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Reeves County, Texas
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Reeves County is situated in Southwest Texas, on the line of the Texas and Pacific Railroad. It was formed from a part of Pecos County in 1883, named in honor of George. R. Reeves, and given county government the following year. Its estimated population is 7,000; Pecos, the county seat, has about 2,000 and Toyah, 700. The county's population has doubled in the last eighteen months. In 2000, its population was 13,137. The surface of the eastern portion is level; in the western portion the Davis Mountains are located. There is a scattering growth of mesquite timber suitable for fire wood. 


The first people to inhabit Reeves County lived in the rock shelters and caves around the edge of the Barrilla Hills and built permanent camps near Phantom Lake, San Solomon Spring, and Toyah Creek. These prehistoric people left behind artifacts and pictographs as evidence of their presence. The Jumano Indians irrigated crops of corn and peaches from San Solomon Spring, where Balmorhea State Recreation Area is now located. Three Jumanos met the expedition of Antonio de Espejo near Toyah Lake in 1583, and guided explorers to La Junta by a better route. Settlers of Mexican descent farmed in the county's Madera Valley from early times. In 1849 John S. Ford traveled along Toyah Creek and noted the productive land upon which the Mescalero Indians cultivated corn. Farmers of Mexican descent who irrigated from San Solomon Spring in the last half of the nineteenth century found a lucrative market for grains, vegetables, and beef at Fort Davis. The first Anglo farmers arrived in Toyah Valley in 1871, when George B. and Robert E. Lyle began irrigating crops from Toyah Creek. Open range ranching first attracted white settlers to the Davis Mountains in 1875.


Towns

Brogado, Orla,Pera,  Huelster
Balmorhea,Lindsay, Pecos, Saragosa, Toyha, Toyahvale, Verhalen




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Surrounding Counties

 Eddy County, New Mexico (north)
 
Loving County (northeast)
 
Ward County (east)
 
Pecos County (southeast)
 
Jeff Davis County (southwest)
 
Culberson County (west)

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