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Ackerly, Charles
Monday evening at about 10 o’clock the angel of death entered the home of Mr. and Mrs. William Ackerly and called their son Charles. The young man has been very ill for a couple of weeks with typhoid fever, and last Saturday appeared to have taken a turn for the better. Sunday his condition became alarming, however, and vomiting spells were frequent. All that could be done was done for the sufferer but he gradually sank and expired Monday evening. The case is all the more sad because of the fact that the young man with his parents and sister came to Brigham only last April from Tasmania, and he has been laboring had in connection with his father, this summer, to get a little start in this new land, that they might surround their little family with a few of the comforts of life. His poor parents feel the loss of their son very keenly, and are certainly worthy the sympathy and assistance of any one who can extend a helping hand. Charles Ackerly was born in Tasmania, Australia, 20 years ago today and was just budding into manhood when death cut him down. We extend sincere sympathy and pary our Father’s blessings to attend Bro. and sister Ackerly and their daughter that they may have strength to bow in submission to the Lord’s decree and say, “Thy will, not ours, be done,” and that the healing influence of the Holy Spirit my bind up their broken hearts. Funeral services were held in the 3rd ward meeting house at 11 o’clock a. m. today. Bishop Stohl presiding. The stand was beautifully decorated with a profusion of flowers and a sweet spirit was present. The services began by the choir singing, “What voice salutes the startled ear.” Prayer was offered by J. Frank Bowring. Choir sang, “Though deep’ning trials throng your way.” The speakers were Bp. Sthol, H. M Figgins, Henry C. Jensen, Axel B Ohlson, Hyrum J. Hansen, Jesse W. Hoopes, Nels Madsen, Bp. T. H. Blackburn, Pres. Oleen N. Stohl and Wm. Horsley. Words of consolation and encouragement were spoken, and the many virtues of deceased were commented upon. It was pointed out and borne testimony to, that Brother Ackerly and family had made no mistake in coming away from their native home even though they are called upon to part with their son. The gospel reaches beyond this life, and the son has gone to the other side to associate, with and teach his four brothers and sisters who have proceeded him. Between speakers Victor E. Madsen sang, “I know that my Redeemer lives.” The choir sang, “Shall we Meet beyond the river?” and John B. Mathias pronounced the benediction.
Source: The Box Elder News- October 8, 1908- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Albon, James
Died at Brigham City, September 7th with bowel complaint; Elder James Albon. Deceased was born May 8th 1793 at Colchester, Essex, England. In 1840, he being a minister among the Independents, opened a church, which he owned in London, for Elders H. C. Kimball and W. Woodruff to preach in; upon hearing their testimony he became convinced of the truch of Mormonism, was baptized and received ordination as an Elder the same year. He faithfully proclaimed the gospel for nearly thirty years in Great Britain, while many of our elders found his house a ome of comfort, rest and refreshment. His stay in the country has been brief. He leaves a wife to mourn his loss. He was interred on the morning of the 9th inst.
Source: Deseret Evening News - Sept. 14, 1870 - Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Albon, Mary Ann
In Brigham City, on the 4th instant, of old age and debility, Mary Ann Albon. Deceased was born in Bacton, Suffolk, England, October 11th, 1793, and was baptized intothe Church by Elder Heber C. Kimball, during his mission in Great Britain. Her husband, James Albon, who died her a few years ago, spent nearly a lifetime in the ministry before and after he joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and was very widely known in Great Britain.
Source: Deseret Evening News - Feb. 25, 1880 - Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Alcorn, Baby
Sudden death of babe. We sincerely sympathize with Mr. and Mrs. Alcorn of Thatcher in the loss of their little two-months old baby. Mr. and Mrs. Alcorn came to Brigham last Saturday from their home to transact some land business, and while they were here their little babe died very suddenly. Mr. Alcorn went to J. D. Call’s office and remained about an hour talking of his affairs, while Mrs. Alcorn waited in front of the First National Bank. Finally she was sent for to come up and sign some papers. She handed the baby to a little girl who was with her and went. When she returned about fifteen minutes later, she observed for the first time that the child was dead. Dr. Harding was summoned, but all attempts to restore life were fain; death was evidently due to heart failure. The grief of the mother over the loss of her deal little one is truly pathetic.
Source: The Box Elder News- May 16, 1907- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Allen, William
Mr. Wm. Allen, who has for the last thirty years made his home with the family of George Gidnet in this city, died Saturday the 7th inst. of old age and gereral debility. Mr. Allen was a cousin of Mr. Gidney who helped him to emigrate from England over thirty years ago. He has a wife and four children in the old country all of whom have preceded him to the spirit world. Of late years, Mr. Allen has been very feeble and has had to be nursed almost like a baby. He was not in very good circumstances financially and only last meeting the county commissioners set aside $30 to be used for his benefit. While Mr. Gidney was alive he provided for the old gentleman, but since death, the family has found it quite a burden upon them hence this help from the county. Mr. Allen was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ Latter-day Saints and was faithful until the last. Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock in the 2nd ward meeting house at which friends gathered to show their last respects. Interment took place in the family lot at the cemetery.
Source: Deseret Evening News - Oct. 12, 1905 - Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Andersen, Alexander
Death at Bear River. We are pained to learn of the untimely death of Alexander Andersen of Bear River City, which occurred on the 17th inst. Mr. Andersen was afflicted with typhoid fever and was unable to keep up the combat against this formidable enemy. He is the youngest son of A. O. Andersen and old resident of that town. He was 34 years old and leaves a wife and three children to mourn his loss. Funeral services were held in the Bear River City meeting house on Friday, they 20th. of this month, presided over by Bishop Lars F. Johnson. The ward choir led by O. J. Olsen and accompanied by Eunice Ensign, rendered sweet and appropriate music. The speakers were Elders Alvin Ipsen, Lorenzo Jensen and Bishop Lars F. Johnson. All spoke of the good character of Bro. Andersen and also offered words of consolation to the bereaved family. The casket was beautifully decorated with flowers, and a long train of carriages followed the remains to the cemetery. The Bear River City Band, of which deceased was a member rendered several fine selections in the open air.
Source: The Box Elder News- December 26, 1907- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Andersen, Annie K.
Mrs. Annie K. Andersen, an old lady born in Denmark June 3rd, 1819, died at Mantua April 11th, and was buried the next day.
Source: Brigham City Bugler- April 16, 1892- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Andersen, Leon
Leon Andersen, son of Nephi Andersen of Bear River City, died Saturday night from diphtheria. This is the second death in the family of Mr. Andersen within a week, both from the same cause. We extend sincere sympathy.
Source: The Box Elder News- January 16, 1908- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Anderson, Alvin
A sad death occurred yesterday at the home of Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Anderson, 643 Fourth east street, when their 12-year-old son Alvin passed away as a result of diphtheria, with which he had been afflicted but a few days. The family had just recovered from a siege of smallpox when Alvin contracted a sore throat which later developed into diphtheria. The funeral was private from the family residence today.
Source: Deseret Evening News- January 2, 1906- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Anderson, Else Maria
At Mantua, Box Elder Co., on the 23rd inst., after fourteen months lingering sickness, ELSE MARIA ANDERSON, aged 27 years.
Source: Deseret News- November 4, 1874- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Anderson, Hansine N.
Yesterday afternoon at 3:15 o’clock, the spirit of Hansine N. Anderson took its flight from this probation, bringing relief to the soul which has suffered for such a long time. Mrs. Anderson has been very ill for the past eight months, six of which she has been confined to her bed and during that time has suffered terrible pain. Her trouble was inflammation of the stomach, and for many years she has been suffering from ill health. The deceased was born in Bornholm, Denmark, Nov. 19th, 1869, thus being her thirty-ninth year. She was the wife of Nels P. Anderson and the mother of seven children. Besides her own children, she has had four of her husband’s children by his first wife, to look after and she performed that duty with a fortitude and love a true mother, for she had a most kind and loving disposition. Mrs. Anderson was the sister of A. M. Nelson of this city and another brother resided in Idaho. Funeral services will be held in the Fourth ward meeting house Saturday at 3 o’clock p. m. We extend sympathy to Mr. Anderson and family, praying God to comfort them in the hour of trouble.
Source: The Box Elder News- March 25, 1909- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Anderson, John L.
John L. Anderson, one of Brigham City’s oldest citizens, passed away June 9th, of general debility. He was in comparatively good health up to a month ago, when he began to fail rapidly, and since that time has been confined to his bed almost continuously. Mr. Anderson was born November 28, 1826, in Sweden, and became a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in September, 1853, immigrated to this country shortly after, and for about forty years has resided in Brigham City. He has been married three times, but his wives have all preceded him into the spirit world. Twelve children and fifteen grandchildren survive him. Mr. Anderson was familiarly known in this county as “Painter Larsen”; in fact, up to ten or twelve years ago, very few people knew him by any other name. He was a lovable old gentleman of youthful spirits and hardly an excursion or any other celebrations has occurred without his presence. He was an enthusiastic member of what is known as the Scandinavian circle in this city, and was always present at their gatherings. He was a devout and consistent Latter-day Saint. Funeral services were held in the 4th ward meeting hours Tuesday afternoon. Messrs. James and Fred Palmer and their families were in attendance.
Source: The Box Elder News- June 13, 1907- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Anderson, Katie Viola
Funeral services for Miss Katie Viola Anderson, 13 years old, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Winson of Brigham City, will be held at 1 p.m. Wednesday in the Emerson ward meeting house. Friends are invited to attend. Internment will be in the city cemetery.
Source: Salt Lake Telegram - October 31, 1910 - Submitted and transcribed by Marla Zwakman


