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BOULIGNEY, John Edward, legislator and jurist: b. New Orleans, La., Feb. 17, 1824; d. Washington, D. C., Feb. 26, 1864. He was a nephew of Dominique Bouligny. He was elected to Congress as a "Natural American" Dec. 5, 1859, and served till March 3, 1861. He was strongly opposed to secession, and was the only representative from any one of the seceding states who did not resign his seat. All through the war he remained in the North and died there.

[Source: THE SOUTH in the Building of the Nation Volume XI; Ed. by James Curtis Ballagh, Walter Lynwood Fleming & Southern Historical Publication Society; Publ. 1909; Transcribed and submitted by Andrea Stawski Pack.]

Bouligney, John Edward , congressman, was born Feb. 5, 1824, in New Orleans, La. In 1859-61 he was a representative from Louisiana to the thirty-sixth congress; and of the representatives of twelve millions of people, he was the only one who refused to abandon his state to the leaders of the secession movement, and continued in congress until the close of his term. He died Feb. 20. 1864, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

SEMMES, Thomas Jenkins, lawyer: b. Georgetown, D. C., Dec. 16,1824; d. New Orleans, La., about 1903. He was educated at Georgetown College and at Harvard Law School. He practiced law about five years in Washington, D. C., and then removed to New Orleans, La., where he soon became one of the leaders at the bar. He held several political offices in Louisiana and was in the Confederate senate. He was professor of civil law in the University of Louisiana from 1873-79, and in 1886 was elected president of the American Bar Association for the following year.

[Source: THE SOUTH in the Building of the Nation Volume XI; Edited by James Curtis Ballagh, Walter Lynwood Fleming & Southern Historical Publication Society; Publ. 1909; Transcribed and submitted by Andrea Stawski Pack]

 

DAVID D. PORTER.

Admiral David Dixon Porter, late Commander-in-Chief of the United States Navy, and whose life was almost contemporaneous with the naval history of this country, was born at Chester, Pa., June 8, 1813, and died at Washington, D.C., February 13, 1891. The following relating to the family is of interest just here:

"In the State of Delaware, near Glasgow, a Baltimore sea-captain, before the Revolutionary War, bought a farm. His wife was about to be confined at a certain time, and knowing that her husband was to come into the port of Boston with his ship, she hastened thither, and David Porter was born in Boston, though of Middle State origin. It is said that the original name of the Porters in Ireland was McElwee, but that one of them became a rigid Puritan, and was called Doorkeeper, on account of his protestation that he would rather be a doorkeeper in the house of God than the subject of a king. From Doorkeeper, according to the legend, the name was turned to Porter. The young Porter who had been born in Boston during the Revolution entered our navy during the administration of John Adams, and incidentally saw battle service against the French. He soon became distinguished, particularly in the war with Tripoli and in 1812. In 1824 Porter 'bulldozed' the authorities on the Spanish island of Porto Rico, and our Government had to suspend him for six months. He then entered the naval service of Mexico at a salary of $25,000 a year and remained there five years, when President Jackson appointed him Minister to Constantinople, where he died in 1843, and is buried in the grounds of the Naval Asylum at Philadelphia. Captain Porter—that being his rank—married at Chester, Pa. His wife was Evelina, a daughter of William Anderson, a Revolutionary major. She died in 1871, at the age of eighty."

The children of David and Evelina Porter were Commodore William D. Porter, who died from wounds received at the capture of Fort Henry; David D. Porter, the subject of this sketch; Theodore Porter, lieutenant in the Mexican war, who was killed near the battlefield of Palo Alto in 1846; Hamilton Porter, lieutenant in the navy, who died of yellow fever in 1844; Henry Ogden Porter, midshipman in the navy in 1846, a lieutenant in the Marine Corps, and the executive officer of the Hatteras when the privateer Alabama captured her. There were two daughters in the family: the eldest, Evelina, married her cousin G. Harris Heap, U. S. Consul at Tunis, and died leaving four children; the other daughter, Imogene, married a Mr. Harris.

The mansion of Admiral Porter's father stands on the brink of the Delaware at Chester, and is a noble-looking old place, now almost deserted. About the time of the birth of our subject, his father, Commodore David Porter, was winning imperishable laurels in the victorious Essex by the stubborn contest with Britain's seamen for sailors' rights on the high seas. David D. Porter was a student in Columbia College, Washington, D.C., and in 1824 sailed with his father in the John Adams to suppress piracy in the West Indies. On the termination of this cruise he accompanied his cousin, Captain David H. Porter, in the Guerrero, which sailed from Vera Cruz in 1827, and engaged with a Spanish frigate, La Lealtad, Captain Porter being killed in the action. Receiving a commission as midshipman, February 2, 1829, young Porter was assigned to the Constitution, and served two years in the Mediterranean squadron, under Commodore Biddle, and later on the same station in the United States under Commodore Patterson. He was promoted to passed midshipman in 1835, and assigned to special service in coast and river surveys until 1841, when he became a lieutenant. He was ordered to the frigate Congress and served in her four years in the Brazilian squadron. In 1845 he was called for duty at the observatory in Washington. He left this position for service in the Mexican war with the mosquito fleet under Commodore Tatnall, and after performs of the same name.

The Admiral was a man of extraordinary physical strength and endurance. Apparently short and slight, he had a magnificent reserve of bodily and mental force which never failed him. Admiral Porter was the author of a "Life of Commodore Porter," "Incidents and Anecdotes of the Civil War," "History of the Navy in the War of the Rebellion," and of two novels; "Allan Dare and Robert le Diable" and "Harry Marline," the former of which was dramatized and produced in New York in 1878. He also wrote many important official documents, and but a few years ago published some very vigorous letters relative to the Fort Fisher affair and the conduct of General Butler in connection therewith. Admiral Porter celebrated his seventy-sixth birthday on June 8, 1889. About a month previously he and his wife—who was the daughter of Commodore Patterson of the Washington Navy Yard—celebrated their golden wedding at their beautiful and historic home in Washington, surrounded by nearly all of their children and grandchildren. Admiral Porter, besides being a naval officer of the highest rank, was a historian, an inventor, an authority on projectiles, armament, and explosives; the designer of an ingenious and formidable submarine torpedo boat, and was something of a politician, besides branching into light literature and attracting to himself a coterie of literary men.

Senator Chandler, in his eulogy of Admiral Porter, pronounced in the United States Senate Chamber, after the President's message announcing the Admiral's death had been read, concluded as follows: "His distinguished traits of character, I think, were courage and persistence. Faults he had doubtless, but they did not abate in the least his bravery or his energy. He was never a conservative, but always in favor of doing something. Action, action, constant action was his motto, and to this he owed the marvelous success of his life, and his elevation to be so deservedly the head of the American navy. Patriotism was, with him, a passion. Courage and love of country were indeed his birthright. With such a father as Captain David Porter, of the famous Essex, he could not be otherwise than an intense, fighting American; and the deeds of these two famous officers constitute a marvelous chapter in our naval annals. Their memories will always hold a high place in the affection of a grateful people whose valor they illustrated and whose government they loved, honored, and periled their lives to preserve."

[Source: Contemporary American biography Volume 1, Part 2; By Atlantic Publishing & Engraving Co., N.Y.; Publ. 1895; Pgs. 499-500; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.]

JAMES ELVERSON.

James Elverson, proprietor of the Philadelphia Inquirer and of those sterling, long established weekly papers, Saturday Night and Golden Days, has long been a power in the publishing world and latterly a very prominent figure and a factor of force in the daily journalism of the Quaker City. He was born in Derbyshire, England, October 13, 1838, and when nine years of age came to this country with his parents. His father, who was a manufacturer of hats, settled in Newark, N. J., and there our subject passed his youth. His schooling was short, but he has splendidly supplemented in later life (and in the larger school of the world) the initiation in education which his naturally bright mind obtained in his boyhood's brief school-days.

At the age of fourteen years he became a messenger in the office of the Magnetic Telegraph Company, at sixteen he was an operator, and before he was twenty Manager of the Consolidated Offices in Newark, Agent of the Associated Press, instructor of operators, and an all-around electrical expert, invaluable to the company which had his services. It was to the exercise of the same qualities of quick observation, ready adaptation, original application, indomitable energy, which brought him greater success in later years, that his rapid advancement was attributable in this his first business association.

On the outbreak of the War of the Rebellion young Elverson went to Washington, D.C., and became the Manager of the American Telegraph office there, a position which, as one may readily see, involved through the whole momentous period of the great conflict a peculiar and quite heavy responsibility. It also brought him into relations with the President, members of his Cabinet, prominent Senators, and Representatives which were very interesting, and afforded Mr. Elverson a fund of invaluable reminiscences of those great personages in the drama of our national life. He held this position until the end of the war, performing its duties with faithfulness and capability, and to the entire satisfaction of his company and the Chief Executive and officials of the Government, who were its heaviest patrons and of course demanded the most inviolable and discreet loyalty. Having unflinching faith from first to last in the ultimate complete triumph of the Federal power, our subject had invested to his fullest ability in Government securities, and at the close of the war he found himself in possession of a competency.

