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Red River County Biographies


 

Benningfield, James Robert
[Submitted by Gene Phillips]

JAMES ROBERT BENNINGFIELD is a native Texan, and was born September 1, 1853, and is a son of William and Mary Ann (Bankston) Benningfield. William Benningfield was born in Arkansas, was a pioneer, having come to Texas many years ago, was a prominent Mason and an active member of the Presbyterian church, he was killed in battle in the late war and was buried, with several of his comrades from the same county, on the field on which he fell. The maternal grandfather of our subject, James Bankston, was also one of the old pioneers of Texas.
James R. Benningfield is the second of a family of five children, named as follows -- Mary Mandon, James H., John, Susan and Joseph, of whom the youngest died January 12, 1889. James R. married Miss Nettie Bell Bankston, daughter of Levi Bankston, of Red River county, and three children have come to add happiness to this union -- Robert Andrew, Gordon Lane and Olive Estelle. James Bankston, the grandfather, and family were members of the Baptist church. His eleven children lived to maturity and ten had families, but all have passed away from time to eternity. Mr. and Mrs. Benningfield are active members of the Methodist church. They reside upon one of the finest farms in Red River county, which Mr. Benningfield tills with intelligent care, using the most modern machinery and most approved methods of culture.
[Biographical Souvenir of the State of Texas, F A Battey & Co 1889]
ADDED 25 Sep 2016

 

Custer, Georgia
[Submitted by Gene Phillips]

MISS GEORGIA CUSTER is a daughter of U. H. and Mandane P. (Boyd) Custer, of Mississippi. U. H. Custer was among the leading merchants, and also greatly interested in the agricultural development of that State. Miss Georgia is the fourth in a family of six children, named as follows - Julia P., Melvin J., Frank, Geor­gia, Melanethon and John. She came to Texas with her brothers in 1882, and located in Cooper, Delta county, but in 1885 moved to Bed River county, and engaged in teaching school. In 1885 she originated the Farmers Alliance Journal, which is published at Clarksville, in the interest not only of the organiza­tion after which it is named, but in that of the entire population of the county, and it is mak­ing its influence felt. Through its advertising columns and market reports the farmer finds he can buy equally as cheap in Clarksville as at more distant markets, if not cheaper, and those merchants who have had the foresight to adver­tise in the Journal have realized a large increase in their business, and consequently in their profits. The Journal is independent in politics, and the paper is most ably edited.
[Biographical Souvenir of the State of Texas by F.A. Battey & Company 1899 - transcribed by Gene P.]
ADDED 27 Mar 2016

 


Clark, James

[Submitted by Gene Phillips]


JAMES CLARK is the offspring of parents who were among the earliest settlers of Texas. He was born March 19, 1838, in Red River county, and is a son of James and Isabella H. (Hopkins) Clark. His father was native of Tennessee, but came to Texas in 1824, and was a leading spirit in the Texas revolution. He held the office of lieutenant of his company, and did active service in the field, and materially aided the cause in a financial way. The mother of James, Mrs. Isabella H. Clark, now Mrs. Isabella H. Gordon (whose very interesting memoirs appear in this work), was at home soliciting and equipping, at her own expense, recruits for the campaign, while her husband was doing active service at the front. The paternal grandfather of James was Benjamin Clark, of South Carolina, who was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. His maternal grandfather was a native of Indiana.
James Clark has been instrumental in materially aiding the development of his native State. In 1861, at the beginning of the late war, he organized a company, and by a unanimous call he accepted its captaincy, in which capacity he served until failing health warned him to resign. After a short time of rest and recuperation, he organized another company, and was called upon to be its captain without a dissenting voice. With this company he served in the Twenty-ninth Texas cavalry under Colonel Charles DeMorse. His superior officer, General W. R. Scurry, recognizing in him military abilities, which were an honest inheritance from an ancestry of soldiers, called upon him to occupy an official position on his staff. After mature deliberation he resigned the captaincy of the last company he had organized, and complied with General Scurry's request, and was with him when he was killed at the battle of Jenkin's Ferry, in Arkansas. General Kirby Smith, being familiar with the strong ties that bound these two soldiers together, detailed Captain Clark to escort the body of General Scurry to Austin, Texas, for interment. After the performance of this sad duty, he returned to his command, occupying his rank on the staff of General Waterhouse, successor of General Scurry, which office he held until the close of the war.
Captain Clark studied medicine in New Orleans, Louisiana, in his early life, but, preferring the life of a farmer to that of a physician, has devoted the greater portion of his life to farming and stock raising, in which he has been very successful. On February 10, 1865, he married Miss Margaret Bell Anderson, daughter of Rev. John Anderson of Ireland, who had immigrated to this country from his native land. This wife was a devout member of the Episcopal church, aided in adding to its membership, and liberally contributed to its charities. She died as she had lived, a good, Christian woman, leaving to her husband's care and attention four children, which had blessed their union, and named as follows -- M. B., Frank H., Pat B. and Mariah L.
February 8, 1875, Captain Clark married, Miss Mary Malvina Gaffney, daughter of Peter and M. E. Gaffney, of South Carolina. Three children came to brighten this union. The eldest, M. G., died when quite young; the two younger are M. M. and James, Jr. -- the last is a namesake of his father, and it is to be hoped a follower in the footsteps of his worthy sire; he is a fine, healthy boy. Captain Clark is a member of the Catholic church, and a leading and prominent citizen of his county.