Angerbauer [Ingabour], Rose
Little Miss Rose Ingabour [Angerbauer], the eight year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Ingabour [Angerbauer] of the First ward, died, Monday, of membranous croup. The funeral services were held in the ward hall Tuesday afternoon and the remains were laid away soon after. The deceased was at school the Friday previous.
Source: Brigham City Bugler- March 5, 1892- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Archibald, James H.
Plymouth, Boxelder Co., March 12 - James H. Archibald, brother of Bishop Thomas Archibald, of this place, died March 8, of heart trouble. He was 44 years old, and leaves a wife and five children, and numerous brothers and sisters. Funeral services were held on Sunday, the 10th inst. Beautiful selections were rendered by the choir and the speakers were Elders E. H. Rudd, Eberhart Zundel, Charles Wright, and Counselor Robert Nish.
Source: Deseret Evening News- March 14, 1907 - Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Arrowsmith, Mary Frouie West
Very suddenly and without a moment’s warning, Frouie West Arrowsmith of this city was called in death Tuesday morning. She and her mother were partaking of their breakfast and Frouie arose from the table to pour out a cup of coffee, when she fell to the floor expiring instantly. The doctor pronounced the cause of death heart failure. Mrs. Arrowsmith has been suffering some, and only a few months ago her life was despaired of when she underwent an operation in Salt Lake City. Death is undoubtedly a happy relief to her. Mary Frouie West was born in this city, July 25th, 1872, her parent being Chauncy W. and Sylvia Snow West. She has resided in this city and Salt and Ogden alternately, all her life. About five years ago she was married and leaves a little son four years of age. In her younger days she was a most beautiful girl, but suffering changed her features until they did not resemble her former self at all Besides her little boy, a mother, brother and two sisters survive her. Funeral services were held in the First ward meeting house this afternoon.
Source: The Box Elder News- December 3, 1908- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Austin, Elwood
Elwood Austin, the 15-year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. W. Austin, Jr., died at their residence on Factory street last Friday night, at 11:30 o’clock, from the effects of heart trouble. The remains were prepared for burial and shipped to Payson Sunday morning for interment. Funeral services were held in Payson, but we were unable to obtain particulars for this issue. On account of the services will appear next week.
Source: The Garland City Globe- March 20, 1909- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Austin, Elwood
Funeral services over the remains of Elwood Austin, the 15-year old son of Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Austin, jr., were held in the 2nd Ward meeting house at Payson Monday, March 15h, a big turnout being present. Numerous relatives from Lehi, Salt Lake and other cites were in attendance. Bp, J. S. Taylor presided and the ward choir furnished the music. Prayer by Chas. Hawkins. The speakers were J. A. Lovelass, W. S. Tanner and John Barnett. Benediction by J. S. Bills. The remains were interred in the city cemetery and the grave was dedicated by German Elsworth. Mr. and Mrs. Austin returned to this last Thursday night.
Source: The Garland City Globe- March 27, 1909- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Ayers, John
Last Friday, Jan. 29trh, Mr. John Ayers was called in death after years of suffering. The cause of death was consumption, from which disease Mr. Ayers suffered many years. He was a brother to Mrs. W. T. Harding, and had been living in his sister’s home for the past two and a half years. Mr. Ayers came to Brigham over two years ago from Springfield Ohio, in the hope that the mountain air would restore his health and for a time he appeared to get better. During the past year he has been almost perfectly helpless, his sister being compelled to wait on him continuously. He was 54 years of age, and buried a wife a few years ago. Funeral services were held in the 3rd ward meeting house Saturday at 1 o’clock p. m., David P. Burt, presiding. The speakers were Henry C. Jensen, I. E. Pribble, H. S. Larsen, David Rees, Fred J. Holton and D. P. Burt. The choir sang, “Just As I Am,” “I Need Thee Every Hour, “ and “Nearer My God to Thee.” Daisy Madsen sang “Not Half Has Every Been Told, “ between speakers. The remains were interred in the city cemetery.
Source: The Box Elder News- February 4, 1909- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Barker, John Newman
At an age of 81 years and nearly six months, the life of John Newman Barker was brought to a close March 30th, at 10 o’clock a. m., his body having completely worn out from a long life. Mr. Barker, was the big vinyardist at Willard, and his place has become famous for the splendid fruits which he raised and the excellent wines which he manufactured. At Yorkshire, England, on Oct. 5th, 1827, Mr. Barker first saw the light of day and he drew to young manhood in that country. In the year 1847 he left his native land for the promised land in the western part of America and reached Salt Lake City that same year. A short time afterwards he moved to Cache Valley settling in Wellsville where he lived a number of years, then moved to Willard where his home has been ever since. He was compelled with his neighbors and friends, to forsake his home and possessions at the time of the “move” and went south to escape the approaching army. When peace had been restored, Mr. Barker came back to his home. He was ever on the alert for something in the mining line, and a good part of his younger days was spent in prospecting and mining in Montana and this state. At his place on the hillside near Willard, he planted a vineyard which has become famous. From the juice of this fruit he has manufactured wines that also command attention of the class who indulge, establishing a name for his wares in the commercial world. As a man, Mr. Barker was the most generous and true to his friends. His spirit was youthful although his body was worn out, and he delighted in the association of young people. A wife has preceded him to the spirit world, and he now leaves another wife and several children. Funeral services were held in the Willard tabernacle Thursday last, the speakers being Patriarch E. P. Cordon, John L. Edwards, Bishop Wm. Facer, P. A. Nebeker and Abram Zundel. All these parties had been acquainted with deceased for a great many years. The remains were interred in the Willard cemetery, not far from the home where deceased had spent so much of his life.
Source: The Box Elder News- April 8, 1909 - Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Barnard, Ezra J. W.
Death of a pioneer. Ezra J. W. Barnard goes to a well earned rest. Died at North ward, Brigham City, Jan. 16, 1903, Ezra Jacob Wyckoff Barnard, born in Barrington, Steuben county, N. Y., July 8, 1830. He was the son of John P. and Elizabeth Ann Wyckoff Barnard. His parents moved to Farr West, Mo., when he was six years old, and two years later removed to Illinois, passing through the trials and persecutions incident to those perilous times. The family came on to Utah in 1848, arriving in Salt Lake City Oct. 9. His parents settled in Centerville Davis county. In 1849, in company with Sidney Willis and Dr. Lee he explored the islands of the Great Salt Lake, being two days and two nights without food. He helped to establish the first ranch in Tooele valley in 1849. In the spring of 1850 he went with his father to California and returned in the fall. Went out with President Brigham Young in 1851, exploring Sanpete valley and the Sevier river. In 1853, he accompanied Apostle C. C. Rich to San Bernardino, Cal. Returning the same year and again made the same trip, carrying the United States mail in 1854. In September, 1854, he left home for the Flathead Indian country, exploring the north county and returning by way of Salmon river. In April, 1855, he left with that sturdy company of pioneers under the leadership of Col. Thomas Smith, to make a settlement on the Salmon river. He was a conspicuous character in that little band, performing deeds of valor that stand as a monument to his integrity and friendship towards his brethren. No man who put his trust in him was ever betrayed. He was compelled through sickness to return home in the fall of 1855. In April, 1865 he married Harriet Josephine Leach, who bore him five children; two of them survive him. He buried his wife in April, 1868. In May, 1856, he returned to Salmon river, returning home in the fall for supplies. In June, 1857, he brought the sail in from Salmon mission. He made several trips to and from the mission and experienced many hardships and narrow escapes, being often beset by Indians. Wherever it took courage to face dangers ahead there could be found the subject of this sketch. His account of the attack of the Indians on the settlement at Salmon river is a very interesting history as it is given in detail. A story told of privation and suffering incident to late fall and winter travel as related of his home coming from that mission field reads much more like a fiction than reality. After the mission was abandoned he returned his attention to farming and stock raising. On Dec. 17 1879, he married Esther Baty, who bore to him three sons and two daughters all of who survive him. The funeral services were held in the North ward meetinghouse, Jan. 19, 1903, Bishop Thomas Yates presiding. Consoling and appropriate remarks were made by Elders John Seaman, George Whitworth, Michael Wheatly, Bishop Thoans Wheatly, President L. A. Snow and Bishop Thomas Yates. Interment was made in the Brigham City cemetery. Thus closes a long and useful life. The wife loses a loving and kind companion, the children a father whose energy was devoted to their interests, and the community a valuable and worthy citizen.
Source: Deseret Evening News - January 28, 1903 - Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Beinkamp, C. F.
Aged resident falls dead in his garden. Brigham, May 20 - Tuesday afternoon C. F. Beinkamp, and old resident of this city, dropped dead while in the act of irrigating his garden, the cause of death being heart failure. Mr. Beinkamp was born in Sjelland, Denmark, in January, 68 years age, and has been in the country about 17 years. Two sons survive the deceased, William and Henry Beinkamp, both of whom reside in this city. Funeral services were held today at 11 o’clock a. m. in the Second ward meeting house.
Source: The Salt Lake Herald-Republican- May 21, 1909 - Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Beinkamp, C. F.
Tuesday about noon, Mr. C. F. Beinkamp of the Second ward was called to the other life very suddenly. He had been up town after the mail and upon reaching home entered the house for a few minutes. His son William was in the act of shaving when his father entered, and Mr. Beinkamp sat down for a moment then went out to fix up some irrigating ditches. The son said he heard a noise like a stone striking the house, just as his father passed out of the door, but paid no attention to it. When he had completed his shaving, he stepped to the door to throw out the water and then saw his father lying prone upon the ground. He attempted to rouse him, but life was extinct. Death must have been instantaneous, and resulted from heart failure. The coroner was notified and viewed the remains but it was not considered necessary to hold and inquest. Funeral services were held today at 11 o’clock in the Second ward meeting house. Deceased was born in Sjelland, Denmark, in January 68 years ago, and came to this country about 17 years ago. He was called upon to part with his wife two years ago, since which time he has felt very lonesome. Shortly after the arrival of the family the only daughter died and was buried in the cemetery here. Surviving the father are two sons, William and Henry, both of whom reside in this city. Mr. Beinkamp was an unassuming man, honest and true to his convictions and friends. He was of such a kind willing disposition, that many times he might have been imposed upon by the unscrupulous, as he did everything required of him cheerfully. For a number of years he has acted as janitor of the Second ward meeting house and was always found doing his duty. He has now gone to rest, a condition which is no doubt very welcome to him.
Source: The Box Elder News- May 20, 1909 - Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Beinkamp, Mrs.
Mrs. Bienkamp of the 2nd was died last Thursday night of general debility, and was buried from the ward meeting house Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock. Mrs. Bienkamp has lived in Brigham City for a number of years, but has never gone out much and was therefore not very widely acquainted. There was a good attendance at the service a fact greatly appreciated by the relatives and the ward authorities. The speakers were Elders Andrew Funk, C. J. Nielsen, H. C. Christiansen, Peter Sorensen, N. J. Valentine and Bp. Blackburn. Elder C. A. Kaiser offered up the opening prayer and Elder Richard Christiansen uttered the benediction.
Source: The Box Elder News- April 11, 1907 - Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Berg, Dr. Ludvig Hermann
Friday, January 17th, at 11:20 a. m., Dr. L. H. Berg passed into the other life after a lingering illness of many months. On Thursday last he felt quite strong and was going some work in his office. About 3 o’clock an attack of his trouble, heart failure, struck him and he was compelled to go home. His condition was at once seen to be serious and Dr. Harding was called. During the forepart of the night the patient suffered intensely and sank perceptibly. Stimulants were administered and altho’ life was sustained, the sufferer lapsed into unconsciousness about 2 o’clock remaining in the condition un-about 11:20 when he passed peacefully away. Ludvig Hermann Berg was born in Skelskor, Denmark, something over 69 years ago. He engaged in the barber business in his native town, studying dentistry during spare time. He emigrated to Salt Lake City in 1873 and engaged in the practice of dentistry. He came to Brigham City in 1887 and has since resided here. Dr. Berg was deeply respected by all who knew him, loved most by those who knew him best. Having a big heart he was a true friend to the needy, ever ready and willing to divide his substance with his less fortunate neighbors. He had the spirit of the true philanthropist. To the extent of his means he gave freely, cheerfully and unobtrusively. If the scripture be true wherein it says, “God loves the-cheerful giver,” then surely Dr. Berg was beloved of God. He was quiet and unassuming yet unusually progressive being greatly interested in the upbuilding of this city and in the good of the people. For several years he has acted as a member of the City Board of Health. He was true to his friends and to his covenants. He came to this land for the sake of his religious belief and he remained true to his convictions. Funeral services were held in the 3rd ward meeting house Monday at 11:00 o’clock a. m., counselor D. P. Burt presiding and taking charge. The choir sang, “What voice salutes the startled ear.” Prayer by Bishop J. B. McMaster. Singing, “Though deep’ning trials, etc.” The speakers in their order, were as follows: David P. Burt, James Olsen, john Evans, Henry C. Jensen, Dr. W. W. Willey of Bountiful, James Bywater. A quartette was sung by Daisy Madsen, Ray Evans, Norman Lee and Victor Madsen, entitled, “My Father Knows.” After this others spoke as follows: Peter F. Madsen, Lars Petersen of Hyrum, victor E. Madsen and Pres. Oleen N. Stohl. Every speaker bore testimony to the honesty, integrity, kindness and generosity of the deceased. Some of the speakers had made his acquaintance in Denmark over 37 years ago, others had known him since his arrival in the United Sates, while others had been his neighbors during his residence in Brigham City. It was said of him that the bishopric had never made a call of any kind upon him but he had cheerfully responded. He never was absent from a quorum meeting but what he sent a written excuse. He has won a victory: he has not fallen, but risen. During 30 years of acquaintance in this country he has remained a true friend. He sought to live the life of a Latter-day saint and had a good record. His home in Denmark was the nucleus of the church in that neighborhood. He was a sincere man, a companion to the young and old alike. The choir sang, “Mid scenes of confusion.” Benediction by Oluff Petersen.
Source: The Box Elder News- January 23, 1908 - Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Berry, James
The sudden and unexpected death of James Berry, an ex-soldier of the civil war, occurred at the home of Thomas Fryer, Deweyville, Saturday May the 19th. Mr. Berry was born in Bolton, in England, Feb. 18. 1841. He emigrated in the year 1861 and came to the United States. At the outbreak of the civil war he enlisted in a New York regiment and served through the entire war, finally being discharged at Fort Douglas, Utah, and has been a resident of the West ever since that time. For the past two years, he has made his home with Thomas Fryer. Funeral services were held at the Deweyville meeting house May the 21st. at 3 p. m. the speakers being Bishop Geo. C. Dewey and R. N Gardner.
Source: The Box Elder News- May 24, 1906 - Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Bigler,Isabella
Mrs. Isabella Bigler of Plymouth, wife of Adam Bigler died on the 4th inst. She leaves a family of five boys and three girls nearly all grown. The funeral services were held at Plymouth on Wednesday and then the remains were taken to Farmington for interment. The deceased was an old settler in this county, having lived here nearly 20 years. Sheriff Josephsen went up to attend the services, deceased being his neighbor in that locality.
Source: The Box Elder News - January 9, 1904- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Bingham, William
Brigham City, Sept. 10 - The past week has been unusually unfortunate in this locality in the line of deaths and casualties. On Wednesday William Bingham, one of the most highly respected young men of this community, died of typhoid fever, and his funeral took place on Friday. He was the son of L. P. Bingham, was 29 years old and was unmarried.
Source: The Salt Lake Herald- September 12, 1899 - Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Blackburn, Roxy
Brigham City, Feb. 14 - Mrs. Roxy Blackburn, wife of ex-Commissioner Thomas T. Blackburn, who has been suffering during the past five months with a complication of ailments, died last night at 6:30. She leaves a husband and several small children, the youngest being about four years of age. The funeral will take place on Wednesday next. The funeral services will be held in the second ward meeting house, commencing at 1 o’clock p. m.
Source: The Salt Lake Herald- February 15, 1899 - Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Boden, Brigham
Brigham City, April 10 - Brigham Boden was found this morning dead in a room in his own house. His head was half blown away. All the circumstances point to suicide. The suicide was shown by his having within his grasp a shotgun. His hand was upon the trigger and the gun against the wall where it has been placed for a solid base before the trigger had been sprung by means of a stick, which lay near by. The last time Boden was seen alive was yesterday morning at 10 o’clock. His step-son, Harry Westman, missed him during the day and last night and made a search for him and did not return until 2 o’clock this morning. Just why Boden killed himself is not known. He had been drinking a good deal of late. He had also been in ill health and not long ago had trouble with his wife. The difficulty is reported to have been settled. Mrs. Boden was in Salt Lake and has been sent for. A coroner’s jury was impaneled this morning and a verdict returned to the effect that the deceased met his death by a self-inflicted gunshot wound made with suicidal intent.
Source: The Salt Lake Herald- April 11, 1899 - Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Boothe, Elva
Sad death of Miss Elva Boothe. One of our most estimable young ladies gone to rest. Tuesday morning at 8:30, the residents of this city and community were painfully shocked by learning of the sad news that the spirit of Miss Elva Boothe, one of our city’s most bright and lovable young ladies, had taken its flight to the life beyond. Miss Bothe was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Boothe who reside in the northern part of town. She had been an employee of Riter Bros. Drug Co. for the past year and nine months, but owing to ill health gave up the position a few months ago and has been confined to her bed ever since. From a severe cold her case developed into pneumonia and later a puss formation congested her lungs, which finally resulted in causing her untimely death. Miss Boothe was loved by everyone who knew her for she possessed an especially sunny disposition that made friend for her where she went. The remains, accompanied by a large funeral procession, were brought to the Garland ward hall where impressive funeral services were held. Thursday at 2:30 p. m. The hall was crowded with relatives and friends of the deceased and the floral offerings were numerous and beautiful. The large curtain back of the stand was decorated with rose-bush boughs and bore the words: ”At Rest.” Among the floral offering were three beautiful designs. A wreath from the Y. L. M. I. A., a cross and anchor combined, contributed by Messrs H. F. Otte, J. W. Lewis and Riter Bros. Drug Co, and “The Gates Ajar”, bearing the word “Friends”, contributed by numerous acquaintances of the deceased. The casket was literally bedecked with beautiful flowers. Most of the business houses closed during the service. Bp. W. L. Grover resided at the services, members of the ward choir furnishing appropriate music. Singing by the choir “We Shall Meet Beyond the River.” Prayer by A. H. Gleason. “I Will Meet Thee”, a pleasing quartette, was rendered by F. D. Welling, Jos Jensen, Wm King, Thos E King, Mesdames Jas Thompson, D. E. Manning, Jos Jensen and Miss Mabel Crandall. The following speakers paid a high tribute to the noble character and lovable disposition of deceased and offered words of comfort to the bereaved family: A. I. Grover, Counselor D. E. Manning and H. F. Otte. Miss Lenora Romer read some choice sentiments and a trio entitled, “Sister Thou Was Mild and Lovely,” was rendered by Marie Wing, Essie E. Foulger and Mary Wanlass. Singing “Sweet Rest in Heaven.” Benediction by Olof Johnson. After the benediction the audience was given an opportunity to view the remains. The pall bearers were: Wm. Shumway, Jas A. Evans, Harrison Boothe, Frank Wood, J. J. Shumway and H. F. Otte. A large cortege followed the remains to the city cemetery where they were interred, the grave being dedicated by Bp. W. L. Grover.
Source: The Garland City Globe- May 25, 1907 - Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Boothe, Fanny Priscilla
Fanny Priscilla Wilde Boothe, the wife of John N. Boothe formerly of this city, died at the home of his mother, Susannah P. Boothe, last Monday morning at 8:10. Her immediate trouble was dropsy and heart failure. She was married to Mr. Boothe eight years ago last March and was the mother of three children, on boy and two girls. The youngest child is but six years old. Mrs. Boothe has been indisposed for a year past and a short time ago she became so bad that they rented out the ranch and came to this city in hopes of getting constant medical attention that she might have a better chance of recovering her health. Mrs. Boothe had been president of the Y. L. M. I. A. in the ward where she resided, but upon leaving here to come to Brigham she sent in her resignation. The resignation was not acted upon until last Sunday evening when her successor was named. It is quite a coincidence that within a few hours after her release from that office her spirit should take its flight into another sphere of action. Tuesday morning the body was taken to Coalville, where Mrs. Boothe was born and reared. Some of the family from here went up to attend the funeral services, among them being B. F. Boothe, Evan Morgan and Mrs. Norton, a near neighbor to the family, from Weston. Mrs. Susannah Boothe had intended to go but her health would not permit.
Source: The Box Elder News- July 5, 1906 - Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Bowring, Henry E.
Pioneer Actor Dies at Brigham City - Henry E. Bowring, one of the pioneer theatrical men and actors of Utah, died at Brigham City Saturday. His death was sudden and unexpected. Mr. Bowring landed in America just half a century ago with but one cent in his pocket. Undaunted by circumstances, he made his way to Iowa City, Ia., and later traveled by foot to Utah. In early days Mr. Bowring built a small theater in Salt Lake City, which was one of the first here. At one time Mr. Bowring had four wives, all of whom are now dead. He lived in Salt Lake City until 1877, and has since made his home at Brigham City. His funeral will be held at that place at 1 o'clock tomorrow afternoon.
Source: Salt Lake Telegram - March 5, 1906 - Submitted and transcribed by Sandra Davis


