Wisconsin Genealogy Trails


Buffalo County Wisconsin Biographies

 

Olf Lamo
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 565 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

OLF LAMO, a resident of Maxville township, Buffalo county, now retired from active work, is a member of the hardy and industrious Norwegian race that has taken a prominent part in the building up of many communities in this and other northwestern states. He was born in Norway, December 4, 1854, and acquired his education and began industrial life in his native land. The conditions there were not favorable to the speedy acquirement of wealth, for he worked a whole year for three dollars and a suit of clothes; the second year he did better so far as cash remuneration was concerned, for he received six dollars. He had formed the project of coming to America to better his condition, but he had to exercise considerable patience and be rigidly economical for some years before he found himself with enough money to pay for his passage. At last in 1877 he left Norway, and on arriving on this side of the Atlantic made his way to Buffalo county, Wisconsin, locating first in Canton township, where he found work at grubbing land. Although not a highly paid occupation, his savings accumulated much more rapidly here than they did in Norway and it was not a great while before he found himself able to get married and begin farming on a place of his own. His bride was Therba Torgason, who was born in Norway in 1862 and who had come to the United States in 1871 with her parents, Sunda and Anna Torgason, they locating near Menominie, Wis. The farm Mr. Lamo bought was merely a tract of 120 acres of land in section 24, Maxville township, as there were no buildings on it, and he first had to erect a log house before beginning any other improvements. All things were done in time, however, a good house and barn and other buildings being erected and the land well cultivated. On that place he resided for thirty years and then retiring, built a house on an adjoining site, where he and his wife are now living. They are the parents of nine children and have nine grandchildren, the former being Caroline, Julia, Mary, Thomas, Sever, Theo, Joe, Myrtle and Adelaide. The family are affiliated religiously with the Norwegian Lutheran church, in which Mr. Lamo has held official position.


Paul Lanicca
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 546-547 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

PAUL LANICCA, one of the leading citizens of Alma township, Buffalo county, who has served many years in public office, and is also proprietor of an excellent farm in section 6, was born in Switzerland, March 7, 1858, son of John Thomas and Ursula (Lanicca) Lanicca. The parents were married in Switzerland, where the father was born, April 15, 1815. They came to America in 1868, locating in Washington county, Wisconsin. Subsequently they removed to Alma township, Buffalo county, buying the farm on which their son, Paul, now resides. Here John T. Lanicca died in 1890, at the age of 75 years, and his wife in 1892, at the age of 74 years. Their children were: Elsbeth, who is now living in Alma, the widow of J. P. Allemann; Ursula, who married John Buchly, and is now deceased, as also is her husband; Mary, who is the wife of Jacob Faller, and lives in Alma; Marguerite, now deceased, who was the wife of John Risch, and whose only surviving child, Lena, born April 4, 1888, is now residing with the subject of this sketch; Christian, who died in 1880, at the age of 25 years; Paul, subject of this memoir, and Verona, born July 7, 1864, who resides with her brother. Paul Lanicca spent his youthful days on the farm, assisting his father to develop and improve it. In 1890, on the father’s death, it became his property, and he has since operated it on his own account. Its area is 200 acres, of which 75 acres are cleared, the remainder being in woodland and meadow. Mr. Lanicca does mixed farming and has a herd of registered Shorthorn cattle, to the breeding of which variety he gives particular attention. He also raises hogs for the market and grows grain and other farm crops, realizing good financial returns, and his buildings and farm equipment are modern and in good condition. Mr. Lanicca served three years as chairman of the Alma town board and was supervisor on the side board for two years. He has been district school clerk for 20 years. Fraternally he belongs to the lodge of Modern Woodmen of America at Alma.


Albert Emil Larson
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume I Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 177-178 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

ALBERT EMIL LARSON, who rents and operates the farm in section 19, Maxville township, established by his father in 1883, was born on this farm Nov. 12, 1884, son of Christ and Anna (Anderson) Larson. The parents were natives of Norway, but were married in Wisconsin. The father was a farmer from his youth up and was well qualified, therefore, to wrestle with any agricultural problem. When he settled on his land in Maxville township he began with but a few acres, but gradually increased his landed possessions until he owned a tract of 220 acres, on which he built a good frame house and other buildings. After an industrious career, he died in 1916 at the age of 56 years. His wife is still living, being now 54 years old. Albert Emil, who was the eldest of their ten children, was educated in the school of his district and learned farming on his parents’ homestead, where he has always made his home. On his father’s death in 1916 he took over the place, on which he is engaged in grain and stock raising with success. He is a member of the Norwegian Lutheran church. Mr. Larson married Mary Serum, daughter of Christ Serum of Modena township.


Jens Larson
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume I Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 282-283 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

JENS LARSON, who settled in Nelson township, Buffalo county, in 1872, and aided in the work of civilization by carving out a farm from the wilderness, was a native of Norway, where he was married to Julia Christianson. For some years after his marriage he continued to reside in his native land, but his thoughts often turned to America, whither many of his more ambitious countrymen had gone, some of whom had sent back accounts of golden opportunities which existed there of obtaining free land and establishing homes. He and his wife finally resolved to try their fortunes in the New World, and put by what money they could, until finally in 1869 they found they had enough to pay the expenses of the journey. They had by that time five children: Christian, Kate, Emma, Stena and Louis, and with them they embarked on a vessel bound for Quebec. From that port they proceeded west to Chicago, where they broke their tiresome journey by a halt of three days. Their next stop—a short one—was made in Racine county, Wisconsin, and then they continued north to a farm some 20 miles from Milwaukee, on which they resided for three years. Not having yet found an ideal location, however, in 1872, Mr. Larson and his family made one more removal, this time to Buffalo county, Wis., taking the train to La Crosse, and then coming up the river by boat to Alma. After arriving here he located in Norwegian valley, Nelson township, getting a tract of 120 acres of wild land. Like many of the early settlers he arrived here almost destitute of resources, his principal capital being health and strength and a firm determination to succeed. He was able to buy a cow in the first year of his settlement, but it was two or three years before he succeeded in getting an ox team; consequently his progress up to that time was very slow. He had to build the log house which he and his family used for a dwelling. To narrate his subsequent history would be to recapitulate the history of practically all the pioneers who arrived here under similar circumstances, descriptions of whose privations and struggles with poverty, together with their final success through industry and perseverence, may be found on many pages of this volume. Suffice it to say that Mr. Larson shared both in their struggles and triumphs and his latter years were spent in comparative ease and comfort. He was a member of the Norwegian Lutheran church and for many years associated in friendly intercourse with the better class of settlers in his township, by whom he was esteemed as a good neighbor and worthy man. He died at the age of 65 years, being survived by his wife, who is still living, and who has now almost rounded out a century of existence, being 98 years old. She resides with her daughter, Kate Torgleson.


Lewis A. Larson
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume I Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 451-453 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