Coming to Philadelphia in 1865, he established in connection with a former associate a newspaper known as Saturday Night, which, it is noteworthy in connection with the recent attitude of Mr. Elverson in the journalism of the city, was conducted in the interests of municipal reform. This was made the beginning of his career as a publisher, which proved to be the true vocation of his life, one for which he has over and again exhibited his exceedingly great especial equipment. A year after the establishment of this journal, inspired by the success of the New York Ledger, and recognizing the vast and inadequately met demand for light literature of good quality at popular prices, he transformed his publication to a first-class story-paper.

The launching of this literary craft over the breakers and its sailing through the troubled shallows near shore, into the broad open sea of popular favor, he accomplished by an original and bold measure which was nothing short of a stroke of genius. Mr. Bonner's paper was well established and was pushed by all of the resources of an already great fortune, and by shrewd ability. To successfully enter into competition with it required high excellence in the journal itself and great outlay of money, absolute uniqueness of initiative, and most confident and strong enterprise; while to carry on competition demanded in addition alert apprehension of public needs, with adroitness in meeting them, sustained fertility of invention, energy, activity, and general business sagacity, all in uncommon degree of development. To prepare a journal of highest literary excellence, of to conceive how any journal could be better provided for in its business, editorial, art, or mechanical departments, or in any of the multiplicity of details that contribute each their especial convenience from basement to roof of the handsome and substantial structure.

All of this, however, tells nothing of the intellectual or moral side of the journal, which was built up by Mr. Elverson from a circulation of less than five to over 100,000, with all that such increase implies. The Inquirer was made by its new proprietor the exponent of a higher theory of journalism than had generally prevailed in the city, and in nothing was this more manifest than in its political attitude and its aggressive action in favor of public reforms. It will be recalled that Mr. Elverson's initial undertaking in the field of journalism had as its aim municipal reform, and the idea he entertained thirty years ago, although not then developed, seems to have been kept uppermost in his mind ready for evolvement in his latest and largest enterprise. At any rate, the Inquirer under his management has fought steadfastly from the first all that was of ill-savor in the politics and public business of Philadelphia, and to constantly and consistently champion the people. It is unwaveringly and stanchly Republican on all essential issues, but has reserved the right of independence from partisan obligation in local affairs. It has opposed the corrupt and selfish schemes of politicians, and punctured their pretensions; exposed political and official profligacy and venality, and powerfully battled for the economic and honest administration of the city government, while at the same time taking an advanced position in all matters tending to progress. It has avowed and continuously showed its purpose to take the moral side of all great questions either as against party or faction, or powerful corporations. It coined the phrase "the New Philadelphia," which has since become widely adopted, and in its attitude toward the people of the city and its strivings for their interests, that term has been its shibboleth and tocsin. Under it victories for popular rights have been already gained and triumphs of progress won. Tangible tokens of the Inquirer's influence appear in many great improvements and testimony to its righteous aggressiveness in the general march of progress, material and moral. Mr. Elverson, to whose perspicacity, pertinacity of endeavor, and rare genius for innovation his great success in journalism is to be credited, has maintained, in spite of his great achievements, a modesty of character that marks him more positively perhaps than all else as the fit recipient of the good fortune that he has secured.

He has shown successively that he is a worthy steward, both in business and in a humane sense, of the talent placed in his keeping. While not allowing it to rust, he has multiplied it over and over, and always to the benefit of his fellows and the community generally. He is a man who has shown his largeness in gathering gentleness simultaneously with the gathering power, which is a somewhat rare accomplishment; and in all of the unceasing activity and care-creating enterprises of his life he has preserved and developed gracefulness and geniality and a certain kindliness which goes out to those about him, without consciousness, but as spontaneously and inexhaustibly as balm upon the air. He is universally liked and respected by the hundreds of employees in the publication office of his three papers, and there is evidence everywhere of stronger ties between them than usually exist in the relations of employees and employer.

Socially he is a favorite, and his home at 2024 Walnut Street—a house built by him—with its treasure of things beautiful, is one of the pleasantest centers of familiar and friendly convening in the city. He was an original member of the Art Club and the Reform Club in Philadelphia, and is a most popular personage of the leading club in Washington, of which he has been a member for years. Mr. Elverson married January 2, 1868, Miss Duval, daughter of Hon. Eli Duval, a prominent politician of Maryland, and for many years a member of the Legislature from Anne Arundel County. Their son, James Elverson, Jr., is the General Manager of the Inquirer, a very popular member of the younger circles of Philadelphia's best life, and an aide on Governor Hastings' staff. Their daughter, Eleanor Louise, is the wife of M. Jules Patenotre, French Ambassador to the United States, and resides in Washington.

[Source: Contemporary American biography Volume 1, Part 2; By Atlantic Publishing & Engraving Co., N.Y. ; Publ. 1895; Pgs. 496-497; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.]

ALMY, John Jay, naval officer, was born in Rhode Island, Apr. 25, 1815. He entered the navy as a midshipman in 1829, and until 1835 cruised in the Mediterranean and neighboring waters. He was promoted passed midshipman July 3, 1835, served on the receiving-ship at New York in 1836 and 1837, and then again cruised in the Mediterranean until 1841, when he was commissioned lieutenant. In 1842 he was attached to the home squadron, and from 1843 to 1845 was engaged in the suppression of the slave trade on the coast of Africa. During the Mexican war he was an officer of the line-of-battle ship Ohio, and took part in the capture of Vera Cruz and Tuspan. From 1851 until 1856 he was attached to the coast survey. He was then assigned to the command of the steamer Fulton of the North Atlantic squadron, and in 1857, while stationed off the coast of Nicaragua received the surrender of Gen. Wm. Walker, the filibuster leader, and his followers. In 1858 and 1859 as commander of the Fulton he accompanied the expedition to Paraguay.

At the opening of the civil war in 1861 he was on duty at the New York navy yard, where he remained until 1862. He was promoted to be commander Apr. 24, 1861 and in 1862 was assigned to the command of the gunboat South Carolina of the South Atlantic blocking squadron. In 1864 he commanded the steamer Connecticut of the North Atlantic squadron, and captured or destroyed eight blockade runners. He was commissioned captain March 3, 1865, and until 1867 was commander of the Juniata, cruising in Brazilian and South African waters. From 1868 until 1870 he was on ordnance duty in New York, and from the latter date until 1873 was attached to the signal corps. He was advanced to the rank of commodore Dec. 30, 1869; rear-admiral Aug. 24, 1873, and until 1876 was commander in-chief of the Pacific squadron. During the violent Panama revolution in October, 1873, Rear-Admiral Almy landed a sufficient force of marines from the flag-ship Pensacola, and the Benicia; thereby ensuring the safe transportation of passengers, freight, and specie for three weeks. For these timely services he received the thanks of the Pacific mail steamship company, the Panama railroad company, and all the foreign consuls and merchants of the city. On Apr. 24, 1877, he was placed on the retired list on account of the legal age for retirement, and now (1893) resides in Washington, D. C.

[Source: The National Cyclopedia of American Biography Volume 4; By George Derby, James Terry White; Publ. 1893; Pg. 283; Transcribed and submitted by Andrea Stawski Pack.]

Almy, John Jay, naval officer, was born April 25, 1814, in Rhode Island. He entered the navy as midshipman in 1829; advanced to the rank of commodore in 1869; and until 1876 was commander of the Pacific squadron. He attained the rank of rear admiral; and was retired in 1888. He died May 16, 1895. in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]


ALVORD, Benjamin,
soldier, was born in Rutland, Vt., Aug. 18, 1813. He was graduated from West Point in 1833; served in the Seminole war in 1835-37; was instructor in mathematics at West Point until 1839; was on frontier duty in 183940; made adjutant of the 4th infantry in 1840; engaged at Camp Izard and other border stations in 1841-42; on garrison and engineer duty until 1846; participated in the military occupation of Texas and the war with Mexico in 1846—1847. He was engaged at Palo Alto and Resaca de la Palma, where, for gallantry, he was brevetted captain, and at Paso, Ovejas, National Bridge, Cerro Gordo and Las Animas, in which latter place he was brevetted major. He was chief of staff to Maj. Lally's column on the march from Vera Cruz to Mexico. In 1854 he became paymaster of the department of Oregon, where he remained until 1862, when he became brigadier - general of volunteers, resigning the grade Aug. 8, 1865. For gallant and meritorious services he was, on the 9th of August, 1865, brevetted lieutenant-colonel, colonel, and brigadier-general, U. S. army. He then became paymaster in New York City for two years, when, in 1867, he was appointed chief pay master of the district of Omaha and Nebraska, retaining the position until 1872. From that year until his retirement from the service in 1881, he was paymaster-general of the U. S. army, with headquarters at Washington, D. C., his rank being that of brigadier-general. Among his published works are; "Tangencies of Circles and of Spheres" (1855); "The Interpretation of Imaginary Hoots in Questions of Maxima and Minima" (1860), and numerous essays and reviews. He died in Washington, D. C., Oct. 16, 1884.

[Source: The National Cyclopedia of American Biography Volume 4; By George Derby, James Terry White; Publ. 1893; Pg. 51; Transcribed and submitted by Andrea Stawski Pack.]

