 he located at Huron, where he has since engaged in the practice of law and in the intervening period of nine years he has made a creditable record as a strong and resourceful representative of the profession. He prepares his cases with great thoroughness and care and his ability is evidenced in his careful analysis and sound logic.

On the 27th of November, 1912, Mr. Ede was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Jones, of Manchester, New Hampshire, and they have a wide acquaintance in Huron, the hospitality of many of the best homes being cordially extended to them. Mr. Ede is a Mason of high rank, having attained the thirty-second degree. He also belongs to the Mystic Shrine at Sioux Falls and he is a loyal exemplar of the teachings of the craft, which are based upon the principle of universal brotherhood. In politics Mr. Ede is a progressive and upon the ticket of that party was elected to the legislature in 1913. To questions of government he gives careful consideration and his support of or opposition to any measure is the result of comprehensive study of the situation, its needs and its opportunities. He may well be classed among the public-spirited citizens and representative men of Huron.

History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915

W. L. CUSICK.

W. L. Cusick is a prominent and well known farmer of Clay county, owning six hundred acres of land, three hundred and sixty of which are located in that county, and two hundred and forty in Stanley county. He was born upon the farm on section 27, Fairview township, where he still lives, in 1875, a son of Nelson W. and Annie (Ledew) Cusick. The father was born in New York state and the mother in St. Mary, Iowa, in 1857. The father came west when a young man and first located in Michigan, but afterward removed to Dakota territory in the early '60s, becoming one of the pioneers of Clay county, where he entered a homestead and also a preemption claim. In company with Cornelius Andrews and Jonas Meckling he platted the town site of Burbank in June, 1873. He fanned and raised stock until his death, which occurred in 1889 when he was in his sixty-fourth year. He was an excellent business man and was one of the wealthy men of the county at the time of his death, owning thirteen hundred acres of land situated in Clay, Union and Yankton counties. During the Civil war he enlisted in Company A, Volunteer Dakota Calvary, under Captain Nelson Miner, which was organized chiefly to protect settlers from Indian outbreaks, etc. In political matters he adhered to the democratic party but never sought office for himself. In 1894 his widow joined him in death when in her thirty-sixth year. To their union were born six children, three sons and three daughters: W. L., of this review; Mollie, the wife of James Hitchcock, of this state; William, of Clay county; Carrie, the wife of W. A. Chaussee, of Clay county; Lillie, deceased; and John, a resident of Montana.

W. L. Cusick was given excellent educational opportunities, as he was a student in the University of South Dakota after finishing the course in the local schools. When he began his active business career he turned his attention to farming and stock-raising, which he still follows. He is residing upon the old homestead where his birth occurred and owns six hundred acres of land, three hundred and sixty of which are in Clay county and the remainder in Stanley county. He is progressive, energetic and businesslike in all that he does and his extensive interests are well managed and yield him a large annual income.
In 1897 Mr. Cusick was united in marriage to Miss Emma O. Russell, a native of Lincoln county, South Dakota, and a daughter of C. S. and Catherine A. Russell. Her parents removed to South Dakota from Iowa in 1876, and previous to living in the latter state they were residents of Wisconsin. The mother was born in Pennsylvania and the father in Ohio. He passed away in 1900 and was survived by bis widow for nine years. He was a veteran of the Civil war, having served faithfully and gallantly in the Union army, and was familiarly known as Uncle Sam in his neighborhood. All of his six children survive and they are as follows: W. R., a resident of Lake Andes, South Dakota; Mrs. Ida L. Sherman, living in Hotchkiss, Colorado; Mrs. Abbie J. Smith, a resident of Berkeley, California; Calvin L., who lives in Vermillion, this state; Mrs. Cusick, the next in order of birth; and Mrs. Katie May Hopson, who makes her home in Winnifred, South Dakota. To Mr. and Mrs. Cusick have been born five children: La Verna whose birth occurred in 1898 and who is now attending high school; Frank R., born in 1900; Lee Wallace, born in 1902; Corinne M., in 1907; and Arthur Burdette, in 1910.

Mr. Cusick it a democrat in his political allegiance but has confined his political activity to the exercise of his right of suffrage. Fraternally he belongs to the Knights of Pythias, the Modern Woodmen of America and the Yeomen, and in his life exemplifies that spirit of brotherhood which is the basis of all fraternal organizations. He has won at the same time material success and the sincere respect and esteem of those who know him, as his integrity and honor have been no less marked than his business ability.

History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915

JAMES N. BLODGETT.

Upon a farm on section 2, Gayville precinct, Yankton county, resides James N. Blodgett, whose identification with Dakota covers a period of forty-six years. He arrived in this state on the 1st of June, 1669, the family coming by wagon from Polk county, Iowa, The father, Myron Blodgett, was a native of Massachusetts and in early life went to Indiana, where he married Phoebe Harris, a native of that state. She died leaving one son, Omar G., who is now living in Polk county, Iowa. Mr. Blodgett next removed to Tama county, Iowa, where he met and married Sarah Cronk, a native of Ohio, and they remained in Tama county until 1863, when they became residents of Polk county, Iowa, settling fourteen miles east of Des Moines, where they lived for six years. There was no railroad beyond Sioux City when the Blodgett family passed through on their way to Dakota. The father secured a claim in Clay county, a mile southeast of Gayville, using his homestead right, but soon abandoning that tract, he purchased land two miles west of Gayville, where he lived until his death on the 16th of April, 1883. In the meantime he had carefully and persistently cultivated his farm and had extended its boundaries by additional purchase until he was the owner of three hundred and fifty-five acres, of which he secured a quarter section by preemption. His widow long survived him, dying December 14, 1911, when she lacked but five days of being seventy-nine years of age. After his death she married Rev. P. N. Cross, an early settler of Clay county, who has made his home at Pipestone, Minnesota, since his wife passed away. Although born in 1833 he is still quite active for one of his years. James N. Blodgett and his brother, who lives upon the old homestead, are the only surviving children.

James N. Blodgett was born on a farm in Tama county, Iowa, November 19, 1854, and remained with his parents until the father's death, after which he started out in business life on his own account. For a year he rented the home place and then', in 1885, purchased a part of his present farm, to which he has added until he now has three hundred and sixty acres of rich and arable land. At the time he made the purchase the only building upon the place was a log house. A small grove had also been planted. This he enlarged by adding many other trees, and as the years have gone by he has added all the modem equipments and accessories to his farm, making it a model property. He has erected a commodious residence, substantial barns, granary and other outbuildings for the shelter of grain and stock, and today has one of the most fertile and best improved farms in the county, the fields annually returning to him substantial harvests as the years have gone by. Conditions today, however, are in marked contrast to those of the early pioneer period, for he and his father's family suffered from the hardships, privations and trials incident to pioneer life. During the flood of 1881 the water was around their house for three weeks and most of the time stood in the house from one to three feet deep, the family being obliged to live in the second story during that period. Mr. Blodgett had purchased an Indian canoe for a watering trough and when the flood came he used it to get to high ground for provisions and to look after the stock. He also helped his neighbors rescue their cattle and horses, which were being carried away by the flood. The cattle and horses owned by Patrick Dinneen floated through Mr. Blodgett's farm on two straw stacks and grounded in Clay county a few miles below. Mr. Blodgett lost but two or three shoats and one cow, while some neighbors lost nearly a hundred head of cattle besides smaller stock. Previously he had purchased an old warehouse in Gayville, had moved it to his place and put it on a high foundation. On the floor of this building he kept in safety between thirty-five and forty head of cattle, seven horses and forty hogs, losing but the few mentioned above. When the blizzard of January, 1888, occurred, James N. Blodgett was employed by the firm of Bagstad & Aaseth and was in Gayville when the blizzard struck. He was warned not to start home, but he felt that he should be there and made his way through the blinding storm, proceeding along the road until he came to a slough near his home and then passed along the bank of it to the grove and on to the house. Prairie fires were of frequent occurrence in those early days and James N. Blodgett saw from his father's home one fall thirteen places on fire at one time, but their own home escaped.