LEWIS A. LARSON, agriculturist, of Gilmanton township, Buffalo county, is a man whose personal record is well worthy of a place in the history of this county. Belonging to that class of self-made men to whom the world owes much the greater part of its progress, he has exemplified in his own life the fact that energy and perseverance will conquer almost every difficulty and win success in spite of adverse circumstances. Mr. Larson was born in Noway, September 17, 1856, son of Andreas and Karn Larson. In his native land he attended the common schools and also spent one year in high school. He was not yet 15 years old when, in the summer of 1871, he set out with his sister, Anna, aged 13, for the United States, whither his father had preceded him in the previous spring. On the very first day at sea his sister was seized with fever and was very weak when the vessel reached New York. The brother and sister set out at once for Buffalo county to join their father, anticipating a speedy end to their troubles and a happy reunion. Going by rail to Grand Haven, Mich., they there took boat for Milwaukee, and then boarded a train for Black River Falls. The sister, whose strength was quite exhausted, became rapidly worse, and was destined never to reach the end of the journey, as she died when the train reached Tomah, Wis. Proceeding westward with his sister’s body, young Larson, prostrated with grief, was met at Black River Falls by a friend of his father, who took him on to Blair, Trempealeau county. On his arrival there he received another shock when he learned that his father was dead and had been buried three days before. The father had not yet got a home and had been living with a brother named Christ Larson, with whom Lewis now took up his residence. But his misfortunes were not yet over, as the entire Larson family, including Lewis, were taken sick with typhoid fever, and it was many weeks before he recovered. He made his home with the Larsons for three or four years, working in the vicinity of Blair until he was 21 years old. In 1876 or 1877 he started out for himself, buying eighty acres of wild land in section 1, Gilmanton township. There were no buildings and he began operations with nothing but his hands, first putting up a frame shack 12 by 16 feet in size, and then applying himself to the work of grubbing and clearing the land. His early progress in this latter work was very slow, as for some time he had no team; but during the winter of 1878-79 he obtained the use of a team for its keep and in the following summer he found himself able to buy an ox team, which he housed in a straw shed. He had in the meanwhile assumed the responsibilities of matrimony, on October 9, 1877, being united in marriage with Augusta, daughter of Andreas and Bertha (Jorgensen) Larson of Blair. They began housekeeping in the board shack above mentioned, in which they resided until 1894. He then built the upright of his present frame house, adding the wing in 1899, and it is now a very comfortable residence. Among his other constructions are a frame barn 36 by 48 feet in size, with full stone basement nine feet deep, and with a wing 32 by 32 feet for stock, two machine sheds, 16 by 16 and 16 by 32 feet; a poultry house 12 by 16 feet, and a garage 18 by 20 feet, all the buildings being kept in good condition. The original frame shack was transformed into a feed granary. To his original eighty-acre tract Mr. Larson added by purchase 120 acres adjoining and forty acres half a mile south. He has now 150 acres under the plow, the land being very productive. The farm is located two and a half miles northeast of Gilmanton village. Mr. Larson is engaged in general farming and dairying, having at the present time some twenty graded Holstein cows, using a full-blooded Holstein sire and some twelve or fifteen head of young cattle. He also has a herd of about twenty-five Poland-China hogs. His teams, machinery and other equipment are all of the best. As one of the successful men of his township and one of its long-time residents, Mr. Larson has been called upon at various times to take part in local government matters, to which as an interested citizen he has responded. Thus, he served several terms as a member of the town board, was treasurer of district No. 1 school board and is now treasurer of the directing board of Gilmanton high school. He is a stockholder in the Gilmanton & Dover Telephone Company, the Gilmanton Co-operative Creamery Company, and the Gilmanton Farmers’ Equity Exchange of Mondovi. He was one of the founders of the Western Bennett Valley Congregation of the Scandinavian Luthern church, and is now a deacon and trustee in it, he and all his family being members. To Mr. and Mrs. Larson eleven children have been born, as follows: Anna, born in 1878, died in infancy; Carl, born in 1882, also died in infancy; Mary, born December 19, 1884, is now Mrs. Anton Olson of Naples township, this county; Alvin, born April 6, 1887, is now in the United States service at Del Rio, Tex.; Laura, born September 21, 1888, graduated from the Alma Training School and the River Falls State Normal School and has been teaching for the past nine years; Oscar, born March 10, 1892, is residing on the home farm; George, born September 3, 1893, is a graduate of the Gilmanton high school and of the agricultural course of the Wisconsin State University, and is now in the United States service In France; Louise, born September 1, 1896, is residing at home; Albert, born December 23, 1898, died February 10, 1909; Cora, March 9, 1901, graduated from Gilmanton high school, where Carl, the youngest member of the family, born September 14, 1902, is now a student, both residing on the home farm.


Louis Larson
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume I Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 283 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

LOUIS LARSON, a prosperous farmer of Nelson township, Buffalo county, of which he is one of the leading citizens, was born on a farm in Norway, June 10, 1854, his parents being Jens Larson and Julia Christianson. His education was acquired chiefly in Norway, but was continued for a short time after his arrival in this country with his parents in 1869. When his parents located in Nelson township, Buffalo county, in 1872, he left home and began working on farms, continuing to work for others until his marriage at the age of 27 years to Julia Thompson, daughter of Bartel and Jennie Thompson, of this township. He and his wife then located on the old Thompson farm, on which he has built a frame house and barns, and where he is doing a prosperous business as an agriculturist and stock farmer. Mr. Larson has served the town as supervisor, and the Norwegian Lutheran church, of which he is a member, as one of its officials. He and his wife have had ten children, of whom two, Albert J and Christian A., are now deceased. The survivors are: Nellie, now Mrs. Louis Johnson, of Cascade valley, Nelson township; and Ben Julius, Christ Martinus, Arnold Theodore, Elmer, Alfred Leonard, Josephine Georgiana and Alma Johanna. Mrs. Larson died April 8, 1918.


Fred Laue
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume I Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 230-231 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

FRED LAUE, proprietor of the Laue Lumber Company of Alma, Buffalo county, and mayor of this city, was born here on a site opposite his present place of business, Oct. 23, 1869, son of Fred Sr. and Margaret (Heitzman) Laue. His education was acquired in the Alma graded schools and in colleges at La Crosse and Milwaukee. As he grew up he became associated with his father in the latter’s varied business interests, and five years ago, in 1912, became sole proprietor and manager of the Laue Lumber Yards, of which one is located in Alma, another at Nelson and a third at Cochrane. The business is a large and flourishing one and gives full scope to Mr. Laue’s managerial ability. In the spring of 1917 Mr. Laue was elected on the Republican ticket as mayor of Alma, and up to the present time has made an excellent public official, his intimate knowledge of all local conditions enabling him to act with wisdom in all matters connected with the city government. He has long been an adherent of the Republican party, having organized and been president of a Republican club previous to the election of President McKinley. Both as a business man and as a patriotic and reliable citizen, his reputation stands high. Mr. Laue was united in marriage, May 1st, 1893, to Emily Scherer, daughter of Albert and Charlotte (Wagner) Scherer, her parents being among the earliest settlers in Fountain City, the father being a widely known pioneer hotel keeper. Mr. and Mrs. Laue have one child, Charlotte Margaret, who graduated with high honors from the State University of Wisconsin, having taken the course in letters and science and made a very high record in philosophy.


Fred Laue, Sr.
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume I Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 229-230 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

FRED LAUE, SR., one of the immigrants to Buffalo county and city in 1857, and for nearly forty years one of the county’s prominent and respected citizens, was born in Schauenburg, Lippe, Germany, Jan. 15, 1833. His father died in the army when he was a child, and he was reared by an aunt, whose name was Caroline Fischer. As he grew to manhood he learned the trade of a mechanic, and thus equipped, came, in 1849, to the United States. For a while he worked at his trade in Pennsylvania, and then became foreman of a machine shop at Cincinnati, Ohio. While residing there he became interested in a colonization party bound for Buffalo county, Wisconsin, and in 1857 came himself to Buffalo City. He was accompanied by his wife, whose maiden name was Julia Horst and whom he had married in Louisville, Ky., in 1854. Here he soon became connected with the sawmill industry, usually one of the most important industries in a pioneer community, and in 1859 brought in the machinery for the Buffalo City Sawmill, which was the first mill of the kind in this section. He also conducted a store, but continued as proprietor of the mill in partnership with Adolph Buecker until 1865, when he moved to Alma and operated a mill in the south end of town, where the lumber yards of his son Fred are now located. His wife Julia died in the following year, and Mr. Laue remained unmarried until Feb. 7, 1869, when he took for his second wife Margaret Heitzman, who was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, July 15, 1849, daughter of Michael and Catherine (Schultz) Heitzman. Mr. Laue was one of the organizers of the Mississippi Logging Company, and was the originator of the Beef Slough Log Driving and Transportation Company, which was later merged into the Weyerhaeuser lumber interests. He also founded the Alma flour mills, with which he was connected for the rest of his life, but which were later burned down, the company being dissolved. The local creamery was another of his interests, he being for some years a member of its governing board. As one of the leading business men of Alma, Mr. Laue was strongly interested in the prosperity and development of the place, and served as president of the village board before Alma became a city. He was always a Republican in politics. His religious affiliations were with the Lutheran church, but he cheerfully gave support to churches of all denominations, and was a man universally respected and esteemed. His death, on Dec. 21, 1896, was an event that cast a deep shadow over the community. By his first wife, Julia, Mr. Laue had three children: Laura, who married C. A. Horst of Bellingham, Wash.; Matilda, now Mrs. P. E. Ibach, of Alma City, and Julia, wife of Fred Rauch of Chewelah, Wash., all of whom were born in Buffalo county. The children by his second wife were five in number: Fred, Jr., now engaged in the lumber business in Alma; Edward, who lives in the state of Washington; William, a merchant of Alma, and Adolph and Charles, who are deceased. The mother, Mrs. Margaret Laue, died in May, 1917. Mrs. Laue’s parents, Michael and Catherine (Schultz) Heitzman, were married in Cincinnati, Ohio, Michael being a native of Germany. He was a painter by trade and died when his daughter Margaret was two years old, the latter having a sister, Christina, who is now living in St. Joseph, Mo. Mrs. Catherine Heitzman subsequently became the wife of Antoine Mann, formerly a shoe-maker in Buffalo City.


Adolph Lauterbach
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume I Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 178-179 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

ADOLPH LAUTERBACH, a well known farmer of Modena township, Buffalo county, was born in this county, May 2, 1865, son of August and Emelia (Linse) Lauterbach. He was seven years old when his father died and at an early age had to become industrially active. At the age of 15 he went to live with an uncle, with whom he resided for five years, after which he returned to the home farm on which his mother was living. Here he has since remained, and by the purchase of eighty acres more land now personally owns 105 acres, his mother, who still survives, having 120 acres, which he also operates. He has brought the property into good condition, having fenced it, dug a well and erected good buildings. The residence, which he also built, is one of the nicest farm-houses in the township. In earlier years Mr. Lauterbach did much hard work grubbing the land, but that pioneer work was happily finished. He raises Percheron horses and full blooded Jersey cattle, and is also a stockholder in the Modena Creamery. A prominent citizen of the township, he served as supervisor two years and as school clerk for eleven or twelve years. At present he is treasurer of the Lutheran church congregation of the united townships, Albany, Canton and Modena. His religious affiliations are with the German Lutheran church.


