CARROLL

COUNTY

TENNESSEE


We regret to inform researchers of the passing of our long-time host of this site, Christine Walters.
Her loss to our group is immense. Genealogy was her life and Genealogy Trails was where she chose to store the data she found. She worked until her last days on her websites and the data she helped to put online will remain available for viewing.

Sadly this website is available for adoption

 

Check your attics!
Dust off your family scrapbooks!
We're looking for DATA for this site!!!

If you would like to submit data for this site,
please Email Us with your submissions.

We regret that we are unable to do personal research for anyone.
All data we come across will be added to this site.
Thank you for visiting and hope you'll come back again to view the updates we make to this site.

 

There is a legend, that at the time of Jesus Christ's Crucifixion the dogwood was the size of the oak and other forest trees. So firm and strong was the tree that it was chosen as the timber for the cross. To be used thus for such a cruel purpose greatly distressed the tree, and Jesus, nailed upon it, sensed this, and in his suffering said to it: Because of your regret and pity for My suffering, never again shall the dogwood tree grow large enough to be used a a cross. Henceforth it shall be slender and bent and twisted and its blossoms shall be in the form of a cross...two long and two short petals. And in the center of the outer edge of each petal there will be nail prints, brown with rust and stained with red, and in the center of the flower will be a crown of thorns, and all who see it will remember.

Although the dogwood is not Tennessee's state tree it really should be. Tennessee nurseries grow more dogwoods than any other state and have been doing it for more than one hundred years. The dogwood blooms in April when Easter Sunday marks the resurrection of Christ after the Crucifixion.

CARROLL COUNTY INTERESTS

BIBLE RECORDS

BIOGRAPHIES

BIRTHS

CEMETERIES

CENSUS

CHURCHES

COURT & LEGAL

DEATHS

DEEDS

EPIDEMICS

GALLERY

GOSSIP COLUMNS

LAWYERS - 1850

MARRIAGES

MILITARY

NATCHEZ TRACE

NEWS ARTICLES

OBITUARIES

OLD HOMES & BUILDINGS

PECAN TREE

PIONEER FAMILIES

POST OFFICES

PRISONS

SCHOOLS

SURNAMES

WEBSITES
Carroll Co Connections

WILLS & PROBATE

HISTORY of CARROLL COUNTY TN

Counties of TN
History of Carroll Co (Goodspeeds)
Resources of Tennessee Vol. 2

HISTORY of CARROLL COUNTY TN
Carroll county is abundantly supplied with timber of excellent quality, consisting of hickory, oak (all varieties), poplar, gum, beech, etc. There is a plow factory at Trezevant, a number of saw and planing mills, at various points, and flouring mills, etc. The general topography of the county is undulating and broken, with considerable plateaus of comparatively level country.

The county is very well watered with numerous creeks, among which are Big Sandy, with numerous tributaries in the eastern part of the county, having a general northern direction, and emptying into the Tennessee River. The other principal streams are Rutherford's and South Fork of Obion River, Ready, Beaver, Gwinn's, Crooked and various other creeks, which, uniting in the western half of the county, form the Obion River, affording, in their courses, numerous mill sites. The agricultural productions of the county are greatly diversified, consisting of corn, wheat, oats, hay, cotton, tobacco, Irish potatoes, sweet potatoes, sorghum and rye.

The educational institutions are, Trezevaut High School, McKenzie College, Bethel College (also at McKenzie), Huntingdon High School, West Tennessee Seminary (at Hollow Rock), Macedonia Academy, Buena Vista Academy and Clarksville Academy.
The county seat is Huntingdon, with a population of 646. Other towns in the county are, Hollow Rock, Marlboro, BuenaVista, Clarksburg, Lavinia, Atwood, Trczcvant, McLemonsville and McKenzie
The principal religious denominations arc, Cumberland Presbyterians, Methodists, Baptists and Christians.
The Nashville. Chattanooga and St. Louis Railroad, and the Memphis branch of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad pass through the county
Hand-book of Tennessee By A. W. Hawkins, Henry E. Colton 1882

TOWNS and CITIES

ATWOOD
History of Atwood
BETHEL
History of Bethel
BRUCETON
Bruceton Texaco
BUENA VISTA
History of Buena Vista
CHRISTMASVILLE
Story of Christmasville
CLARKSBURG
History of Clarksburg
HOLLOW ROCK
History of Hollow Rock
HUNTINGDON
History of Huntingdon
Unclaimed Letters 1839
Hotel Carroll
Huntingdon Story
McKENZIE
History of McKenzie
McLEMORESVILLE
History of McLemoresville
POND BRANCH
History of Pond Branch
TREZEVANT
History of Trezevant
YUMA
History of Yuma

Search this site powered by FreeFind

"Genealogy Trails" is looking for County and State Co-ordinators. If you think you might be interested in volunteering please visit our Volunteer Information Page and get in touch with Kim, let her know which county, state, or both, you'd be interested in.

** JOIN OUR MAILING LIST **
You won't want to miss out on updates to this website.
They will only be announced here.
There are several regions - join as many as you wish.
Click Here

SUBMIT AN OBITUARY
If you have an obituary to share just click above

SUBMIT A HEADSTONE
Share your cemetery information with us..

LIBRARIES/SOCIETIES/GOVERNMENT

Carroll County Library
625 High St.
Huntingdon TN, 38344
Phone: 731-986-1919

Carroll Co Archives
In the Browning Museum
McKenzie TN
Jere Cox & Vicki Shaffer



Gordon Browning Museum

Surroundings Counties

BENTON

DECATUR

GIBSON

HENRY

MADISON

WEAKLEY

 

HENDERSON

 

Genealogy Trails