Box, Olivia
At Brigham City, Oct. 30th, of heart disease, OLIVIA BOX, wife of Wm. Box, aged 66 years. Born at Tain, Staffordshire, Eng. Embraced the gospel in 1841, emigrated to Nauvoo in 1842. Lived subsequently at St. Louis two years, and Council Bluffs four years. Arrived in this valley in 1852.
Source: Deseret News- November 22, 1871- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Brorsson, Pehr
At Brigham City, Dec. 10th, of old age debility, PEHR BRORSSON. Deceased was born at Skabeye, Sweden, July 21st. 1802, where he embraced the gospel in 1852; arrived in Utah in 1854; was a member of the Forty-first Quorum of Seventies; lived and died a devoted saint, never murmuring in any condition in life. A large number of people attended his funeral on the 12th inst.
Source: Deseret News- December 29, 1875- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Burrell, John Raymond
John Raymond Burrell, son of William and Elma Burrell, of the 2nd ward of this city, departed this life Saturday morning, the 9th, of pneumonia. The young man was robust and hearty, the very picture of health, until attacked last Wednesday with the dread disease. He was 19 years old and had always lived with his parents working for his father in the sawmill. It is needless to say that the family is greatly shocked at his untimely taking away. We extend sincerest sympathy to those bereaved.
Source: Box Elder News - September 14, 1905 - Submitted and transcribed by Sandra Davis