August Lauterbach
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume I Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 178 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

AUGUST LAUTERBACH, a pioneer of Modena township, Buffalo county, was born in Germany, Jan. 27, 1835, and came to the United States in 1851 by sailing vessel. Ten years later he was married in La Crosse, Wis., to Emelia Linse, who was born in Germany, Oct. 29, 1837, and who is still living in Modena township. They settled in the town of Shelby, La Crosse county, where they resided for two years, at the end of that time coming to Modena township, Buffalo county. Here they located in German Valley, section 11, where Sam Meyer now resides, and erecting log buildings, Mr. Lauterbach began pioneer farming with an ox team. After a residence there of nine years he and his family removed to section 25, obtaining 120 acres of land, of which about ten acres had been broken, there being also a small shanty on the land. There Mr. Lauterbach passed the rest of his life, engaged in improving his place, his death occurring about 1872. He and his wife had five children: William, now deceased; Adolph, a farmer in Modena township; Marie, now deceased, who was the wife of Frank Rockwell; August, who died at the age of three years, and Emelia.


Alfred H. Lawrence
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 575-576 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

ALFRED H. LAWRENCE, for a number of years one of the prominent and highly esteemed citizens of Modena township, Buffalo county, but now deceased, was a native of New York State, but came of a well-known Massachusetts family. His grandfather on the Lawrence side married a Lowell, and the close union of the two prominent families was further evidenced in the founding of the Lawrence-Lowell Sheeting Factory at Lowell, Mass. George Lawrence, father of Alfred H., came with his family by way of the Lakes to Rock county, Wisconsin, and later moved to Fond du Lac county, where his wife died. Subsequently he removed to Iowa, in which state he spent his last yaers. Alfred H. Lawrence was married in Wisconsin to Louisa Odell, daughter of Austin and granddaughter of William Odell, the Odells being among the very first settlers in the vicinity of Modena, Buffalo county. It was in Modena township that Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence settled in 1872, with two children, Fred Henry and Lillian. Four years later they bought the farm now owned and operated by their son Fred, which they improved in various ways, particularly by the erection of new buildings. Here Mr. Lawrence died at the age of 57 years, and his wife at that of 62. They were affiliated religiously with the Methodist church. Mrs. Louisa (Odell) Lawrence, daughter of Austin and Rhoda Ann (Rouse) Odell, was the third born of her parents’ thirteen children. The two eldest in the family, Willmar and Caroline, died at the ages of 9 and 7 years respectively. Cassius, the next eldest boy, enlisted for service in the Civil War at the age of 16 years, in Company I, 36th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and was killed in action June 3, 1864. When he went to the war he left his father to battle with the work of clearing and cultivating the homestead, with only small boys to help, which broke the father down in health and was probably the cause of his death at the age of 55 years. His wife had preceded him to the grave by only three weeks, dying at the age of 51. Coming to Wisconsin in the early forties from New York State, they had settled at a place called Rising Sun, but moved from there to Columbia county, whence they later came with a team by way of La Crosse to Buffalo county. Only one wagon track then marked the trail along the Mississippi river and Beef river to where the little village of Modena now stands. Austin Odell built a log hut on his homestead, where he lived and reared his family of nine children up to the time of his death, one more boy, Henry, dying in infancy in Modena. The daughter, Louisa, succeeded in keeping the three smaller children in the old home, adjoining the present farm of Fred Henry Lawrence, with the aid of Abner Odell. Adeline Odell Thomas was the first white girl married in Buffalo county. She died at Lodi, where she had lived all her married life. There are now seven of the children living, among those not already mentioned being: Mrs. Chloe Parr, Augusta, Mrs. Harriet Bowen of Bangor, Mrs. Eudora Moats of Eau Claire, and Mrs. Ida M. Hanan of Mondovi, all in Wisconsin. The latter named was the first white girl born in Buffalo county. The ancestors of the Odell family came from Ireland, and according to family tradition, were soldiers for many generations in their native land. Their descendants have served their adopted country, the United States, in the War of the Revolution, the War of 1812-15, the Civil War, and in the present war with Germany, in which several of the great nephews and three great grandchildren are taking part, one grandson, Lawrence L. Hanan, of Mondovi, being now in France. The three great grandchildren are Merton Odell, of Lodi, Roy Miller, of Augusta, Wis., and Karl Miller. The grandchildren are Lawrence L. Hanan, a member of the 86th Division, 33d Infantry, called the Black Hawks; Raymond Bowen, of Bangor, and Giles Odell of Eleva, Wis., now in the cantonments awaiting their call for oversea.


Fred Henry Lawrence
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 578-579 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

FRED HENRY LAWRENCE, engaged in agriculture in section 23, Modena township, Buffalo county, where he is operating the old homestead of his parents, Alfred H. and Louisa (Odell) Lawrence, was born in the town of Oakfield, Fond du Lac county, Wisconsin, June 13, 1859, and has resided since 1876 on the old homestead, which he assisted his father to improve and develop. His educational opportunities were limited, but he attended the district school for a while and acquired the rudiments of knowledge sufficient for the ordinary purposes of life. After his parents’ death the home farm came into his possession and he has since cultivated it on a profitable basis. Mr. Lawrence was married, June 8, 1892, to Elizabeth Steele, who was born in Mondovi township, Buffalo county, Wisconsin, June 25, 1868, daughter of Jonathan and Mahala (Hummer) Steele, the house in which she first saw the light being a log structure erected by her father and her grandfather, Elisha Hummer, and at the time of her birth the flooring had not yet been laid. Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence are the parents of one child, Glenn, who was born January 21, 1894, and who is residing at home. Jonathan Steele, the father of Mrs. Fred H. Lawrence, was a native of Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, and was married in that state to Mahala Hummer, who was born at High Bridge, New Jersey. Mr. Steele was a farmer by occupation, and on coming to Buffalo county, Wisconsin, about I867, he purchased 160 acres of land in Mondovi township, buying the right of another man who had homesteaded it. Ten acres were broken, but there being no buildings, he had to erect them himself. With the help of oxen he developed his land into a good farm. His market was at Mondovi village, seven miles away, the journey both ways being made by him on foot. On that farm he died at the age of 69 years, after a life of useful industry. He was a son of John and Elizabeth Steele, his father being a native of Ireland and his mother of Scotch origin. His wife, Mahala, died July 20, 1918. She was a daughter of Elisha Hummer of New Jersey, her mother, whose family name was Diltz, being of German descent. Elisha Hummer was a Revolutionary soldier and was with the army under Washington at Valley Forge, during the memorable winter of 1777-78.


Martin Lee
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 628 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

MARTIN LEE, a farmer on the old Lee homestead in section 9, Dover township, Buffalo county, was born in Norway, Oct. 1, 1865, son of Ole K. and Oler Lee. His school days were limited in extent but were spent in this township, and at an early age he began to make himself useful on the home farm. Here he has always remained, and has assisted greatly in its development, among other things having erected a good frame residence. He was a shareholder in the old cheese factory and also took shares in the creamery when it started, having always believed in encouraging home industries. He now has the active management of the farm in his hands and is raising good stock and making the place yield satisfactory financial returns. He is a member and has been an officer in the Norwegian Lutheran church. Mr. Lee married Anna Larson, a native of Dane county, Wisconsin, and he and his wife have five children: Elmer, Christ, Emma, Oscar and Tilda.


Ole K. Lee
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 627-628 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

OLE K. LEE, a pioneer of Dover township, Buffalo county, who is still living here, was born in Norway, August 13, 1835, and there grew to manhood and married. With his wife Oler and their six children—Martin, Knute, Anton, Andrew, Betsey and Mary—he set out for the United States, and, with true pioneer instinct, or, it may be, with previous knowledge of existing conditions, came west to Green county, Wisconsin. Mr. Lee's design was to establish a home and wrest a living from the soil, and having little or no money, he soon became convinced that a location farther to the northwest was desirable as affording better opportunities for obtaining free or cheap land. Accordingly he came to Buffalo county to look over the ground, and, being satisfied with the prospects, secured a tract of wild land in section 9, Dover township. Here he built a log shack, to which in the fall of the same year he brought his family with their household possessions. He had nothing but his hands with which to make a beginning and had to carry provisions on his back from Alma. It was two years before he got an ox team, though he was able to get a cow the first year. The money to pay for the latter he earned by grubbing for a neighbor. Thus a part of his time at first was spent in working for others, as was the case with most of the pioneers in this region, but in spite of a slow start he made progress, which was gradually accelerated until he found himself the owner of a fine farm. Here he has since resided and is now numbered among the prosperous citizens of his township. At various times he has held office in the Norwegian Lutheran church, which he helped to establish. Mr. Lee's first wife, Oler, died at the age of 67 years, and he subsequently married Mrs. Hans Olson, a widow. His children are all of the first marriage.