On the 23d of February, 1883, Mr. Blodgett was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Douglas, a native of Greenwich, Connecticut, and a daughter of Archibald and Catherine (Smith) Douglas, who in the spring of 1880 came to Dakota and bought a farm in the Volin precinct, where Mrs. Blodgett afterward taught school near Marindahl. They were living there when the flood of the spring of 1881 swept through the valley and they too suffered, as did many of their neighbors, being forced to live for three weeks in the second story of their house. To Mr. and Mrs. Blodgett have been born four children: Kathleen, who is now the wife of L. N. Aaseth, of Gayville; Artinca, the wife of G. L. Alstrup, who cultivates the farm of his father-in-law and occupies a part of the family home; George W., who is associated with Mr. Alstrup in the operation of the home farm; and Roy N., a student in the South Dakota State College at Brookings.

The family have been reared in the faith of the Methodist Episcopal church, to which the parents belong. Mr. Blodgett is a republican in his political views and, although not an office seeker, keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day. He holds membership with the Modern Woodmen of America and his daughter Artinca is connected with the Royal Neighbors. Every phase of frontier life in Yankton county is familiar to James N. Blodgett, and he is among those who have contributed to the development and improvement of the county which is today enjoyed. His life has been a busy and useful one, and the careful management of his farming interests has in time brought to him a substantial success that numbers him among the prosperous farmers of the community.

The Biographical Directory of the Railway Officials of America
T. Addison Busbey, 1906

JOHN R. PHELAN

Phelan, John R., General Superintendent Wyoming District Chicago Burlington & Quincy Ry. Office Alliance, Neb. Born July 11, 1851, at New London, Conn. Entered railway service 1869, since which he has been consecutively to 1875, rodman locating party, contractor construction and in track department West Wisconsin Rd (now Chicago St. Paul Minneapolis & Omaha Ry); 1875 to Feb. 1882, with Chicago Milwaukee & St. Paul Ry during the construction of several lines in Iowa, Dakota and Minnesota and afterward as roadmaster at Sioux City, Ia., and Yankton and Sioux Falls, S. D.; 1882 to Nov. 1902, with Burlington & Missouri River Rd in Nebraska successively as roadmaster, trainmaster, assistant superintendent and superintendent Wyoming division; Nov. 1902 to May 1, 1905, superintendent Alliance division Chicago Burlington & Quincy Ry; May 1, 1905, to date, general superintendent Wyoming district same road.

 

“History of Dakota Territory”, George W. Kingsbury, 1915

BARTLETT TRIPP

Bartlett Tripp, a native of the state of Maine, was born July 15, 1839, at Harmony, Somerset county. His early education was obtained at the country schools and at intervals he engaged in teaching. In 1857 he entered Colby College at Waterville and in the early spring of 1861, while en route to California, he visited a brother living in Sioux City, Iowa, and at that time came to southeastern Dakota and was then much impressed by the possibilities of the country and the opportunities which it offered to young men with little capital. Continuing his journey westward to Omaha, he joined a train of about sixty wagons just leaving to cross the great plains, reaching Salt Lake City late in the season. There he taught school during the winter and in the spring went to Sacramento, California, where he
assisted in the survey of what afterward became a part of the great Central Pacific line. His health becoming impaired, he returned to Maine and later entered the law course at Albany, New York, graduating in the class of 1867. Among his classmates graduating at the same time was William McKinley, afterward president of the United States. Even earlier they had formed a friendship that continued throughout life.

From 1867 until 1869 Mr. Tripp practiced law in Augusta, Maine, as a member of the firm of Pillsbury & Tripp, but the call of the west was insistent and drew him to the land of promise. In 1869 he returned to Dakota, settling in Yankton, where he resumed the practice of law, forming a partnership with his elder brother, General William Tripp, then surveyor general. The bar at Yankton was at that time a very able one, among its members being George H. Hand, Colonel G. C. Moody, General William Tripp, Asa Bartlett, S. L. Spink, Warren Cowels and James D. Boyer. Bartlett Tripp soon gave evidence of his ability as a lawyer and rose rapidly to prominence as an authority upon legal problems. His power as a counselor and advocate won him a liberal clientage and he became recognized as one of the foremost representatives of the South Dakota bar. In 1873 Mr. Tripp, the junior member of the bar, was one of the attorneys for the defense in the Wintermute case, the most celebrated criminal trial of its time. Some years later he was associated with Colonel Moody in the revision of the code of 1903, and his name figured conspicuously upon the legal history of the state.

Mr. Tripp was twice married. In 1863, at Garland, Maine, he married Ellen M. Jennings, who died in 1884. On the 6th of November, 1887, in St. Paul, Minnesota, at the home of her brother, United States Senator Cushman K. Davis, Mr. Tripp married Janet (Davis) Washburn, who survives him. Mrs. Tripp comes of ancestry honorable and distinguished, being a lineal descendant of Thomas Cushman and Mary Allerton, the latter the last survivor of the one hundred passengers who came to America in the Mayflower. Mrs. Tripp organized and was appointed regent of the Daniel Newcomb chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution.

In 1883 Bartlett Tripp was elected president of the first territorial constitutional convention. As more than four-fifths of the members of that convention were republicans and Mr. Tripp was a democrat, it showed a remarkable confidence in his ability. His knowledge of the law well qualified him for the onerous and responsible duties which devolved upon him on this occasion and his work was at all times actuated by a public-spirited devotion to the general good. In 1SS5 he was appointed by President Cleveland as chief justice of the supreme court of Dakota and he proved himself the peer of the ablest men who have ever graced the court of last resort. His powers had gained him recognition as one of the most eminent lawyers of the northwest and his service on the bench placed him with the foremost jurists of his section of-the country. From 1893 until 1897 he was United States minister to Austria, Hungary and in 1899 President McKinley appointed him chairman of the Samoan commission to settle difficulties growing out of the Berlin treaty, involving England. Germany and America. Judge Tripp was well equipped to deal with international problems and his diplomacy secured for the United States the island of Tutuila with absolute and independent control of the harbor of Pango-Pango, where our coaling station, the largest in the world, is situated half way between Hawaii and Australia. Of this harbor Judge Tripp says in his book, My Trip to Samoa, "The harbor can be as easily defended as the approach to Gibraltar without the expenditure of money for fortifications which nature has already built. All that is required is to mount and man the guns." Mr. Tripp was identified with the development of Dakota and up to the time of his death, which occurred December 8, 1911, took an active interest in its progress, marking with pride its evolution from early pioneer conditions through its territorial struggle, the attainment of statehood, the growth of mining, agricultural and educational interests and finally its marvelous prosperity, for South Dakota is today the richest state per capita in the Union.