Alvord, Benjamin, soldier, author, was born Aug. 18, 1813, in Rutland, Vt. He was a United States officer who served in the Mexican and civil wars; and attained the rank of brigadier-general. He was the author of Tangencies of Circles and Spheres; and Interpretation of Imaginary Roots in Questions of Maxima and Minima. He died Oct. 16, 1884, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

MEIGS, Montgomery Cunningham, soldier, was born at Augusta, Ga., May 13, 1816, the son of Charles Delucena Meigs and Mary Montgomery. His father was a lineal descendent of Vincent Meigs who emigrated to America and settled in Connecticut in 1634. His mother's ancestors settled at Eglinton, N. J., 1702. Montgomery C. Meigs was educated at the Franklin institute and at the University of Pennsylvania until he attained the age of sixteen. He then entered the West Point military academy, from which he was graduated in the class of 1836, and was commissioned a lieutenant in the 1st artillery. The following year he was made a lieutenant in the engineer corps, and promoted a first lieutenant in 1838, and made captain in 1853. While serving in the engineer corps he was employed on the works for the improvement of the navigation of the Delaware River, and upon the Delaware breakwater, under command of Capt. Delafield. He assisted Capt. Robert E. Lee in the surveys of the harbor of St. Louis and the rapids of the Mississippi river at Des Moines and Rock Island, built Fort Wayne on the Detroit River and had charge of the construction of Fort Montgomery at the outlet of Lake Champlain. He was superintending engineer of these and other constructions from 1831-49.

He was employed in the engineer bureau of Washington, D. C., from 1849-50. He made the surveys and plans for the Potomac aqueduct at Washington, D. C. These plans having been adopted by congress in 1853, he constructed the work, including that triumph of engineering art, the Cabin John and the Rock Creek bridges. He was also in charge of the construction of the wings of the capitol and of its iron dome, and of the halls of the capitol. In 1860 he was ordered to Florida to take charge of the building of Fort Jefferson, but was recalled to Washington in February, 1861, and was present at the inauguration of President Lincoln. In April, 1861, he was ordered by the president to plan and organize an expedition for the relief of Fort Pickens, Pensacola, which was then threatened by the Confederate troops. This expedition saved Fort Pickens and secured to the United Slates the important harbor of Pensacola. Capt. Meigs was commissioned colonel of the 11th infantry on May 14, 1801; quartermaster-general, U. S. army, May 15, 1861, with rank of brigadier-general, which he held until he was retired as over sixty-two years of age, on Feb. 6, 1882. As quartermaster-general he was present at the first battle of Bull Run and during the siege and the battle of Chattanooga. He visited the armies of McClellan, Gen. Butler, and Gen. Grant during the operations on the Potomac, the James, and in front of Richmond, and for a time had personal charge of the base of supplies of the army of the Potomac.

He was made a major general on July 5, 1864, and shortly afterward visited Savannah, where he met Gen. W. T. Sherman, mid refitted his army at Goldsborough and at Raleigh. His duties in charge of the vast business of equipping and supplying the large armies kept him principally confined to the offices of the quartermaster's department at Washington. Subsequent to the civil war he remained at Washington, and in connection with his official duties, inspected the workings of departments under his supervision. He went abroad on account of ill health in 1867, and again in 1875 on special service to study the constitution and government of European armies.

In 1876 he was a member of the commission for the reform and reorganization of the army. Gen. Meigs was also a member of the board to prepare plans and specifications for the war department building, and the National museum. He was regent of the Smithsonian institute, a member of the National academy of sciences, and various scientific societies. From 1861-83 he published annual reports of the quartermaster's department., as well as other government reports. After he was retired in 1882, he was selected as architect and supervised the construction of the Pension bureau at Washington, congress having made an appropriation for this building with the proviso that it should be erected under the supervision of Gen. Meigs. He died at Washington, D. C., Jan. 2, 1892.

[Source: The National Cyclopedia of American Biography Volume 4; By George Derby, James Terry White; Publ. 1893; Pgs. 69-70; Transcribed and submitted by Andrea Stawski Pack.]