Note: James and his 2nd wife are buried together in St Joseph Cemetery in Clarksville. His findagrave memorial states that his father, James Clark, is the founder of Clarksville.

Note: James and his 2nd wife are buried together in St Joseph Cemetery in Clarksville. His findagrave memorial states that his father, James Clark, is the founder of Clarksville.

[Biographical Souvenir of the State of Texas, F A Battey & Co 1889]

ADDED 20 Apr 2014




 

Baker, Alvin B
[Submitted by Gene Phillips]

ALVIN B. BAKER is the third in a family of seven children born to Algernon S. and Maria (Allen) Baker, both natives of Cumberland county, Kentucky, and was born in the same county, October l6, 1835. In 1846 Algernon S., who was a farmer, came to Texas, and here became assessor and tax collector, and afterward county judge of Red River county, where he died, a strict member of the Methodist, Episcopal church. The father of Algernon S. was Obadiah Baker, a native of Virginia, who settled in Kentucky at a very early day. Mrs. Maria Baker was a daughter of Simpson Allen, a native of North Carolina, and also an early settler of Kentucky. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Baker were all boys, and named, respectively, Melville, Alfred, Alvin B., Egbert S., Obadiah B. and George C.
Alvin B. Baker was reared in his native county until he came to Texas with his father, and here he is now one of the most substantial farmers of the county. In 1801 he joined the Confederate army in Colonel Young's regiment, but was afterward transferred to General S. B. Maxey's command. His health failed him, however, and he was forced to return home, but after recovering he joined the State troops and served until the close of the war. In 1871 he formed a partnership with G. C. Baker, and engaged in mercantile business in Clarksville, and continued in trade until 1881, when he retired.
[Biographical Souvenir of the State of Texas, F A Battey & Co 1889]
ADDED 30 Mar 2015

 

Barry, Susan L.
[Submitted by Gene Phillips]

MRS. SUSAN L. BARRY was born in Clarksville, Texas, and is the daughter of Charles C. Dale (who was born in Maryland in 1818) and Susan (Harris) Dale. Charles C. Dale is by occupation a merchant tailor, came to Texas in 1840, located at Clarksville and moved thence to Eureka Springs, where he at present resides. Mrs. Susan (Harris) Dale died in 1842, at about twenty years
Susan L. Barry is the younger of two children aud was educated in Clarksville. In 8161 she was married to Joseph E. Barry, a native of Tennessee, but who was brought to Texas when a small boy by his parents. There are two children living born to this union, named, respectively, Jasper D. and John F. Mr. Barry served through the late war in the confederate service with marked courage, and at the time of his death was a merchant at Clarksville, and a member of the Masonic fraternity.
[Biographical Souvenir of the State of Texas, F A Battey & Co 1889]
ADDED 30 Mar 2015