Dr. F. B. Gault, president of the State University of South Dakota, in his memorial address, said: "Judge Tripp waas the highest type of manhood at his own hearthstone, upon the bench, as a diplomatic representative of his country and as he stood, full-orbed in scholarship and experience, in the lecture room before his class of young attorneys. As chairman of the Samoan commission he was called upon to meet unusual international complications. The result is that he added one of the most luminous pages to the brilliant history of American diplomacy. The stirring scenes of the Spanish-American war and the war in the Philippines with all the dramatic incidents relating thereto filled those years so largely that the public mind did not fully grasp the national and international significance of his statesmanship".

"For over forty years Judge Tripp has been connected with the judicial system of our commonwealth. The cases he has tried, the decisions he has rendered, the opinions he has delivered and his public addresses upon various occasions will be cited in years to come. His influence as a great lawyer and as a distinguished jurist can never be forgotten. The history of the two score years and more of his active life as a citizen and public official are an imperishable part of the history of this commonwealth. . . . Verily a great man dwelt in our midst. His life work, so monumental, is a part of the enduring renown of our state. His influence, extending to generations yet to be, will constitute his perpetual memorial."

Hon. H. C. Preston, state senator, upon the same occasion, said in part: "While Judge Tripp's loyalty and devotion were manifested in your community, the home of his choice, yet withal he did not belong to you alone. He was a part and parcel of the state and the nation as well, for every community through the length and breadth of our commonwealth claims him as a benefactor. The history of the territory and state, yet to be written, will be replete with his acts. They form a part of the foundation upon which the superstructure of our government stands. Our constitutional and legislative acts constitute no small part of his master mind; our judicial system and the correct interpretation of our laws will forever mark with distinction his wisdom and sound judgment"

Mrs. Tripp still retains her residence in Yankton and is a leading figure in the social circles of the city. "When her husband was minister to Australia she contributed not a little to his success in a social way through her courteous manner to all, her uniform tact and her high ideals. Said one who knew her: "Always elegantly and tastefully gowned, with a gracious manner, she was a prominent figure in the social life of the diplomatic circle and made the social functions given by the American minister most attractive and popular." She is a leader in the social circles of South Dakota and largely, but quietly and unostentatiously, promotes the charitable and benevolent work of the city. Her high character and advanced ideals are appreciated on every hand. Thus it is that the lines of her life have been cast in harmony with those of a distinguished and honored ancestry.

History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915

CHARLES A. ALSETH.

Charles A. Alseth has since 1911 been a factor in financial circles of Lake Preston. His birth occurred near Whitewood, South Dakota, on the 26th of November, 1883, his parents being John O. and Martha Alseth, pioneers who settled in Yankton county, South Dakota, in 1869 and removed to Kingsbury county in 1878. He homesteaded on section 21, township 110, range 54, and also took up a tree claim, devoting his attention to general agricultural pursuits with excellent results for a number of years. At the present time he is living retired in Lake Preston, enjoying a rest which he has truly earned and richly deserves.

Charles A. Alseth pursued his early education in the public schools and subsequently entered Yankton College, which institution conferred upon him the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1910. The following year he entered the Merchants Exchange Bank of Lake Preston as cashier, having purchased an interest in the institution, of which he remained a director and stockholder until January 1, 1915. In 1915 Mr. Alseth organized and became one of the incorporators of the Farmers National Bank of Lake Preston, which has a capital of twenty-five thousand dollars, and he is serving as cashier of that institution. In his capacity of cashier he has contributed to the growth and success of the bank in no uncertain degree and enjoys an enviable reputation as a popular, courteous and able official. He was likewise one of the organizers of the Lake Preston Lumber Company.

In politics Mr. Alseth is a stanch republican, while fraternally he is identified with the Masons and the Yeomen. His religious faith is that of the Congregational church, the teachings of which he exemplifies in his daily life. He has gained a creditable measure of success in business and financial circles for one of his years, and South Dakota is proud to number him among her native sons.

 


CRAWFORD, Coe Isaac (1858—1944)
Senate Years of Service: 1909-1915 Republican
Coe Isaac Crawford, a Senator from South Dakota; born near Volney, Allamakee County, Iowa, January 14, 1858; attended the common schools and was instructed by a private tutor; graduated from the law department of the University of Iowa at Iowa City in 1882; admitted to the bar and commenced practice at Independence, Iowa; moved to Pierre, Territory of Dakota, in 1883 and continued the practice of law; prosecuting attorney of Hughes County in 1887 and 1888; member, Territorial council 1889; upon the admission of South Dakota as a State was elected as a member of the first State senate; attorney general of South Dakota 1892-1896; unsuccessful Republican candidate in 1896 for Representative at Large to the Fifty-fifth Congress; attorney for the Chicago & North Western Railway Co. for the area around South Dakota 1897-1903, when he resigned; moved to Huron in 1897; Governor of South Dakota 1907-1908; elected as a Republican to the United States Senate and served from March 4, 1909, to March 3, 1915; unsuccessful candidate for renomination in 1914; chairman, Committee on Expenditures in the Interior Department (Sixty-first Congress), Committee on Claims (Sixty-second Congress); resumed the practice of law in Huron, S.Dak., until 1934, when he retired from active business and political life; died in Yankton, S.Dak.., April 25, 1944; interment in Municipal Cemetery, Iowa City, Iowa.

Source: Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1771-Present; contributed by A. Newell.

 

DILLON, Charles Hall (1853—1929)
Charles Hall Dillon, a Representative from South Dakota; born near Jasper, Dubois County, Ind., December 18, 1853; attended the public schools; was graduated from the academic department of Indiana University at Bloomington in 1874 and from its law department in 1876; was admitted to the bar in 1876 and commenced practice in Jasper, Ind.; moved to Marion, Iowa, in 1881, to Mitchell, Dakota Territory (now South Dakota), in 1882 and to Yankton in 1894 and continued the practice of law; delegate to the Republican National Conventions in 1900 and 1908; member of the State senate 1903-1911; elected as a Republican to the Sixty-third, Sixty-fourth, and Sixty-fifth Congresses (March 4, 1913-March 3, 1919); was not a candidate for reelection in 1918; resumed the practice of law in Yankton; moved to Vermillion, S.Dak., in 1922, having been elected associate justice of the State supreme court, and served until November 15, 1926, when he resigned; unsuccessful candidate for nomination as United States Senator in 1924; retired in 1926; died in Vermillion, S.Dak., September 15, 1929; interment in Yankton Cemetery, Yankton, S.Dak.

Source: Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1771-Present; contributed by A. Newell.

Edgar J. Anderson—born in England in 1847; came to America in 1859, and settled with his parents in Racine, Wisconsin; in 1881 he came to Yankton; married Miss E. Kirkman. They have three children.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

 J. B. Ashley—born in Indiana, in Warwick county, in 1856; came west in 1879, and settled near the Jim River, in Dakota; came to Yankton and established a meat market in 1881, the firm name being Maxwell and Ashley.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

J. H. Balmat—was born in Ohio, January 3d, 1848; came to Kansas City in 1868, in 1869 he went to Des Moines, Iowa; in 1871 he came to Dakota; married Mary McMackin; she died May the 8th, 1879; have two children, Jennie M. and Joseph L.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Gen. William H. Beadle—born at Rockville, Ind., in 1838; graduated at the University of Michigan, a member of the celebrated class of 1861, nearly all of whom immediately enlisted in the service of their country for the war of the Rebellion. Subsequently graduated from the Law Department of the University in the class of 1867; enlisted as a private in the 31st Ind. Volunteer infantry, in 1861; promoted First Lieutenant, Sept 3d, 1861; Captain November 9th, 1861; Lieutenant Colonel 1st Michigan sharpshooters, November, 1862, and Colonel, in 1863; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps for disability, caused by wounds and sickness June 14th. 1864; Brevet Lieutenant Colonel for "gallantry in defense of Washington;" Colonel for "gallant and meritorious services," and Brigadier-General for " gallant and meritorious services during the war; "was private secretary to Gov. A. W. Howard, of Dakota; Surveyor-General of Dakota from 1869 to 1873; commissioner to revise and codify the laws of Dakota 1875 and '76; member Dakota legislature in 1877; since February, 1870, Territorial Superintendent of Instruction; married to Ellen S. Chapman, of Albion, Michigan, May 1863, and has three daughters. 

