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Hardeman County
Genealogy and History


Volunteers Dedicated to Free Genealogy



This county is available for adoption.

We're looking for folks who share our desire to put data online and are interested in helping this project be as successful as we can make it. If you are interested joining our group as County Host for this website, or any of our websites, view our Volunteer Information page. A desire to transcribe data and know-how to make a basic webpage is required.

In the meantime, we'd be very happy to accept any data you'd care to contribute and would like to see displayed on this site. We're looking for birth/death/marriage records, obituaries, cemetery headstone readings, biographies, county histories, census data, pensions and other military data.

Email your transcribed data to me Christine Walters and I'll take care of putting it online.

WE REGRET THAT WE ARE UNABLE TO DO PERSONAL RESEARCH FOR YOU.
All data we come across will be added to this website, so please keep checking back.


Hardeman County was founded in 1823. It was named in honor of Thomas Jones Hardeman. He was Captain during the War of 1812; colonel of Tennessee Militia in the fighting before New Orleans, quartermaster of Jackson's Natchez Expedition in 1812. He served as one of the commissioners who established Bolivar in 1825. Upon moving to Texas in 1830, he was prominent in the fight for independence and would later become a member of the Congress of Texas.

The eastern and central portions of the county arc broken and somewhat hilly. The western portion is generally level. The soil in the western half is an argillacious loam, while the prevailing character in the east is a sandy loam. Bolivar is the county seat, and has a population of-. Other towns in the county are Toons, Middleburg, Hickory Valley, Grand Junction, Saulebury, U Bet, Middleton, Pocahontas, Crainsville, New Castle, Whiteville, Cedar Chapel and Cloverport. Hatchie River runs through the county, and affords steamboat navigation to Bolivar. The county is well watered with numerous creeks, among which Pincy, Porter's Creek, Pleasant Run and Spring Creek afford good water power. Timber is abundant, consisting of oak, hickory, ash, pine gum, walnut, cypress, poplar, etc. The principal agricultural products arc corn, wheat, oats, hay, cotton, Irish potatoes, sweet potatoes, sorghum and rye. There is a woolen mill near Bolivar, with a capital of 87,500, employing tea hands. The principal religious denominations are Episcopalians, Presbyterians, Baptists and Christians. County tax, 20 cents per $100; school tax, 10 cents; road tax, 5 cents. Railroads: The Chicago, St. Louis and New Orleans Railroad passes through the county.



ONLINE DATA

Accounts

Bible Records

Biographies

Births

Cemeteries

Census

Church Histories

Court Records

Death Records
1860 Mortality Census
TSLA 1908-1912

Fires, Floods & Disasters

History

Merchants

Military Records

News Articles

Obituaries

Officials

Old Homes

Schools

Road Warrants

Wills & Estates




CITIES and TOWNS

City of Bolivar


Surrounding Counties
Chester -- Fayette -- Haywood -- McNairy --
Madison --


Tennessee Genealogy Trails

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