 

Bagby, William Henry
[Submitted by Gene Phillips]

WILLIAM HENRY BAGBY, the present popular clerk of Red River county, Texas, is a native of that county, and was born March 2, 1850, the son of George H. and Margaret (Latimer) Bagby. His father held numerous offices of trust and honor, was county clerk of Red River county, Texas, and a member of the legislature from that county in 1861-62. He offered to join the Confederate army but was rejected on account of his being over age, and in 1863 he was killed by Indians. He descended from an old Virginia family and his father was a soldier in the war of the Revolution.
Our subject is the tenth of eleven children born to his parents. His brothers and sisters are -- James D., William A., Lucy J., Mary S., Ballard C, Thomas M., Henry R. L., Georgia A. C, Susan W. and Margaret L. He began life as a merchant in Jefferson, Texas; subsequently removed to Galveston, but returned to Red River county in 1875, engaging in merchandising and afterward in farming. In 1883 he resumed merchandising, in which he continued until 1888, when he was elected county clerk of Red River county. This is the first time Mr. Bagby ever allowed his name to be mentioned for office, and the high esteem in which he is held in this community is evidenced by the fact that he was elected over four opponents, receiving nearly as many votes as all others.
Mr. Bagby was married September 30, 1875, to Miss Clara Lane, the daughter of L. L. Lane, of Texas. They have four children - Lindsay Lane, George H., Margaret Latimer and William E.
Mr. Bagby is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the American Legion of Honor, and he and his wife are members of the Episcopal church.
[Biographical Souvenir of the State of Texas, F A Battey & Co 1889]
ADDED 11 Nov 2014

 

Bailey, Albert S
[Submitted by Gene Phillips]

HON. ALBERT S. BAILEY was a native Texan, and was born in Red River county, July 5, 1854. His father, John C. Bailey, was born in Maury county, Tennessee, in 1799, came to Texas in 1837, and settled in what is now Red River county, followed farming, held the respect of all who knew him, and died in 1870, a member of the Christian church, and holding a high degree in Masonry. His wife bore the maiden name of Semiramis Moore, was born in Lauderdale county, Alabama, in 1815, and still survives, the mother of thirteen children.
Albert S. Bailey, the tenth of the above mentioned family of thirteen, was reared on the home farm, but had the advantages of the best schools of northern Texas. In 1874 he entered the United States Military Academy, at West Point, New York, and graduated from that institution in 1878, with high honors. Until 1882 he served in the Sixth United States cavalry, and then resigned and returned to his native county, read law under A. M. Taylor, of Clarksville, and was admitted to tho bar in 1883, but abandoned the profession, and devoted his attention to farming and stock raising. In November, 1888, he was elected to the State legislature, but about February 17, 1889, was taken ill, returned home, and expired April 1.
In 1884 Mr. Bailey married Miss Sallie McKee, of Red River county, a daughter of William and Kate (Fulbright) McKee, who bore him two children, Addie and Kate. Mr. Bailey was a bright and enthusiastic Free Mason, and left behind him a host of mourning friends.

[Biographical Souvenir of the State of Texas, F A Battey & Co 1889]
ADDED 11 Nov 2014

 

Dillard, I N

DILLARD, I. N.

Bought First XIT Land

I. N. Dillard was one of a group of five who bought the first of the XIT land to be sold when it was dispersed in 1900. He was born in Red River County in 1851 and moved from Floydada to Deaf Smith County. Mrs. Dillard died in 1901, and her grave was the eleventh in West Park Cemetery at Hereford. Dillard moved to Lockney and Lubbock in 1915.

Jesse Dillard, now 72 and living in Los Angeles, Calif., probably thought 13 was his unlucky number. it was his 13th birthday, July 25, 1904, which was almost his last birthday anniversary.

To give the grass on their ranch 12 miles north-west of Hereford a chance to get started, young Jesse was "loose herding" the Dillard cattle on free range near the caprock. He was batching, and his father and sister came out once a week to bring supplies.

