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Biographies A-G

ABLEITER, JOHN G.

JOHN G. ABLEITER, farmer; P. O. Annaton; was born in 1829, in Wurtemberg; was a son of Leonard Ableiter; living with his parents until he was 14 years of age; then worked for himself fourteen years; then went to Switzerland for four years, when he again returned to Germany, where he resided but six months; then came to America, in 1854, locating at Chicago; then to Grant Co., Wis., near Platteville, for two years; then to Liberty, where he has lived since he was married to Miss Mary Klais, a daughter of Bernard Klais, of Mineral Point. They have five children -- George, Albert, August, Mary and Annie. He has 148 acres of land. In politics, he is a Democrat, and a member of the Anglical Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Liberty Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ABRAMS, DELOS

HON. DELOS ABRAMS, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Bloomington. The subject of this sketch is a gentleman who is honored by all who know him, and has held many prominent positions in the community in which he resides; as for enemies he has none, but is noted by all for honesty and veracity, and has aroused his neighbors from their lethargy and slumbers many times on important political questions. He was born in 1834, in Montgomery Co., N. Y.; was a son of Anthony and Scyntha Abrams; he received a common-school education. His aged mother died in 1855, and his father in 1871; their loss was long mourned by all who knew them. Delos Abrams is one of nine children, seven of whom are living; his brother, Andrew Abrams, died in Africa in 1879, as a missionary; he is also a brother to the noted Dr. Charles Abrams, of Fayetteville Co., Wis. Delos lived with his parents until 21 years of age, when, in 1855, he married Miss Martha M. Harvey, a daughter of James Harvey; she is one of five children; they have four children -- Mary A., Susie K., Elizabeth B. and Harvey. Mary A. is married to Charles Alexander, of Carroll Co., Iowa. Mr. Abrams is a Republican; was School Clerk eleven years; Justice of the Peace two years; Assessor one year; Chairman of Town Board two terms, and was elected in 1876, to the honorable position of Representative in the State Legislature on the Republican ticket, with a majority of 206 -- the largest ever given in his district; he has never been defeated in any political effort; is running a large farm of 606 acres of land, valued at $16,000; is also the proprietor of one of the finest dairies in Grant Co., and is a Royal Arch Mason.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Little Grant Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ADAMS, WILLIAM E.

WILLIAM E. ADAMS, farmer, Sec. 8; P. O. Little Grant; was born in Patch Grove, Grant Co., Wis., in 1850, a son of Henry and Hannah Adams; his father was born in New York; his mother is a native of Pennsylvania. William lived with his father until he was 20 years of age; he received a common-school education; he then worked for William Humphrey eight years. Was married in 1876, to Miss Mary Van Dusen, an orphan girl, who came from New York in company with the family of J. K. Lum; they have three children -- Hiram, Lulu, and an infant. Owns 200 acres of land, valued at $5,000; has been School Director one term. Politics, Republican.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Little Grant Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ADKINS, ABRAM

ABRAM ADKINS, Farmer; P.O. Beetown; born in 1843 in Morgan Co., Ky.; was a son of Joseph and Nancy Adkins; came to Wisconsin in 1845, and located near Lancaster, where he resided for ten years; then to Iowa Co., Wis., where he lived four years; returned to Grant Co. again in 1878, located near Beetown. Married in 1870, to Miss Serena Campbell, a daughter of Harrison Campbell, has four children--Flora L., Thomas C., Frank L., Lulie G., was Road Overseer one term; was Constable one term in the town of Woodman, has 50 acres of land, valued at $1,000. Enlisted in the 5th W. V.I., Co. I, afterward Co. B; was a scout under Gen. Sheridan eighteen months; marched with Lee as a spy the day before his surrender, and took back to camp a rebel prisoner; he served three years and four months. Politics, Republican.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

ADKISON, I. R.

I. R. ADKISON, farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. Platteville; was born in Warren Co., Ky., March 5, 1819; emigrated to Jackson Co., Ind., then to Fulton Co., Ill., then in 1860 to Wisconsin; now owns 80 acres of fine land well improved, and owns what he has by his own industry. He learned the trade of miller in Ellisville, Fulton Co., Ill. His wife, Sarah J. Horn, who was born at Cleveland, Ohio, July 20, 1830; married May 6, 1846, in Jo Davies Co., Ill.; they have six children -- Leonard, Norman, Hulan, Alma, Cora, Mary. In politics, Republican; both members of the Free Methodist Church; class-leader for seven years. Has held the office of Pathmaster.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Ellenboro Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ALCORN, WILLIAM

WILLIAM ALCORN, carpenter, Lancaster ; a native of Ireland ; he came to New York in 1833, and remained there until 1845, when he came to Grant Co., where he has since resided and Worked at his trade. He was married, in 1849, to Miss Miram Lockhardt, a native of Indiana. Mr. Alcorn has been, for over twenty-five years, a member of the I. O. 0. F. ; he is a member of the Grand Encampment, and has passed all the chairs of the subordinate lodge. They have had ten children, eight of whom (four sons and four daughters) are living.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