Baldwin, Abraham, lawyer, college president, congressman, United States senator, was born Nov. 6, 1754, in Guilford, Conn. He settled in Savannah, Ga.; and was chosen a member of the state legislature. He originated the plan of the university of Georgia; drew up the charter; persuaded the assembly to adopt it; and was for some time its president. In 1785-88 he was a representative from Georgia to the continental congress; and was a member of the convention which framed the constitution of the United States, which he duly signed. In 1789-99 he was a representative from Georgia to the first, second, third, fourth and fifth congresses. In 1799-1807 he was a United States senator. He died March 4, 1807, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw' s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Berdan, Hiram, soldier, inventor, was born about 1823, in Plymouth, Mich. He attained great skill as a marksman; and in 1861 was made colonel of the first regiment United States sharpshooters, which he had organized. He was brevetted brigadier-general of volunteers for his conduct at Chancellorsville; and major-general for gallantry at Gettysburg. After the close of the civil war he went to Russia and spent several years in superintending the manufacture of his rifle there for the Russian government. In 1888 he returned and sued the United States for $500,000 for infringing his patents in the Springfield rifle; and in 1892 the court of claims awarded him one hundred thousand dollars. He died March 31, 1893. in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Betts, Thaddeus, lieutenant-governor, United States senator, was born in Norwalk, Conn. He was at one time lieutenant-governor of Connecticut. In 1839-40 he was United States senator. He died April 8, 1840, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Bibb, George M., lawyer, jurist, United States senator, was born in 1772 in Virginia. He was in the Kentucky state senate two years; held the position of chancellor of the court of chancery; and was secretary of the treasury. He afterwards practiced his profession in Washington, D.C.; and acted as an assistant in the office of the attorney-general of the United States. In 1809-27 he was chief justice of the supreme court of Kentucky. He was a United States senator in 1811-15 and in 1829-35. He died April 14, 1859, in Georgetown, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Bigelow, Frank Hagar, clergyman, scientist, author, was born Aug. 28, 1851, in Concord, Mass. For some years he was assistant astronomer in the Argentine national observatory in Cordoba; and was afterward a professor of mathematics in Racine college of Wisconsin. Since 1891 he has been professor of meteorology in the United States weather bureau in Washington, D.C.; and since I890 has also been assistant rector of St. Johns church of that city. His name is especially associated with an instrument for the photographic record of the transit of stars; and with some novel studies by which the solar corona, the aurora and terrestrial magnetism are shown to be associated. He is the author of Internal Cloud Report; and Barometry of the United States.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Birney, James Gillespie, statesman, abolitionist, author, was born Feb. 4, 1792, in Danville, Ky. He was a statesman famous for his opposition to slavery. He was twice a candidate for the presidency of the United States—in 1840 as the nominee of the abolitionists, and m 1844 as the nominee of the Liberty party. He was the author of Ten Letters on Slavery and Colonization; Addresses and Speakers; and American Churches the Bulwarks of American Slavery. He died Nov. 25, 1857, in Perth Amboy, N.J.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Birney, William, soldier, lawyer, author, was born May 28, 1819, near Huntsville, Ala. During the civil war he served as a private, captain, major, lieutenant-colonel and as a colonel in the New Jersey volunteers; and was brigadier-general and was brevet major-general in the United States volunteers. He was a noted lawyer of Washington, D.C. He was the author of Life and Times of James G. Birney; and Plea for Civil and Religious Liberty. He died on Aug. 14, 1907, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Black, Henry Campbell, lawyer, author, was born Oct. 17, 1860, in Ossining, N.Y. In 1880 he graduated from Trinity college of Hartford, Conn. He practiced law in St. Paul, Minn.; then at Williamsport, Pa.; and since 1888 has followed legal literature as a profession in Washington, D.C. He is the author of Constitutional Prohibitions; Law of Tax Titles; Dictionary of Law; Law of Judgments; Law of Intoxicating Liquors; American Constitutional Law; Construction and Interpretation of Laws; Handbook of Bankruptcy Law; and Law of Mortgages.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Black, James A., soldier, congressman, was born in 1793 in Abbeville, S.C. He served as captain in the war of 1812. He was a representative from South Carolina in 1843-48 to the twenty-eighth, twenty-ninth and thirtieth congresses as a democrat. He died April 5, 1848, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Blackford, Isaac Newton, lawyer, legislator, jurist, was born Nov. 6, 1786, in Bound Brook, N.J. He was judge of the first district court of Indiana in 1814-15; was speaker of the first state legislature in 1816; was judge of the supreme court of Indiana in 1819-35; and was judge of the United States court of claims in 1855-59. He died Dec. 31, 1859, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Blaine, James Gillespie, statesman, author, was born Jan. 31, 1830, in Washington Countv Pa. He graduated at Washington College in 1847; adopted the profession of an editor; removed to Maine; and edited the Kennebec Journal and Portland Advertiser for several years. He served four years in the Maine legislature, two years as speaker of the house. In 1863-1876 he was a representative from Maine to the thirty-eighth to the forty-fourth congresses, serving as a member of the committee on post offices and post roads. He served on the committee on military affairs, the special committee on the death of President Lincoln, and as chairman of the committee on the war debts of the loyal state. In 1869-75 he was speaker of the house to the forty-first, forty-second and forty-third congresses; and in 1876-81 he was a United States senator. In 1881 and in 1889-92 he was secretary of state. He was an unsuccessful candidate for president of the United States in 1884. He was the author of Twenty Years of Congress. He died Jan. 27, 1893, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Blair, James, congressman, was born in Lancaster. S.C. In 1821-23 and 1829-34 he was a representative from South Carolina to the seventeenth, twenty-first, twenty-second and twenty-third congresses. He died by his own hand April 1. 1834, in Washington, D.C. [Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Blair, James G., lawyer, congressman, was born in 1828. He was a lawyer of Canton, Mo. In 1871-73 he was a representative from Lewis County, Mo., to the forty-second congress as a republican. He died about 1906 in Canton, Mo.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Blake, John B., banker, financier, was born Aug. 12, 1802, in Colchester, Va. He was commissioner of public buildings during a part of the administration of President Pierce, and during the whole of that of President Buchanan. For many years he was president of the National Metropolitan Bank of Washington, D.C.; and was connected with the board of public works in Washington, D. C. He died in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Blakeslee, Francis Durbin, educator, clergyman, college president, was born Feb. 1, 1846, in Vestal, N.Y. In 1863-64 he was quartermaster's clerk in the fiftieth New York engineers; and in 1864-65 was a clerk in the quartermaster-general's office at Washington, D.C. In 1869-70 he was principal of the union school at Whitney's Point, N.Y.; and in 1871-73 filled a pastorate in Groveland, N.Y. In 1873-84 he was principal at the East Greenwich academy, R.I.; in 1884-85 traveled in Europe; and in 1886-87 filled a pastorate in Newport, R.I. In 1887-99 life was principal of the East Greenwich academy; in 1899-1900 was president of the Iowa Wesleyan university; and since 1900 has been president of Cazenovia seminary of New York.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Bland, Thomas A., physician, surgeon, lecturer, author, was born May 21, 1830, in Bloomfield, Ind. During the civil war he was a surgeon in the army. For twenty years he lived in Washington, D.C., with his wife and coworker. M. Cora Bland, M.D., also a skilful physician and able writer and a popular lecturer. He has been at the head of the Eclectic medical society of the District of Columbia from the first; was its first president, and was re-elected by unanimous vote seven times since. He is the author of How to Get Well and How to Keep Well; and other works.
|[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Blease, Cole L., lawyer, statesman, was born in October, 1868, in Newberry County, S.C. He received his collegiate education at Newberry College; and graduated from the Georgetown law school at Washington, D.C. In 1894-1900 he served three terms as a representative in the South Carolina state legislature; and was twice elected speaker pro tem. He has been county chairman; a member of nearly all the state conventions; and for the past ten years has been a member of the state democratic executive committee. He has also served three terms as city attorney of Newberry; and is a prominent member of the improved order of red men; independent order odd fellows; knights of pythias; and woodmen of the world. In 1905-09 he was a member of the South Carolina state senate; and was the president pro tem of that body.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Bliss, Alexander, soldier, diplomat, was born Dec. 27, 1827, in Boston, Mass. Early in the civil war he entered the army as captain of volunteers; and later passed through the various grades of major, lieutenant colonel and colonel by brevet in the regular army, his service being chiefly in the quartermaster's department. In 1868 he was appointed secretary of legation at Berlin. He died April 30, 1896, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Bliss, Tasker Howard, soldier, was born Dec. 31, 1853, in Lewisburg, Pa. In 1875 he graduated from West Point military academy; and in 1884 from the United States artillery school. In 1875-92 he served in the first United States artillery. In 1884-85 he was adjutant in the artillery school; and in 1888-95 was inspector of rifle practice. In 1895-97 he was on special duty with the secretary of war; and in 1897-98 was military attache of the United States legation at Madrid. He served through the Spanish-American war; and in 1898-1902 was chief of the Cuban customs service. In 1901 he was appointed brigadier-general in the United States volunteers; and in 1902 became brigadier-general in the United States army. Since 1903 he has been president of the army war college at Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Bliss, William Julian Albert, educator, author, was born in 1867 in Washington, D.C. He is a professor at the Johns Hopkins University of Baltimore, Md. He is a part author of A Manual of Experiments in Physics.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Bliss, Zenos Randall, soldier, was born April 17, 1835, in Johnston, R.I. During the last year of the civil war Colonel Bliss commanded a brigade in Grant's Virginia campaign. He became a brigadier-general in 1895; and in 1897 he was advanced to major-general and retired after more than forty years of continuous and faithful service. He died Jan. 2, 1900, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Blood, Henry Ames, poet, was born June 7, 1838, in Temple, N.H. He was the author of How Much I Loved Thee, a drama in verse; and History of Temple, N.H. He died in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Blount, Henry Fitch, manufacturer, scientist, was born May 1, 1829, in Ontario county, N.Y. For thirty years he was in active business life; and now resides in Washington, D.C. He is a fellow of the American association for the advancement of science.