Edward Lees
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 594-595 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

EDWARD LEES, pioneer, whose life and work are interwoven in the foundations of Buffalo County history, was born in Scotland, where he was reared to sturdy manhood. In 1848, with his wife, Catherine Dobie, and three children, Robert, Alexander, and George, he set out to try his fortunes amid the wider opportunities of the new world. After a voyage of 48 days aboard a sailing vessel, the family landed in this country and found their way to Ottawa, Waukesha County, Wisconsin, where for a time Mr. Lees found various employment. While thus engaged he devoted his spare time to the study of law in a law office, and in due time was admitted to the bar. A man of superior attainments and sterling worth, in a small community he soon attracted the attention of his fellow men, and in 1853 he was sent to the assembly as a representative from that county, an unusual record for a man who had been in this country but five years. While serving in the assembly, he heard of the tracts of fertile lands in Buffalo County, and at once made his plans to cast his lot here. Accordingly, in 1855, he landed at Fountain City with his family, and after looking about for a while, secured some good land three miles east of that place. In 1856, when the town of Belvidere was created, he was elected its first chairman, and upon taking his seat as a member of the county board, was named as chairman of that body. In a community where nearly all the pioneers were people of alien tongue and customs, his legal knowledge was of much importance in shaping the official destinies of the county. When Cross was set off from Belvidere the following year, he was made its chairman, and continued in office for many years, likewise continuing his position as chairman of the county board. Soon after his arrival, he had formed a partnership with Ferdinand Fetter, and with him established a law office in Fountain City, continuing, however, to devote much of his attention to developing his farm. He was elected district attorney in 1859 and served until 1867, and during his term of office in 1860 endeavored to enlarge the boundaries of Buffalo county by proving that the creation of Trempealeau county had been illegal. Elected to the office again in 1871, he served four years more. In 1875 and 1876, he served in the assembly of which he had been a pioneer member twenty-three years before. After a long and useful career, he died on his farm at the age of seventy-four years, one of the most honored and respected citizens in Buffalo county. His good wife lived to be seventy-nine. They left six children, Robert, Alexander, George, John, Isabella, and Mary.


Edward Lees
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 596 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

EDWARD LEES, commissioner of the Supreme Court of Minnesota, was born at Fountain City, Wisconsin, Dec. 1, 1865, son of Robert and Mary (Baertsch) Lees. He was educated in the Alma schools and in 1886 graduated in law from the University of Wisconsin. With this preparation he moved to Winona and started practicing in the law office of W. A. Finkelnburg. In 1895 he formed a partnership with M. B. Webber in the law firm of Webber & Lees, one of the best known firms in Minnesota and western Wisconsin. In 1916 he was tendered the appointment as judge of the Third Minnesota District Court, but declined the honor. Nov. 12, 1918, he was appointed commissioner of the Supreme Court of Minnesota, and soon after moved to St. Paul. For many years Mr. Lees was a leader in Winona in all civic, philanthropic and patriotic work. He was associated with the Margaret Simpson Home, the Board of Park Commissioners, the Winona Park and Drive Association, and other similar activities. He was director of two campaigns of the Red Cross for funds in Winona county, and was connected in a legal capacity with many commercial and industrial enterprises there. For twenty years he was a member of the Minnesota State Board of Law Examiners. Mr. Lees was married Oct. 9, 1894, to Katherine E. Ernst of St. Louis, daughter of Gustave and Johanna (Ficke) Ernst, and has two daughters, Flora Elizabeth and Jean.


Robert Lees
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 595-596 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

ROBERT LEES, for nearly three decades county judge of Buffalo county, which office he was honorably holding at the time of his lamented death, was born at Coatbridge, near Glasgow, Scotland, July 3, 1842, son of Edward and Catherine (Dobie) Lees. He was still a young boy when he was brought to Waukesha county, this state, in 1848 and to Buffalo county in 1855. Reared in a pioneer community, he received such education as the district schools afforded, and supplemented this first by association with his learned father and later by wide reading and observation. At the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861, he enlisted in Co. H, 6th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and with that company saw active service in the Iron Brigade. Wounded at the Battle of Gettysburg, in the heroic charge of that brigade, he was sent to the hospital, where he was mustered out July 16, 1864. Incapacitated for farm work, he returned home and devoted the next twelve years of his life largely to educational work, teaching in various rural schools and in 1864-5 and again in 1869-71 serving efficiently as county superintendent. In 1873 he represented his district in the state assembly, and in 1887 and 1889 in the state senate. In the meantime he had given up his educational work, and having been admitted to the bar, opened an office in Alma. As a lawyer he was able and conscientious, and though an excellent court pleader, it is said that he settled more litigation in his office than was settled in the district court. In 1881 he was elected county judge and continued in office the remainder of his life. He also served in various local positions, including excellent work on the Alma school board. His death, Sept. 21, 1908, was widely mourned. Robert Lees was married March 4, 1865, to Mary Baertsch, who was born at Galena, Illinois, April 28, 1845, daughter of Andrew and Mary (Perry) Baertsch, earliest pioneers of Buffalo county. This union was blessed with six children: Edward, Mary, Isabella, Andrew, Alice and Cora. Edward is now on the supreme bench of Minnesota and has recently moved to St. Paul. Mary is a retired school teacher. Isabella is the wife of Norman Fetter, St. Paul attorney. Andrew is a leading attorney of La Crosse. Alice is dead. Cora is the wife of Robert Gasell, a well-known educator who holds the degree of Ph.D. from Washington University at St. Louis, Missouri.


John Le Gore
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume I Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 493 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

JOHN LE GORE, one of the pioneer settlers of Mondovi township, now deceased, was born in New York State, but came to Wisconsin in 1845 and to Buffalo county in 1856. In 1844 he had married Pauline Farrington, and together they took up pioneer life in Mondovi township, where they subsequently made a comfortable home. Mr. Le Gore held various local offices during his residence here, and in the early days, when privation was the common lot and the pioneers often shared necessities with each other, his home, humble though it was, always had the latchstring out, and good cheer and hearty hospitality were accorded every visitor, whether friend or stranger. While the Civil War was in progress Mr. Le Gore enlisted in Company G, 25th Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteers, and served until discharged for disability. For a number of years before his death Mr. Le Gore, affectionately known as “Uncel John,” was in poor health, but was always kind hearted, generous and hospitable. He and his wife had five children, one of whom, Frances, now the widow of Ezra H. Myers, was the first white girl born in Mondovi township. Another member of the Le Gore family, Lorenzo Dow Le Gore, for some time an officer in the state’s prison at Waupun, and a man of fine personal character, is also now deceased.


Henry Lehmann, Jr.
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume I Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 223 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

HENRY LEHMANN, JR., who occupies a prominent place among the rising young farmers of Alma township, Buffalo county, was born in this county, Aug. 2, 1889, son of Henry and Ursula (Wald) Lehmann. The father, who was born in Germany, came to the United States in 1860, and was married in Alma township in 1880, he and his wife settling in Alma township, Buffalo county, where he engaged in farming and became quite successful. Though now retired and living in Alma, he still owns a fine farm of 300 acres in this township, about 220 acres of which are cleared. During his active career he served for 14 years as treasurer of his district school board. He and his wife have been the parents of ten children, all of whom are living, namely: Ella, born May 22, 1882; Clara, born Jan. 3, 1884, who is the wife of Edwin Accola; Alvina, born Dec. 30, 1885, who married Nicholas Kattipolt; Anna, born Sept. 4, 1887, who married Gustav Duerkop; Henry, Jr., subject of this sketch; Olivia, born Dec. 31, 1891, who is teaching school; Roy, born Dec. 8, 1893, who also is a school teacher; August, born May 30, 1895, who is engaged in farming on the home place in Alma township, and who was married May 14, 1918, to Daily Kohlhepp; May, born Feb. 9, 1899, who resides at home; and Wilma, born April 10, 1902, who is also a teacher. Henry Lehman, Jr., was educated in the school of his home district and after arriving at the industrial age spent his early years in assisting his father on the parental homestead, which he helped to develop and improve. At the age of 26 years he began farming on his own account, becoming proprietor of the farm on which he now resides, located in section 18, Alma township, and which was formerly the property of Valentine Thoeny. Here he is successfully engaged in general farming, keeping a good herd of milch cows, and giving his chief attention to dairying and the raising of swine. He is as yet unmarried, his sister Ella keeping house for him. In politics he is a Republican.