He left his camp before sun-up one morning for a fresh horse. As he got ready to throw his rope, his mount stepped in a prairie dog hole and fell. When he came to, he realized he had a fractured thigh. He started crawling toward a mud hole in the draw for water, and finally reached it about sundown. About noon the next day a neighbor, Jim Williams, rode down the draw to see if there was enough water for the cattle, and found the boy unconscious, and brought him to town.

Jesse Dillard moved to California in 1918 but recalls many happy family visits while living in Texas and on frequent visits since then.

The I. N. Dillard's daughters are: Mrs. Cecil Odom, Slaton, Tex.; Mrs. O. D. Wyatt, Fort Worth; Mrs. G. C. Mullins, Lubbock, and Mrs. Fred Waep, Tucson, Ariz.
[A History of Deaf Smith County, by Bessie Patterson, 1964 ; transcribed by Susan Geist]
ADDED 17 Jun 2014

 

Smoot MD, R. J. B.
[Submitted by Gene Phillips]

R. J. B. SMOOT, a promising young physician and surgeon of Dallas, was born in Collin County, Texas, February 20, 1867, son of W. B. and Lizzie (Bozarth) Smoot, natives of Virginia and Missouri respectively. His father came from Howard County, Missouri, to Texas in 1861, and settled in Collin County, where he was engaged in farming and stock raising, being especially interested in the latter occupation. He did his part toward opening up the way for the progress of civilization in this section of the country. His death occurred in 1867, at about the age of fifty years. His widow is still living, and is now a resident of Plano, this State. She is a member of the Christian Church at Plano. She was his second wife, and is the mother of two sons, Walter and J. B. The former died at the age of twenty-seven years. At the time of his death he was engaged in the livery business at Quanah, Hardeman County, Texas. Dr. J. B. Smoot received his education at Thorp's Spring, at Carlton College and at Bonham, Texas; also attended Christian College, at Canton, Missouri. While at Canton he began the study of medicine under the instruction of Dr. M. A. Atkinson, of that place. Afterward he entered Beaumont Hospital Medical College at St. Louis, where he graduated in March 1888. He then remained there in charge of the medical clinic until November. Returning to Texas, he located in Dallas, where he has since been engaged in the practice of his profession, meeting with marked success. He is a member of the Dallas County Medical Association. Dr. Smoot was married December 9, 1891, to Miss Marie E. Tyler, daughter of W. M. and Dixie Tyler, the latter being a daughter of Judge P. S. Lannaen, of St. Louis, Missouri. To Mr. and Mrs. Tyler were born four children, viz.: Walter, William, Mary E. and 1'. L. William died in 1891, at the age of twenty-three years. Mrs. Tyler was married in 1890, to Joseph A. Wherry, City Registrar of St. Louis. The Doctor is a member of the K.of P. order, having passed all the chairs in his lodge up to that of V. C., which position he now occupies. A man of pleasing address, scholarly attainments and professional ability, Dr. Smoot bids fair to make his mark in the world. Although only a recent accession to Dallas, he has gained the confidence of the people here and, both as a physician and a citizen, he is held in high regard by all who know him. [Memorial and Biographical History of Dallas County, Texas: Containing a History of this Important Section of the Great State of Texas, from the Earliest Period of Its Occupancy to the Present Time ... and Biographical Mention of Many of Its Pioneers, and Also of Prominent Citizens of Today, 1892]
ADDED 30 Jan 2014

 

Sullivan, Elijah
[Submitted by Gene Phillips]