Burrows, Mary
On Wednesday last, April 9, 1902, Mary Burrows, late of Birmingham, England, departed this life at the ripe age of 82 years, one month and three days, from general debility.Mother Burrows was born at the town of Kineton, Warwickshire, England, and, with her husband, Thomas Burrows, was baptized members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1846. She was left a widow in 1862; kept the conference house in Birmingham from 1863 till 1866, in which latter year she, with her family, came to Zion, walking across the plains and reaching Salt Lake City in safety in 1867. She married Wm. W. Player of the Sixteenth ward, Salt Lake City, who died in 1873, since that time she has resided mostly in Salt Lake City. During the past six months she has been living with her son, John Burrows, at Brigham City. She leaves four sons and 16 grandchildren. The funeral was held Saturday, April 12, in the First ward hall, Brigham City, under the direction of Bishop J. B. McMaster, and her remains were interred in the Brigham City cemetery.
Source: Deseret Evening News - April 14, 1902 - Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Burt, Alonzo
The body of Alonzo Burt, who was frozen to death in the big Wyoming blizzard December 10, 1901, was brought home for interment on the noon train Sunday by his brother, D. C. Burt. He had been herding sheep for Anderson & Johnson near Black Rocks, Wyo., and was driven away with his sheep in that terrible storm, which lasted for three days. The body was found forty miles from his camp, lying face downward, no doubt just as he fell. The body was in a good state of preservation. The funeral services were held in the Third ward meeting-house at 2 p. m. today, Bishop Stohl presiding. The room was beautifully and appropriately decorated and was filled to it utmost capacity with sympathizing friends, while many could not gain admittance. All were deeply impress with the solemnity of the occasion. The speakers were W. L. Watkins, Oleen Stohl, James Pett, Jacob Jensen, A. Madsen, President Kelly and Bishop Stohl.All spoke well of the young man, his parent and family, offering words of hope and consolation to the bereaved ones. Alonzo was one of a pair of twins born September, 1869. His parents are among the oldest settlers of Brigham and the young man was born and raised here.Alonzo and his twin brother now sleep together in the City cemetery.
Source: The Salt Lake Tribune - February 11, 1902 - Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Burt, Daniel
At Brigham City, September 3d, DANIEL W., son of Andrew and Ann Burt, of cholera infantum, aged two months and seven days.
Source: Deseret News- September 10, 1873- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Campkins, Wilford
Our Brigham City correspondent A. C. sends us the particulars of the death of Brother Wilford Campkins, of Three Mile Creek, Box Elder County. While at Corinne with a load of hay, Brother Campkins stepped into a store, leaving his horses and wagon in the street close by. While in the store he was informed that the horses were starting to run, and stepping up to their heads quickly, trying to hold the animals, he was knocked down and run over by them, and the two wheels of the wagon passed over his body, causing serious injury, from which he died on the 24th inst at 9 o’clock, in Corinne. Deceased was about thirty years old, and leaves a wife and three children to mourn his untimely death.
Source: Deseret News - January 29, 1879 - Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Carter, Simeon
At Brigham City, Feb. 3d, 1869, Br. Simeon Carter aged 75 years. Deceased was born at Killingworth, Middlesex Co. Connecticut, on the 7th of June 1794. He embraced the gospel in Kirtland, Ohio, Feb 22d, 1831. He was one among the first men who were ordained High Priests in this dispensation, and was among the twenty-four who were present at Joseph’s house when the first High Council was organized. He was one of the committee appointed to locate the city of Independence, in Jackson County, Missouri, and was also connected with “Zion’s Camp” in 1833. He labored faithfully performing various important missions in the States. On the 7th of May, 1846, he left the City of Nauvoo to go on a mission to Great Britain, from whence he returned and arrived in Salt Lake Valley, in the Autumn of 1849, being among the first who settled in Brigham City. Enfeebled and burdened with age he reclined to rest in full faith and anticipation of a glorious resurrection. He was interred on the 4th inst. and attended by a very large procession of the citizens of Brigham City.
Source: Deseret News- February 17, 1869- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Champlin, Mary
Died at Brigham City, at the residence of Bro. J. T. Packer, from the effects of canker, Mary Champlin, aged 77 years, on the 3rd instant. Deceased was born at Old Salisbury, Essex county, Mass.; embraced the gospel with her husband at Brooklin, Susquehanna County, Penn., in 1832, while Martin Harris and his brother were preaching there. On their journey to Far West they were stopped by a mob and survived the memorable scenes at “Haun’s’ Mill.” Of those where remained at the blacksmith shop, Bro. Champlin was the only one who escaped death, and was saved by the brethren falling on him. One of the mob, however, discovered him and said “by h---! There is yet one man who is not killed, let us finish him;” while another said, “It is time we were off.” which created panic, and all fled. He guarded off the guns of the mob which, through the shop walls were aimed at the little boy of Bro. Warren Smith, who was at last so brutally murdered by them. He subsequently lived in Nauvoo, Ill.; was with the Saints in the general exodus from there and with his family, reached Salt Lake Valley in 1849, and died ten years ago. Sister Champlin, the deceased, was without the sight of her eyes for the last five years of her life. The interment has just taken place today at 3 p. m., and has been largely attended.
Source: Deseret News- April, 12, 1871- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Cheeseman, Robert
Robert Cheesman dies by own hand. While laboring under temporary derangement caused by worry over his physical condition, Mr. Robert Cheesman took his own life shortly after one o’clock last Thursday after the News had gone to press. Mr. Cheesman had been suffering for two years with heart trouble and dropsy which made it impossible for him to work. He was a carpenter by profession and a first class workman, used to a hard active life and when his physique became undermined he worried considerable often saying to his family that he would like to be through with life altogether. But while his condition was not altogether the best physically, he was getting along nicely and his family did everything to make him cheerful and comfortable. On Thursday, Mrs.Cheesman was down town and dinner had been prepared by Grandma Cheal for herself, Mr. Cheesman and his son John. The father did not feel like eating and left the other two before they had finished the meal. He stepped to the door felt for his hat and found it was not on his head, then retraced his steps, got his hat and went out of the room into the little summer kitchen where he placed the muzzle of a shot gun against his heart and released the trigger with a stick. As the shot rang out, the son and grandmother both sprang to their feet, and the son exclaimed “Father’s shot himself,” and so they found him, his life just fluttering away. The news of the sad occurrence caused a gloom to settle over the entire community and sympathy for the dead as well as the living, was expressed on every hand. It has been reported that Mr. Cheesman took his life while in a state of intoxication. It is unqualifiedly false for he had overcome any habit that he had of that nature, some years ago and had not tampered with liquor since that time. Brooding over his physical condition caused his mind to become deranged and when the family physician was informed of the occurrence he said he was not the least surprised but had been afraid of just that thing for some time. Mr. Cheesman was a quiet inoffensive man who attended to his own business and let other people alone. He was honest, upright and a hard worker, never idle until compelled to be through the breakdown of his physical condition. That his mind should become so affected as to prompt the ending of his life, is a matter of keen regret amongst his friends and universal sympathy goes out to Mrs. Cheesman and her four children and their families. The News joins in offering sincere condolences with a hope that comfort and strength will be given, sufficient in the occasion. Funeral services were held at the home on south Main street, Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock, Bishop George W. Watkins in charge. Consoling remarks were made by Bishop Watkins, Oluff Petersen, Dr. J. D. Harding, who explained the physical condition of the deceased, J. B. McMaster, Nels Madsen, Amos Hatch and President Oleen N. Stohl. The singing was furnished by a male chorus from the First ward choir, and the prayers were offered by Elders Amos Hatch and C. F. Nelson. The attendance more than filled the rooms, and many beautiful floral emblems covered the casket, and the remains were accompanied to the cemetery by a large cortege, the grave being dedicated by L. W. Anderson.
Source: The Box Elder News - January 16, 1913 - Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Christensen, Andrew
Death of a good man. Andrew Christensen found dead in his bed. Andrew Christensen, an old and faithful resident of Brigham City, was found dead in his bed, by members of his family, at seven o’clock yesterday morning. The body lay across the bed, partly dressed. An inquest was holden at eleven a.m. when the verdict, “death resulted from heart disease,” was rendered. He was forty eight years of age, lacking a few days. He has been an active member in the community and held many positions of trust. He was postmaster at Brigham City about seven years. At his death he was County Prosecuting Attorney, Auditor and Recorder of Brigham City, and a Notary Public, all of which offices he filled with credit and honor, and gave the best of satisfaction to the community. He was been correspondent of the Deseret News and other papers published in the Territory, many years. He was very modest in his deportment, notably a good and true citizen. The community will miss his services and his genial companionship. He had resided in Brigham City about twenty-five years and it can be truly said of him, “another good and true man has gone.” He leaves a wife and six children to mourn his loss. The funeral takes place on Saturday, the 6th inst., at 10 a. m. We are indebted for the information of the sad event to Brother James Bywater.
Source: Deseret Evening News - May 5, 1882 - Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Christensen, Anna Leoda
The angel of death entered the home of Mr. and Mrs. Oluff Christensen of the First Ward last Saturday evening, and took their little daughter, Anna Leoda, who was just three years and eight months of age. The little child had been suffering for over a year with diabetes, during which time every effort was made to combat the disease, but the work was unsuccessful. This is the first experience of this kind to enter the lives of Mr. and Mrs. Christensen, and is all the more painful from the fact that Anna was their eldest daughter. Their many friends sympathize with them in their bereavement and the News desires to be included. Funeral services were held in the First Ward meeting house Tuesday at 1 o’clock p. m., and appropriate and consoling remarks were made by Elders, John E. Baird, Eli Christensen, Jesse W. Hoopes and N. L. Hansen.
Source: The Box Elder News - February 2, 1911 - Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Christensen, Camilla
On Sunday morning, Mrs. Camilla Christensen of the Second ward passed away from a complication of heart trouble. The lady had been ill for some time and had suffered greatly although the final moments were marked by a peaceful sleep from which she did not awaken. Deceased was a native of Denmark, having come to Brigham City four years ago. She had some little experience in getting over here, as she was not permitted to land when she reached America the first time, on account of being ill. She was returned to Denmark where she was bed fast for some time and when her strength returned, she made another attempt going by way of Canada and was successful. She has resided in Brigham City ever since coming to this country and leaves a daughter, Mrs. Dagmar Using, of this city. Funeral services were held in the Second ward meeting house Tuesday at 2 o’clock p. m. The deceased had made a previous request that all the speakers at her funeral express themselves in the Scandinavian language which was complied with, the speakers being N. J. Valentine, C. W. Knudson, O Petersen, P. H. Sorensen, P. F. Madsen, C. C. Hansen. Music was furnished by the ward choir.
Source: The Box Elder News - December 28, 1911 - Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Christensen, Christian
At Brigham City on the 7th inst., of typhoid fever, CHRISTIAN CHRISTENSEN, aged 31 years. Deceased leaves a wife and two children to mourn his loss, as well as a host of friends.
Source: Deseret News- December 18, 1878- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Christensen, Elsa Kerstina
With but scarcely an hour’s warning and after having spent a pleasant day and evening with relatives and friends, the life of Mrs. Elsa Kerstina Christensen, widow of the late Lars C. Christensen, came to an end Monday morning early at the home of her son Peter in Salt Lake City. Some Weeks ago, Mrs. Christensen went down to Salt Lake City to visit with her son and grandsons and families, and was enjoying splendid health considering the many sick spells she has had to pass through, so that not the latest thot [thought] was entertained as to anything of a serious nature happening to her. Sunday evening she was visiting at the home of her grandson Mr. Jerrold R. Thompson, was lively as usual, chatted pleasantly and continuously throughout the evening, departing for home between eleven and twelve o’clock. When she arrived at the home of her son Peter, she began to feel queer and her heart action became irregular. The lady realized immediately that her condition was serious and informed those about her that she believed her time had come. She quietly gave instructions as to her burial and some other things that were on her mind and then sank peacefully to rest, there was no pain, and the wish she had so often expressed, that she might not be called upon to linger long and suffer, was fulfilled. When the message was received by the family in this city, they were shocked, and as the news was passed around, it seemed almost impossible to believe as Mrs. Christensen was known to be in the enjoyment of pretty good health at the present. The end came as a result of heart failure, and the lady often told her family that she would not be surprised if death should claim her in that manner. Mrs. Christensen was born in the northern part of Denmark in the section known as Vensyssel, in the year 1840. She was one of the thousands which that part of the Danish kingdom has given to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and when at the age of 15 years, she emigrated to Utah. In the year 1859 she became the wife of Lars C. Christensen, by whom she bore ten children, six of whom are still living. Besides raising such a large family, she was called upon to act as mother to a number of children who were left motherless when Mr. Christensen’s first wife died. This duty was fulfilled with the true mother spirit, and every one of those children who are still living, regarded her in the light of mother and now that she is gone, they feel that they have truly lost their mother. Mrs. Christensen was a lovable woman, with a heart that beat with true sympathy for all of God’s creatures. When her family of boys was growing up, nothing delighted her more than to have them bring their young friends to her home where she entered into their games and fun, and always saw to it that something was prepared for the youthful stomachs to take care of. She lived in her children, and often remarked that her greatest joy would be to have her children grow up to honorable men and women. As a friend and neighbor, she was unselfish and helpful, never turning a deaf ear to the cry of the needy. As a church worker she was faithful, and in her younger days took a very active part in the mothers’ organization in the ward. All who knew her loved her, and the hearts of her friends are sad at the parting. Funeral services will be held in the Third ward meeting house this afternoon at 2 o’clock.
Source: The Box Elder News - February 9, 1911 - Transcribed and submitted by Allison Morgan


Christenson, Christiane
Bear River City, Box Elder County, Utah Territory, December 1879. - Editors Deseret News: I hereby wish to inform my friends and relations that my wife Christiane, daughter of Anders and Marie Sophie Christensen, died November 5th, 1879, at her residence, from paralysis, form which she suffered nearly two months. She was born in Jylland, Denmark, August 31st,1834. She emigrated to Utah in 1859, and crossed the Plains with the handcarts and suffered much hardship and scarcity of food. She arrived at Salt Lake City September 4th, 1859, and was united in the bonds of matrimony on October 13th, 1859, Brother Erastus Sdow performing the ceremony. These 20 years we have enjoyed the blessing of God and raised four sons and three daughters, who are left with me to mourn the loss of a true and faithful mother. She died in full faith of the gospel, and a hope of a glorious resurrection. L. C. Christenson.
Source: Deseret News - January 7, 1880 - Submitted and transcribed by Jim Vandermark


Clark, Sarah
After enduring suffering with a saintly fortitude, for over five years during which time she was deprived the use of her limbs through paralisis the gentle spirit of Mrs. Sarah C. Clark was released Monday evening to go back to the Father that gave it and the worn out body sank to its final deserved rest. Some five years ago Mrs. Clark suffered a paralytic stroke which rendered her helpless, and at the time her five children were very small and unable to do much in the sustaining of the family. They gave the best there was in them, however, and the vision of their little mother lying helpless upon her bed, inspired and gave them courage to grasp firmly the problem of life and make the most of them. Mrs. Clark’s condition improved to the extent that she was able to be wheeled about in an invalid chair and in that condition she was compelled to live. In her suffering she exercised an influence over her children this drew them closely to her, and a more devoted family could hardly be found. The helpless mother directed the lives of her children, and they rewarded her by carrying out her instructions and counsel. Under those conditions, the little family grew and the eldest, Miss Dela, was led to the altar only last week and wedded to the man of her choice. It seemed that the spirit of the mother had been waiting for this even to be consummated before it went to its rest for on Sunday evening, Mrs. Clark suffered another stroke which took her off for some little time and alarmed the family. She rallied, however, and later slept soundly through the night. Monday morning she seemed brighter than she had for some time, and her speech, which was slowly being affected, was more clear and distinct. The hopes of the children were soon blasted, however, for another stroke came in the early afternoon, and from that moment life slowly ebbed away. Five children are left alone practically, although as stated, the eldest has a companion. Miss Right the next eldest, is the little lady who so pleasantly waits upon the public from behind the post office window, and then there are Mary, George and Platt who are attending school. Platt, the youngest of the family is 12 years of age. The passing of Mrs. Clark, while a great blessing and relief to her, is extremely sad for the children, for while she was unable to do anything for them in a temporal way, yet she kept the family together and cheered them with her love. Every heart in this community goes out to them in sympathy. Beautiful and impressive funeral services were held in the First ward meeting house yesterday afternoon. The stand was draped in white and banked with a profusion of flowers in various designs. The white casket was completely covered with floral emblems and a sublime influence attended all that was said and done. Bp. Geo. W. Watkins presided, and the speakers in their order were: Bp. Watkins, Elders F. W. Fishburn, J. B. McMaster, C. Holst, J. D. Peters and Pres. Oleen N. Stohl. The words spoken were eulogistic of the beautiful life of the deceased, and breathed sympathy and comfort for the bereaved. The choir sand “Sister, Thou Was Mild and Lovely,” “Nearer My God to Thee,” and “O, My Father.” Between speakers, Victor E. Madsen sang “Resignation.” The prayers were [illegible] by Elders Wm. [illegible] and [illegible] Hansen.
Source: The Box Elder News - February 16, 1911 - Transcribed and submitted by Allison Morgan