Ole T. Leirmo
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume I Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 329-330 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

OLE T. LEIRMO, who for about 21 years was engaged in agricultural pursuits in Naples township, Buffalo county, was born in Norway, March 3, 1852. In his native land he was married to Gertrude Feigum and in 1880 they came to Wisconsin, locating first in Trempealeau county. Thence in 1882 they came to Naples township, Buffalo county, taking a tract of 80 acres of unimproved land in section 23. He and his wife resided at the home of John Berg until he had time to build a house, which, when completed, was a single room log dwelling. It is still standing on the farm. Like the earliest pioneers, Mr. Leirmo made use of oxen for the draft work of the farm, and he himself worked as hard as his cattle, having no resources save his physical strength and will-power. These in the end proved sufficient stepping-stones to fortune, or at least to a comfortable degree of prosperity, and in the year 1900 he was able to build a good frame house of two stories. At his death, which occurred May 29, 1903, he had cleared between 55 or 60 acres of his land. He was buried in Norden cemetery. His wife, who passed away before him, Feb. 26, 1896, was laid to rest in the Norden cemetery, the family being members of the Norden Lutheran congregation, of which Mr. Leirmo was one of the founders. In politics he was a Republican. A list of the children of Mr. and Mrs. Leirmo is as follows: Anna, born in Norway, March 16, 1879, is now the wife of Ole S. Olson of Naples township; Mary, born in Naples township, Buffalo county, July 8, 1882, is the wife of Michael Bjorgos, of the same township; Thomas, born in this township May 28, 1884, is a resident of Dennison, Minn.; Christian, born in Naples township, June 5, 1886, is a resident of Eau Claire, Wis.; Oliver, born in Naples township, Jan. 24, 1889, is a farmer in this township; John, born here June 29, 1890, is still a local resident and a farmer by occupation; Gertrude, born in Naples township, Jan. 17, 1893, died Nov. 23, 1909; Thomas born Jan. 7, 1881, died in infancy.


Ole Hanson Lerum
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume I Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 297-298 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

OLE HANSON LERUM, a pioneer of Nelson township, Buffalo county, was a native of Lyster, Norway, his parents being proprietors of a farm known as Lerum Farm. He was married in his native land to Anna Alme, and in 1850 they left home for the United States, which they reached after a voyage of six weeks on a sailing vessel. After stopping six years in Dane county, Wisconsin, they came to Buffalo county, driving with ox teams, and accompanied by Erik Alme, Arne Otteson and Jens Hogland, the last mentioned also having his family with him. Mr. Hanson located in section 11, Nelson township, on a tract containing nine “forties” of land. He had an ox team of his own, with a few cows and one or two hogs and sheep. The first summer he and his family lived in their covered wagon, but he later built a log house. There he resided until his death in 1888 or 1889, by which time he had made good progress on his farm and became one of the leading citizens in the township. In early days he, at different times, held public office, and he was also one of the prominent members of the Norwegian Lutheran church. His wife is still living on the old place and although 94 years old, is able to spin and knit as she did in her younger days, when she made clothes for the family. They had two sons and four daughters: Hans, Thomas, Julia, Christie (deceased), Sarah and Anna. Hans is now living in Minneapolis; Julia is in Grant county, Minnesota; Anna, resides with her mother, and Sarah is in Canada.


Thomas Hanson Lerum
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume I Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 298-299 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

THOMAS HANSON LERUM, a well-to-do farmer of Nelson township, Buffalo county, was born in this township, in the log house of his parents, Ole and Anna (Alme) Hanson Lerum, Dec. 7, 1860. The name Lerum, added to the name of Hanson, is taken from the old home place in Norway. The educational opportunities of the subject of this sketch were few, but he attended a log schoolhouse for awhile, where he learned to read and write and to do a little arithmetic. The rest of his time after he was old enough was spent in working on the home farm, of which he came into possession at the age of 21 years, as manager and part owner, four years later buying the interests of his brothers. The farm now contains 320 acres, and has been much improved by him. The basement barn, 56 by 34 feet, the upper part, 78 by 34 feet, being a horse barn, was built by him in 1897. In 1893 the brick veneered residence, 33 by 31 feet, was erected. The granary, 18 by 26 feet, with 14-foot posts, was built in 1898. Among the other buildings are a chicken house, 22 by 16 feet, an auto shed, 16 by 12 feet, and machine shed, 40 by 22 feet. The fine pine shade trees were also set out by Mr. Hanson Lerum himself. He is raising Durham cattle and Duroc Jersey Red hogs, and has a fine flock of Shropshire and Oxford sheep of crossed breed, in which he takes justifiable pride. For a number of years formerly he served as a member of the town side board. He also helped to organize the Burnside creamery and served for some years on its board of directors. Among his present interests are those of a shareholder in the Nelson bank, in which he has held the office of examiner. The Norwegian Lutheran church numbers him among its active and useful members. Mr. Hanson Lerum was married, Feb. 25, 1892, to Tena Hanson, who was born in Buffalo county, daughter of Syver and Julia Hanson, her parents, Norwegians, being early settlers in Modena township, this county. He and his wife have had six children, two of whom are now deceased. Those living are: Martin, Sidney, Laura and Agnes. The family belong to the Norwegian Lutheran church.


Andrew Lindstrom
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 570 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

ANDREW LINDSTROM, a former citizen of Maxville township, Buffalo county, but now deceased, was in his day a man well known and respected in the northwestern part of Buffalo county. He was a native of Sweden, born Feb. 14, 1846, and came to the United States in 1871, locating in Buffalo county, Wisconsin, where he was married, in 1880, to Christina Larson, who was born in Norway, March 8, 1850. She came to this country in 1866 by sailing vessel, being 13 weeks on the ocean. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Lindstrom settled on Beef Slough, in Nelson township, he being employed as brailing boss for several years on the river. In 1882 he secured a farm in section 33, Maxville township, and with his wife moved onto the place in 1884. Only an old log building had been erected, and a large part of the land needed clearing. In time he increased the size of his farm to 240 acres and built a good brick veneer house, with substantial barns, having become one of the prosperous farmers of the township. Here he spent the rest of his life, dying Oct. 31, 1909. He was one of the active members of the Lutheran church, and among other work that he did, helped to improve the church yard. He had been a widower for some years before his death, his wife having passed away Dec. 18, 1903. They had seven children: John, Christian M., Emil, Solomon, Carl, Anna and Carrie. All are now living except Carl, who died at the age of six years.


Christian M. Lindstrom
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 571 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

CHRISTIAN M. LINDSTROM, a successful farmer of Maxville township, Buffalo county, was born in Nelson township, this county, June 12, 1883, son of Andrew and Christina (Larson) Lindstrom. He was educated in the district school, and, with the exception of a few months spent in the west, he has devoted his life to farming at home. He is now serving as chairman of the Maxville township board, having previously been supervisor on the side board. He has also been a member of the school board of his district for several years. His religious affiliations are with the Lutheran church. Christian M. Lindstrom was married, 1907, to Mary Lilleskov, who was born in Modena township, daughter of John and Rosa Lilleskov. Mr. and Mrs. Lindstrom are the parents of two living children: Christine and Alfred. Another child, Rosebelle, died at the age of six months. The Lindstrom Brothers, since the death of their parents have operated the home farm, and have added to it 320 acres purchased from William Jost, thus making a farm of 560 acres. The brothers carry on general farming, and make a specialty of Poland China swine, good Percheron horses, and other reliable stock. They are considered among the most substantial people of the township. They hold stock in the Nelson Telephone Co. and in the Burnside Creamery, of which latter organization Christian M. is a director.


Charles William Herman Linse
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 520-521 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

CHARLES WILLIAM HERMAN LINSE, better known as Herman Linse, a farmer of Modena township, was born in Germany, Aug. 26, 1840, son of William and Ida (Keuhn) Linse. Coming to America in 1848, and locating first near Milwaukee, the family, after several removals, and a residence of about ten years eight miles east of La Crosse, settled, in 1864, in Modena township, Buffalo county. Herman Linse was educated chiefly in Germany, having little time to attend school here. At the age of 26 years he began farming on his own account on his present place. It consisted of 160 acres, of which ten acres had been broken. He paid $70 for the improvements made by the previous owner, though there was no building, and he had to erect a log house and barn himself. He was then a single man, but on Feb. 17, 1869, he married Frederica Triser, a native of Germany, and began domestic life. He had an ox team and two cows and from that beginning he went on to develop a farm, in which task he, in time, succeeded. In 1886 he had so far progressed as to be able to build a fine frame house, having previously, in 1882, erected a frame barn, which he still uses. The work of clearing the land was hard, but was at last accomplished, and Mr. Linse has since increased the size of his farm to 340 acres. He is a member of the German Lutheran church, and aside from his immediate farming interests owns shares in the Modena creamery. His wife died at the age of 58 years. They had nine children, of whom two, Herman and Wilhelmina, are now deceased. The survivors are: Minnie, Odelia, Paulina, Emelia, Henry, William and Alvin.