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Blount, Thomas, soldier, congressman, was born in 1760 in Edgecombe, N.C. He was a general of militia. In 1811-13 he was a representative from North Carolina to the twelfth congress. He died Feb. 7, 1812, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Blunt, James G., soldier, physician, was born in 1826 in Hancock County, Maine. In 1861 he entered the army as lieutenant-colonel in the third regiment Kansas volunteers. He commanded the cavalry in General James Lane's brigade; and in 1862 was promoted to brigadier-general. In 1862, in the battle of Old Fort Wayne, his Kansas and Cherokee troops routed the confederate forces at Maysville, on the western border of Arkansas. On Nov. 28 he attacked and defeated Marmaduke's forces at Cane Hill, Ark. On Dec. 7, 1862, he encountered and defeated, with the aid of General Herron, the confederates under Hindman at Prairie Grove. He died July 25, 1881 in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Bokee, David A., naval officer, congressman, was born Oct. 6. 1805, in New York. In 1849-51 he was a representative from New York to the thirty-first congress. He died March 16. 1860, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Bolles, John Augustus, soldier, lawyer, jurist, was born April 16, 1809, in Eastford, Conn. In 1843 he was chosen secretary of state under Governor Marcus Morton. He was a member of the harbor and back bay commission in 1852. In 1862-65 he served as judge advocate on the staff of General John A. Dix, his brother-in-law. He was brevetted brigadier-general of volunteers in 1865; and was appointed naval solicitor the same year. He died May 25. 1878, in Washington. D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Bolton, Henry Carrington, educator, scientist, author, was born Jan. 28, 1843, in New York City. In 1877-87 he was professor of chemistry at Trinity college of Hartford, Conn.; and in 1889-99 professor of the history and bibliography of chemistry in Columbian university of Washington, D.C. He was the author of Application of Organic Acids to the Examination of Minerals; Literature of Uranium; Literature of Manganese; Student's Guide in Quantitative Analysis; The Family of Bolton in England and America; Scientific Correspondence of Joseph Priestley; and Select Bibliography of Chemistry, in three volumes. He died in 1903 in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Boner, John Henry, poet, was born Jan. 31. 1845, in Salem, N.C. He was one of the editors of the Century Dictionary; and Library of American Literature; and was on the staff of Appleton's Cyclopaedia. He was the author of Whispering Pines, a volume of poems. He died in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Borden, William Cline, army surgeon, author, was born on May 19, 1858, in Watertown, N.Y. In 1883 he graduated from the medical department of Columbia university at Washington, D.C.; and the same year was appointed first-lieutenant and assistant surgeon in the United States army. In 1888 he became captain; in 1898 was major and brigade-surgeon in the United States volunteers; and in 1901 became major and surgeon in the United States army. During the Spanish-American war he was commander of the general hospital at Key West, Fla.; and afterward was transferred to command the army general hospital at Washington, D.C. In 1899 he was professor of surgical pathology and military surgery in the medical department of Georgetown university; and in 1901 became professor of military surgery in the army medical school at Washington, D.C. He is the author of Use of the Roentgen Ray by the Medical Department of the United States in the War with Spain; and many Monographs on medical, surgical and military subjects.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Bossier, Pierre Evariste, state senator, congressman. After serving ten years in the state senate in 1843-44 he was a representative to the twenty-eighth congress. He died April 24, 1844, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Bouldin, Thomas T., lawyer, jurist, congressman, was born in Virginia. In 1829-33 he was a representative from Virginia to the twenty-first and twenty-second congresses. Before entering congress he had been a lawyer of high rank, and an able and upright judge, highly respected for his talents and integrity. He died Feb. 11, 1834, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Bowden, Lemuel Jackson, lawyer, United States senator, was born Jan. 16, 1815, in Williamsburg, Va. He served three sessions in the Virginia state legislature; was n member of the convention for amending the state constitution in 1849; and was a presidential elector in 1861. In 1863-65 he was United States senator from Virginia. He died Jan. 2, 1864, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Bowie, Richard Jones, lawyer, jurist, congressman, was born June 23, 1807, in Georgetown, D.C. In 1836 he was a member of the Maryland state senate. In 1840 he was a presidential elector. In 1849-53 he was a representative from Maryland to the thirty-first and thirty-second congresses. In 1871 he became chief justice of the sixth judicial circuit; and a member of the court of appeals. He died March 12, 1881, in Montgomery county, Md.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Bowerman, George Franklin, librarian was born Sept. 8, 1868, in Farmington, N.Y. In 1892 he was graduated from the University of Rochester, N.Y.; and in 1895 from the New York state library school at Albany with the degree of B.L.S. In 1895-96 he was reference librarian of the Reynolds library at Rochester; in 1897-1900 he was on the editorial staff of the New York Tribune; and in 1900-01 was on the staff of the New International Encyclopaedia. In 1901-04 he was librarian of the Wilmington institute free library; and while living in Delaware was a member of the state library commission. He is a member of the American library association; and was its treasurer in 1906-07. In 1905 he was president of the library department of the religious education association; and in 1906-07 was president of the District of Columbia library association. He is the compiler of Selected Bibliography of the religious denominations of the United States. Since 1904 he has been librarian of the public library of the District of Columbia.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Brackett, Albert Gallatin, soldier, author, was born Feb. 14, 1829, in Cherry Valley, N.Y. He served throughout the civil war. In 1886 he was promoted to the rank of brigadier-general; and subsequently became a colonel in the United States army. He was the author of General Lane's Brigade in Central Mexico; and History of the United States Cavalry. He died June 25, 1896, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Bradford, James Henry, clergyman, chaplain, was born Aug. 24, 1836, in Grafton, Vt. He received a thorough education at East Hampton; and at Yale University. He has been pastor in Hudson, Wis.; and for ten years was in charge of reformatories in New England. For many years he has been connected with the Indian bureau at Washington, D.C. For sixteen years he was chaplain of the District of Columbia commandery military order loyal legion; and for twenty-five years chaplain of Garfield post grand army of the republic. For the past five years he has been chaplain-in-chief of the grand army of the republic at Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Bradford, Royal Bird, rear admiral North Atlantic fleet United States navy, was born July 22, 1844, in Turner, Maine. In 1865 he graduated from the United States naval academy. In 1868 he became master; in 1878 lieutenant-commander; in 1889 commander; and captain in 1899. In 1904 he became rear admiral in the United States navy; and resides in Washington. D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Bradley, Andrew Coyle, lawyer, jurist, was born Feb. 12, 1844, in Washington'. D.C. He was an associate justice of the supreme court of the District of Columbia. He died May 15, 1902, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Bradley, Joseph P., educator, lawyer, jurist, was born March 14, 1813, in Berne, N.Y. He was an associate justice of the supreme court of the United States in 1870-92; and was a presidential elector in 1868. He was the author of The Bradley Family, edited and published by his son. He died Jan. 22, 1892, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Brady, Jasper E., lawyer, congressman, was born in New Jersey. In 1847-49 he was a representative from Pennsylvania to the thirtieth congress. He died Jan. 23, 1870, in Washington. D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Brent, Henry Johnson, artist, author, was born in 1811 in Washington, D.C. He contributed to Porter's Spirit of the Times, over the well-known signature of Stirrup; and was the associate of Lewis Gaylord Clark in founding and editing the Knickerbocker, a magazine that enjoyed great popularity in 1833-64. His best literary work was Life Almost Alone, published as a serial in the Knickerbocker; and Was it a Ghost? a theory and discussion of the celebrated murder of the Joyce children. He died Aug. 3, 1880, in New York City.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Brent, Richard, congressman, United States senator, was born in Virginia. In 1795-99 and 1801-03 he was a representative from Virginia to the fourth, fifth and seventh congresses. In 1809-14 he was United States senator. He died Dec. 30, 1814, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Brewer, David Josiah, lawyer, jurist, was born June 20, 1837, in Smyrna, Asia Minor; and is the son of Rev. Josiah Brewer and Emilia A. Field, sister of David Dudley, Cyrus W. and Justice Stephen J. Field; and his father was an early missionary to Turkey. He graduated from Yale College in 1856; and from the Albany law school in 1858. He established himself in his profession at Leavenworth in 1859, where he resided until he removed to Washington to enter upon his present duties. In 1861 he was appointed United States commissioner; in 1862-65 he was judge of the probate and criminal courts of Leavenworth County, Kan.; in 1865-69 was judge of the district court; and was county attorney at Leavenworth. In 1870 he was elected a justice of the supreme court of Kansas; and re-elected in 1876 and 1882. In 1884 he was appointed judge of the circuit court of the United States for the eighth district. Since 1889 he has been an associate justice of the United States supreme court at Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Brewer, Mark Spencer, lawyer, diplomat, congressman, was born Oct. 22, 1837, in Addison, Mich. Since 1864 he has practiced law in Pontiac, Mich; and has been city attorney; and was state senator in 1873-74. In 1877-81 and 1887-91 he was a representative from Michigan to the forty-fifth, forty-sixth, fiftieth and fifty-first congresses as a republican; declining a renomination. In 1881-85 he was United States consul general to Berlin. In 1896 he was a delegate at large to the republican national convention; and in 1898-1901 United States civil service commissioner. He died March 18, 1901, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Brice, Benjamin William, soldier, lawyer, jurist, was born in 1809, in Virginia. He became a lawyer; was a judge of common pleas in 1845; and was adjutant-general of the state in 1846. He was promoted brigadier-general in 1866; and in 1872 was retired from active service as a major-general. He died Dec. 4, 1892, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Brigham, Charles David, journalist, was born in 1819 in Oxford, N.Y. In his journalistic work in New York City he was associated with Horace Greely. A year before the outbreak of the civil war he was sent to report the sentiment of the south and was arrested as a spy but escaped. In 1885-90 he edited the Times in Pittsburg, Pa. He died Oct. 20, 1894, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Brigham, Elijah, merchant, congressman, was born in 1750 in Northborough, Mass. In 1811-14 he was a representative from Massachusetts to the twelfth, thirteenth and fourteenth congresses. He died April 22, 1816, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Bristed, Charles Astor, journalist, author, was born Oct. 6, 1820, in New York City; and was a son of John Bristed, the noted clergyman and author. He received a thorough education in the public schools of New York City. He was a popular writer in the newspapers and magazines of New York City. He was the author of Five Years in an English University; The Upper Ten Thou and; The Inference Theory of the Government; Pieces of a Broken-down Critic; and Anacreontics. He died Jan. 15, 1874, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Bristol, Frank Milton, clergyman, author, was born Jan. 4, 1851, in Orleans County, N. Y. He is now pastor of the metropolitan methodist episcopal church of Washington, D. C. He is the author of Providential Epochs; The Ministry of Art; and Shakespeare and America.