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

E. A. Odiorne—born in Vermont in 1853; came west in 1877, and settled in Yankton; engaged in his present business in 1881.  

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Hon. Nehemiah Ordway—Governor of Dakota; a native of Warner, Merrimac Co., N. H., and is 52 years old; Col. Ordway has led a very active, business and political life, engaging when quite young in mercantile pursuits, and has subsequently been connected with numerous important business enterprises, serving for many years as president of the Kearsarge National and Kearsarge Savings Banks, in his native town; in 1855 was elected Sergeant-at-Arms in the New Hampshire Legislature, and afterwards serving a clerk; in 1857, at the close of the legislative session, was appointed High Sheriff of his native county, for five years, which position he resigned in 1861 to accept the appointment of General Mail Superintendent for the New England States; in 1862 was commissioned as Colonel by the Governor of New Hampshire, and in December, 1863, was elected Sergeant-at-Arms of the United States House of Representatives for the Thirty-eighth Congress, receiving six consecutive elections and filling that office for twelve years; at the close of the last session of the Forty-Third Congress Col. Ordway returned to New Hampshire, and was elected from his native town to the lower House of the New Hampshire legislature, and was re-elected in 1876-'77, and also served during that period in the Constitutional convention, and at the head of a tax commission which re-organized the whole tax system of the state; was elected under the amended constitution in November 1878, to the State Senate for two years; during the fifteen years since Col. Ordway became an officer in the National House of Representatives he was connected with several important business enterprises in the District of Columbia; Col. Ordway was appointed Governor of Dakota to fill the vacancy occasioned by the death of Gov. Howard; his nomination was reported unanimously from the Committee on Territories, and promptly and unanimously confirmed by the United States Senate; he reached Yankton and assumed office June 27, 1880; in July and August of that year he made an extended tour through the Territory, and aided in sending an elaborate exhibition car, containing agricultural and mineral products of Dakota, to the New England and other state fairs in the Eastern and Middle States; his report to the Secretary of the Interior made in November, 1880, gave a comprehensive statement of the condition of the Territory; his first biennial message, delivered in person to the Legislative Assembly, containing thirty-two closely-printed pages, gave a complete and concise history of the condition and requirements of the Territory; his recommendations in regard to the necessity for the erection of an Insane Asylum and a Territorial Penitentiary, were favorably acted upon by the Legislative Assembly. 

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Warren Osborn—Deputy-Sheriff, was born in Erie County, Ohio, in 1840; he came west in 1855, and settled in Freeborn County, Minnesota, in 1861 he enlisted in Company K, Second Minnesota; discharged August 1,1865, he returned to Minnesota and engaged in the mercantile business; in 1866 he removed to Yankton; in 1879 he was appointed to his present position; married to Mary J. Thomas; they have four children

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

H. W. Pike—grocer; was born in Ohio in 1848; in 1867 he came west and located in Yankton; in 1878 he engaged in the grocery business; he married Sophia Flick; they have three children, M. CM Harry L. and an infant.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

I. Piles—was born in Ohio in 1848; he came to Council Bluffs and lived until 1873; he then removed to Yankton and engaged in his present business; he married in 1873, Miss Florence A. King.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Thaddeus Pisek—comb-maker; established business 1879; born in Bohemia; came to America in 1869 and settled in Dakota; married Rosa Moe, of Bohemia; have four children—Annie, Mary, Johanna, Bowley.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

J. P. Redaelli—born in northern Italy, in April 1825; came to America in 1871; served as a volunteer in the old country in the revolution; married Jane Revell.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Wm. Reinhardt—city marshal; born in Wisconsin in 1856; in 1878 he came to Yankton and was engaged as instructor in the Yankton gymnasium; he married in 1877; he has one daughter— Hattie.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Owen Bartlett—born in Ireland in 1845, in 1863 he enlisted in the 33d Iowa, and served until the close of the war; came to Yankton in 1865 and was engaged in the liquor business until 1870.   In 1873 he engaged in his present business.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

John O. Bates—dealer in gents' furnishing goods; born in Milan, Ohio, in 1848; came to Yankton in 1870; in 1873 he engaged in his present business.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Dr. Walter Atwood Burleigh—a native of Waterville, Kennebec county, Maine; from 1861 to 1864 Dr. Burleigh was agent of the Yankton Indians, and from 1864 to 1868 was delegate to Congress from Dakota In the winter of 1877 he represented Yankton county in the upper branch of the Territorial Legislature, and was chosen president of the council; he has been largely engaged in the steamboating trade of the upper Missouri, having owned or been interested in the steamboats Miner, Carroll, Black Hills and Gen. Terry, and has been quite prominently identified with the history of the tertory (sp territory). His residence is still at Yankton, although he has extensive business interests at Miles City, Montana.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

John Becker—born in Germany in 1836; came to America in 1865, and the following year settled in Yankton; was engaged in the mercantile business until 1871; he then engaged in the hotel business.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Leo Biermeyer—was born in Germany, in 1836; came to America the 17th day of June, 1866; settled in Dakota in 1869; he married Julia Schenk, a native of Germany; they have six children, Emily, Mollie, Josephine, Julia, Johnnie and Lizzie.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Hon. S. A. Boyles—born in Indiana in 1841; was educated at the State University in July, 1861, he enlisted in Company E, 18 Indiana; promoted to First Lieutenant in the spring of 1862; resigned in the winter of 1864, and returned to Indiana; admitted to the bar in Illinois in 1868, elected state attorney from Clay county, Ill., in 1872; resigned the position in 1874 and removed to Hudson county; in 1876 he came to Yankton; was a member of the legislature in 1880, served as chairman judiciary committee.  In 1869 he married Mattie Dillin.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Joseph Bader—was born in Germany in 1832; in 1852 he came to America, and located in Galena, Illinois, and engaged in boot and shoe trade; in 1854 he went to Wabasha, Minnesota, and engaged in mercantile business; in 1874 he went to St. Paul, where he lived until 1875; he then removed to Yankton and opened up the Minnesota Hotel.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

George A. Baker—was born in Waukesha, Wisconsin, in 1847; came west and settled in Minnesota in 1854; and from there he came west with Ben. Hart's army train, and settled in Dakota; served in the army 3 years and 11 months under Robert Cook; was a prisoner fourteen months in Andersonville and Bell Island; after he came out he received a commission as 2d Lieutenant; married Lottie Stewart, of Leavenworth, Kansas; have two children, George T. and Frances L.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