Fritz Oscar Linse
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 521-522 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

FRITZ OSCAR LINSE, a prosperous agriculturist of Modena township, was born in Saxony, Germany, Nov. 26, 1845, son of William and Ida (Keuhn) Linse. His parents settled on the farm on which he now lives, in section ___, as far back as 1864, the father residing on the farm until his death, in 1872. Some time before that, however, owing to his father’s age, Fritz O. Linse had taken over the management of the place, which then consisted of 80 acres, and from that time on he continued to improve it, also in time buying more land until he had 260 acres. Among the improvements were two fine barns, the larger one of which was erected in 1882, and in 1892 the brick residence was built. The place is now operated by his sons, who raise Jersey cattle, a good grade of horses, and other stock. In early days Mr. Linse used to drive to Alma with an ox team, a distance of 18 miles. On one occasion he drove with 55 bushels of wheat to Alma, having a yoke of four oxen. There was high water in the creek and in crossing the bridge the planks gave way and the oxen’s legs went through. With the assistance of eight men, who came along, he unloaded his wheat and extricated the oxen. Then, loading the wagon again, he proceeded on his way until he got to within three miles from Alma, when his team and wagon slid down a bank 20 feet high, so that he had to unload again to get back on the road. When he got to Alma it was towards evening, and there he found that the delay he had experienced had been of benefit to him, as within a few hours the price of wheat had risen from $1.50 to $1.70 per bushel, an increase that paid him amply for his extra trouble and annoyance. On another occasion it took him from one o’clock in the morning until two o’clock the next morning to go to Alma and back for a load of lumber, allowing time for the oxen to feed twice. Mr. Linse is a stockholder in the local creamery and has served as one of its officials. He has also served on the school board and has been an official of the Lutheran church, of which he is a member. Mr. Linse was married, Dec. 13, 1872, to Caroline Danz, who came to the United States from Saxony, Germany, in 1871. He and his wife are the parents of nine children: Oscar, Albert, Emma, Lydia, Mary, Wilhelmina, Ida, Edward and Eugene. Emma, Lydia and Mary have taught school.


Herman Linse
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume I Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 497 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

HERMAN LINSE, a pioneer of Modena township, Buffalo county, where he is now living at the venerable age of 79 years, was born in Germany and was seven years old when he accompanied his parents to the United States. They resided for awhile in Portage and La Crosse, Wis., and were very poor. In 1859 they came to Modena township, Buffalo county, where they began pioneer farming with no other tools than an axe and a grub hoe. Herman was then 22 years old, and was of material assistance in developing the farm. In 1864 he was married in Modena township to Frederica Treise, who had come to America at the age of 18 years, and they took up their residence on a homestead farm of 160 acres of wild land in Modena township, their dwelling being a pioneer log house. They had both a horse team and an ox team, so in that respect were more fortunate than many of the pioneers, who started with nothing. In time Mr. Linse developed his land into a good farm—the same on which he now lives. He has had an industrious career and well earned his present prosperity and ease. His wife died in October, 1906. Their family consisted of four sons and four daughters, namely, William, now a prosperous farmer in Mondovi township; Herman, who is deceased; Henry and Alvin, who are living in Modena; Minnie, Othelia, Paulina and Amelia, the sisters all living in Modena township.


William Linse
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume I Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 497-498 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

WILLIAM LINSE, one of the leading farmers of Mondovi township, Buffalo county, residing in section 33, was born in Modena township, this county, March 16, 1874, son of Herman and Frederica (Treise) Linse. He received a limited education, attending for a brief period or at intervals the log schoolhouse of his district, and remained on his parents’ farm until 1897. In that year he went to the Dakotas, but returned the same fall. In the following year, 1898, he was married to Bertha Hilend, of Pepin county, and he and his wife began domestic life on a rented farm—known as the Sweet farm—in Modena township. In 1898 Mr. Linse bought the Mosher farm of 190 acres of improved land in Gilman valley, Gilmanton township, on which he remained until the spring of 1902. He then bought and removed to the John McQuillan farm of 202 acres in section 33, Mondovi township, five miles south of Mondovi City. He had scarcely been settled here when his wife, Mrs. Bertha Linse, died, on March 4, 1902. She left two children: Waldemar, born Sept. 3, 1899, and Joseph, born Oct. 23, 1901, both of whom are now living and residing on the farm with their father. Some time after coming here Mr. Linse bought an additional tract of 80 acres adjoining, which makes the present size of the farm 282 acres. The original buildings consisted of a two-story frame house of nine rooms, a fair barn and one or two outbuildings. His own improvements have been more extensive and include a variety of buildings. The first barn he built —a good-sized, substantial structure-burned down. He then put up another which a violent storm blew away. The third one, constructed in 1914 and .now standing, is a substantial frame building, 50 by 80 by 14 feet in size, with full basement, cement floor and modern equipment, including “James" stanchions. He has also built a tool shed 24 by 64, a granary, a garage 14 by 20, a power-house 10 by 14, a double corncrib 20 by 30 feet, and has just completed a tile-block silo 16x42 feet with a capacity of 200 tons. It is one of the largest in Buffalo county. He also has built in connection a separator room of the same material 12x16. His buildings are electrically lighted. The soil of his farm is rich and well cultivated. His cattle, graded, are of the Shorthorn breed, comprising about 30 cows and 15 young cattle, while he has a herd of about 100 Duroc-Jersey hogs. His teams, machinery and other equipment are all of a high grade. In addition to his immediate interests in this farm, Mr. Linse is a stockholder in the Equitable Elevator Co., the Farmers’ Co-operative Creamery and the canning factory, all of Mondovi. On March 23, 1904, Mr. Linse married Huldah, daughter of August Heck, of Canton township, Buffalo county. Of this, his second marriage, five children have been born: Bertha, Jan. 22, 1905; August, June 24, 1906; Clarence, May 25, 1908; Angalica, March 3, 1910, and Helena, April 23, 1912, all of whom are residing at home. Mr. Linse is a staunch Republican in politics, and he and his family are members of the German Lutheran congregation at Mondovi.


William Linse
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 521 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

WILLIAM LINSE, one of the pioneers of Modena township, Buffalo county, long since passed away, was a native of Germany. He was there married to Ida Keuhn, and in 1848, accompanied by their five children, Charles, Emelia, Herman, Matilda and Fritz, they emigrated to the United States, making the voyage in a sailing vessel. They located first near Milwaukee, then removed to a place 30 miles from there, where Mr. Linse farmed for one year, subsequently removing to Portage. They also spent some time near Watertown. After moving about in this way until 1854, making trial of different locations, they settled on a place eight miles east of La Crosse, where they remained ten years. In 1864 Mr. Linse and all the members of his family, except Charles, came to Buffalo county, Mr. Linse securing 80 acres of land in section 12, Modena township. It was unbroken and full of “grubs,” which had to be removed, and there were no buildings. Consequently, there was a great deal of hard work to be done, and Mr. Linse began by erecting a log house. His labors were continued, however, only for a few years, as he was already an elderly man, and his death occurred in 1872, when he was aged seventy. His wife, who was born in 1811, survived him, dying in 1889. Of their children, already mentioned, Charles and Matilda are deceased. Emelia is the wife of August Lauterbach. Herman resides in Mondovi township. Fritz Oscar is residing in Modena township, after a successful career as a farmer.


Paul Lisowski, Jr.
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume I Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 469-470 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

PAUL LISOWSKI, JR., who owns and operates a good farm of 354 acres in Montana township, Buffalo county, residing in section 11, was born in this township January 15, 1889, son of Paul, Sr., and Anna (Kleuning) Lisowski. The parents were natives of Germany, the father coming to America when a boy, in 1878, and settling with them in this county and state, where he resided most of his life, during his active years being engaged in farming on the homestead now operated by his son and namesake, Paul, Jr. He is now retired and he and his wife reside in Independence, Trempealeau county. They had five children: Andrew, now deceased; Paul, Jr.; Hattie, who married Frank Mish; Mary, who married Joe Pyka; and Peter, born January 15, 1902, who lives in Independence. Paul Lisowski, Jr., attended district school until 16 years old and assisted his father on the home farm until he was 21. It contains 354 acres, of which about 170 acres are clear, the rest being in bluff and timber. Here he is now engaged in general farming, mainly dairying and hog raising, keeping a mixed herd of milch cows. He is also a shareholder in the Independence Grain and Stock Company and the Independence Creamery. Mr. Lisowski was married November 14, 1914, to Gertrude Sonsalla, who was born in Bohri’s Valley, this county, March 29, 1896, daughter of John and Agnes (Garbria) Sonsalla, who were natives of Germany. Her father is now deceased, but her mother is living and resides in Independence. They had twelve children: Anna, who married Peter Kuka; Victoria, who married Walter Pampuch; Roy, a student of Whitehall, Wis.; Mary, now deceased; John, who lives in North Dakota; Julia, the wife of John Lygula and a resident of Whitehall, Wis.; Rose, who married Martin Kampa; Joseph, who is living on the old home farm in Bohri’s Valley; Lucy, who married Thomas Mish; Albert, who married Christine Mish, and resides in Independence; Susan, deceased; and Gertrude, wife of Paul Lisowski. Mr. and Mrs. Lisowski are the parents of two children: Virginia, born September 5, 1915, and Raymond, born February 23, 1918.