Compton, Junius
On Thursday of last week, while shooting sparrows in the lot, Mr. W. F. Compton accidentally shot his little step son, death resulting on the day following. Junius wanted to go off with some of the other boys to play on the morning of the Fourth, but his father and mother objected, Mr. Comtpon proffering to go with him out in the orchard and shoot sparrows with the 22 calibre rifle. They had discharged all their cartridges but one and Mr. Compton suggested that they go into the house. The boy espied a little bird sitting up in a tree and excitedly called his father’s attention to it, at the same time dancing around in front of the gun. While pulling up to take aim, in some manner the gun was discharged, the bullet striking the boy in the side well toward the font, and passing through the intestines lodging in the hip. He sank to the ground with a cry and Mr. Compton gathered him in his arms and rushed into the house. Medical aid was immediately summoned and the little fellow was made as comfortable as possible. At that time the seriousness of the wound was not known but it was thought to be only in the flesh. Junius suffered terribly during the night and the following day it was considered advisable to perform an operation. Accompanied by Dr. McGee, Mr. and Mrs. Compton took the little fellow down to the Dee hospital in Ogden Friday afternoon and he was operated upon immediately. The intestines were found to be perforated in two places and the operation was performed. The boy regained consciousness after being under the surgeon’s knife but sank rapidly and passed away upon the operating table. Mr. and Mrs. Compton are all but distressed over the sad occurrence for the little fellow was a most lovable child, bright of mind, sweet of temper and active in his body. He was a faithful member of the Sunday School, Primary and Religion Class, and his fellow class mates paid a tribute to his memory at the funeral services Sunday afternoon when they sang the song “Shine On,” then they each placed a boquet on the casket. The remains were prepared for burial by the Larking Undertaking Co., and were brought to Brigham on Saturday. Funeral services were held in the Second ward meeting house at 4:30 p. m., the building being packed to its capacity with sympathizing relatives and friends from this city and Ogden. Bishop Blackburn was in charge and offered a few remarks in which he pointed out the beautiful traits of character in the life of the little boy. Other speakers were Elders C. W. Knudson, C. A. Kaiser, E. A. Larkin of Ogden, and Pres. W. C. Horsley. The choir sang the hymns “I Need Thee Every Hour,” “Sometime We’ll Understand,” and “O, My Father.” During the services Miss Geraldine Blackburn sang the selection “Your Little Rose Bud has Left You.” And the class mates of the deceased sang “Shine On.” The prayers were offered by Elders Wm. Preston and N. J. Valentine respectively and the grave was dedicated by Elder H. J. Christiansen, grandfather of the boy. H. Junius Compton was 10 years and one month old when he died. He was born in this city and was a favorite among the young folks of his age, and a leader in the children’s organizations of the ward. His sudden demise has cast a gloom not alone over the family, but over all his associates for he was beloved by all.
Source: The Box Elder News - July 11, 1912 - Transcribed and submitted by Allison Morgan


Coombs, J. M.
Judge J. M. Coombs, who died yesterday, was a very true man. He served as United Sates Marshal in the old stormy Maxwell days, and when later he was admitted to the practice of law and went to serve as Probate Judge in Brigham City his soul and his patriotism were tested every day, for in those days Brigham City was not much in love with the United States Government or its officers. It was enough to say that he did his duty like the true man that he was. Of late years he had been breaking with disease and had practically retired. He was a kindly, brave and true man and earned his reward.
Source: Salt Lake Telegram - August 17, 1906 - Transcribed and submitted by Allison Morgan


Coombs, Phoebe
Mrs. Phoebe Coombs, the wife of Judge J. M. Coombs of Brigham City, departed this life yesterday at 5:20 p. m. The cause of death was cancer. She was a great sufferer and death came as a happy relief. Judge Coombs is well known throughout Utah, and the deepest sympathy of a host of friends is with him in this sore [illegible].
Source: The Salt Lake Tribune - October 12, 1898 - Transcribed and submitted by Allison Morgan

Cornford, William
Death of William Cornford. Aged Gentlemen of the Third Ward Passes Away Unexpectedly. Funeral Services Sunday. William Cornford, a resident of the Third Ward of this city passed away rather unexpectedly last Saturday morning the immediate cause of his death being stomach troubles. About a year ago an ulcer formed on one of his eyes totally destroying the sight of that member. Since then he has been somewhat indisposed almost continuously until his death. It was known that he was pretty sick, but when one of the members of Mr. Heber Smith’s family, with whom he lived, visited his room about eleven o’clock Friday night he seemed to be getting along as well as could be expected. There was no thought of his being very seriously ill; when he was called next morning he failed to respond, and upon entering his room the family found that he had passed away. He has been working at odd jobs for sometime past and for three or four years has acted as janitor of the Emerson school. William Cornford was born May 4, 1831 in Hailsham, Sussex, England. He was a farmer and gardener and was an expert in his line. Some of his family joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in England and came to this country settling in this state. About eight years ago he and his wife started for Utah but Mrs. Cornford died enroute at Buffalo. Her body was brought here for burial. Shortly after that Mr. Cornford joined the same church and was a member in good standing at the time of his death June 7, 1905. He was the father of nine children, eight of whom survive him. Five are in this state and three remain in England. There are 54 grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Funeral services were held Sunday the 9th, in the Third Ward Meeting House where a goodly number of friends gathered to pay their last respects. The meeting was presided over by Bishop Lorenzo N. Stohl, William Jeppson taking charge. The singing was by the ward choir and visitors. The first song was, “Nearer dear Savior to Thee.” Prayer by Elder John Crawford. Singing, “Guide me to Thee.” The third song was “Peace, be still.” The speakers were Bishops Thomas II Blackburn and J. B. McMaster, Elders James Olsen, Adolph Madsen and President W. C. Horsley. These were old friends and acquaintances of deceased and they all bore testimony that Mr. Cornford had been in his life-time a good and exemplary man. The closing song was, “Home Sweet Home.” Benediction by Elder Heber C. Boden. Quite a long procession followed the remains to the cemetery where they were interred in the family burial ground. We take pleasure in expressing the thanks of the family of Mr. Cornford in this city for the assistance rendered in their trouble by neighbors and friends.
Source: The Box Elder News - July 13, 1905 - Transcribed and submitted by Allison Morgan


Coulam, Joseph C.
Died in the 11th Ward of this city, September 11th of Diphtheria, Joseph C., son of Henry and Sarah Coulam, aged 3 years, month and 17 days.
Source: Deseret News - September 17, 1879 - Submitted and transcribed by Jim Vandermark


Crawford, Alice
Mr. and Mrs. Alphonzo Crawford of Perry lost their little two months old babe Monday, the child having been frail since its birth. It did not seem to gain strength but rather wasted away and Mrs. Crawford picked it up Monday afternoon to nurse, when the little one went into convulsions and passed away. Funeral services were held yesterday and the remains were brought to this city for interment.
Source: The Box Elder News - January 9, 1913 - Transcribed and submitted by Allison Morgan


Crawshaw, Levi
At Brigham City, Box Elder County, Utah, Levi Crawshaw, aged 74 years, 4 months and 7 days, after a lingering illness of about 9 months. Brother Levi was the son of Richard Crawshaw and Mary Batersby, was born April 30, 1810, at Acrington, Lancashire, England. Was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints July 4th, 1841, by Elder Cook, was a faithful laborer in the cause of truth. He traveled miles to preach the Gospel and distributed publications of the Church among the people; presided for years over a branch of the Church in Lancashire. Emigrated to Utah with part of his family in the fall of 1868, going to Wellsville, Cache County, thence to Brigham City, where he has lived for 13 years a sober, industrious and saint-like life. He was ordained a High Priest April 13, 1884.
Source: Deseret Evening News - September 12, 1884 - Transcribed and submitted by Allison Morgan


Davis, Azetta
Little child poisoned. Tuesday afternoon while Azetta, the little 3-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Davis of Perry ward was playing about the house she found some constipation tablets which after eating threw her into convulsions, Mr. Davis was in Brigham City, but was telephoned for and brought with him Dr. Harding. It took them only 12 minutes to reach the home, to find that the baby had died in terrible agony. Funeral services were held in the Perry ward meetinghouse Wednesday afternoon under the direction of Bishop Morris Peters, the speakers were Elders Elma Iversen, Richard Thorn, Thomas C. Young, Brigham Nelsen and Bishop Peters, who spoke words of comfort to the parents who have the sympathy of the whole community.
Source: Deseret Evening News - August 1, 1908 - Transcribed and submitted by Allison Morgan

Davis, John C.
At Brigham City, February 16th, 1878, after a prolonged illness, JOHN C. DAVIS. He joined the Church in Birmingham, England at an early day, lived the life of a Latter-day Saint, was ordained a High Priest and died firm in the faith of the gospel.
Source: Deseret News- May 29, 1878- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Dunn, Alice
Death of little Alice. Dear little Alice Dunn has flown to the arms of Him who said, “Suffer little children to come unto me.” She was the only child of Agent E. W. Dunn and wife. On New Years day, little Alice, who was nearly well from the whooping cough, came down with pneumonia. She died Sunday night. The dear child was so patient and sweet that, although everything possible was done for her relief, no one realized until the last hours how sick she was. Little Alice was a tiny maid, only 19 months old, but was so bright and had such a lovely disposition and sweet ways that she won all hearts. Mr. and Mrs. Dunn are nearly heart-broken. In this, their first great sorrow, they have the sympathy of all their friends and acquaintances. The funeral was held at the house Tuesday and 12 o’clock. After singing, and prayer by Wm. Horsley, words of consolation were spoken by Wm. Wrighton, Charles Kelly, President Clawson and Bishop Valentine. Jacob Jensen pronounced the benediction. Then the exquisite coffin, the last gift of loving hearts, was taken to the cemetery, followed by those who mourned, and the lovely clay was laid away in “God’s Acre” to await the resurrection morn.
Source: Brigham City Bugler - January 12, 1895 - Transcribed and submitted by Allison Morgan


Dunn, Elizabeth
At Brigham City, May 19th, of inflammation of the lungs, ELIZABETH, daughter of Joseph M. and Susannah Dunn, aged six years, five months and six days.
Source: Deseret News- June, 7, 1876- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Evans, David Rees
In Brigham city, Thursday, January 3d, 1861, DAVID REES EVANS, formerly of Pembrokeshire, Wales, aged 42 years, 4 months and 20 days.
Source: Deseret News- January 16, 1861- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Fishburn, Eliza
In Brigham City, Box elder county, Utah, on the night of the 9th of April, 1884, after a few days illness of hemorrhage, Eliza Fishburn, widow of Francis Fishburn; born August 25th, 1813, at St. Ives, Huntingdonshire, England. She was the daughter of Samuel and Sarah Jeffs; emigrated to Utah in 1875, and resided from that time up to her death in this city, at the residence of her son Robert L. Fishburn. She died in the full hope of a glorious resurrection was extremely exemplary in life, eminently of a motherly disposition peaceable and self-denying, and bore her trials and afflictions with Christian patience and fortitude; she was highly esteemed, and her loss is mourned by a numerous posterity and a host of friends.
Source: Deseret News - April 23, 1884 - Transcribed and submitted by Allison Morgan


Fishburn, Eliza
Mrs. R. L. Fishburn, Sr., is dead. She was a noble woman, a lovable and affectionate wife and mother and a good neighbor. She was a pioneer of this sate and this city. The immediate cause of her death was an abscess on the kidney, but she was well along in years, being nearly seventy, and general debility hastened on the end. There would seem to be less cause for sorrow as the passing of those whose span of existence is will completed, but there is little difference in the pangs of parting with a loved one either young or old. Therefore we feel to sympathize with those who are bereaved. Would that we could offer some word of consolation that would soften their sorrow, but we realize how important is human power to heal the wounds of the heart. The Great Physician alone is thus mighty. Elizabeth Priscilla Noble was born April 3rd, 1836 in Irchester, Northamptonshire, England. Her parents joined the church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1840 so she was practically brought up in that church. She emigrated from England in 1857, crossing the Atlantic on the ship “George Washington” and traversing the plains in Captain Israel Evans handcart company. They arrived in the Salt Lake valley September 11th of the same year. The family settled in Salt Lake City where they remained until the move south in the fifties. June 8, 1858, she married at Lehi to Robert L. Fishburn, the ceremony being performed by Captain Israel Evans. She and her husband crossed the plains in the same company and had pulled on the same handcart from Iowa City to Salt Lake, a distance of 1300 miles, the journey requiring thirteen weeks. In 1860 they moved to Smithfield, Cache county, being among the first settlers to that valley. In 1868 Mr. Fishburn was called to Brigham City to take charge of the choir and conduct singing classes. During the many years that he acted in the capacity, Mrs. Fishburn was his staunch support. She was a beautiful singer. She was the mother of ten children of whom three sons and four daughters are now living and all married. She was grand-mother to twenty-seven children, twenty-three of whom survive her, and great grand-mother to two. Funeral services were held Sunday in the tabernacle at which Bp. Blackburn of the 2nd ward presided. The tabernacle choir furnished the singing. There was a profusion of beautiful flowers contributed by relatives and friends. Elders James Olsen and Charles Neal of Plain City, friends of the family; James Mack of Ogden; E. A. Box, Justin C. Wixom, James Pett, Patriarch William L. Watkins, Bp. J. B. McMaster and Prest. Oleen N. Stohl, were the speakers. They were unanimous in their testimony that the deceased was a woman of sterling character, and possessing the true courage of the pioneer. She had endured those trials without a murmur and had remained cheerful and sweet tempered through it all. A long line of carriages followed the remains to the cemetery where they were interred. Among those who came from out of town to pay their last respects to the departed were the following: Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Smith, LeRoy Smith, LaVon Smith, Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Chambers, Mr. and Mrs. Everett Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Albert McCann, Alfred Chambers, Mrs. Wm. Scrowthers, Mrs. Z. Raymond, Miss Jane Ann Watts, Miss Eliza Watts, Mrs. Kate Ewen, Mrs. Birdie Covey and Miss Maggie Nobel of Smithfield, Mr. and Mrs. James Mack and Wanda Mack of Ogden, Mr. Charles Neal and Mrs. Alice Robinson of Plain City, Francis Scholes, Walter Scholes, Miss Caroline Scholes, Mrs. Pricilla Whitaker, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Hodder from Salt Lake City, Arthur Scholes of San Francisco, Fred Scholes of Logan, Mr. and Mrs. Heber Sheffield of Kaysville, and Peter Barson of Clarkston.
Source: The Box Elder News - July 6, 1905 - Transcribed and submitted by Allison Morgan