ALDERSON, JAMES

JAMES ALDERSON, dealer in general merchandise; business was established in 1874 by Peacock & Atkinson; in 1879, Mr. Alderson purchased a half-interest with Mr. Atkinson, son of one of the former owners, and in the spring of 1881, Mr. Alderson became sole proprietor, and was appointed Postmaster in April, 1881; he was born in Yorkshire, England in 1836; came to America in 1844, and with his parents located in British Hollow. He married Catherine E. Dodge, a native of England.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Glen Haven Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ALDERSON, JOHN

JOHN ALDERSON, was born July 8, 1811, in Muker Parish, Yorkshire, England, has been a practical miner since he was 9 years of age. In 1840, he brought his family to the United States, landing at New Orleans, and coming thence up the Mississippi to Galena, locating at New Diggings, La Fayette Co., he spent fourteen years in the mines in that vicinity; in 1855, he bought and settled upon his present farm, this has been managed by his sons to a great extent, while he continued mining; has 117 1/2 acres and good improvements. He married in her native Parish of Marsden, Lancaster, Miss Margeret Anforth; they have four children -- James, Elizabeth, Ralph and Mary; the two eldest were born in England, and Ralph and Mary in Wisconsin. Mr. Alderson is a good type of the hardy and energetic English miner; he was the discoverer of the noted Champion mine at New Diggings, and has also found other leads of a less important character.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ANDERSON, WARDEN

WARDEN ANDERSON, Jamestown; born in Shelby Co., Ky., Aug. 1, 1818, and emigrated to Jamestown, Grant Co., Wis., in 1842; removed to Illinois, where he resided for three years; in 1845, he removed to Wisconsin again and settled permanently. His property is in village lots; probable value, $1,000. In politics he is a stanch Republican; was formerly a follower of the old Whig party. Public offices held by him: Town Board, Justice of the Peace, and, at present (1881), Postmaster. He married Sarah A. Calvert Oct. 16, 1877.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Jamestown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ANDERSON, T. B.

T. B. ANDERSON, blacksmith and wagon-maker, Millville; established business in 1877; born in Hancock Co., Ohio, in 1847; came to Wisconsin with his parents in 1855, and located at Woodman. Married Irene Scott, a native of Pennsylvania; they have three children -- Mary A., Albert E. and Medora. Mr. A. enlisted in Co. E, 4th Mo. V. C., in 1862, and was discharged in 1865.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Millville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ANDERSON, SEVER

SEVER ANDERSON, boots and shoes, Boscobel; born in Norway. In 1870, came to Madison, Wis., followed his trade, which he learned in Norway, commencing at the age of 15 years. In 1872, came to Boscobel and opened this shop. Married in 1871, to Rhoda Davison; she was born in Norway. They have four children, two sons and two daughters. He is a member of the United Workmen; member of the Fire Department and member of the Lutheran Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ALEXANDER, GORHAM

GORHAM ALEXANDER (deceased) ; a native of Jefferson Co., N. Y. ; he came to Grant Co. in 1840, and located in Beetown ; Sept. 4, 1861, he enlisted in Co. F, 10th W. V. I. ; he was taken sick while in service, removed to a hospital in Nashville, where he remained a short time, and was then taken to the hospital at Louisville, Ky., where he died in January, 1863. He was married, in 1846, to Miss Emily Ward, a native of Vermont, and left four sons and five daughters. Mrs. Alexander resides on a farm on Sec. 13 ; P. O. Liberty Ridge.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

ALLEN, J.H.

J.H. ALLEN, of the firm of Allen & Son, merchants, Washburn; was born in Etna, La Fayette Co., Wis., Sept. 22, 1858. Engaged as clerk for Mr. Buchan, at Benton; afterward for Godfry & Bros., druggists at Benton. Attended Commercial College at Debuque; graduated in 1876; came to Washburn in August, 1879, and engaged in business. In politics, Republican.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

ALLEN, JOHN

JOHN ALLEN, farmer, Sec. 16; P. O. Martinville; was born in Cheshire, England, July 21, 1821; came to America in 1856, and settled in the town of Clifton, Grant Co., Wis., on Sec. 14; farmed there two years, and on S. Millard's farm three years, and then bought the place where he now lives from J. Allen Barber, in 1861, and has lived there ever since. Was married to Harriet Hough, in Church of England, England, by Rev. Pierunes; have seven children living -- Elizabeth, John, James, William, Charles, Joseph N., George A.; also two deceased -- William and George, the former buried in England, the latter in Rock Church Cemetery, Clifton. John Allen owns 161 acres of land, and has been a member of the town board two years. His son, William, has been a Good Templar seven years. There is a breastwork thrown up on his farm, about one hundred rods long, which was evidently used in battle in early times.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ALLEN, JOHN