Ara A. Litchfield
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume I Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 455-456 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

ARA A. LITCHFIELD, a retired farmer residing in the village of Gilmanton, Buffalo county, is a man who has acquired a competency through years of hard work and good management along agricultural lines. He was born in Adams county, Wisconsin, August 12, 1864, son of Thomas and Atilda (Blanchard) Litchfield. He received but a poor education, attending school for a limited period in Gilmanton township, Buffalo county, and being obliged at an early age to make himself useful on his parents’ farm. He herded cattle, drove oxen and helped to clear the farm, residing at home until 17 years old. In 1881, being ambitious to make an early start for himself, he bought a farm of 100 acres in section 29, Gilmanton township, which was but slightly improved, there being a small frame house and granary on it. For about five years he led a bachelor’s life on this place, and was then united in marriage with Julia, daughter of Zeba and Lydia (Brown) Lunderville, of this township. For about twenty-five years he resided on his farm in section 29, making important improvements on it, which included the building of a comfortable residence, a barn, granary and other buildings, all frame and substantially constructed. He also developed eighty-five acres of land and brought it into a high state of cultivation. In 1903 Mr. Litchfield bought his father’s old farm of 161 acres in section 15, Gilmanton township, an improved place, on which he lived until 1909, when he rented it to his son, Thomas Roy, and took up his residence in Gilmanton village. There he remained until 1915, in which year he went back to the farm and resided on it for two years or more, at the end of which time he retired and again took up his residence in the village, where he is now living with his wife. His career as an agriculturist was progressive and successful, being marked by hard work and persevering effort. He was engaged in general farming and dairying, finding a ready market for his products and at an early period taking rank among the prosperous citizens of his township. He still owns the farm, of which 130 acres are now under cultivation. Mr. Litchfield is a Republican in politics and saw service for some time as a member of the Gilmanton town board. He was reared in the faith of the Methodist Episcopal church, though not now a member. He holds membership, however, in the camp of Modern Woodmen of America at Gilmanton, which he joined in 1896, and in the Knights of Pythias lodge, with which he became connected in 1911. He and his wife have two children: Thomas Roy, born April 18, 1887, and now angaged in the livery business in Mondovi, who married Myrtle Trowbridge, and has three children, Loraine E., Erna and Doris; and Letta, born December 16, 1888, who is now the wife of Bert Loomis, a farmer of Gilmanton township, and has three children, Ellen J., Cecil A. and Jerald E.


Charles Loewenhagen
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume I Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 372-373 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

CHARLES LOEWENHAGEN, who is numbered among the prosperous farmers and stock raisers of Belvidere township, Buffalo county, residing in section 28, was born in Alma City, this county, October 11, 1886, son of Frederick and Minnie (Stuhr) Loewenhagen. He received a good education and was reared to agricultural pursuits, working for various farmers until reaching 24 years of age. Then with his brother Otto he rented a farm in Alma township, this county, on which he resided for three years, during two of which he operated it alone. After that he operated a rented farm in Milton township for two years, and then, in 1916, bought his father’s farm in section 28, Belvidere township, on which he now lives, and where he is carrying on general farming, giving special attention to dairying and the raising of swine. He has 160 acres of land, a good frame residence, and a modern barn, 80 by 34 feet in size, supplied with a ventilating system. About 100 acres of his land are being cultivated, the rest being in woodland and meadow. On May 20, 1911, Mr. Loewenhagen was united in marriage with Anna Stuber, who was born in Rose Valley, January 27, 1890, daughter of John and Bertha (Heuer) Stuber. She was one of two children born to her parents, having a brother, Emil, who married Della Weiss and now resides in Rose Valley. Her father died in 1895 as the result of an accident which he met with while threshing. Her mother is still living. Mr. and Mrs. Loewenhagen have had two children, one of whom, a son, died in infancy. The surviving child is Earl, who was born May 23, 1914.


Frederick Loewenhagen
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume I Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 372 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

FREDERICK LOEWENHAGEN, a retired farmer and well-known and respected citizen residing in Alma City, was born in Germany, September 25, 1856. Growing to manhood in his native land, he was there married to Minnie Stuhr, who was born in Germany, February 1, 1858. Immediately after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Loewenhagen came to America, locating in Alma, Buffalo county, Wisconsin. Later they engaged in farming in Belvidere township, this county, on the farm now owned by their son, Charles, in section 28. During their early years on the place they had many difficulties to overcome and hardships to endure, as all this region was then new and but thinly settled by whites, though the Indians were numerous. They had, therefore, to carve a home from the wilderness, a long and toilsome task which they attacked with energy and finally completed. They remained on their farm until 1913, in which year they retired with a competence to Alma City, where both are now living. They have been the parents of eleven children: Lena, Minnie, Emma, Charles, Otto, Frederick, Elsie, Anna, Meta, Esther and William. Anna died at the age of 14 years.


Clement D. Loomis
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume I Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 421 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

CLEMENT D. LOOMIS, general merchant and dealer in farm implements in Gilmanton village, Buffalo county, is one of the leaders in his line of business in this part of the county. He was born at Gilmanton, this county, March 17, 1872, son of Danford and Rosaltha (Clark) Loomis, and received his education in the local school, which he attended until about 15 years old. When a boy of 8 he lost his father and he subsequently resided with his mother until he reached the age of 20. He was then married. in April, 1892, to Lizzie, daughter of William and Barbara Ehric, of Gilmanton township, and they began domestic life together on the Loomis farm. In 1895 the mother of the subject of this sketch deeded the old home farm to him and his brother Ray, and an equal division of the property was made at once. Clement D. remained on his half of the farm until 1905, engaged in its cultivation. In 1900, however, he added to his business interests by engaging in the sale of farm implements and hardware, the latter business being in Gilmanton village. In 1905 he moved to the village of Gilmanton, where he not only conducted his implement business but also became a general merchant, securing a store and putting in a stock of groceries, dry goods, clothing, boots and shoes, shelf and heavy hardware, with other miscellaneous goods, and he has since been engaged in this double enterprise. Mr. Loomis has shown himself to be as good a business man as he was a farmer and has achieved gratifying success, having built up a good trade in both the leading branches of his business. A Republican in politics, he takes a warm interest in whatever is for the good of the community in which he lives, and is a member and clerk of the Union Township High School Board. His fraternal society affiliations are with the Beavers, Maccabees and Modern Woodmen of America. He and his wife are the parents of six children: Danford, born February 11, 1892, who was employed in his father’s store but who is now with the American Expeditionary Forces in France; Lyman, born August 27 , 1893, who is employed in the store; Lucille, born October 10, 1896, who is now the wife of Julius Sund, of Gilmanton village; Anna, born March 2, 1898, and Ivy, born October 5, 1900, who are both in their third year in the Gilmanton high school; and Ruth, born October 11, 1903, who is a student in the Gilmanton schools.


Dennison D. Loomis
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 571-572 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

DENNISON D. LOOMIS, proprietor of the Loomis Homestead in section 21, Dover township, Buffalo county, was born in Vermont, May 3, 1833, son of Jonah and Phoebe (Blanchard) Loomis. On both the paternal and maternal side he comes of old New England ancestry, his mother’s father having been a Revolutionary soldier. The parents, who were farmers, spent their lives in Vermont, the mother dying when the subject of this sketch was 15 years old. In addition to Dennison there were seven other children in the family; one a son who died young, two daughters, Sallie and Phoebe—these three being older than the subject of this sketch—and three sons and a daughter, who were younger. Dennison D. Loomis was educated in the schools of Vermont, and remained in that state until he was 17 years old. He then came west to Fond du Lac, Wis., where he farmed for a year or more, after which he moved to La Crosse county, and in 1855, after attaining his majority, came to Gilmanton, Buffalo county, where some settlers from Vermont were then located. Here he took a pre-emption claim of eighty acres, made some improvements on it, and afterwards rented it out, and engaged in farming elsewhere. The Civil War coming on, he enlisted on November 18, 1861, in Company B, Second Wisconsin Cavalry, with which he served until his discharge, December 25, 1863. During his military service he participated in engagements at Yellville, Helena, Prairie Grove and La Grange in Arkansas, the Siege of Vicksburg, Red Bone Church, Miss., and Ingraham’s Plantation. After his honorable discharge from the army he returned to Gilmanton township, this county, and for a year or so thereafter was comparatively inactive, being sick from the effects of his hard service. On his recovery he took up farming again on his pre-emption claim, on which he had erected a log building. After two or three years he sold out and bought another farm in this township, remaining on it one year. On July 29, 1866, Mr. Loomis was united in marriage with Ella Britton, who was born in Allegany county, Pennsylvania, March 9, 1850, daughter of George W. and Harriet (Longcore) Britton. The newly wedded couple took up their residence on a homestead in section 21, Dover township, which is the same on which they are living today. It consisted of 160 acres of wild land, on which Mr. Loomis had to erect a log building. During the half century or more that he has resided on this place he has made extensive improvements, and it is now a good farm, well cultivated and with convenient and substantial buildings. Aside from his immediate farming interests Mr. Loomis helped to establish the local cheese factory, and later the creamery, of which latter he was president for twelve years. He also owned shares in the Gilmanton State Bank, which, however, he has presented to his children. For many years he served as a member of the school board. He and his family have made donations to various churches, including in particular the Union church in Gilmanton. In July, 1916, Mr. and Mrs. Loomis had the felicity of celebrating their Golden Wedding, upon which event they received many congratulations. During their long residence in the county they have made numerous friends, being acquainted with all the old residents in this part of it and with most of the later comers except the most recent. They have had eight children in all, three of whom—Jessie, Raymond and Roy—are now deceased. Those living: Carrie, now, Mrs. George Jaquish, residing near Eau Claire; Charles and Guy, of Dover township; Blanche, wife of Nathan Jaquish, of Dover township; and George, who is residing at home.