Elijah Sullivan, of Wills Point, was born in Red River county, Texas, February 26, 1841, so that there are very few older Texans than he. His father came with him to Van Zandt county when he was three years old. He is now probably the oldest settler in the county. Mr. Sullivan received his education under the prevailing system then. The elder Sullivan built the school house and hired the teacher, Prof. White. The country at large was a wilderness. May, 1865, Mr. Sullivan married Miss Mattie Huff. She became the mother of ten children, all now living. September 3, 1886, she died. April 29, 1896, he married Miss Estelle Hill, who still survives to bless his home. He is a Cumberland Presbyterian and a Mason. Mr. Sullivan enlisted in Dallas as a Confederate soldier July 1861, Co. G. 3rd Texas Cavalry, Ross' Brigade. His first service was a forced march to Springfield, Mo., where they joined Gen. Price. He was in Wilson's Creek battle August 10, following. He is a typical southerner and a believer in Texas and her future.
[Source: Texans Who Wore the Gray, Volume I; by Sid S. Johnson; transcribed by FoFG mz]
ADDED 30 Jan 2014

 

Garner, John Nance
[Submitted by Gene Phillips]

John Nance Garner, (1868-1967), American political leader, who was elected VICE PRESIDENT after serving 30 years in the U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. Born near Detroit, Texas, on Nov. 22, 1868, Garner read law in Clarksville, Texas, and began practice in Uvalde, Texas, in 1890. He acquired the Uvalde Leader in lieu of a legal fee and his reputation as a newspaper editor led to his appointment and reelection as county judge of Uvalde county. After two terms in the Texas House of Representatives, Garner moved to the U.S. House in 1903, serving until 1933. In 1931 he was elected Speaker. "Cactus Jack," as his friends called him, was an expert at backstage maneuvering to get legislation passed. He often invited colleagues to his office where he applied persuasion and good whiskey, a technique he called "striking a blow for liberty." Garner, the favorite son presidential candidate of Texas, made possible the nomination of Franklin D. ROOSEVELT in 1932 by releasing his Texas and California delegates. Garner then accepted the vice presidential nomination reluctantly. Though elected vice president with Roosevelt in 1932 and 1936, Garner was never comfortable in the NEW DEAL, which he regarded as too liberal. He finally broke with Roosevelt over the latter's plan to "pack" the Supreme Court in 1937. In 1940, Garner ran unsuccessfully against Roosevelt for the presidential nomination. Garner might have been a serious presidential candidate had he not been so vigorously opposed by representatives of organized labor. Labor leader John L. Lewis once characterized Garner as "a labor-baiting, poker-playing, whiskey-drinking, evil old man." When he left Washington in 1941, Garner retired to Uvalde. He made and kept a vow never to go east of the Potomac River again. He died in Uvalde on Nov. 7, 1967.
["Garners of Texas A Personal History" by Bascom N. Timmons, Harper & Bros. Publishers, New York, 1948.]
ADDED 19 Jan 2014

 

White, John R
[Submitted by Gene Phillips]

John R. White, late of this county, was born in Red River County, Texas, in November, 1858. He was raised on a farm just across the river from his adopted county and State, attended the neighborhood schools until he was large enough to ride to Clarksville, a distance of ten miles to school, which he did all the time he could be spared from the farm. After reaching his majority, he married Miss Lena Simpson, a native of the Indian Territory, and moved to Idabel in 1903, where he entered the mercantile business and proved himself one of the successful merchants of the new country. In 1911 and 1912, his health began to fail and he went west with the hope of regaining it, but soon lost hope and returned to his home in Idabel, where he died in August, 1914. The same vim and determination to succeed that made Mr. White, when a boy, ride ten miles to school every day, characterized his after life and brought success to his efforts as a successful business man.
[McCurtain County & Southeast Oklahoma, Idabel, Okla. author W A Carter, 1923]
Added 20 Jun 2013

 

Arnett, Judge George T
[Submitted by Gene Phillips]