JOHN ALLEN, Martinville; was born at Cheshire, England, Sept. 26, 1845. His father, William Allen, removed to Clifton, Grant Co., Wis., in April, 1854, and settled on Sec. 14, and own 280 acres where he resides. John Allen commenced business for himself in October, 1872, as a farmer, but soon went into partnership with his brother Joseph in the mercantile business, also in buying and shipping stock, in which they have shown great enterprise. Mr. A. was married, April, 23, 1879, to Miss C. E. Hartsook, who was born in Berrien, Berrien Co., Mich., Sept. 2, 1854. They have one child -- Dora Frances.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ALLEN, WILLIAM

WILLIAM ALLEN, Sec. 14; P. O. Livingston; was born in Cheshire, England, Jan. 31, 1819; was a farmer there until 1854, when he came to America and settled in the town of Clifton, Wis.; owns 280 acres of land on Sec. 13 and 14; has held the office of School Clerk six years. Was married to Mary Hough, Nov. 15, 1840, at Prestbury, in Cheshire, England. She was born July 1, 1820, in Cheshire, England. Mr. Allen and wife lived in the little log cabin, which still stands on the place, until 1863, when they built the house which they now occupy; they have had ten children, of whom seven are living -- Joseph, John, Kate P., George, Elizabeth, Sarah and James; the deceased are William, Mary Jane and John; the first two are buried in Rock Church Cemetery, John was buried in England. Joseph married Agnes Watson. John married C. E. Hartsook. Kate married John Person. George married Martha Fieldhouse, and Eliza married Joseph Biddick. All are now living in the town of Clifton.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ALLEN, JOSEPH

JOSEPH ALLEN, Livingston, dealer in general merchandise and live stock; was born in Cheshire, England, Oct. 3 1843; came with his parents to America in 1854, and settled in the town of Clifton, where he helped his father on the farm until 21 years of age, at which time he went to farming for himself; farmed for six years, and, in 1871, started a store in Martinville and stayed there until the spring of 1880, when he moved the storehouse and stock to Livingston, and occupied it until September when he built the store he is now in, which was the second store in the town. Was married to Agnes Watson, at the City Hotel in Mineral Point, March 21, 1870; she is the daughter of Jonathan Watson, town of Lima; they have four children -- Mary Jane, Frank E., George H. and Nellie. Has held the office of Town Treasurer five years; is a member of the Masonic Order at Montfort, Lodge 165.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ANDREW, WILLIAM

WILLIAM ANDREW, Sec. 22; P. O. Livingston; was born in England June 16, 1819; was engaged in mining lead there until 1843, when he left England and went to St. Louis; left there in 1844 and settled in the town of Clifton, where he following mining until 1874; bought the farm he now lives on from J. T. Brown, and has 400 acres of land; has also 360 acres in the town of Lima, on Secs. 6, 7 and 8; also, 175 acres in Waterloo. Is engaged in raising fine stock on his farm. Married Anna Pierson, in Buffalo, N. Y., in 1848; she was born in England in 1826; have had eleven children of whom ten are living -- Martha, James, Mary, Jane, Sarah Rosie, William W., George Albert, John Joseph, Lily May, Phoebe, and Anna, who died in Yankton, Dak. He has been a liberal contributor to all charitable purposes. Was Chairman of the Town Board of Clifton for one year, was also School Clerk, and was one of the founders of the first school in town.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ANDREW, WILLIAM T.

WILLIAM T. ANDREW, farmer, P. O. Hazel Green; owns 240 acres of land valued at $50 per acre; born in Hazel Green in 1848; settled on present farm in 1876. Married Julia Robes in 1875; she was born in Hazel Green.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ANDREWS, C. M.

C. M. ANDREWS, stock-dealer, Hazel Green; born in Cornwall, Eng., in 1844; came to America in 1850, and settled in this town. Married Mary Trewatha, a native of England; they have three children -- William, Freeman and Leonard. Mr. A. has been a member of the Town Board two terms.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ANDREWS, THOMAS C.

THOMAS C. ANDREWS, retired farmer; P. O. Hazel Green; born in Cornwall, Eng., in 1817; came to America in 1849, and located in Hazel Green, and engaged in mining and farming. Married Mrs. Ann Miller, a native of Cornwall, Eng., in 1839; they have two children -- Mary Alice Miller and William Harvey Miller. Mr. Andrews has one child by a former wife -- William. Member of the M. E. Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ANGUS, CHARLES H.

CHARLES H. ANGUS, farmer. Sec. 30 ; P.O. Lancaster ; he was born in Montgomery of Lancaster. In January, 1863, he enlisted in Co. K, 47th W. V. T., and served about eight months, when he was discharged from the hospital on account of disability. They have five children John D., Ed W., Charles B., George P. and Laura C. Mrs. Angus is a member of the Congregational Church. Mr. A. is a member of the I.O.O.F., and in politics a Republican.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

ARMSTRONG, L. G.