Fishburn, Harper
At Brigham City, Dec. 31st, 1874, of typhoid fever, HARPER, son of Robert L. and Laura M. Fishburn, aged two years, two months, and seven days.
Source: Deseret News- January 6, 1875- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Fishburn, Henriette
At Brigham City, Oct. 22nd, of diarrhea, HENRIETTE, daughter of Robert L. and Eliza P. Fishburn, aged 1 year, 1 month and 18 days.
Source: Deseret News- November 4, 1874- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Flickenger, Ettie
Sunday evening about 7:30 o’clock, the spirit of Mrs.Ettie Flickenger of this city, passed into the other life, and the sufferings of a tried soul were ended. Mrs. Flickenger had long been a sufferer with leakage of the heart, and has been in feeble health for some time past. She leaves four sons, aged 26, 22, 12, and 4 years respectively, the two eldest residing one in Montana and the other in Oklahoma. The boys were notified of their mother’s death, and the one living in Montana came down, but the other one did not arrive to attend the funeral which was held in the Fourth ward meeting house yesterday at 2 p. m. Mrs. Flickenger came from Pennsylvania to Brigham City last October. She was baptized into the dominant church by Elder John E. Baird, at her home in the east a number of years ago, and came to this city more on account of that fact, and because she desired to get closer to the body of the church and in a better climate. Her demise was a sweet release to her, but is very sad for the children. The two youngest will remain in this city, and be taken into the families of friends.
Source: The Box Elder News - March 9, 1911 - Transcribed and submitted by Allison Morgan


Forrest, Agnes
Brigham City, Sept. 18. – Today the remains of the wife of James Forrest were brought down from Montana and interred in the Brigham City cemetery. The deceased was a daughter of Robert K. Wilson, saloonkeeper of Brigham. She was married to Mr. Forrest about a year and a half ago. Mr. Forrest was formerly a Brigham boy, but for several years has been laboring in the mines of Montana. A few months ago he took his young bride back with him, expecting to remain two years. Two weeks ago she gave birth to twins, which died, and a few days later her spirit followed her little ones into that unknown kingdom beyond the river. The sorrowing relatives are generally sympathized with.
Source: The Salt Lake Herald - September 19, 1896 - Transcribed and submitted by Allison Morgan


Gardner, Angelina
At 10:50 p. m. on Thursday night January 22nd, the spirit of Mrs. Angelina Gardner passed into the other world and the labors of a faithful woman were at an end so far as this life is concerned. The death of Mrs. Gardner occurred at Riverside, Idaho at the home of her daughter Electa Burbank with whom she had been visiting since December 24th Mrs. Gardner left her home in Brigham on October 12th for a visit with her children, brother and sister in Idaho and Montana. She went first to Butte, Mont., where she spent a few weeks with her sisters Mrs. K. Kirby, Mrs. H. J. Milton and Mr. P.P. Gould. Her son John also came to Butte to see his mother, from Spokane, Washington. From Butte Mrs. Gardner came on down to Rigby, Ida., to see how daughter Abbie, and then onto Riverside where she died. During the final 25 hours of her life, she was unconscious and failed to recognize any of her family who surrounded her bed. For a number of years Mrs. Gardner has been very feeble though her indomitable will would not give up and she made trips from her home to the Post office occasionally with the aid of a crutch and by taking her time got along fairly well. She was born at Colburn, Canada, March 7, 1833. Accepted the gospel as taught by the Elders of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and joined the saints in the states where she met William Gardner, the whom she was married when only nineteen years of age, the ceremony being performed in the state of Iowa. She crossed the plains with her husband and other in 1852, the family coming direct to Willard where they resided a few years then removed to North Ogden where they made their home until 1863 when they came to Brigham and have resided her ever since. Her husband, the late William gardner died a number of years ago, and now surving the mother, are five children, nine grand children and ten great-grandchildren. Her remains were brought to this city on Saturday morning last and the funeral services were held in the Fourth ward chapel at 1 o’clock p. m. funeral services were held Tuesday at 1 o’clock in the Fourth ward meeting house, Bishop Brigham Wright presiding. The speakers were Denmark Jensen, James Nelson, John F. Merrell, E. P. Cordon of Willard and Bishop Wright. The musical numbers rendered by the choir were the selections, “Sister thou was Mild and Lovely,” “I Need Thee Every Hour” and “Resting Now.” Between speakers, Mrs. C. E. Jensen rendered a solo. The prayers were offered by John E. Baird and Orson G. Loveland. The grave was dedicated by C. M.
Source: The Box Elder News - January 29, 1914 - Transcribed and submitted by Allison Morgan


Gardner, Hyrum Alma
At Deweyville, Box Elder Co., Utah, Dec. 5, 1885, of erysipelas, Hyrum Alma, son of Milo V. and Margaret Gardner; born at Deweyville, July 31, 1874.
Source: Deseret News - December 16, 1885 - Submitted and transcribed by Marla Zwakman


Gibbs, Georgie Winnetta
At Brigham City, April 20th, of convulsions, GEORGIE WINNETTA, daughter of George F and Ida S. Gibbs. Deceased was born August 5th 1877. The funeral took place at Brigham City Cemetery, May 1. Among the mourners who followed were the most of the members of Prof. Fishburn's choir, who sung two appropriate songs. Patriarch W. Box offered up a prayer, and elder J. D. Rees made some consoling remarks.
Source: Deseret News- May 15, 1878- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Gilmore, Mark A.
Died in Brigham City, March 5th, of diphtheria, Mark A. son of Mark A. and Lovina Gilmore, aged 8 months and 13 days.
Source: Deseret News- March 11, 1869- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Green, Leonore Louise
At Brigham City, on the 22d inst., of lung fever, LEONORE LOUISE, daughter of William and Laura M. Green, aged 18 weeks.
Source: Deseret News- April 2, 1879- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Hampton, Julia Ranalph
Died in this city, August 6th 1879, of diphtheria, Julia Ranalph, daughter of Brigham Y. and Mary J. R. R. Hampton, aged 8 years, 7 months and 29 days.
Source: Deseret News - August 13, 1879 - Submitted and transcribed by Jim Vandermark


Hansen, Christian
Answers Last Call - Aged Veteran of the Fourth Ward Passes to the Great Beyond - In the departure of Christian Hansen from this world which occurred last Monday we are called upon to say good-bye to one of the noblest and grandest old men it has ever been our good fortune to know. His spendid physique, his powerful personality and his enlivening disposition made him a favorite among classes both old and young. He has been a familiar figure in Brigham City for many years. His death is the result of old age--he passed the 85th mile stone last January. Christian Hansen was born in Skildelov, Denmark, Jan. 15, 1820. He was married Nov. 1, 1850, to Elizabeth Erickson, who preceded him to the spirit world six years ago. He became a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in his native land April 9, 1852 and in December 1853 immigrated to Utah where he arrived in October 1854. He came to this part of the country and operated for many years the "Dairy" at Collinston or on the divide near Beaver Dam. On September 1882 he went on a mission to Denmark. He was in the move south in 1857 returning July 4th of the same year. Mr. Hansen is an old soldier, having served in the Danish army from 1842 to 1847 and although he was in the thick of battle between Denmark and Germany almost continuously for three years was never wounded. He has been very weak for several months and his death was not unexpected. He leaves besides his two wives, Marla and Christena, nine children, Willard, Lorenzo, Peter, Ephraim, James, Alma, Lester, Lizzie, Simeon and Daniel. Besides these there are 41 grand-children and five great-grand-children. Funeral Services. Services were held over the remains yesterday afternoon at 2 o'clock in the 4th ward meeting house. Notwithstanding the fact that the news of his death was not generally known, there was a good attendance. The meeting was presided over by Bishop Brigham Wright. Singing was by the ward choir, under the direction of Fred Kolter. Six sons of deceased officiated as pall bearers. The floral decorations were profuse and beautiful. The speakers were Elders James Olsen, A. Valentine, Bp. Larsen of Logan, Bp. James Nelson, Patriarchs Wm. L. Watkins and John D. Burt, Presidents Lucius A. Snow, Oleen N. Stohl and Bishop Wright. They were all old acquaintenances of deceased and the beautiful tributes they bore to his sterling character must have been a great source of gratification to the relatives and friends. We do not meet such men often in the course of a lifetime and it is too bad that they cannot stay with us always. But he knew he had always done the right and he died happy.
Source: Box Elder News - June 29, 1905 - Submitted and transcribed by Sandra Davis


Hendricksen, Mark Ward
Mark Ward Hendricksen was killed last Friday, Oct. 16, at noon, on a farm five miles southwest of Corinne. A team attached to a wagon became frightened and ran away. Elder Hendricksen in attempting to stop the horses was knocked down and a wheel passed over his head. Death was instantaneous. His remains were brought to Brigham City where his family resides. Sunday, the funeral services were held in the Fourth ward meetinghouse, after which the remains were interred in the Brigham City cemetery. Elder Hendricksen was born on Sept. 14, 1865, in Lolland, Denmark. At the age of 16, in the face of strong family objection, which amounted at times to persecution, he joined the “Mormon” Church and was ever true to its principles. He emigrated to Utah in October, 1884, and made his home in Big Cottonwood, near Salt Lake City, until last June when he moved to Brigham City. He spent several seasons among the hills of Wyoming, braving the perils of blizzards and border warfare between cattle and sheep men. In April 1896, he married Caroline C. Andersen, who had emigrated from Sweden and who has been a faithful and loving helpmeet, who, with three small children, is left to mourn his untimely death.
Source: Deseret Evening News - October 21, 1903 - Transcribed and submitted by Allison Morgan


Hendrickson, Caroline
Carolina Christina Anderson Hendrickson, 87, died in a local hospital Monday afternoon following an illness of several years’ duration. She was born May 19, 1863, in Upsaia, Sweden, a daughter of Eric and Margaretha Jenson Anderson. She was reared and educated in Sweden and came to the United Sates as a convert to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1894. She made her home in Logan. She married Mark Ward Hendrickson April 22, 1896, in the Salt Lake City LDS temple. He died in 1903. Mrs. Hendrickson lived in Big Cottonwood Canyon for a short time and then came to Brigham City in 1902 and resided there since that time. She was active in LDS church work and the Relief society. Surviving are two sons, Wilford M. Hendrickson, Los Angeles, Cal., and Alvin N. Hendrickson, Brigham City, and four grandchildren. Funeral arrangements are being made by Harrold B. Felt funeral home of Brigham City.
Source: The Salt Lake Tribune - March 20, 1951 - Transcribed and submitted by Allison Morgan


Hendrickson, Kristine A. Mortensen
Mother Called by Death - Mrs. Kristine A. Mortensen Hendrickson, 65, died on Tuesday, Dec. 8 at her home in Corinne, Utah, after a lingering illness. Services were held on Friday, Dec. 12, at Corinne with burial in the Brigham City Cemetery. Survivors include a son and five daughters. Two of the daughters, Mrs. Anna Wight and Mrs. Dorothy Wight, are Susanville residents.
Source: Lassen Advocate (Susanville, Lassen County, CA) -- January 5, 1953 - Submitted by Jana -- A Friend of Free Genealogy