Judge George T. Arnett, of Idabel, Okla., a native of Texas, born at Manchester, Red River County, June 20, 1884, was raised on a farm and remained there until he was 24 years old, practically the sole support of his mother and four younger brothers and sisters, his father having died when he was but 12 years old. His education was obtained, even in the common schools, under difficulties that required grit and determination-plowing all day and studying at night. When he had finished with the public schools, he took a course at Commercial College, Tyler, Texas. In November, 1908, he came to Idabel, and began work for the Smith Lumber Company as bookkeeper. A few years later he attended the Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tenn., and was admitted to the bar in that State in January, 1915. In June, 1915, he went before the Supreme Court of Oklahoma and was licensed to practice law in his adopted State, and opened an office in Idabel,where, as a citizen and a lawyer, he is respected and trusted. On March 3rd of the present year-1923-under a special Act of the Legislature providing for an additional judge for the 27th District, he was appointed district judge, and for the first time, McCurtain County has a resident district judge and one whom her people appreciate. During the late war he served faithfully as a member of the local board for the county. Judge Arnett is a lawyer of ability, and this ability has been acquired by persistent study and hard work. He has been successful in his chosen field of work, financially and as a practitioner. His appointment as additional judge met the hearty approval of the people of the district-the right man in the right place.
[McCurtain County & Southeast Oklahoma, Idabel, Okla. author W A Carter, 1923]
Added 20 Jun 2013

 

Coleman, William A
[Submitted by Gene Phillips]

William A. Coleman was born in Red River County, Texas, in 1862, raised on a farm and had only the advantages of the common schools. In 1880, when he was 18 years of age, he came to the Indian Territory and settled at what is now Pleasant Hill, in this county, and for many years pursued his occupation of farming. Later, he married Lou Anna Morris, who was of Indian blood, and became a citizen of the Choctaw Nation. To his farming operations he very soon added the mercantile business and was considered successful in both lines of business. Mr. Coleman was the father of a large family of children, kind and indulgent, clever in business, loyal to his friends, and a progressive citizen. Prior to his death, in December, 1915, he had accumulated considerable property, and was one of the most prominent men in McCurtain County's financial world.
[McCurtain County & Southeast Oklahoma, Idabel, Okla. author W A Carter, 1923]
Added 20 Jun 2013

 

Blanton, Emmett
[Submitted by Gene Phillips]

Emmett Blanton, whose parents live at Broken Bow, this county, was born in Red River County, Texas, in 1892. Enlisted at Idabel and after a short stay at Camp Travis, was sent overseas with the 2nd Detachment, Company C, 340th Infantry. He was gassed at Forest Hill, captured by the Germans and was in prison until the armistice. On coming home he was sent to Fort Ward, in New Mexico, for treatment, but died there on the 15th of May, 1919, and was brought home and buried at Wright City.
[McCurtain County & Southeast Oklahoma, Idabel, Okla. author W A Carter, 1923]
Added 20 Jun 2013

 

Whiteman, W J
[Submitted by Gene Phillips]

W. J. Whiteman of Goodwater, this county, was born at Clarksville, Texas, in November, 1869, where he was educated and lived until 1893, when he came to the Indian Territory and settled at Goodwater, where he has lived ever since. Mr. Whiteman was one of the many young men who cast their lot with the fortunes of the new country with nothing to fight the battle of life but energy, integrity and determination, but he has signally succeeded. It is very rarely that a genial, hospitable and liberal man, such as Mr. Whiteman, succeeds financially, but he has proven an exception to the rule. Three years after coming to Indian Territory, he married Miss Mattie J. Harris, from which union there are eight children. Mr. Whiteman is a member of the Methodist Protestant Church, member of the Goodwater Lodge A. F. & A. M., No. 148, Royal Arch, Idabel Indian Consistory No. 2, McAlester, Bedouin Templar, Shriner. Besides his well-equipped farm, he does a splendid merchandise business at Goodwater, and is a stockholder in most of the banks of the county.
[McCurtain County & Southeast Oklahoma, Idabel, Okla. author W A Carter, 1923]
Added 20 Jun 2013

 

Robert Lee Gray
[Submitted by Carolyn Lauderdale 23 Nov 2010]

Robert Lee Gray was born in Red River County, TX. he married Magnolia (Nolia) Alzenia Floyd who was born in Sevierville TN and came with her parents, Richard Robertson and Jane B. (Jenny) McDaniel Floyd, to Clarksville, Red River Co. Texas when she was 9. Bob was the son of Wm Henderson and Mary Frances Reed Gray from Red River, Gregg, Harrison, Denton and Garza TX counties. Billy Gray was born in Mississippi and Fanny Reed was born in Georgia. Bob and Nolia Gray married in Clarksville, TX and had 5 children Eunice Leola (Wm Pearlie Smith), Marvin Odell who was an invalid and died at age 16 in Denton County TX and is buried in the Bolivar TX cemetery with his parents Bob and Nolia, Owen who died at about 16 months from a fever caused by teething and is buried in Red River Co. TX, Ruby Lee Gray (Fred L. Arnold) and Velma Fay Gray (Virgil P. Carter).