L. G. ARMSTRONG, M. D., born March 7, 1834, in Cortlandville, Cortland Co., N. Y., where he resided with his parents until 5 years old, when the family removed to Groton in Tompkins Co., from there to Whitewater, Wis., in 1845, and in true pioneer style laid his claim, and began opening up a farm, where "the whole time" was occupied in driving breaking-team, building fence and opening stone quarries. In 1852, he entered the State University at Madison, where in due course of time he began the study of medicine, with Prof. S. P. Lathrop as his preceptor, where he remained as much of the time as his means would admit. To recuperate his purse, school-teaching was just to his hand, not neglecting to board around among the scholars. In the early part of 1856, he went to Chicago, where he placed himself under the special care of Profs. Davis and Evans, who furnished him odd jobs of nursing their patients for ready cash. At the commencement of Rush Medical College, February, 1858, he graduated in a class of thirty-one, receiving the first honors of the class in surgery, and second honors in theory and practice of medicine. During the spring of 1858, he went to Palmyra, Wis., and opened an office for the practice of his chosen profession, where he remained until April, 1860, when he came to Fennimore and opened an office on the Military Road, one and a half miles northwest of the present village. In January, 1861, he was married to Miss S. D. Bond, of Milton, Wis., and after the burning of the Gillman Hotel, at which he lost every particle of property he had accumulated, he began housekeeping in the little cottage by the roadside, remaining here faithful to his business until August, 1862, when he volunteered as Second Asst. Surg. Of the 8th W. V. I., and was assigned to duty in Corinth, Miss., in care of "wounded rebs." The arduous duties of the position, together with the unsanitary surroundings soon so much reduced his physical condition as to oblige a return to the North to recuperate his strength. After a year he was again able to take the field, this time as First Asst. Surg. Of the 6th W. V. I., in the old "Iron Brigade," near White House Landing, in Virginia. Continuing with the regiment until the organization of the 48th Wisconsin, of which he was commissioned as full Surgeon, doing duty with the regiment as Surgeon through all the time the regiment was in the field, and, in addition to his other duties, filling the position of Post Surgeon, at Fort Scott, Kas., until he received orders to disband the hospital and proceed to the plains to establish a line of hospitals along the Arkansas River, extending from Fort Zaroh to Fort Dodge. After the regiment was mustered out of service, he was retained with a detachment of regular troops at Fort Larned, Kan., until relieved in February, 1866. March 5, 1866, he opened an office in Boscobel, for the practice of his profession among his old friends and neighbors, where he has continued without interruption to the present time, building up a first class practice as a surgeon and physician. In the social circle and the private family, he has many characteristics which are too well known to the inhabitants of Grant Count to require any eulogy from the present historian.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ARNOLD, OMAR J.

OMAR J. ARNOLD, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Fennimore; born in 1844 in Fulton Co., Ill.; removed with his parents to California when 8 years old; came to Grant Co., Wis., in 1856. Married Marcia J. Anderson Sept. 16, 1869; she was born in Hancock Co., Ohio, May 3, 1853, and came to Wisconsin in 1854. Mr. Arnold received a common school education; attended the Bloomington Seminary; also took a select course at the State University in 1864-65; followed teaching for several years. He is the inventor of the Eureka Corn Cultivator, on which he received a United States patent. Has three children -- Bessie, Bertha, Cora P. Has also been identified with the Republican party; was elected Chairman of the Board of Supervisors in 1879, and re-elected in 1880; was enumerator of the tenth census of his town, and owns a valuable farm of 160 acres.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Mount Ida Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ARTHUR, EVAN

REV. EVAN ARTHUR, died at Beetown, March 21, 1881, in the 65th year of his age. He was born in Wales, and came to the United States about 1833, at the age of 18, and soon became a master workman in the iron rolling mills of Pennsylvania ; afterward was Superintendent of several mills in other States. He traveled considerable, residing in and traveling over thirteen different States. He came to Grant Co. in 1850, and settled at Cassville, where, in 1851, he lost his wife, Martha Arthur ; soon thereafter he moved into the town of Beetown, where he has ever since resided. He united, when a mere boy, with the church, and, for the last quarter of a century at least, has been an active Christian worker and a consistent member of the Methodist Church, saying, just before his death, " My peace has been made with God for many years." Wherever known he was universally respected as one of God's noblemen. By his death the county loses an old, respectable citizen. He left eight children.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

ARTHUR, L. J.