John Bramsen—born in Schleswig, Germany, in 1848; came to America in 1866; settled in Yankton. Dakota Territory, in 1870; married Mary Thompson; have four children, Eric, Dick, Freddie and Katie.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Jacob Brauch—was born in Switzerland in 1826; came to America in 1852, and settled in St. Louis; married Annie Brezhlel (who died in 1876); then married Mary Rizli; have eight children, Adolph, Emil (?), Gust, Robert, Augustus. Julius, Albert and Frank, Mr. Brauch served in the army in the old country two years.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Michael Brennan—was born in Ireland the 19th of July, 1842; came to America in August, 1865, and settled in Council Bluffs, Iowa; came to Dakota in 1877; married Kate Walsh, of Yankton, D. T.; have one child named Ann, aged five months.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

W. M. Bristol—principal of public schools; was born in Connecticut in 1839; he is a graduate of Yale College of 1860; in 1864 he enlisted a private in the 13th Wisconsin Light Battery; he was promoted to Lieutenant, and then 1st Lieutenant; and afterwards detailed to go to the ordnance department at New Orleans; he remained in New Orleans a year and a halt after the close of the war; he then entered the Theological Seminary of Andover, Massachusetts, remaining two years; he soon alter located at Ripon, Wisconsin, where he remained five years as Professor of Latin of Ripon College; from there he went to Atlanta, Georgia; thence he came to Yankton; he married Rose E. Olds, of Minnesota.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

W. H. H. Brown—dentist; born in Pennsylvania in 1840; came west in 1879, and located in Yankton; he is one of the leading dentists of the city; married in 1876 to Miss Adella Van Tassel, a native of Pennsylvania.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Chas. Broderson—born in Prussia in 1834; served one year in Prussian war, and eighteen months in the Danish army, receiving a medal from the King of Denmark for bravery in the war of 1864; he came to Yankton in 1869, and went into the mercantile business; in 1873 he engaged in hotel business.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

H. J. Brisbine—born in Ohio in 1825; came to Yankton and opened first farm west of Yankton; has held the office of Judge of Probate and other county offices; he has seven children; Milton and H. E. reside in Yankton; H. E. holding a responsible position in the store of Jacob Max.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

F. Burgi—born in Monroe, Green county, Wisconsin, in 1855; November 17, 1875. moved to Dubuque, where he lived one year; from thence he moved to Dakota Territory, and settled in the vicinity of Yankton; he married Leora J. Ryan, of Indiana, afterwards of Dubuque; have one child eight months old, named Freddie.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Gottfried Burgi—was born in Switzerland, city of Berne, in 1845; came to America in 1868, and settled in Monroe, Wisconsin; lived in Chicago three years; then came to Dakota; he married Mary Korth; they have five children, Rosa, Henry, Adolph, Ella and Louisa.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

John Campbell—of the Yankton iron works; born in England, and in 1869 he came to America, and located in Sioux City in 1872; he removed to Yankton in 1864; he married Ann Hunn; they have five children, Susan, Joseph, John, Martha and Robert.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Joseph Campbell—foundry and machinist; born in England; he came to America in company with his brothers; in 1866 he married Helen Easton; they have five children, Joseph H., Chas A., Charlotte A., John and Constance E.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Felix Cariveau—born in Canada in 1837; came to the United States in 1853; settled in St. Paul, Minnesota; came to Dakota in 1876; served in the army four years under Gen. Thomas; married Elizabeth Conley, a native of Delaware; have four children, Blanche A., Mary, Lillian and Robert.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Walter H. Carr—born in England in 1848; came to America in 1851; settled in Utica, New York; came west in the spring of 1867, and settled in Yankton, Dakota Territory; established business in Yankton in 1876; served in the army eighteen months in Hancock's 2d corps; married Lizzie Allen, a native of England; have two boys, Allen C. and Lewis E.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Hon. L. Congleton—probate judge; was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, in 1818; until 1S55 he was employed by the Pennsylvania Canal Company; he then removed to Central Iowa; he soon after removed to Spirit Lake, Iowa, and was elected judge of probate, which position he held until 1864, when he removed to Yankton; in 1866, was appointed court commissioner; he held the office until October 1, 1881; in 1876 he was elected probate judge of Yankton county, which position he still holds; in 1839 he married Rose Stewart; they have two daughters.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

D. B. Cooley—was born in New York, Otsego county, in 1841; came west in 1858 and settled in Illinois; came to Dakota in 1867. He made the first set of harness ever made in Dakota Territory; he made the first, and only, horse collar ever made in the Territory, and also built the first brick house in the Territory. He married Minnie Chamberlain, of New York; they have two children, Mattie T. and George H. Mr. Cooley was the youngest Justice of the Peace ever elected in New York, which office he held three years.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

W. H. Curtis—born in New York in 1849; came to Yankton in 1868, and was engaged in various pursuits until 1881, when he became proprietor or the Bradley House. Married in 1866 to Miss C. M. Tarbox, a native ot New York; have four children, Hattie B-, Charles F., Dora A. and Cora F.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

W. B. Dean—freight and ticket agent for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad; was born in Illinois; in 1881, he married Minnie Morrill.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

F. K. DeLong—was born in Ohio November 17th. 1854; came to Illinois at the age of two years, where he received his schooling; from Illinois he went to Minnesota, and in 1881 came to Dakota Territory, where he settled permanently; married Jennie Mackenzie, a native of Canada.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

T. S.  Dickson-county superintendent; born in Glengary county, Canada, in 1848; he practiced law in Chicago seven years; in 1876  he came to Yankton; taught school two years, and was subsequently elected county superintendent of Yankton county.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

R. A. Dickson—born in Glengary county, Canada, in 1852; in 1876 he went to Black Hills; in 1879 he returned to Yankton, and is at present engaged in teaching.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

H. D. Dodge—dentist; born in New York in 1849; was brought up in the mercantile business until 1S68; studied medicine one and a half years in Syracuse, New York; then studied dentistry and located in Dubuque, where he practiced four years; and located in Yankton in 1875.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

James Donahue—born in Rochester, New York, in 1842; came west in 1869, and settled in Dakota; married Mary A. Walsh, of Wisconsin; have two children, Tommy, aged eleven, and Nellie, aged six.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

E. C. Dudley—3alesman for Richey; born in Illinois in 1845; came to Yankton in 1869; following year he engaged in hardware business, and continued until 1878; he married Miss Ruch; they have four children, Edna, Mabel, Honora and Julia.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Hon. Newton Edmunds—born in Niagara county, New York, May 31, 1819; moved to Washtenaw county, Michigan, in 1832; came to Yankton, Dakota, in 1861, as chief clerk  in the Surveyor General's office; was appointed Governor of Dakota in August, 1863, which position he held until September, 1866, when he engaged extensively in farming and sheep raising; engaged in the banking business in Yankton in 1873, which business is still continued, the firm being Edmunds & Wynn, Leighton Wynn, of Pennsylvania, being the junior member thereof; married in 1848 to Margaret E. Heartt, of Michigan, and has three sons and one daughter; in 1876 he was a member of the Government Commission which made the successful treaty with the Sioux Indians, the result of which was the opening of the Black Hills to white immigration; at the time of his occupancy of the chief executive's office the governor of Dakota was ex-officio Superintendent of Indian Affairs, and consequently in that capacity Gov. Edmunds had charge of all the Indians in the Territory. In this position in 1865, he made peace with all the Sioux, and also between the latter and other Indians; the first general peace made after the Minnesota massacre of 1862 Probably no other man in the country has had greater experience in Indian negotiations than Gov. Edmunds and certainly no other person has managed so many such negotiations with so great success. The Governor has also held numerous minor positions of public trust.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Miss B. Eickhoff—dress maker; born in Illinois in 1858; in 1872 went to Nebraska; in 1879 came to Yankton.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Chas Eiseman—dealer in dry goods and clothing; born in Baden, Germany, in 1835; came to America in 1850; in 1868 he came to Yankton, and engaged in dry goods trade in company with his brother; he married in 1866 to Miss Lehman.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