Hewlett, Pearl
Brigham City, Boxelder Co., July 26. – Little Pearl, daughter of Joseph Hewlett, died Wednesday afternoon at the home of her grandmother, Mrs. Matilda Hansen. She had been ailing for some time when she suddenly became very ill Wednesday and succumbed before a doctor arrived. The cause was Bright’s disease.
Source: Deseret Evening News - July 28, 1902 - Transcribed and submitted by Allison Morgan


Holland, Eli
Brigham City Utah, March 12. Eli Holland, the 16-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. John Holland of the First ward died at his home Friday morning from the effects of an internal injury. He was jumping with some other boys west of Corinne, where he was employed, and was brought home and given medical aid, but his injuries proved fatal as stated above. The funeral was held at 11 o’clock at the First ward meeting-house today.
Source: The Salt Lake Tribune - March 13, 1904 - Transcribed and submitted by Allison Morgan


Horsley, Lillie
Brigham City, Utah, Oct. 22 – Mrs. Lillie Stewart Horsley, 33 years of age, wife of Clem Horsley of this city, died last Friday morning at 3 o’clock. She had given birth to a little girl the night previous and was thought to be getting along nicely, when she suddenly passed away. Great sympathy was shown the bereaved husband and family by relatives and friends, a number of whom came from Provo and Salt Lake City. She leaves a family of five children, the oldest a boy of 12. Funeral services were held in the tabernacle Sunday afternoon, at which Charles Kelly and Olsen Stohl of the stake presidency, John Welch and Hattie Wight were the speakers. The coffin and the entire stand seemed to be one solid mass of flowers, evidencing the love and esteem in which Mrs. Horsley was held.
Source: The Salt Lake Herald - October 23, 1902 - Transcribed and submitted by Allison Morgan


Jensen, Mrs. A. E.
BRIGHAM CITY, Dec. 12. A short service was held at the Mantua cemetery Monday afternoon for Mrs. A. E. Jensen, who died Saturday night at Magna of diphtheria. Mrs. Jensen was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Mads Hansen of Mantua and the wife of A. E. Jensen, a former resident of that place, who acted as superintendent of schools of Box Elder county several years ago. She was born at Mantua 45 years ago. The family resided for a time at Harrisville, and then removed to Magna, after leaving this city. Surviving are the husband and three children, who are under quarantine at Magna, the parents and the following brothers and sisters: Mrs. Hyrum Ipsen of Willard, Mrs. Edward Jensen, Mrs. Ezra Jensen and Lucias Hansen, of Mantua, Mrs. Parley Jensen and Guy Hansen of Ogden; Cyrus Hansen of this city, James Hansen and Clifford Hansen of the Utah Hot Springs.
Source: Salt Lake Telegram - December 12, 1922 - Submitted and transcribed by Marla Zwakman


Jensen, Hans
Manic dead - Hans Jensen, the man whom we mentioned as having gone mad in Brigham City, bitten his tongue into shreds and torn out some of his teeth, died on Saturday night.
Source: Deseret News- February 4, 1880- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Jones, Emeline
Near Brigham City, on the 21st inst., EMELINE, wife of Tailor Jones, aged 21 years. Deceased was a native of Wales, where she embraced the gospel; she emigrated to Utah in 1866. She leaves a husband, two children and many friends.
Source: Deseret News- June 4, 1873- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Jones, Jane
At Willard City, Box Elder county, July 31st, 1879 of diphtheria, Jane, the beloved daughter of Benjamin and Mary Jones aged 9 years and 3 days. Deceased was a bright and intelligent child.
Source: Deseret News (Salt Lake City, UT) - Aug. 13, 1879 - Submitted and transcribed by Candi H.


Kelly, Edith Eliza
At Brigham City, Nov. 27th. of inflammation of lungs, EDITH ELIZA, daughter of Charles and Emma Kelly, aged 4 months and 18 days.
Source: Deseret News- December 4, 1872- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Kelley, William H.
President Kelley Dies at Brigham - BRIGHAM CITY, Utah, April 24 - William H. Kelly, president of Box Elder stake and one of the best known men in this section of the State, died at his home here Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock. The end came quite unexpected. Bishop Kelly attended conference and was taken ill on his return home. He was aged about 70 years. He came to this country from England forty years ago and he has resided here. He was first councillor to Rudger Clawson when Mr. Clawson was president of this stake, and succeeded him as president when Clawson was made an apostle. He was quite prominent last summer in the Adademy opera house dispute. He leaves a large family, mostly grown up. One of his daughters was recently married in the Temple in Salt Lake. He leaves a large circle of friends. Mr. Kelly underwent an operation last winter and apparently got over it well for a man of his age.<
Source: Salt Lake Telegram - April 24, 1905 - Submitted and transcribed by Sandra Davis


Kenney, E. E.
Died At his lodgings, second house east of the City Hall, E. E. Kenney, of kidney disease, at two o'clock a.m., August 12. Deceased was a native of Lowell, Mass., was a stranger to those who witnessed his patient suffering and his peaceful, quiet departure.
Source: Deseret News - September 17, 1879 - Submitted and transcribedby Jim Vandermark


Lambourne, Alfred Clarence
Died In the 26th Ward of this city, August 7, 1879, of cholera Infantum, Alfred Clarence, son of Alfred and Wilhelmina Lambourne, aged 1 year and 5 days.
Source: Deseret News - August 13, 1879 - Submitted and transcribed by Jim Vandermark


Lauritsen, Benjita S.
BRIGHAM CITY, Nov. 17. Mrs. Benjita S. Lauritsen, 80 years of age, died here Wednesday. She was born at Sweden April 25, 1837, and came to Utah in 1885. She married Nels Lauritsen, who died sixteen years ago. The family resided at Mantua for a time, but after the death of her husband Mrs. Lauritsen removed to this city. Surviving are four children: C. L. Lauritsen and Mrs. Albertina Nelson of this city, J. M. Lauritsen of California and John Lauritsen of Idaho. Funeral services will be held Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Sixth ward chapel.
Source: Salt Lake Telegram - November 17, 1922 - Submitted and transcribed by Marla Zwakman


Lindsay, James Leroy
At Deweyville, Box Elder County, Utah, January 21st, 1885, of pneumonia, James Leroy, son of James S. and Emma J. Dewey Lindsay, aged 15 days.
Source: Deseret News (Salt Lake City) - January 28, 1885 - Submitted and transcribed by Candi H.


Loveland, Rosetta Caroline
At Brigham City, on the 26th inst., of consumption, ROSETTA CAROLINE, daughter of Anson C. and Lydia R. Loveland, aged on year, eleven months and five days.
Source: Deseret News- October 6, 1880- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Luckham, Roger
At Brigham City, May 24, of old age and debility, ROGER LUCKHAM, aged 72 years. Deceased was a native of England; made Canada his home when at the age of 17 embraced the gospel in the township of Brook, Lampton Co., U. C., 1845; was at Winter Quarters the following year; came to Utah with the company next following the pioneers. Decease has passed through many hardships and trials and always proved faithful, was never behind in paying tithing. He had even overpaid quite a little sum when his last settlement was made.
Source: Deseret News- June 6, 1877- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Mathias, Margaret
Also, at the same place [Brigham City], Oct. 15th, of lung complaint, MARGARET MATHIAS, aged 59 years and 9 months. She embraced the gospel in South Wales, in 1847, was with the first company of Saints who emigrated from Wales in 1849.
Source: Deseret News- November 22, 1871- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Nelson, Bernice
Child dies of measles. The first fatality as a result of measles came to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Carl Nelson of the Second ward Sunday, when one of their infant twins died. It was the little girl and the infant was just eight months old. Mr. and Mrs. Nelson have had quite a time rearing their babies thus far and to lose one is a sad blow. The disease seemed to be malignant in character and fastened itself upon the baby in such a manner that very little relief could be obtained. Funeral services were held at the family home Tuesday afternoon and consoling remarks were made by members of the bishopric and other neighbors after which the little remains were taken to the cemetery and interred.
Source: The Box Elder News - February 6, 1913 - Transcribed and submitted by Allison Morgan


Nelson, Mrs. Ferdinand
BRIGHAM CITY, Dec. 17. Mrs. Ferdinand Nelson died at her home in Mantua yesterday after a lingering illness. Mrs. Nelson was 44 years of age, and was the mother of thirteen children, three of whom are dead. Surviving are the husband and ten children and her aged mother, Mrs. Olsen, who resides in this city.
Source: Salt Lake Telegram - December 18, 1921 - Submitted and transcribed by Marla Zwakman


Nielsen, Christian
Christian Nielsen of the 3rd ward has gone to his rest. He was well along in age, being in his 70th year, and was bent and worn by the burden of many years of hard labor. He bore his trials and sufferings with patience and set a splendid example for younger and more fortunate men. He died as he had lived, a faithful Latter-Day Saint. Mr. Nielsen was born in Ugilt Eljorring Amt, Denmark, Dec. 24, 1826 and joined the church on May 6, 1862. He came to this country in 1881 and lived in Sanpete County two years after which he moved to Brigham city which has since been his home. He leaves a widow, two sons, and a daughter to mourn his loss. Mr. Nielson was a veteran of the wars between Denmark and Germany from 1848 to 1850 where he served with honor. The King of Denmark recently sent him a medal of honor in recognition of his service to the state. He figured conspicuously in the wars of Lyptol, Isted and other places. Funeral services were held in the Third ward meeting house Friday at 2 p.m. where a goodly number of friends and acquaintenances gathered to pay their last respects.
Source: Box Elder News - September 14, 1905 - Submitted and transcribed by Sandra Davis


Oldfield, George
At Brigham City, Sept 9th, of bowel complaint, GEORGE, son of Alfred and Elizabeth Oldfield, aged 1 year, 6 months, and 19 days.
Source: Deseret News- September 27, 1871- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Olsen, Christen
At Brigham City, on the 13th inst., of diarrhea, Christen Olsen, aged 66 years. Deceased was born in the neighborhood of Aalborg, Denmark, and was among the first who embraced the Gospel in that country, being baptized March 15, 1850. He emigrated to this country in the fall of 1853, where he has since been faithful to every requirement of the Gospel.
Source: Deseret News- November 3, 1869- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Olsen, Denora
At Brigham City, June 17, of a combination of diseases of long standing, DENORA, daughter of James and Maria Olsen, aged about three years.
Source: Deseret News- June 28, 1876- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Petersen, Julia Ann Sorensen
At Brigham City, April 13th, JULIA ANN SORENSEN PETERSEN, formerly of Norre Sundby, of lung disease, aged 67 years.
Source: Deseret News- April 23, 1873- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Phillips, Moroni Melvin
At Brigham City, April 4th, of diphtheria, MORONI MELVIN, son of Moroni and Maria Welch Phillips, aged 2 years, 5 months and 8 days.
Source: Deseret News- April 16. 1879- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Phillips, William S.
At Brigham City, Dec. 18th, 1876, of nervous debility, Elder WILLIAM S. PHILLIPS, aged 61 years, 6 months and 18 days. Elder Phillips embraced the Gospel at an early day, soon after its introduction into the principality of Wales, by Elder Wm. Henshaw; took a very active part in the spread of the same, gave freely of his means to sustain the cause, and preached and travelled for years. On the release of Elder Dan Jones, he was called to succeed him, in the presidency of the Welsh Mission, which position he occupied from January 1st, 1849, until he was released to emigrate, January, 1854, during which time several new conferences were organized and thousands were added to the Church. He afterwards performed a mission to his native country, and returned about ten years ago. Elder Phillips, at the time he was actively engaged in the ministry, was a man of great faith, especially in the gift of healing, and several cases wherein the gift and power of God were made manifest occurred through his instrumentality, some of which are already published in the Millennial Star and other works of the Church. He was a man of few words, beloved by all who knew him. He leaves a wife and four grown up sons to mourn his loss. Peace to his ashes.
Source: Deseret Evening News- December 27, 1876- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Pulsipher, Sena Olena
Also at the same place [Brigham City], of kindred complaint, SENA OLENA, daughter of Orson and Susannah Pulsipher, aged 2 years.
Source: Deseret News- May 20, 1874- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Rasmussen, Mrs. Hans
BRIGHAM CITY, Oct. 29. Mrs. Hans Rasmussen of Mantua died at the family home this morning after a short illness from general debility. Mrs. Rasmussen was born in Denmark in 1843, and came to Utah in 1868, residing at Mantua since that time. She is survived by her husband, six sons and one daughter. Funeral services will be held at the Mantua ward chapel on Wednesday of next week.
Source: Salt Lake Telegram - October 30, 1921 - Submitted and transcribed by Marla Zwakman