L. J. ARTHUR, of Lancaster (son of Rev. Evan Arthur), attorney at law and Notary Public; was born near Dubuque, Iowa, June 29, 1850 ; came to Grant Go. in 1851, and settled at Cassville he has resided in said county ever since. He graduated at the Platteville Normal School in 1871 ; during the following winter, he was Principal of the Potosi Graded School, and, during the next succeeding two years, was Principal of the Cassville Graded Schools ; in 1875, he graduated in the Wisconsin University Law School, and has been practicing law at Lancaster, Wis.; he was a candidate for District Attorney in 1880. Was married, June 6, 1878, to Miss Emma Ziegler, daughter of M. M. Ziegler, of Lancaster. Mr. Arthur is a self-made man, having borrowed money and schooled himself, both in the normal and the law school ; friends, who knew him from childhood, lent him money on his own note, when he was only 16 to 18 years old, thus furnishing him the means to educate himself. He now has an elegant home, and has a good law practice and is in fair circumstances. He is known as an earnest temperance man and temperance worker ; his example and success are well worth the consideration of young men.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

ATKINSON, ARCHIE

ARCHIE ATKINSON, Sec. 14; P. O. Hazel Green; owns 80 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre; born in Hazel Green Feb. 20, 1844; settled with his parents on this farm in 1848. Married Hester Lory; she was born in England in 1850; they have three children -- Harry, Grace and Myrtle. Mrs. A. is a member of the M. E. Church. His father was born in England in 1807; his mother in 1808; moved to this country in 1834; settled near Chicago when that city was but a small village; his father hauled lead with an ox team to Chicago; he died April 12, 1880.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ATKINSON, HARRIET

HARRIET ATKINSON, Farming; P.O. Lancaster; born in Lincolnshire, England, in 1841; was daughter of George Blackburn, and wife of David Atkinson deceased; came to Grant Co. in 1856. Was married in 1857; has a family of five children; her property is valued at $3,000. Member of the M.E. Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

ATKINSON, JAMES

JAMES ATKINSON, farmer and miner, proprietor of the Peacock & Atkinson mine; North Andover; born in England in 1826; came to America in 1853, and settled in British Hollow, located on this place in 1870. Married Agnes Ann Peacock, a native of England; they have six children -- Robert, Christopher, Frances Maria, Eliza J., Otto and Blanch.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Glen Haven Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

AUSTIN, ALFRED E.
ALFRED E. AUSTIN, farmer, Sec. 2; P.O. Lancaster; born in town of Lancaster, Wis., Oct. 30, 1858; went to Iowa in 1878, returned in 1880 ; owns 118 acres of land, with a fine large house and barn ; is a stock-raiser. His sister keeps house for him. In politics a Democrat. His parents were Henry and Mary Austin, natives of England.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

AUSTIN, HENRY

HENRY AUSTIN, farmer; P. O. Lancaster; was born at Terickenham, Middlesex, England, Nov. 20, 1821. He left London March 21, 1846, in the ship Mediator ; landed at New York City May 4, 1846, after a pleasant trip of six weeks ; after a short stay in the city, he started for Detroit, Mich., intending to enter the nearest Government land to the city ; he found 80 acres, which he entered ; this was at Flat Rock ; built the first home in America, where he remained five years, then, on account of the fever and ague being so bad, he sold and removed to Wisconsin in the year 1851, near Lancaster, and bought 40 acres of improved land of Myron Tuttle, an old settler, which place he has added to until he now owns 501 acres of land, with a fine brick house, 22x22, with good barn, 20x20, stable, 18x30 a fine home, made mostly by his own industry ; he is quite extensively engaged in the stock business and grazing, as his farm is adapted to that line ; also in the creamery business, and has made it a success. His first wife, Miss Eliza Children, was born at "Bethnal Green, London, April 17, 1825, and married at St. George's Church, Southwark, London, Jan. 19, 1841, died at Lancaster. Grant Co., Wis., Nov. 10, 1855 ; by this union there were five children Eliza, born at Hanworth, Middlesex, England, Jan. 14. 1842; Henry, born at same place Oct. 27, 1843, now residing in Applington, Butler Co., Iowa, as is also William, who was born at the same place Feb. 6, 1846 ; Jane was born in Michigan, July 30, 1848. died at Lancaster, Wis., March 23, 1853; Arthur G., born in Wisconsin Sept. 30, 1854, died at Walla Walla, Washington Territory, Sept 8, 1878 ; his second wife, Mary Ann Penrice, a native of Accrinton, Lancashire, Eng., born Dec. 18, 1841 ; came to America with her parents about thirty years ago ; settled at Milwaukee, Wis. they now live at Eskridge, Kan. : married Jan. 10, 1858; they have seven children Alfred E., born Oct. 30, 1858 ; Walter A., March 20, 1860 ; Charles F., March 22, 1862, died November,' 1876 ; Reuben A., born Sept. 27,1864; Ellen A., Dec. 16, 1866 ; Edwin J., May 7,1869 ; Mable A., July 19, 1877. In politics, Democrat ; in religion, Swedenborgian. Has been Clerk of School District No. 3 two years.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

BALDWIN, J. H.