Bob and Nolia moved from Clarksville to Denton, Tx and then to Bolivar (Denton Co.) TX where they lived on Dr. Knox’s place. While living in Bolívar their son, Owen, died from complications of a fall as a toddler that had left him an invalid. From Bolivar, Bob, Nolia, Ruby and Velma moved to New Lynn Tx where Bob worked on the Double U and they lived in a small house on the Double U. Their oldest daughter, Eunice had married Pearlie Smith and resided in Krum (Denton Co.) TX with their two daughters Robbie and Melba Smith. On January 1, 1937 Nolia suffered a stroke on the porch of their home and fell into the yard. Ruby, their fourth child, heard her mother fall and ran to help her. Her condition was grave and Bob sent a telegram to his daughter, Eunice, in Krum telling her was sending someone to pick them up and bring them to New Lynn. They , as most during that time, did not have a telephone nor a car. Before they could reach New Lynn, Nolia had died. She always loved Bolivar and Bob decided to bury her there. His son-in-law, Wm Pearlie Smith, rode back to Bolivar with her body and the train. The rest of the family followed in two cars. My mother, Robbie Smith Kelly, said on the way back to Bolivar, it was raining and they had a wreck, the two cars ran into each other. She said an old farmer and his wife let them stay in their house until the cars could be repaired and they could be on their way. She said it was dark in their house and she was only 10 years old and she was scared. In an attached picture cropped from the original photo of the funeral of Nolia Gray, is Pearlie and Eunice Gray Smith with Robbie and Melba, Virgil and Velma Gray Carter with Richard and Ruby Gray who had not yet married Fred Arnold.

After the death of her mother, Eunice and Pearlie packed up their belongings and moved from Krum to New Lynn to help her father make a crop. They stay one year and moved back to Krum, with $100.00, their share of the crop. They again packed up their belongs in an old pickup and headed home, camping out along the way. It took several days to reach their home in Krum, and Mama said her mother cooked on a campfire and they slept on the ground. She said they bought a radio with part of their money.

Bob married again soon after the death of his wife to a woman Mama said they called Lee Fay but she doesn’t know her last name. Robert Lee Gray died October 19, 1939 in the Lubbock hospital from kidney cancer and is buried in the Bolivar Texas cemetery with his wife and son.

Bob’s father, Wm Henderson Gray lived Post, Garza Co., Tx where several of his children had move to from Clarksville and Denton counties. He died in Post on September 21st 1933 and is buried in Longview, TX, La Grone Chapel cemetery with his wife Mary Frances Reed Gray who preceded him in death on August 15, 1927.

Children of Wm Henderson and Fanny Gray are
Minnie
Emma Mae (Ike Killingsworth) Longview Tx
John Patterson (Maude Mable Burg) Krum, TX
Oscar Gray (Melinda (Linnie) Elder) Clarksville, TX
Robert Lee Gray (Magnolia Alzenia Floyd) Clarksville, Denton, Lynn TX
Helen Elizabeth (Cullie Andrew Richards) Longview, Post, Tahoka TX
James Charlton (Buddie) (Minnie Miller) Longview TX
Vara Etta (Frederick Payne Cockerill) Clarksville, Post, TX
Cora Alice (Thomas Anderson Stone) Clarksville, Tahoka TX
Willie Jewell (Lacey J Richardson) Clarksville, Post TX

This information is from family history, stories from my mother Robbie Smith Kelly, aunt Ruby Gray Arnold and cousins Charlotte Young Stice and Judith Gray Ellsworth.


This page last updated on -- 25 Sep 2016

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