L. H. Eliot—born in New York State in 1826; came west in 1858; first settled in Indiana; in 1864 he moved to Yankton, Dakota Territory; he was three months in the Quarter Master's department in Chattanooga as a civilian; has been deputy sheriff two terms; married Mary Tredway, of the state of New York.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Ephriam M. Epstein—M. D.; born near Russia; was educated in Europe and America; he graduated at Andover (Mass.) Theological Seminary, and the college of physicians and surgeons, of the state of New York; came to Dakota Territory in 1881; prior to this he lived in Ohio twelve years; married Helene Greyer, of Hanover; have two children, Frieda and Julia; served in the Austrian navy in the year 1866, in the campaign against Italy; was received there on his American diploma (a very unusual thing); he is a thorough American, but still has a bond of sympathy for his mother country, Russia.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

D. Frank Etter—M. D.; born in Pennsylvania in 1835; began the practice of medicine in 1836; in 1855 he came to Illinois, and in 1873, to Yankton; is U. S. examining physician.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

J. W. Evans—was born in Ohio, Wayne county, January 17, 1832; came west in 1850, and settled in Indiana; was one of the earliest settlers that came to Dakota; he came from St. Paul with Dakota Land Company, of which he was a member; this was the pioneer party; in 1857 he went to Minnesota; the same year he moved to Dakota; served in the provost service; his wife died February 19, 1857; her maiden name was Maria McMullen; have one child named Irene E.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Hon. Andrew J. Faulk—born November 26,1814, at Milford, Pike county, Pennsylvania; moved with his parents to Kittanning, Armstrong county, Pennsylvania; came to Dakota in October, 1861, and became trader at the Yankton Indian agency, which post he afterwards sold to C. and D. Hedges, of Sioux City, Iowa; returning to Kittanning. Pennsylvania, he embarked in the oil business in Oil City from the summer of 1864, to 1866: was superintendent of the Latonia Coal Company, of New York, (which company he helped to organize) and also helped organize the Paxton Oil Company, of West Pithole, Pennsylvania; during his operations in the oil regions he assisted in sinking some eighteen different oil wells, meeting with but indifferent financial success, however; was appointed governor and superintendent of Indian affairs for Dakota, August 4. 1866, and continued in this at that time arduous position until May, 1869; was editor of the Armstrong (Pa) Democrat from 1837 to 1843, and has filled various public positions in that state; was mayor of Yankton from the spring of 1871 to the spring of 1872, and officiated at the public reception of Senator Hannibal Hamlin, of Maine, upon the latter's visit to Yankton, during his occupancy of the mayoralty; has been clerk of the United States District Court for the Second Judicial District for the past eight years, and is United States commissioner; is a great grandson of Gen. Daniel Broadhead, of Pennsylvania, of Revolutionary fame; married November 26, 1835, to Charlotte McMath, of Pennsylvania, and has one son and five daughters, among the members of his family being Hon. W. A. Burleigh, his son-in-law; was for about eight years president of the Dakota Bar Association; took a large delegation of Brules, Yanktons, Yanktonnais and Santees to Washington in 1867, and has had great experience in Indian affairs.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Phil. K. Faulk—born in Pennsylvania in 1840; enlisted in 161 in the 11th Pennsylvania infantry; was discharged three months later; he then re-enlisted and served until Jan. 3, 1863; he re-enlisted again in 54th Pennsylvania state militia; commissioned 2d lieutenant of company C; mustered out in August, 1863; and re-enlisted in the 11th, February 29, 1864; on the 6th day of May, at the battle of the Wilderness, he lost his right arm; in1865 he came to Yankton, and was employed in surveyor general's office as messenger; he remained there until 1871, reading law during the time under Gen. Tripp; admitted to the bar in 1869; married in 1879, to Rachael A. Poulton, of Baltimore, Md.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

R. H. Fellows—born in Troy, New York, in 1849; came west in 1867; settled in Dakota in 1878.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

John M. Fogarty—was born in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1845; came to Yankton in 1871; served in the army three years, in the 5th Maryland regiment; married Martha W. Ridell, of Pa.; has been a member of the city council.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

J. L. Foskett—was born in New York in 1844; came west in 1866, and settled in Iowa; in 1372 be came to Dakota Territory; was postmaster about ten years, and has served as president of the council of the city of Yankton; married Lovina Nestle, of New York; have five children, Lewis, Willie, John, Minnie and Charley.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

R. J. Gamble—born in Genesee county, N. Y.; moved with his brother, in 1862, from New York to Wisconsin; remained there until 1875, when he removed again to Yankton, and engaged in law with his brother, under the firm name of Gamble Bros.; he has held office of district attorney.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

J. R. Gamble—born in Genesee county, N. Y.; located in Yankton, 1873; was district attorney from January 1,1875, to January 1, 1876, and was acting U. S. attorney after the death of Col. Pond until his successor was elected; member of Territorial Legislature in 1870 and.1880; elected to Territorial Council in 1881; has been a member of the Territorial republican committee for several years; married in 1875 to Miss Fannie Davis; they have two children.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

.

John E. Gillespie—was born in New Orleans, April 1, 1844; was raised in St. Louis, and spent seventeen years in Texas; came to Dakota in 1879; married Leila Cartwright, of Tennessee; they have five children, M. Olivia, Emma J., L. Ella, William and Lula; Mr. G. was in the United States service in Texas as a ranger.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Wilson S. Goodwin—was born in Newport, Mich., in 1843; came to Wisconsin in 1854; from Wisconsin he went to Minnesota, where he lived ten years; he then moved to Dakota; served in the army three years, under Col. Cobb, of the 5th Wisconsin; he went through the regular gradations from private to captain.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Fred Hammond—manager of the Singer Sewing Machine Company for Yankton; born in England; came to America in 1870; located in Yankton in 1879.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Hon. Geo. H. Hand—born at Akron, Summit county, O., Aug. 9, 1837; moved to Portage, Wis., in 1850. where he read law with his father, Alvah Hand Esq.; was admitted to the practice of the profession in the spring of 1859; from Portage he went to St. Joseph, Mo., where he practiced his profession for a short time, moving thence to McGregor, Iowa, where he remained in the practice about two and a half years; he afterwards enlisted at Chicago as a private in the Chicago Board of Trade Battery, and served about one year; came to Yankton in Nov., 1865. and in March, 1866, was appointed U. S. Attorney for Dakota, which position he held until May, 1869, until which latter year he was engaged in a law partnership with the Hon. S. L. Spink, lately deceased; in 1869 he formed a law partnership with Hon. G. C. Moody, which continued until the spring of 1872, when Mr. Hand was appointed Register of the newly established U. S. Land Office for the Yankton district; this position he occupied until Nov. 1, 1874, when he was transferred to the Secretaryship of the Territory, which office he has ever since held, and in which capacity he has been frequently called upon to be Acting Governor of Dakota; has held in addition a number of minor offices.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