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Broderick, David Colbreth, United States senator, was born Dec. 4, 1820, in Washington. D.C. He removed to California in 1849; and engaged in the business of smelting and assaying gold. He was a member of the convention which drafted the constitution of that state; served two years in the California state senate; and was president of that body in 1851. In 1857-61 he was United States senator. He died Sept. 16, 1859, near Lake Merced, Cal.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Bronaugh, John Mitchell, soldier, was born in Washington, D.C. He served in the Mexican war; and in 1847 was brevetted first lieutenant for gallant and meritorious conduct in the battles of Contreras and Churuhusco. He died March 23, 1889.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Brooks, Jabez, educator, college president, author, was born Sept. 18, 1823, in England. He received a thorough education in public and private schools. He came to the United States in 1840; and became a student in the Rock River seminary at Mount Morris, Ill. In 1850 he graduated from the Wesleyan university with the degree of A.M.; and he received the degree of D.D. from Lawrence university of Wisconsin. In 1850 he became principal of the Watertown seminary; in 1854-57 was principal of the Hamline University at Red Wing, Minn.; and in 1861-69 he was president of that institution. He is the author of Attic Greek, a book for beginners; and has published several pamphlets, sermons and commencement addresses; and many articles in state and other papers.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Brooks, James, journalist, congressman, was born Nov. 10, 1810, in Portland, Maine. In 1839 he was elected to the state legislature of Maine; and in 1836 established the New York Daily Express, of which he was the chief editor and proprietor. In 1847 he was elected a member of the New York state legislature. In 1849-53 and 1863-73 he was a representative from New York City to the thirty-first and thirty-second and the thirty-eighth to the forty-second congresses. He died April 30, 1873, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Brooks, Preston S., soldier, congressman, was born in August, 1819, in Edgefield district, S.C. He was a state representative in 1844. In 1846 he raised a company of volunteers; and was made captain. In 1853-57 he was a representative to the thirty-third and thirty-fourth congresses. In 1856 he made a personal assault upon Charles Sumner in the United States senate chamber, which caused him very much excitement throughout the country. He died Jan. 27, 1857, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Broome, Jacob, congressman, was born July 25, 1808, in Baltimore, Md. In 1840 he was deputy auditor of Pennsylvania. In 1855-57 he was a representative from Pennsylvania to the thirty-fourth congress. He died in November, 1864, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Brown, Aaron Venable, lawyer, congressman, governor, cabinet officer, was born Aug. 15, 1795, in Brunswick County, Va. He received a good education in the public and private schools of his native state. He served for a number of years in the state legislature of Tennessee; and in 1839-45 he was a representative from Tennessee to the twenty-sixth, twenty-seventh and the twenty-eighth congresses. In 1845-47 he was the tenth governor of Tennessee. In 1857-59 he was postmaster-general; and filled numerous other positions of trust and honor. He died March 8, 1859, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Brown, Anson, congressman, was born in New York. In 1839-41 he was a representative from New York to the twenty-sixth congress. He died June 21,1840, in Ballston, N.Y.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Brown, Arthur, lawyer, United States senator, was born March 8, 1843, in Kalamazoo County, Mich. Since 1879 he has practiced law in Salt Lake City, Utah. In 1895-97 he was United States senator from Utah. He died Dec. 12, 1906, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Brown, John B., politician, was born July 16, 1807, in Richfield, N.Y. In 1849 he removed to Virginia, where he became prominent in politics in that state. In 1856 he was one of the electors for Fremont; and in 1860 was a delegate to the Chicago convention, where Lincoln was nominated. On his return he was thrown into prison on the charge of circulating incendiary documents. At the beginning of the civil war the confederate authorities offered one thousand dollars for his apprehension. He subsequently received an appointment in Washington. He died Dec. 9, 1867, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Brown, John Howard, journalist, author, was born Nov. 8, 1840, in Rhinebeck, N.Y. He was a student at Rhinebeck academy, Fort Edward institute and at Eastman college; and studied law in New York City. He was a newspaper correspondent in 1863-65 in Washington, D.C.; and in 1868-71 was a real estate agent and news correspondent in Georgia. In 1871-85 he was a publisher of popular subscription books in New York City; in 1885-87 he was traveling correspondent for the New York Star; and in 1890-95 was editor of the National Encyclopedia of American Biography of New York City. In 1896-99 he was editor of the Encyclopedia of American Biography published in Boston, Mass., the title of which is now Lamb's Biographical Dictionary of the United States. He is also the author of American Naval Heroes; and other works.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Brown, Obadiah Buren, educator musician, composer, was born July 2, 1829, in Washington, D.C. He was a teacher of music in the state normal schools at Salem, Bridgewater, and at Framingham, Mass. He was an organist in Boston and Maiden, Mass. He is the author of several popular collections of school songs.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Browne, Causten, lawyer, author, was born Oct. 9, 1828, in the District of Columbia. He is a lawyer of Boston, Mass. He is the author of Treatise on the Construction of the Statute of Frauds.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Browne, John Mills, naval surgeon was born May 10, 1831, in Hinsdale, N.H. He entered the United States navy as an assistant surgeon in 1853. In 1855-56 he participated in the Indian war on Puget Sound; and later took part in the survey of the northwest boundary. He subsequently became medical inspector; then fleet surgeon; and was made surgeon-general of the navy. He died Dec. 7, 1894, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Bruce, Blanche K., planter, United States senator, was born of slave parents March 1, 1841, in Prince Edward County. Va. He received a limited education; and became a planter in Mississippi in 1869. He was a member of the Mississippi levee board; and sheriff and tax collector of Bolivar county in 1872-75. In 1875-81 he was United States senator. For many years he was register of the treasury at Washington, D.C. He died March 17, 1898, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Brumby, Thomas Mason, naval officer, was born in 1855 in Marietta, Ga. He was one of the survivors of the hurricane off Samoa in 1889. He was promoted to lieutenant in 1887. In 1897-98 he was at the naval observatory and War College; was then assigned flag-lieutenant on the Olympia, of Dewey's squadron; and was present on the flagship at the Manila victory. He died Dec. 17, 1899, in Washington. D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Bryan, William James, lawyer, United States senator, was born Oct. 10, 1876, in Ft. Mason, Fla. In 1890 he began the practice of law in Jacksonville, Fla. In 1904 he was a delegate to the national democratic convention. In 1907-08 he was United States senator from Florida to fill a vacancy. He died March 22, 1908, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Bryson, Andrew, naval officer, was born only 25, 1822, in New York City. He entered the navy as midshipman in 1837; was promoted to lieutenant in 1851; became commander in 1862; was made captain in 1866; became commodore in 1873; and attained the rank of rear admiral in 1880. Previous to his retirement, after forty-three years of service, he was in command of the South Atlantic station. He died Feb. 7. 1892, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Buchanan, Robert Christie, soldier, was born about 1810 in Maryland. He served as lieutenant in the Black Hawk and Seminole wars. He was made captain in 1838; and in the war with Mexico took part in numerous battles. In 1865 he was made brevet brigadier-general of the United States army for gallant conduct at Malvern Hill; and brevet major-general for services at Fredericksburg. He commanded the district of Louisiana in 1868-69. He died Nov. 29, 1878, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Buck, Daniel Azro A., soldier, lawyer, congressman, was born in 1789, in Vermont. He established himself as a lawyer at Chelsea, Vt.; and was for fourteen years a member of the state legislature. He filled the office of state attorney from Orange County for six years; in 1821 he was a presidential elector. In 1823-25 and 1827-29 was a representative from Vermont to the eighteenth and twentieth congresses. He died Dec. 24, 1841, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Buel, Alexander Hamilton, merchant, congressman, was born July 14, 1801, in Fairfield. N.Y. In 1850-53 he was a representative from New York to the thirty-second congress. He died Jan. 30, 1853, in Washington. D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Buford, John, soldier, was born in 1825 in Kentucky. He served in the civil war; was subsequently assigned to the command of the army of the Cumberland, when he was taken sick and died, on the date of the receipt of his commission as major-general. He died Dec. 16, 1863, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Burgess, George Kimball, educator, physicist, author, was born Jan. 4, 1874, in Newton, Mass. He has taught physics at the Massachusetts institute of technology, at the university of Michigan, and at the university of California; and is now assistant physicist at the national bureau of standards at Washington, D.C. He is the author of Experimental Physics; High Temperature Measurements; and translator of Duhem's Thermodynamics and Chemistry.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Burnell, Barker, state legislator, congressman, was born in Nantucket, Mass. He was a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives; and later passed into the state senate. He was a member in the convention which framed the present constitution of Massachusetts; and took an active part in the Harrisburg convention of 1840. In 184-43 he was a representative from Massachusetts to the twenty-seventh congress. He died June 4. 1843, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Burnes, James Nelson, lawyer, jurist, congressman, was born Aug. 22, 1833, in Morgan County, Ind. He was a presidential elector in 1856; was circuit attorney in 1857; and in 1868-72 was judge of the court of common pleas. He then engaged in railroad construction and other business. In 1883-87 he was a representative from Missouri to the forty-eighth and forty-ninth congresses as a democrat, serving four terms, 1882-88. He died Jan. 24, 1889, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Burnett, Richard, colonial governor. In 1652-55 he was colonial governor of Virginia.