J. H. BALDWIN, watchmaker and jeweler; commenced business Dec. 5, 1879, with an assortment of jewelry, clocks, watches, plated and silverware ; his business has increased, and he carries at present a 12,500 stock. Mr. Baldwin learned his trade in Illinois, where he was engaged in business with his brother for ten years. He is a native of Ohio, born near Cleveland Nov. 18, 1848; a son of A. S. and M. J. (Harding) Baldwin. His early life was spent on a farm.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

BALL, JOHN A.

REV. JOHN A. BALL, Congregational Minister, Potosi; was born in Schuylerville, Saratuga Co., N. Y., Nov. 13, 1837. Son of D. S. and Fanny (nee Dewey) Ball. Married in Tioga Co., N. Y., Nov. 3, 1867, by Rev. S. Johnson, to Amelia, daughter of Enoch and Lucy Hooker, of Newark Valley, Tioga Co., N. Y. Has four children -- Frederick H., George Dessick, Lillian Dewey, Florence A. Graduated at Brockport, N. Y., 1860; enlisted in 85th O. V. I. as Corporal; re-enlisted in 3d N. Y. V. I.; served two years, and was transferred by promotion to Second Lieutenant to 127th U. S. C. T.; served nine months and was discharged in Texas. Mr. Ball's grandfather (John Ball) was a Lieutenant in the Revolutionary war, and afterward a member of the New York Legislature. He was a son of Eliphalet Ball, who was a graduate of Yale College, and a member of New Haven College; founder of Ballston Spa. N. Y., and a second cousin of Mary Ball, the mother of George Washington. After Mr. Ball's promotion, he commanded the company and post at Ft. Isabel, Tex., and served in Ohio, Kentucky, Alabama, at siege of Charlestown, S. C., and in the series of engagements about Richmond and Fitchburg, Va., and also at Fortress Monroe. The mother of Mrs. Ball (Lucy Brewster Hooker) was a descendant of William Brewster, a member of the Plymouth colony; her father was a descendant of Rev. Thomas Hooker, who led the colony that settled Hartford, Conn., and his father served in war of 1812.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Potosi Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BALLARD, J. H.

J. H. BALLARD, dealer in butter, eggs, hides, etc., Platteville; member of the firm of Ballard & Co.; is a native of Kane Co., Ill., born in 1848; came to Darlington, Wis., in 1875, and was in business there till August, 1879, since which time he has been living in Platteville. He was married in 1880, in Platteville, to Miss E. M. Carpenter, of that place. In 1859, he went to California and was there about four years. He enlisted in 1861 in the 7th Cal. V. I., Co. E, but was discharged on account of sickness before going into service. His father, Charles Ballard, was a native of Vermont.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BANFIELD, JOSEPH

JOSEPH BANFIELD, farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. St. Rose; owns 200 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre; born in Ireland in 1835; came to America in 1842, and settled in Canada; removed with his parents in 1844 to this county. In 1861, he settled on this farm and married Sarah Hyland, a native of Ireland; they have five children -- Mary Ann, William A., Joseph C., Thomas F., Annie Kate. Members of the Catholic Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Smelser Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BARBER, JOEL ALLEN

LANCASTER

Joel Allen Barber, son of Joel and Aseneth J Melvin Barber, is a native of Vermont, and was born at Georgia, Franklin County, January 17, 1809. His father was from England, and settled at Canton, Connecticut. His mother was of Welsh descent, and her father was a captain in the revolutionary army, serving to the end of the war. Receiving his pay in continental money, his first breakfast after being discharged cost him seventy-five dollars in that currency. Young Barber farmed till his eighteenth year, when he entered the Georgia Academy, and fitted for college; entered the University of Vermont in the summer of 1829; left at the end of two and a half years; read law with Hon. George P. Marsh, of Burlington; was admitted to the bar in Prince George's County, Maryland, in 1834, after teaching school there two years. He returned to Vermont and practiced at Fairfield until 1837, settling, in September of that year, at Lancaster, Wisconsin. Here he has been in the practice for forty years, at times mingling land operations with legal business, but not enough to interfere with his profession. His legal knowledge is sound and extensive; he has a high standing as a criminal lawyer, and in all respects has long been an honor to the profession.

During the forty years that Mr. Barber has been a resident of Grant County, he has held some official position two-thirds of the time. He was on the county board of supervisors several years, and its chairman five; was county clerk four years; district attorney three terms; three times a member of the lower house of the legislature; one term in the State senate, and a member of the forty-second and forty-third congresses. In the house of representatives he was on the committees on war claims and revision of the statutes. He seldom spoke, but was an indefatigable worker.

Originally Mr. Barber was a whig of "free-soil" tendencies, and naturally identified himself with the republican party, to which he has steadfastly adhered.