C. J. B. Harris—law and real estate; born Feb. 2,1844, at Danville, Vt.; moved to Marshalltown, Iowa, in March, 1870, and came to Yankton, July 7, of the same year; was superintendent of schools for two years in Vermont, and assistant clerk of the Vermont House of Representatives in 1863; served in the 6th Vermont regiment from Dec. 30, 1861, throughout the entire war; has been U. S. Commissioner at Yankton; is at present a member of the Board of Aldermen, and has held other minor official positions; was appointed by the Legislative Assembly Commissioner to revise the laws of Dakota in 1873; married in 1881 to Mary Noonan, of Yankton county.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Nils O. Hove—born in Norway in 1835; came to America in 1870, and settled in Dakota Territory; married Mina Stavlo in 1862; have six children, John, Ida, Leina, Mary, William and Fena.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Geo. E. Hawley—born in Wisconsin in 1850; came to Yankton in 1872; in 1874 he engaged in the hardware business; in 1876 he married Mrs. D. K. Dudley.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

R. T. Hoyt— born in New York City in 1833; came west in 1839 with his parents, and settled in Indiana; in 1860 he came to Yankton; from there he went to Sioux City, where he remained until 1865; then again to Yankton, and was in charge of the business house of L. D. Palmer; has been in various businesses until 1876, when he engaged in his present business; married Mary E. Gurney, of Watertown, Wis.; they have five children, M. T., Annie E., R. T., Mary T. and E. C.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

H. F. Jencks—was born in New York in 1828; he came to Missouri Valley Junction in 1873, and engaged in hotel business; two years later his hotel was destroyed by fire, and he went to Sioux City, where he kept the Depot Hotel; in 1877 he came here, and has since been proprietor of Jencks Hotel.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Carl Jensen—of the firm of Jensen & Olson, liquor dealers; was born in Norway in 1846; he came to America in 1871, and settled in Yankton; he was engaged in various pursuits until 1876, when he engaged in his present business.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

E. J. Jenkinson—was born in Wisconsin, January 23, 1863; went to Minnesota in 1865; came to Dakota Territory in 1873, and settled in Yankton permanently.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

L. M. Kee—born in West Virginia in 1836; brought up in the mercantile trade; in 1854 he came to Quincy, Ill.; he removed to Iowa in 1861, and in 1872 to Yankton.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

W. F. Lauman—was born in Pennsylvania, on the 6th of November, 1853; came west in 1872; settled in Yankton in 1873; traveled some before he came here; married Lora A. Ardery on the 30th of June, 1880; have one child, named Silene A.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Fred. Lerch—was born in Germany in 1838; in 1865 he came to America, and settled in Philadelphia; from there to Milwaukee; thence to Chicago, and in 1873 he came to Yankton; he was married in 1871, and has four children; Katie, Louisa, Amelia and Fred.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

D. M. Lowell—born in Michigan in 1843; practiced law in Romeo, Mich., fourteen years.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Capt. W. S. Lyons—born in Ohio in 1842; educated at Oberlin college; employed on the lakes for twenty-two years; for eleven years as master of different brigs; married in 1871 to Miss C. A. Barrager, of Canada; they located in Yankton in 1875, and engaged in the millinery business.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

John Martin—horn in Scotland in 1841; he came to America in 1850, and settled in Wisconsin; was married in 1865 to Mary L. Jenkins; they have two children.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Jacob Max—born in Russia; came to America in 1873, at the head of a colony of one hundred and eight Russian families; forty families settled in Nebraska; the balance in Dakota Territory; he settled in Yankton in 1873, and engaged in present business; married in 1854 to Barbara Schweyer; they have seven children; Martin, John, Emanuel, Emil, Pauline, Amelia and William.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

W. J. Maxwell—born in Wisconsin in 1857; then went to Illinois some years after; thence to Dakota Territory, where he arrived in July, 1866; established business in 1881.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

D. McDevitt—born in Ireland, in March, 1844; came to America in April, 1866; settled in Yankton, D. T., in 1869.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

P. W. Moldenheauel—was born in Germany in 1854; came to America in 1873, and located in Yankton, and engaged in the stock business; is at present engaged in the manufacture of tow, the only manufacture of the kind in Dakota.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

E. S. Mosher—born in Saratoga county. N. Y., the 3d of June, 1815; from New York he came to Winnebago county, Wis., where he lived for twenty years; in July, 1861, he moved to Dakota; was postmaster at Utica P. 0., for seven years; he married Christina Hicks (she died Jan.. 1877); he has five children; Simeon, Emeline, Mary, Nettie and J. Eliza.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

J. C. Mormann—was born in Germany in 1847; came to America in 1873, and settled in Nebraska; in 1874 he moved to Yankton, D. T.; he married Annie Haberraan; they have one child named Clara.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

W. H. Munroe—born in Bristol, R. I., came west in 1876, settled in Yankton, D. T.; served in the army fourteen months under Foster; married Augusta N. Brooks, of Vermont; have one son, Frank, age twenty-one; Mr. Munroe was a commissioned officer five months.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

S. J. Morrow—was born in Ohio, May 3, 1843; came west to Madison, Wis., in 1854; served in the army four years and three months, in the 7th Wisconsin Regiment of Volunteers, under Gen. Callis; Mr. Morrow has exposed himself to great personal dangers and endured all kinds of hardships in order to obtain views of Gen. Custer's memorable battle field, and the spot where he fell. Has views of scenes on Gen. Crooks battle fields; Indian views taken during the Sitting Bull campaign; also views of the ice gorge on the Missouri in the spring of 1881, which views can be had by addressing him at Yankton, Dakota territory. He married Isadore Ketchum, of Portage City, Wisconsin;  have three children—Nellie, Percy and Earl.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Frederick Neubauer—was born in Odessa, Russia, in 1840; settled in D. T. the 6th of September, 1874; married Eustina Byerly; have six children—Carrie, Fred, Ferdinand, Amelia, Willie, Richard.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

P. J. Nyberg—Yankton, D. T.; born in Sweden in 1857; came to America in 1872 and settled in Dakota; married Seina Mathia in 1875; have two children—Mamie and Ernest F.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

C. J. Reitzell—was born in Pennsylvania in 1837; came with his parents to Freeport, Illinois; came to Dakota in 1879; married Bell Scott, of Erie, Pennsylvania; have two boys, Walter S. and Charles F.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Jacob Richenberger—was born in Germany in 1831; came to America in 1881; served in the military in 1872; married Mary Haeeder; have three children—one girl and two boys. 