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Burnett, Sawn Moses, physician, lecturer, author, was born March 16, 1847, in New Market, Tenn. In 1878 he founded the eye and ear clinic at the Central dispensary; and became opthalmic and aural surgeon to the Garfield hospital. He was president of the medical society of the District of Columbia. He was the author of a Treatise on Astigmatism. He died in 1906 in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Burnett, Ward Benjamin, soldier, civil engineer, was born in 1811 in Pennsylvania. He was engaged with his regiment at the siege of Vera Cruz; and was in the battles of Cerro Gordo, Contreras and Churubuseo during the Mexican war. He received the thanks of the state legislature and a silver medal from the city of New York; and was brevetted brigadier-general. As a civil engineer he was engaged on dry-dock construction in 1849-55. He died June 24, 1884, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Burrill, James, lawyer, jurist, United States senator, was born April 25, 1778, in Providence, R.I. He was attorney-general of Rhode Island in 1797-1813. He was a member of the Rhode Island state legislature in 1813; was speaker in 1814; and chief justice of the state supreme court in 1816-17. In 1817-20 he was United States senator. He died Dec. 25, 1820, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Burritt, James, lawyer, jurist, United States senator, was born April 25, 1772, in Providence. R.I. He was attorney-general of the state of Rhode Island in 1797-1813; and was a member and speaker of the assembly in 1814. He was chief justice of the state in 1816; and was elected to the United States senate in 1816. He died Dec. 25, 1820, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Busey, Samuel Clagett, physician, author, was born on July 23, 1828, in Montgomery County, Md. In l887 and 1894-98 he was president of the MedicAL society of the District of Columbia. He was the author of Lymph Channels; Reminiscences of Fortysix-Years of Pracitce of Medicine. He died in 1901 in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Bushnell, William H., journalist, author, poet, was born June 4, 1823, in Hudson, N.Y. He was the author of Biographical Sketches of the Early Settlers of Chicago; The Hermit of the Colorado Hills, a Story of the Texan Pampas; and Ah Meek the Beaver, or The Copper Hunters of Lake Superior. He died in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Butler, Benjamin Franklin, lawyer, legislator, was born Dec. 14, 1795, in Kinderhook, N.Y. In 1821 he was appointed district attorney for the city of Albany; in 1827 was elected to the state legislature; and in 1833-37 and 1837-38 attorney general; and in 1836-37 was secretary of war. In 1845 he was a presidential elector; and was subsequently twice appointed United States attorney for the southern district of New York. He died Nov. 8, 1858, in Paris, France.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Butler, Benjamin Franklin, soldier, lawyer, governor, congressman, was born Nov. 5, 1818, in Deerfield, N.H. In 1853 he was elected to the state legislature; in 1859 was elected to the state senate; and in 1860 was a delegate to the Charlestown convention. In 1861 he was appointed a brigadier-general; and entered actively into the civil war movements. Before the close of that year he was made a major-general, serving as such in New Orleans, Fort Darling, and various other places. At the conclusion of the civil war he resumed the practice of law in Lowell; and in 1867-79 he was a representative from Massachusetts to the fortytieth to the forty-fifth congresses. He was one of the managers of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson. He was re-elected to the forty-first, forty-second, forty-third and forty-fifth congresses. In 1883-86 he was the thirty-second governor of Massachusetts. He died Jan. 11, 1893, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Butler, Charles Henry, lawyer, court reporter, author, was born June 18, 1859, in New York City. In 1881 he graduated from Princeton University. For many years he practiced law in New York City; in 1898 he was legal expert of the Anglo-American Canadian commission; and since 1902 he has been reporter of the United States Supreme Court at Washington, D.C. He is the author of Cuba Must be Free; the Voice of the Nation; Our Relations with Spain; Our Treaty with Spain; Freedom of Private Property on the Sea; and Treaty Making Power of the United States, in two volumes.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Butts, Charles, geologist, scientist, was born Sept. 18, 1863, in Portville, N.Y. He graduated with the degrees of B.S. and M.S. from Alfred University. Since 1901 he has been assistant geologist in the United States geological survey at Washington, D.C. He has made valuable researches in areal and structural geology.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Cain, Richard H., clergyman, bishop, congressman, was born April 12, 1825, in Greenbrier County, Va. At an early age he was sent as a missionary to the freedmen in South Carolina. He was chosen a member of the constitutional convention of South Carolina; was elected a member of the state senate and served two years; and edited a newspaper from 1869. In 1873-75 and 1877-79 he was a representative from South Carolina to the forty-third and forty-fifth congresses as a republican. In 1880 he was chosen bishop by the general conference of the African methodist episcopal church. He died Jan. 18, 1887 in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Calderon, Manuel Alvarez, lawyer, educator, diplomat, was born June 2, 1852, in Lima, Peru. He received his preparatory education in the English college of Lima; and graduated from the Lima University at San Marcos, from which institution he received the degrees of LL.B. and LL.D. He has been professor of law and social sciences, and professor of economics and finance at the University of San Marcos. In 1875 he was secretary of the commission of finance at Paris; and secretary of legation at Washington in 1882. He was counsel before the arbitration tribunals at Berne and Santiago; and of Chili; and a delegate of Peru to the second Pan-American congress. Since 1900 he has been minister plenipotentiary of Peru at Washington. D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Calhoun, Edmund Rose, naval officer, was born May 6, 1821, in Chambersburg, Pa. He was appointed midshipman in 1869; was promoted commodore in 1876; and rear-admiral in 1882. He died Feb. 17, 1897, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Calhoun, John Caldwell, vice-president of the United States, author, was born March 18, 1782, in Abbeville District. S.C. He was a noted South Carolina statesman; in 1811-17 he was a representative from South Carolina to the twelfth, thirteenth and fourteenth congresses. In 1817-25 he was secretary of war; and in 1844-45, he was secretary of state. In 1825-33 he was vice-president under John Quincy Adams; and in 1831-51 he was United States senator. He was one of the ablest political leaders; a great orator; and a political thinker of the first rank. He was the author of A Disquisition on Government; and The Constitution and Government of the United States. He died March 31, 1850, in Washington. D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Callender, John Hill, educator, physician, was born Nov. 28,1832, near Nashville, Tenn. In 1855-58 he was engaged in journalism; and in 1858-61 was professor of materia medica in the Shelby medical college of Nashville, Tenn. He was surgeon of the eleventh Tennessee regiment during the civil war. He died Aug. 3,1896, in Nashville, Tenn.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Callis, John Benton, soldier, legislator, congressman, was born Jan. 3, 1828, in Fayetteville, N.C. He served in the civil war as captain of company F, seventh regiment Wisconsin volunteer infantry; was promoted to major, lieutenant-colonel, to brevet-colonel and brigadier-general for bravery during the civil war. He received a ball in the right lung at the battle of Gettysburg. In 1864 he was appointed major in the veteran reserve corps; and was assigned to duty as military superintendent of the war department in Washington, D.C. He was subsequently made captain in the forty-fifth regiment United States infantry regular army; was promoted to brigadier-general of volunteers; and served until 1868. In 1867-69 he was a representative from Alabama to the fortieth congress. In 1873-74 he served in the state legislature of Wisconsin. He died Sept. 23, 1893, in Lancaster, Wis.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Campbell, Brookins, state senator, congressman, was born in 1808 in Washington County, Tenn. He was for many years a member of the Tennessee state legislature; and in 1845 was elected speaker. He was an officer in the quartermaster's department in the war with Mexico. He was elected a representative from Tennessee to the thirty-third congress. He died Dec. 25, 1853, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Campbell, Archibald, soldier, government official, was born July 26, 1813, in Albany, N.Y. His father, of the same name, came from Scotland and was for forty years deputy secretary of state of New York. In 1836 he became aide-de-camp to General Gaines, then in command of United States forces on the Texas frontier. Resigning from the army in 1836, he was engaged in various surveys and works of internal improvement; and became chief clerk of the war department. He was appointed commissioner of the northwestern boundary survey in 1857; and claimed for the United States the canal De Haro as the water boundary. He died July 28. 1887, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Campbell, Hugh George, naval officer, was born in 1760 in South Carolina. In 1812 he commanded some gun-boats in St. Mary's river during an insurrection against the Spanish rule in Florida. He died Nov. 11, 1820, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Campbell, James Baxter, lawyer, state senator, was born Oct. 27, 1808, in Oxford, Mass. For many years he served in the South Carolina state legislature. When the civil war began in 1861, although believing in the right of secession he opposed the firing on Fort Sumter and other acts that tended toward separation. In 1866 he was elected to the United States senate by the provisional legislature, but he was excluded with other southern members. In 1877 he was elected to the state senate. He died Nov. 8, 1883, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Campbell, John Allen, soldier, governor, was born Oct. 8, 1835, in Salem, Ohio. He was promoted to brigadier-general for courage in the field and marked ability and fidelity at Rich Mountain, Shiloh, Perryville, Murfreesborough and through the Atlanta campaign. In 1866 he became assistant editor of the Cleveland Daily Leader. He was appointed in the regular army and made a lieutenant-colonel; and served as adjutant on the staff of General Schofield. In 1869 he was appointed the first governor of the territory of Wyoming; and was reappointed in 1873. He died July 14, 1880, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Campbell Thomas Jefferson, congressman, was born in 1786 in Tennessee. In 1841-43 he was a representative from Tennessee to the twenty-seventh congress. He was presidential elector in 1837-41. He died April 13, 1850, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Campbell, William Shaw, traveler, diplomat, was born July 26, 1818, in New York City. In 1840-42 he traveled throughout eastern Europe; and an account of his travels were published with the title of Letters From the Heart of Europe. In 1843 he was appointed United States consul at Rotterdam, Holland; and for nearly forty years was in the United States consular service in Holland, Germany and England, retiring in 1897. He now lives in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Caperton, Allen Taylor, congressman, United States senator, was born Nov. 21, 1810. in Union, Va. He served in the state legislature of Virginia a number of years; in 1861 was a member of the state convention to consider the impending trouble and took the side of the union; but when the state went out of the union he sided with the south. In 1863 he was elected to the confederate senate; and was pardoned by President Johnson after the civil war. In 1875-77 he was United States senator from West Virginia. He died July 25, 1876, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Carnahan, James, educator, clergyman, college president, was born Nov. 15, 1775, in Carlisle, Pa. He was pastor of the united churches of Whitesborough and Utica until 1814. He opened a classical academy in Georgetown, D.C., and taught for nine years; when he was elected to the presidency of Princeton college of New Jersey. He died March 2, 1859, in Newark, N.J.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Carpenter, Matthew Hale, lawyer, jurist, United States senator, was born Dec. 22, 1824, in Moretown, Vt. He was for several years a district attorney for the state of Wisconsin; and practiced his profession before the Supreme Court of the United States. In 1869-75 and 1879-81 he was United States senator from Wisconsin; and served as president pro tem of the United States senate. He died Feb. 24, 1881, in Washington, D.C. while a member of the senate.