In 1842 Miss Helen Van Meek, of Jamestown, Grant County, became his wife, she dying in childbed the next year, the child also dying. In 1847 he married Miss Elizabeth Banfill, of Lancaster. They have had seven children, only four of whom are now living. Joel A. is in the United States navy; Marsh is a student in Beloit College; Mattie is the wife of Rev. Edward D. Eaton, of Newton, Iowa; and Carrie is unmarried and resides with her parents.

Mr. Barber has abilities fitting him for any office in the gift of the people of Wisconsin; is a man of solid character as well as intellectual qualities, and is one of those statesmen whose record is an honor to a State.

Source: The US Biological Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Volume (1877) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

BARBER, JOEL ALLEN

Lancaster, was a native of Vermont, and was born January 17, 1809. He worked at farming until his eighteenth year, when he entered the Georgia Academy, and fitted for college; entered the University of Vermont in the summer of 1829; left at the end of two and a half years; read law with George P. Marsh, of Burlington, and was admitted to the bar of Prince George county, Maryland, in 1834. He returned to Vermont and practiced at Fairfield until 1837, settling, in September of that year, at Lancaster, Wisconsin. Here he was in practice for over forty years, at times mingling land operations with law business, but not enough to interfere with his profession. His knowledge of law was sound and extensive; he had a high standing as a criminal lawyer, and in all respects had long been an honor to the profession. During the forty odd years that Mr. Barber was a resident of Grant county he held some official position two-thirds of the time; was district attorney three terms; three times a member of the lower house of the legislature; one term in the state senate, and a member of the forty-second and forty-third congress. Originally Mr. Barber was a whig of free-soil tendencies, and naturally identified himself with the republican party, to which he steadfastly adhered. He died in the fall of 1881.

Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

BARE, JOHN

JOHN BARE, Sec. 19; P. O. Glen Haven; owns 360 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre; born in Yorkshire, England, in 1827; came to America in 1850, and located in Ohio; in 1854 he removed to Wisconsin and settled in this county, and with the exception of two years spent in Texas, he has lived in this county. Mr. Bare has the finest farm in this locality; his dwelling house was built in 1870, at a cost of $4,000. He married Mary Ann Chase, a native of Missouri; they have eight children -- Frank, Annie E., Olive Matilda, John, Ida Rebecca, Mary Jane, Lincoln and Freddie.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Glen Haven Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BARINGHAM, GEORGE

GEORGE BARINGHAM, miner, Sec. 35; P.O. Beetown. The subject of this sketch, better know as old Jodie, was born in 1814, was a son of John and Margaret Baringham, with whom he lived until 22 years of age. He then emigrated to America, locating in the mining regions near Platteville, Wis., where he lived one year; then to Dubuque, Iowa for one year, when, returning to Platteville, he loved there but a short period; then to Red Dog Diggings, near Potosi; then to Beetown, where there were but three families living at that time. He soon struck a large mine known as the "Long Range" lead, which drew the attention of miners, and in reality made the town; he also struck the "Jodie" lead at Muscalonge. He married, in 1849, Rosanna Converse, a daughter of Samuel Converse; has seven children--John, Margaret, George, Melvina, Rosa and Samuel. He has 60 acres of land, valued at $1,000. He has been Road Oversees on term. Greenback in politics.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

BARNES, C. D.

C. D. BARNES, Sec. 2; P. O. Brodtville; owns 160 acres of land; was born in Chautauqua Co., N. Y., in 1848; came to Wisconsin with his parents in 1854, and located on this farm. Married Deetta Jacobs, a native of this county; they have four children -- Ida Pearl, Coral Bella, Ruby Lora, and an infant.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Wyalusing Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BARNETT, JARED E.

JARED E. BARNETT, proprietor of stage and express line ; commenced this business in 1868, succeeding his brother, Thomas Barnett ; he is a native of Jefferson Co., Penn., born Feb. 25, 1831 ; in 1847, he came to Lancaster with his parents ; his father built the Telegraph House in 1848, and kept it until 1852, when he exchanged it for the hotel where the Phelps House now stands, and long known as " Barnett Corner." His mother dying, his father abandoned the hotel, and, in September, 1863, died, at the age of 66. Mr. Barnett was married, July 8, 1856, to Miss Harriet Fisher, daughter of Herman and Mira (Elderkin) Fisher ; they have three sons and four daughters Nellie, Mira, Mary, Harry, Fred, Hattie and Ralph.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