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

John A. Richards—miller—born in Wales in 1842; came to America in 1864 and located in Ohio; he came to Dakota in 1869; married in 1863 to Jane Griffith: have one son—Edward.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Wm. Roantree—miller—was born in Yorkshire, England, in 1844; came to America with parents in infancy, and settled in New York; in 1869 he went to Broadhead, Wis.; thence to Turner county, D. T.; married in 1868 to Alice Addington; have one child.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Peter Royem—Register of deeds and county clerk; born in Norway in 1853; came to America in 1870, and settled in Sioux Falls, where he remained two years, and removed to Yankton; he has been county surveyor two years, and in the fall of 1880 he was elected to his present position; he married Mary Anderson, a native of Minnesota; have one daughter.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

John Satori—born in Germany in 1816; came to America in 1866, and settled in Philadelphia; came to Yankton in 1871; married Caroline Wayne; have three children.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

H. A. Schoreggee—was born in Germany in 1826; came to America in 1850, and settled in New Orleans; came to Dakota ill 1869, and established business and has continued ever since; served in the army in the old country, and served as a militiaman in this country; married Barbara Heinrich; have seven children— Edward, Louisa, Louis, Theodore, Emma, John and Julius.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

John Schnell—was born in Germany the 11th of August, 1845; came to America in 1865, and settled in Schuylkill county, Pa.; came to Dakota in 1872; married Kate Kappler, of Schuylkill, Co., Pa.; have two children, Claude and Eugene J.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Robert Schneider—was born in Germany in 1844; came to America in January, 1866; settled in Boston, Mass.; was in New York seven or eight years, and in Nebraska two years; came to Dakota in May, J 881; he was foreman in a cigar factory in Joliet; married Amelia Melzer, of Germany; have three children—Lillie, Richard and Flora.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

A. H. Schroder—born in Grant county, Wis., in 1855; he came to Yankton in 1876; two years later he engaged in the hardware business.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Geo. R. Scougal, banker—was born in Rothsay, Scotland, Nov11th, 1852; came to America in 1878, and located in Lanesboro, Minn., where he remained until December, 1880, when removed to Yankton, and engaged in the banking business in company with Mr. McKinney; do a banking business in Sioux Falls, Yankton and Dell Rapids; he married Frances W. Taylor; they have three daughters.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

B. M. Semple—was born in Belfast, Ireland, in 1836; came to America in 1853, and settled in Peoria, Illinois; came to Dakota in the spring of 1870.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

E. G. Smith—district attorney, 2d judicial district; born in Ohio in 1851; educated at State university and Lennox college; admitted to the bar in 1874 in Iowa; came to Yankton in 1875; Mr. S. is present reporter of the supreme court.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

H. V. Smith—was born in New York in the town of German, Shenango county, in 1854; came west with U. S. troops and was stationed at Randall and at Cantonement on the Yellowstone; married Miss Sarah Gillman, of Wisconsin, in the winter of 1875; they have one girl, named Maud M.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Hon. S. L. Spink—This distinguished citizen of Dakota, who died September 22, 1881, at his residence in Yankton, aged about 51 years, had resided in Yankton since June. 1865, corning thither from Paris, Illinois, where he published the Paris Beacon, a republican paper, during the war, and was a member of the Illinois Legislature during 1864; was appointed Secretary of Dakota in 1865; was elected delegate to Congress from Dakota on the republican ticket in 1868, and resigned the secretaryship in March, 1869; was again a candidate for delegate in 1870, Dr. Burleigh and Hon. M. K. Armstrong long being his opponents, and was defeated, Armstrong holding the office after a contest.   In 1872 he joined the liberal movement, and subsequently identified himself with the democracy,  whose nominee for Congress he was in 1876. He continued in the practice of his profession at Yankton to the time of his death; his practice was extensive and lucrative, and he was possessed of unblemished character and commanding ability.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Peter Steffen—born in Germany in 1841; came to America in 1866; settled in D. T. in 1872; in 1877 went to the Black Hills; has been dealing in stock for several years; had his barn burned with 17 horses on October 29th, 1878.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

William Stier—was born in Germany in 1831; came to Dakota in 1863 and settled near Elk Point; came to Yankton in the fall of 1864; served in the army two years and a half in the engineer corps; enlisted in St. Louis; has been street commissioner one year in Yankton; married Madeline Urich. a native of France; have five children—William P., Louisa K., Victor C, Alice and an infant.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

S. J. Thomas—machinist; born in New York in 1850; he came to Minnesota in 1862; in 1869 he removed to Yankton; he has been twice married; he has one child, W. J.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

William Ward—born in England in 1854; came to America in 1863; came to Dakota in March, 1878, and settled in Yankton permanently.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

C. Wedell—was born in Krimp, Russia, in 1854; came to America in 1874 and settled in Dakota; married Susie Halsworth; have three children, Mollie, Susie, Katie.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

H. W. White—was born in the State of New York in 1820; then went to Ohio, where he resided 35 years; from there he removed to Illinois; thence to D. T. He married Rose Ann; have three children, Frances, Hiram W. and Blanche; Mr. W. has been a member of the city council for seven years and school director most all his life.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

E. T. White—was born in Woodstock, Vermont, in 1847 when he was 22 years old he was admitted to the bar; in 1870 he came west and settled in Yankton and engaged in the practice of law.   In 1874 he married Mary Bagley, of Bethel, Vermont. Mr. White was clerk of the house of representatives one session; is at present clerk of the city of Yankton.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Thomas J. Williams—born in New York in 1848; came west in 1868; has traveled all through the west; served ten months in the army under Capt. Hawley; married Elizabeth Inerney; was a non-commissioned officer in the army.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

John Wilson—Norwegian descent; was born in King county, Illinois, in 1840. Came west to Sioux City, Iowa, in 1867; came to Yankton, D. T, in 1877; married Jennie Iverson.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

C. N. Wright—engineer in Excelsior company flouring mills; born in Ohio in 1843; came west in 1867 and settled in Iowa. In 1875 he engaged in his present occupation. Married in 1876 to Miss N. C. Bancroft; have one child, Frank.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

Frank D. Wyman—born in Essex county, New York, July 14th, 1841. Came to Wisconsin in 1846 and settled in Walworth county. Came to Dakota in November, 1871, and settled permanently. Served in the army tour years in the 8th Wisconsin veteran volunteers and was honorably discharged. Married Mattie Robertson, of Perry county, Alabama; have three children—Mattie M., Alfred L., Lute A.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

A. Zemlicka—born in Bohemia in 1846; he came to America in 1862 and located in Milwaukee; in 1864 he removed to Boscobel, Wisconsin; in 1869 he came to Yankton and engaged in merchandising; married in 1872 to Josephine Beiba; they have four children—Sylvia, Vesta, Frank, Josephine.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

J. E. Ziebach—manager P. O. bookstore; born at Sergeant's Bluffs in 1858; moved to Sioux City; from there with his parents he went to Yankton.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

F. M. Ziebach—foreman Press and Dakotaian; born in 1830 in Union county, Pa. Published the Lewisburg (Pa.) Argus. Moved to Sergeant Bluffs, Iowa, in 1857, where he established the Western Independent. Moved to Sioux City, Iowa, in the spring of 1858, and started the Sioux City Register. Came to Yankton in 1861 and established the Dakotaian. Went to Dubuque, Iowa, in 1863, and purchased an interest in the Daily Herald of that place. Returned to Sioux City in 1866, and in the fall of that year was appointed register of the land office at Sioux City. Was for two terms mayor of Sioux City, in 1868-9 and 1869-70. Returned to Yankton in 1870, where he has ever since been engaged in the newspaper business. Was for three terms mayor of Yankton, from 1876 to 1879, and was a member of the Territorial legislature during the session of 1877. Has held the well known position of "Squatter Governor" of Dakota ever since the organization of the Territory.   Was a member of Yankton's first Board of Education, and has held other minor offices. Married to Elizabeth Fisher, of Danville, Pa., and has four sons and two daughters.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881

F. H. Ziebach—clerk in American Express office; born in Sioux City in 1861; in '62 he removed to Yankton with his parents; he is a second son of F. M. Ziebach.

History of Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, 1881




HOME



©Genealogy Trails