Henry Lorenz, Jr.
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume I Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 222-223 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

HENRY LORENZ, JR., who is numbered among the representative farmers of Alma township, Buffalo county, was born in Germany April 1, 1870, son of Henry and Mary (Schichie) Lorenz. The father, born in Braag, Germany, July 20, 1840, died in state of Washington at the age of 68 years; the mother, born in Braag, Germany, Oct. 8, 1846, died in 1861. Of their nine children two are now deceased, those living being: Francis, Henry, Mary, Emelia, Frank, Richard, and Celia. Henry Lorenz, Jr., began his independent career as a farmer at the age of 31 years, having previously worked for others. Buying then the farm on which he now resides, located in section 13, Alma township, he has since carried on general farming here a large part of his attention being devoted to dairying and hog raising. Of the 180 acres contained in the farm, 80 acres are cleared, the rest being in woodland and pasture. The buildings, all good, include a barn 32 by 28, with stone basement, a silo built of stone and tile, and a six-room stone house. Mr. Lorenz was married April 19, 1902, to Minnie Falkenberg, who was born in Modena township, Dec. 27, 1880, daughter of William and Anna (Guiger) Falkenberg. She was one of a family of eight children born to her parents—Minnie, Ida, William, Jr., Arthur, Emma, Maud, Aley and Emery. Mr. and Mrs. Lorenz are the parents of five children: Effie, born Dec. 30, 1902; Wilma, Nov. 9, 1904; Garvin, Sept. 5, 1906; Levern, July 7, 1908, and Williard, Oct. 9, 1916. The three eldest are attending school. Mr. Lorenz is recognized in Alma township as a good practical farmer, industrious and progressive, and he and his family are well known and highly esteemed. The family attend the Lutheran church at Cream.


Felix Loretz
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume I Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 500-501 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

FELIX LORETZ, proprietor of a farm of 360 acres in Montana township, Buffalo county, residing in section 7, is a prominent representative of the agricultural interests of this township. He was born in a log house on his parents’ farm in Montana township, Buffalo county, March 25, 1872, son of John and Salamonia (Loretz) Loretz. His parents, who were natives of Switzerland, came to the United States in the sixties and first settled in New York. From there they removed to Sauk county, Wisconsin, and later to Buffalo county, locating in Montana township, where they spent many years in farming. About 1904 they retired and took up their residence in Arcadia, Trempealeau county. They were the parents of five children: Felix, Margaret, Anna, Peter J., and a son who died in infancy. Felix Loretz attended district school until arriving at the age of 18 years, and lived with his parents until he was 27. He then worked in Winona and other cities as a machinist, being thus occupied for about four years, and also resided in the western part of Minnesota for a year. Then returning home, he resided for a short time on the parental homestead, and then rented the farm which he is now operating, buying it after eleven years, in the spring of 1915. Having an area of 320 acres when he took it, he has since enlarged it by the purchase of a 40-acre tract adjoining and now has 360 acres, of which about 200 are cleared and tillable. Mr. Loretz does mixed farming, mainly dairying and hog raising. His cattle are of the Shorthorn variety with a full-blooded sire at the head. His present buildings were on the place when he took it, with the exception of an auto-shed, which he has erected. He is a shareholder in the Garden Valley Creamery and occupies a recognized place among the enterprising and successful farmers of his township. Though he has not been prominent in public affairs, he served as school clerk for three years and was road superintendent one summer. Mr. Loretz was married, May 6, 1904, to Anna Roening, who was born in Winona, Minn., July 6, 1877, daughter of Ferdinand and Emelia (Smith) Roening. Her parents came to the United States from the vicinity of Potsdam, Germany, settling in the vicinity of Oshkosh, Wis. They had a family of nine children: Anna, Edward, Martha, Emma, Eda, Nettie, Franklin, Arthur, and a daughter, Helena, who died in infancy. Arthur is in the U. S. service.

Mr. and Mrs. Roening are now residents of Winona, Minn. To Mr. and Mrs. Loretz four children have been born: Edwin John, Jan. 5, 1907; Sarah Marguerite, May 1, 1909; Myrtle Emelie, Oct. 4, 1910, and Ruth Anna, June 22, 1914. The three eldest are attending school. Mr. Loretz and his family attend the Evangelical church.


William H. Luethi
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume I Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 474-475 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

WILLIAM H. LUETHI, proprietor of a farm of 400 acres, in Montana township, Buffalo county, of which township he is one of the leading citizens, was born in Montana township, May 30, 1878, son of Nicholas J. and Helen (Kranbuehl) Luethi. The father was a native of Switzerland and the mother of Ohio. The former, coming to America in the seventies, settled in Nelson township, this county, and for some years worked as a laborer. Later he bought a farm in Montana township, which he resided on for 20 years, subsequently moving to Alma. He and his wife had six children: William H., Anna, Sarah, Charles, and two others, twins, who died when a year and a half old. By a previous marriage to George Stiehl, Mrs. Helen Luethi had two other children, John and George. All are now living except the twins above mentioned, as also is Mr. Nicholas J. Luethi. Mrs. Luethi died in March, 1909. William H. Luethi attended district school until arriving at the age of 16 years, and assisted his parents until he had attained his majority. Then for the next seven years he worked at the carpenter’s trade, from spring to fall, being employed at threshing in the fall. He then opened a blacksmith’s shop in Montana village, conducting it until his marriage, in 1905, when he rented for three years the farm on which he now resides, which he purchased in 1910. Of its 400 acres about 225 are now cleared, the rest being in pasture and woodland. Mr. Luethi is successfully engaged in mixed farming, chiefly dairying and hog raising, his cattle being of the Shorthorn breed. His main barn, which he has remodeled, measures 32 by 98 feet, his other barn being 32 by 48. He has also built a silo and made an addition to his house, which is a substantial frame structure of eleven rooms. He is also part owner in a threshing outfit and a shareholder in the Garden Valley Creamery. For the last eleven years he has frequently officiated as an auctioneer. He is now a member of the board of supervisors, serving in his third term, and has been school clerk for about ten years. Mr. Luethi was united in marriage, April 12, 1905, with Mollie Kindschy, who was born in Montana, June 19, 1886, daughter of George and Katherine (Danuser) Kindschy. Mrs. Luethi’s father was the first male child of the white race born in Montana township, Buffalo county, of which his parents, Christ and Elizabeth (Runker) Kinschy, were pioneer settlers, having come to this country from Switzerland. Mrs. Katherine (Danuser) Kindschy, to whom he was married in 1878, came here with her parents, Florin and Cecelia Danuser, from Sauk county, in 1859, when a babe a few months old. She was one of six children: Benjamin, Alice, Clara, Mollie, Harry and Roy. Both her parents are still living, being now residents of Montana village. To Mr. and Mrs. William H. Luethi four children were born: Melvin, July 11, 1906; Edna, Nov. 15, 1907; Raymond, Sept. 14, 1909, and Vernie, July 25, 1911, all of whom are attending school.


Herman J. Luther
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume I Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 172-173 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

HERMAN J. LUTHER, a well known horse breeder of Nelson, Buffalo county, was born in Saxony, Germany, Jan. 10, 1867, son of Christ and Caroline (Hess.) Luther. The family, consisting of himself, his parents, and his sister, Christina, came to America in 1873, locating first in Alma, this county. Soon, however, they took a homestead of 120 acres in Nelson township. The land was wild and a log house had to be built for a residence. Then, with nothing but an ox team, they began pioneer farming. That place remained the home of the parents until their last years, when they finally retired and took up their residence in Nelson village, where Christ Luther died at the age of 73 and his wife at that of 70 years. Two children were born to them in Nelson township—Gerhardt and Edward. The farm at Mr. Luther’s death contained 135 acres, he having bought fifteen acres in addition to his original purchase. He also built a frame barn and made other improvements, and he and his wife were esteemed as industrious people and good neighbors.

Herman J. Luther grew to manhood on his parents’ farm and acquired his education in the district school. At the age of 21 years he began working on his own account, for about five seasons being employed on farms in North and South Dakota. Then returning to Nelson, he took up farming for himself on a tract of 160 acres of improved land, which he operated for four years. For three years subsequently he worked out and then bought a farm within the limits of Nelson village, on which he resided until 1908, when he sold it. He owns at present two and a half acres. For the last seventeen years Mr. Luther has been engaged in the breeding of Percheron horses, getting his breeders from the importers, and has done a successful business, having bred more Percheron draft horses within a radius of fifteen miles in the town of Nelson than any other man. Up to 1917 a black Percheron, “Mark,” No. 56833, weight one ton, was one of his best stallions. Mr. Luther is also a shareholder in the creamery and telephone company and is operator of the latter. He has been twice married: first to Lizzie Seifert, who was born in Germany, daughter of August and Marie Seifert. She died March 23, 1902, leaving no children, and in 1905 Mr. Luther was married to Mrs. Minnie Wilke, who was born in Alma, this county, daughter of Paul and Maria Accola. Mrs. Minnie Luther was first married to August Wilke, of which marriage one child, Wilma, was born, in 1897.


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