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Carrol, John, clergyman, bishop, author, was born in 1735 in Marlborough, Md. He was the first Roman Catholic archbishop of Baltimore. He was the author of Concise View of the Principal Points of Controversy Between the Protestant and Catholic Churches; and Discourse on General Washington. He died in 1817 in Georgetown, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Carroll, Anna Ella, military genius, author, was born Aug. 29, 1815, in Somerset county, Md. She was sent by President Lincoln to St. Louis to endeavor to form an opinion of the probable success or failure of a most important expedition preparing to descend the Mississippi by means of gunboats. She reported the Mississippi as frowning with fortifications and tides as unfavorable. She recommended the use of the Tennessee River as the true strategic line. In furtherance of this secret plan the western armies, to the amazement of the confederacy, were suddenly transferred from the Mississippi up to the Tennessee River. The most brilliant result followed. Fort Henry fell, Fort Donelson was taken, the confederacy was divided, and the rebel armies cut off from their source of supplies. This is said to have broken the backbone of the rebellion. She was the author of The Great American Battle, or The Contest between Christianity and Political Romanism; The Star of the West, or National Men and National Measures; The Union of the States; The War Powers of the General Government; and The Relation of the National Government to the Revolted Citizens Defined. She died Feb. 19, 1894, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Carroll, Daniel, congressman, was born in Maryland. In 1780-84 he was a delegate from Maryland to the continental congress; and signed the articles of confederation and also the constitution. In 1789-91 he was a representative from Maryland to the first congress. He died in 1829 in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Carroll, Samuel Sprigg, soldier, was born Sept. 21, 1832, in Washington, D.C. He was promoted brigadier-general of volunteers in 1864; in 1865 received the brevet of brigadier-general United States army, for gallantry at Spottsylvania; and that of major-general for services during the civil war. In 1867 he became a lieutenant-colonel in the regular army. In 1868 he was acting inspector-general of the division of the Atlantic; and in 1869 retired as major-general for disability from wounds received in battle. He died Jan. 28, 1893, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Carter, David Kellogg, lawyer, diplomat, jurist, congressman, was born June 22, 1812, in Rochester, N.Y. He was elected to congress as a democrat; and served two terms in 1849-53. In 1861 he was appointed minister to Bolivia. In 1863 he became chief justice of the supreme court of the District of Columbia. He died April 16, 1887, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Carter, John, lawyer, congressman, was born Sept. 10, 1792, on Black River, S.C. In 1822-29 he was a representative from South Carolina to the seventeenth, the eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth congresses. He died June 20, 1850, in Georgetown, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Carter, Samuel Powhatan, naval officer, was born Aug. 6, 1819, in Elizabethtown, Tenn. He served in the civil war; in 1865 attained the rank of lieutenant commander in the navy; and was captain in 1870. He subsequently attained the rank of rear-admiral; and was retired from active service in 1886. He died May 26, 1891, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Carter, Timothy J., lawyer, congressman, was born (sic). He was secretary of the Maine state senate in 1833; and county attorney m 1833-37. In 1837-38 he was a representative from Maine to the twenty-fifth congress. He died March 14, 1838, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Case, Augustus Ludlow, naval officer, was born Feb. 3. 1813. in Newburg. N.Y. He was made commodore in 1867; and was promoted to rear-admiral in 1872. In 1874 he commanded the combined European, North Atlantic and South Atlantic fleets assembled at Key West at the time the Virginius difficulties with Spain. In 1875 he was placed on the retired list. He died Feb. 17, 1893, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Casey, Edward Pearce, designer, architect, was born June I8, 1864, in Portland, Maine; and is the son of Brigadier-General Thomas Lincoln Casey. He was educated at the Emerson institute of Washington, D.C.; and graduated from the school of mines of Columbia University; he received the degree of C.E. in 1886 and that of architect in 1888. He studied also in Ecole des beaux arts in Paris. In 1892-97 he was supervising architest of the congressional library building. In 1893 he was one of the six equal prize winners in the New York City hall competition; and in 1900 won the first prize for a design for a bridge over the Potomac river at Washington, D.C.; and also won first prize for a design for the Grani monument at Washington, D.C. He is a noted architect of New York City; and a member of the leading architectural and technical associations of America.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Casey, Levi, soldier, congressman, was born in 1749 in South Carolina. He served in the revolutionary war and attained the rank of brigadier-general. In 1803-07 he was a representative from South Carolina to the eighth and ninth congresses. He died Feb.1, 1807, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Casey, Thomas Lincoln, soldier, educator, civil engineer, was born on May 10, 1831, in Sackett’s Harbor, N.Y. In 1859-61 he had Fort Sumter and various engagements with on in 1861; and was in the first attack on command of the engineer corps on the Pacific coast. During the civil war he served at first as staff engineer at Fort Monroe, Va.; became captain in the engineer corps in 1861; was superintending engineer of the permanent defences and field fortifications upon the coast of Maine; and in 1865, became colonel. In 1888 he was appointed brigadier-general; and he had charge of the erection of the library of congress. He died March 25, 1896, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Cashing, William B.. naval officer, was born Nov. 24, 1842, in Delafield, Wis. He was actively engaged in the civil war on the North Atlantic blocking squadron; and attained the rank of commander. He died Dec. 17, 1874, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Cassin, Stephen, naval officer, was born Feb. 16, 1783, in Philadelphia, Pa. He served in the war with Tripoli; he commanded the Ticonderoga in Macdonough's victory on Lake Champlain, and was rewarded by congress with a gold medal for bravery in that action. He was a terror to the pirates that infested the West Indies; and captured four of their vessels in 1822. He died Aug. 29, 1857, in Georgetown, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Chapin, Stephen, educator, clergyman, college president, author, was born Nov. 4, 1778, in Milford, Mass. In 1828-41 he was the president of Columbian college of Washington, D.C. He was the author of Letters on the Mode and Subjects of Baptism; and The Duty of Living for the Good of Posterity. He died in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Chapman, Ervin S., clergyman, reformer, author, was born June 23, 1838, in Defiance, County, Ohio. He was educated in the public schools and under private tuition; and has received the degrees of A.M., D.D. and LL.D. In 1864-69 he was committee clerk in the United States House of Representatives at Washington, D.C. In 1870-98 he was a pastor in Ohio, Wyoming and California; since 1898 has been superintendent of the California anti-saloon league; and he is editor of the Searchlight, its official organ. He is the originator of the stainless flag movement. He is the author of a work entitled The Stainless Flag.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Chatterton, Fenimore, lawyer, state senator, jurist, governor, was born July 21, 1860, in Oswego, N.Y. He was educated in the public schools of Washington, D.C.; and graduated from the law department of the University of Michigan. He has been county treasurer, probate judge and prosecuting attorney of Carbon County; and a member of the Wyoming state senate. In 1890-1903 he was secretary of state of Wyoming; and in 1903-04 was governor of Wyoming. For many years he has been prominent in railway building and mining in Wyoming.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Chauncey, Isaac, naval officer, was born Feb. 20, 1772, in Black Rock, Conn. He made several successful voyages to the East Indies in the ships of John Jacob Astor. He distinguished himself in several actions off Tripoli; and was thanked by congress for his services. He served in the war of 1812; and in 1833-40 was president of the board of navy commissioners. He died Jan. 27, 1840, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Cheney, James William, educator, librarian, organist, was born Jan. 22, 1849, in Newburyport, Mass. In 1870 he graduated from Dartmouth College; and subsequently received the degree of A.M. from that institution. In 1870-87 he taught school; and since 1864 has been a church organist and choirmaster. He is also librarian of the war department library at Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Chew, Richard S., naval officer, was born Sept. 1, 1843, in District of Columbia. He was graduated at the naval academy in 1861; was commissioned lieutenant. He was a lieutenant-commander in 1866; and served on board the frigate Minnesota participating in the actions with the Merrimac. He died April 10, 1875, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Chew, Robert S., government official, was born in 1811, in Virginia. He entered the service of the government in his youth; and had served in the state department more than forty years, when he was advanced to the chief clerkship. He died Aug. 3, 1873, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Chipman, Norton Parker, soldier, lawyer, congressman, was born March 7, 1834, in Milford Centre, Ohio. At the close of the civil war he was brevetted brigadier-general. He was appointed secretary of the territorial government of the District of Columbia at its organization. In 1871-75 he was a territorial delegate to the forty-second and forty-third congresses as a republican.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Churchill, Sylvester, soldier, was born Aug. 2, 1783, in Woodstock, Vt. In 1808 he published the Vermont Republican. He served in the war of 1812-15; and was appointed a lieutenant of artillery in 1812. He accompanied General Wood in the Mexican war; and was promoted brevet brigadier-general in 1847, in recognition of his services at the battle of Buena Vista. He was retired from active service in 1861. He died Dec. 7, 1862, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Clark, James W., state senator, congressman, was born March 2, 1781, in Bertie County, N.C. He was a presidential elector in 1812; three years a member of the state senate. In 1815-17 he was a representative from North Carolina to the fourteenth congress. He died in January, 1844, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Clark, John Bullock, soldier, congressman, was born Jan. 14, 1831, in Fayette, Mo. He entered the confederate army; served as a lieutenant; and was promoted successively to be captain, major, colonel, and brigadier-general. In 1873-83 he was a representative from Missouri to the forty-third, fortyfourth, forty-fifth, forty-sixth, the forty-seventh and forty-eighth congresses as a democrat. He now resides in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Clarke, Daniel B., capitalist, was born March 3, 1825, in Washington, D.C. He was elected a member of the Washington city council; is director of the Metropolitan railroad company; and is also a director of the United States electric light company. He is also president of the Franklin insurance company; and since 1877 has been president of the national bank of the republic of Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Clarke, Henry Francis, soldier, was born Nov. 9, 1820, in Brownsville, Pa. He ordered the expedition for the relief of Fort Pickens in 1861; served in the Massachusetts campaign, and was present at the siege of Yorktown, and in the battles of South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. He was brevetted brigadier-general for gallantry at the battle of Gettysburg; and major-general for faithful services in the subsistence department during the civil war. He died May 10. 1887, in Washington, D.C.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]


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