Rees, Thomas
At Brigham City, on the 1st inst., of typhoid fever, THOMAS, son of ex-Mayor J. D. and Celia Rees, aged about 15 years. The Y. M. M. I. Association attended the funeral of deceased en masse, as well as a number of relatives and friends, on the 2nd inst. Deceased was a promising young lad. The same family has of late been afflicted with five more cases of typhoid fever.
Source: Deseret News- February 11, 1880- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Reese, John
On Thursday, John D. Reese, a prominent citizen of Malad City, died after an illness of three or four weeks, from typhoid fever. His remains have been interred at Brigham City. He was about 68 years of age, and highly esteemed.
Source: The Salt Lake Herald- March 21, 1880- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Rosenbaum, Sarah
Died, this morning, of dropsy, at the residence of her grandfather, A. Neibaur, 13 Ward, Sarah, daughter of Morris and Alice Neibaur Rosenbaum, of Brigham City, aged 9 years. The funeral will take place from the house of A. Neibaur, on Wednesday morning at 10 o’clock. Friends are invited to attend.
Source: Deseret News- September 9, 1868- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Shepherd, John H.
Deaths and Funerals - John H. Shepherd, aged 55 years, late of Brigham City, Utah, died last evening of tuberculosis. The remains were shipped to Smithfield, Utah, this afternoon by Joseph William Taylor.
Source: Salt Lake Telegram - February 4, 1909 - Submitted and transcribed by Sandra Davis


Smith, H. H.
Death at Corinne - H. H. Smith dies after eighteen days of illness - Thursday morning, H. H. Smith, of Corinne, quite a prominent man of Box Elder County, succumbed to the hand of the destroying angel. The deceased was stricken down eighteen days ago with typhus fever. He leaves a wife and several children to suffer the pangs of his untimely loss. He had hosts of friends in the county. Mrs. J. G. Landick, of this city, is a daughter of the departed,
[Source: Brigham City Bugler, April 8, 1893 - Digitized by: University of Utah - Transcribed by K. Proctor]


Smith, Phebe
At Brigham City, May 27th, of inflammation of the throat, PHEBE, daughter of Samuel and Frances Ann Smith, aged 6 ½ years.
Source: Deseret News- June 3, 1874- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Smith, Roxy Hetea
At Brigham City, of sore throat, ROXY HETEA, daughter of Samuel and Frances R. Smith, aged 4 years.
Source: Deseret News- May 20, 1874- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Smith, Samuel L.
At Brigham City on the 21st inst., of inflammation of the lungs, SAMUEL L. SMITH, eldest son of Mayor Samuel Smith, aged nearly 37 years. Deceased was a quiet and unobtrusive young man, and had hardly an enemy in the world. He suffered from lung disease nearly all his life. A very large funeral procession of relatives and friends followed him to his final resting place on the 22nd inst.
Source: Deseret News- September 1, 1880- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Snow, Mary
Mrs. Mary Snow Dies at Brigham City - Mrs. Mary Snow, widow of the late President Lorenzo Snow of the Mormon church, died at her home in Brigham City Saturday. Death was due to valvular leakage of the heart. She was 64 years old. The deceased was a daughter of the lat Jacob Houtz, who lived at Springville. She came to Utah with her parents in 1847, just six weeks after the arrival of the first pioneers in Utah. She was married to Lorenzo Snow in 1858. Four children survive her. They are Mansfield L. Snow, Mortimer H. Snow, Mrs. Virginia S. Stephens and Mrs. George Harding.
Source: Salt Lake Telegram - April 2, 1906 - Submitted and transcribed by Sandra Davis


Southworth, Chester
At Brigham City, Nov. 4, of gravel and old age, CHESTER SOUTHWORTH, aged 81 years. Deceased was born at Mansfield, Tolando county, Connecticut. He embraced the everlasting gospel in Canada, Feb. 25th, 1836; was baptized by James Blakeslee and confirmed by John E. Page; subsequently he lived in Far West, Caldwell Co., Mo., whence he moved to Warsaw, Ill., in 1839; afterward went to Nauvoo, where he was driven by the mob in the general exodus of the Saints; came to Kanesville in 1846, and afterward presided over the Olney branch; came to Utah in 1852, where he remained to the date of his decease. He lived and died a true-hearted man and a faithful Saint, leaving a great number of children and children’s children. His funeral was largely attended.
Source: Deseret Evening News- November 8, 1873- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Southworth, Dora May
At Brigham City, on the 4th inst., of lung fever, DORA MAY, daughter of Joseph and Aldora Southworth, aged one year and four weeks.
Source: Deseret News- June 14, 1871- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Thompson, John C.
John C. Thompson of the Second ward died early Monday morning, Feb. 22, of heart disease. We published an account last week of an accident to Mr. Thompson, who has been the city night-watchman since Jan. 4. He slipped on some ice and broke his leg near the ankle but had nearly recovered from the accident and was feeling quite well up to a short time before his death. He and his wife were alone at their home when he complained of feeling unwell and while she went to a neighbor to get help he passed away. The deceased was born in Denmark and came to this city about 13 years ago. He has been a good citizen and highly respected. He leaves a wife and two daughters, the latter living at Roweville. The funeral was held in the Second ward meeting house Tuesday afternoon, Bishop Valentine presiding. The speakers were Elders T. H. Fishburn, C. M. Jensen [illegible] of Mantua, S. S. [illegible] of Salt Lake City, Bishop Lars F. Johnson of Bear River City, Bishop Joseph Stokes of Roweville, Peter Sorensen and Bishop Valentine. The singing was rendered by the ward choir. There was a large attendance of friends and the pall bearers were members of the police force. The city council at its session Tuesday night adopted resolutions of respect which will be published next week.
Source: The Box Elder News- February 25, 1904- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Valentinsen, Valentin
At Brigham City, on the 26th of September, of inflammation of the lungs, VALENTIN VALENTINSEN, aged 65 years. Deceased was among the first of Saints, from Denmark, who came to this country, and settled in Brigham City, then Box Elder, where he has performed much work as a true and a faithful man.
Source: Deseret News- October 17, 1877- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Wight, Betsy Ann
At Brigham City, Jan. 27th, after a protracted illness of the mountain fever, BETSY ANN, daughter of Lyman and Harriet Wight, aged 15 years, 8 months and 10 days. A very large procession attended the funeral of deceased on the 29th of January.
Source: Deseret News- February 10, 1875- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Wight, Stephen
Stephen Wight, son of Daniel and Mary Hewitt Wight, was born at Henrietta, Monroe Co. New York, May 7th, 1820. He received a good common and high school education in the State of New York then took up the study of surveying. He was converted to the truthfulness of the doctrines taught by the Latter Day Saints through the preaching of Apostle Lyman Wight and joined the church in the year 1839. He was then called and set apart to preside over the branch of the church in western New York where he resided. He came to Nauvoo in 1843, but soon returned to his old home to persuade some of his folks, who had joined the church during his absence, to come to Nauvoo. While at home he married Phebe A. Gates, April 8, 1848, and he immediately returned to Nauvoo, his eldest sister Maria Wight, and his youngest brother Ephraim, and his wife accompanying him. His wife died eight months later and he moved with the saints to Council Bluffs the same year. He acted as bishop in Farmersville branch, at Council Bluffs for about a year. Jan. 20, 1850, he married Lucy E. Waterbury. In 1852, he crossed the Plains and came to Utah in Pres. Howell’s company, helping to drive an ox team all the way from Council Bluffs to Salt Lake City. He made his home at Mill Creek for nine years, where he worked at the mechanic’s trade and took an active part in church work. April 20, 1856, he married A. Emma Pulsipher. In the year 1861 he moved to Brigham City where he ran a carding machine for President Lorenzo Snow, two years. The following two years were spent in school teaching, then he acted as county surveyor for Box Elder Co. for a number of years. He was an active worker in various church capacities during the early days of Brigham. For a number of years, he has remained quietly at home feeling that his public work was finished. Friday, Jan. 8, 1904 at 11 o’clock a. m. he quietly passed away, without much suffering, having finished a long and useful career. He had reached the age of 83 years, 8 months and 1 day, and was willing and anxious that his mortal life should cease. He was the father of 18 children, grandfather of 31 children and great-grandfather of 14 children. Funeral services were held in the Fourth ward meeting house Monday which were attended by a large number of relatives and friends. The speakers paid a high tribute to his exemplary life and good works and offered words of comfort to the family and friends.
Source: The Box Elder News- January 14, 1904- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Wilson, Robert W.
Robert W. Wilson of Brigham City is Dead - Was One of Utah's Pioneers, Known for His Public Spirit and Charity - Robert Knox Wilson, for nearly half a century a resident of this city, died at his home on February 28th. Mr. Wilson was born February 20, 1824, in Scotland, from which country he emigrated with his wife in 1851, going first to St. Louis, Mo., whence he journeyed in 1852 to Salt Lake City. Here he remained for about a year, engaged as a quarryman in Red Butte canyon, when he went to California, remaining about two years. On his return to Utah in 1855 he settled in Brigham and engaged in farming, which occupation he continuously followed until 1885, being accounted the best and most successful farmer in this county. On retiring from active agricultural pursuits he engaged in the liquor business, which became widely known as the house of R. K. Wilson & Sons. Mr. Wilson's chief characteristic, among many strongly marked ones, was his uniform suavity and kindness and it was rare indeed for any to receive other than most kindly consideration at his hands. He was also, up to the last day of his life, the foremost among the men of public spirit and enterprise in the community. In closing this all too brief record of his career the writer can say that it is a question whether a single life will be so much missed, or one whose absence will be more keenly felt than that of Robert Knox Wilson. May he rest in peace.
Source: Salt Lake Telegram - March 3, 1902 - Submitted and transcribed by Sandra Davis


Wood, James Baron
At Brigham City, October 26, 1879, of consumption, JAMES BARON, son of James George and Hannah Wood, aged 1 year, 8 months and 24 days.
Source: Deseret News- November 12, 1879- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Worthen, Alonza Heber
Died In the 20th Ward, Sept. 11, 1879 of miasmas, Alonzo Heber, son of Elizabeth and Alonzo H. Worthen, aged 2 years, 2 months and 13 days.
Source: Deseret News - September 17, 1879 - Submitted and transcribed by Jim Vandermark


Wright, Helena
At Brigham City, April 14th, at 4 p. m., HELENA, daughter of Jonathan C. and Caroline Wright, of inflammation of throat and lungs, aged 1 year, 2 months and 4 days.
Source: Deseret News- April 22, 1874- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Wright, Jonathan C.
A dispatch to President John Taylor, on Monday, from Brigham City, announced the death of Hon. Jonathan C. Wright. His demise took place at 11:55 o’clock. Mr. Wright for years has held a prominent position in the territory. He had been probate judge of Box Elder County for a long period, and was also a member of the Legislature during a number of sessions, and was familiarly known as “Common Law Wright.” While not a man of very extended educational attainments, be possessed good, sound judgment, and was just, honorable and upright, things far more necessary in these days, if one cannot have both.
Source: The Salt Lake Herald- November 9, 1880- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Wright, Lois Susannah
At Brigham City, on the 1st inst., LOIS SUSANNAH, wife of Hon. J. C. Wright, aged 18 years, 10 months and 5 days.
Source: Deseret News- January 16, 1861- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Wright, Mary
At Brigham City, March 27, of sore throat, MARY, daughter of Jonathan C. and Mary Jane Wright, aged 1 year, 8 months and 22 days.
Source: Deseret News- April 8, 1874- Submitted and transcribed by Allison Morgan


Young, James
Utah Pioneer Dies At Brigham City - James Young, 71, died yesterday at his home in Perry, death being due to an ailment which had existed several years. When 17 years of age Young crossed the plains to Utah and became an important factor in founding his town. He was born in Caldicott, England, September 23, 1848, emigrated seventeen years later and arrived in Utah in 1865. Three years later he married Miss Francessa Campkin of Perry. He is survived by his wife and the following children: W. J. and A. L. Young of Perry, H. G. Young of Salt Lake, L. H. Young of Thatcher, J. T. Young, naval training school, San Francisco; Mrs. Lillie Johnson of Brigham, Mrs. Maud Watt of Layton and Mrs. Lizzie Wight of Thatcher.
Source: Salt Lake Telegram - March 4, 1919 - Submitted and transcribed by Sandra Davis

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