BARNHART, HENRY

HENRY BARNHART, miller, Sec. 22; P. O. Bloomington; born in 1820 in Butler Co., Penn.; was a son of Philip and Elizabeth Barnhart, where he resided until 1845; he then emigrated to Wayne Co., Ohio; lived there until 1852; then to Medina Co. for one year; thence to Clayton Co., Iowa, where he lived for twenty-three years; then to Allamakee Co. for two years; then to Prairie du Chien, Wis., for two years; thence to Grant Co. in 1879, and built the mill known as the Barnhart Mill, where he now resides; he is a millwright by trade, and has built grist-mills, saw-mills and woolen factories; has 23 acres of land in Iowa, valued at $1,300; has 30 acres of land and the grist-mill where he now lives, valued at $14,000. Was married in 1850, to Eliza H. Creamer, a daughter of Peter Creamer, of Dauphin Co., Penn.; has eight children, seven living -- Emma H., Henry N., Mary J., Edmond R., Susan, Lillie E., Fred W. (deceased), Elizabeth. He enlisted in 1862, in Co. L, 6th Ohio V. C.; served three years; has been Justice of the Peace two terms. Politics, Greenbacker.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Little Grant Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BARSTOW, SAMUEL

SAMUEL BARSTOW, farmer, Sec. 25; P. O. Platteville; born at Norway, Herkimer Co., N. Y., Aug. 12, 1812; emigrated at the age of six years to Trumbull Co., Ohio, where he attended the district school in the schoolhouse, which was composed of logs with slabs as seats. He remained at home on the farm until the year 1838, when he came to Wisconsin and remained one year, then returned to Ohio, and in the fall of the year 1844, he returned to Grant County, where he bought 160 acres of land and has improved with a fine house 26x42, good barn 30x40, wing, 15x30, basement stable. The old log cabin is still standing on the place. His first wife, Elizabeth De Wolf, a native of Trumbull Co., Ohio, was born June 5, 1813, and married April 9, 1834; she died Aug. 9, 1866; by this marriage there were two children -- Scott -- born Dec. 23, 1837, now residing in Thayer Co., Neb.; Ariel, who was born Oct. 19, 1842, and enlisted in Company E, 25th W. V. I., now in La Fayette Co., Wis. His second wife was Mrs. Arminda Hyde, born July 21, 1822, at Malone, N. Y., and married in 1843 to Mr. Hyde, a native of Highgate, Franklin Co., N. Y.; he died at Lancaster, Wis., in 1863, leaving four children -- Columbus, now in Georgetown, Wis.; Julia, born June 19, 1849, now Mrs. McFadden, in Kansas; Flora, born Sept. 27, 1857, now Mrs. Downing; Frank D., born Dec. 18, 1856, died Sept. 30, 1878, now in Kansas. Mrs. Hyde married Mr. Barstow in 1867; they have no children. In politics is a Republican, and held the office of School Clerk and Treasurer of District No. 7, also Justice of the Peace under the old Territory Law and now Justice; the first Assessor under the State law; Town School Superintendent, also Chairman of the Board of Supervisors.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Ellenboro Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BARTHOLOMEW, A. J.

A. J. BARTHOLOMEW, farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. Boscobel. Born in Brown Co., Ohio; when about 6 years old, came to Rush Co., Ind., with his parents; remained there about six years, then came to Illinois, followed farming; about five years later, came to Highland, Iowa Co., where he remained farming about four years. In 1850, he went to California, followed mining there about fifteen years. There he enlisted, in 1861, in Co. B, 4th Cal. V. I.; served three years. In 1865, came to Boscobel; removed to his present farm in 1866. Owns 245 acres of land. Is a member of the Odd Fellows. Married in 1866, to Miss Mary L. Watrous; she was born in Ohio. They have six children -- four sons and two daughters.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Marion) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BARTLETT, J. O.

J. O. BARTLETT, proprietor of restaurant and confectionery store ; opened his store in the spring of 1876, first in John Larkin's building ; in the winter of 1878, he moved to his present store in the Henry Remeyer building. Mr. Bartlett has been a shoemaker in Lancaster since June, 1869, carrying on both branches of business until January, 1880, when failing health compelled him to lay aside shoe making. He was born in New Hampshire Oct. 15, 1824, a son of Daniel W. Bartlett. He was married in New London, N. H., in May, 1850, to Miss Elizabeth Haines ; they have two sons and a daughter Victor L., George E. and Belle.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

BASHFORD

BASHFORD & HUMPHREY, dealers in general merchandise, Glen Haven; business was established in 1871. Mr. Bashford, the senior member, born in New Hampshire in 1814; he came to Wisconsin in 1862, when he removed to Glen Haven and engaged in the mercantile trade until the close of the war; in 1871, he formed a partnership with Mr. Humphrey, and has continued in merchandising since. He married Elizabeth K. Blessing, a native of Western Virginia; they have two children -- Martha and Charles. Mr. Bashford was elected to the Legislature in 1859 and in 1870; in 1864, he was Sergeant-at-Arms to the State Senate. Mr. Alfred Humphrey, the junior member was born in Patch Grove in 1849; he came to Glen Haven in 1871. He married Jennie Calvert, a native of Canada; they have three children -- Harry, George and May.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Glen Haven Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BASS, N. W.

N. W. BASS, builder and proprietor of the Valley Mills and the Platteville Woolen Mills; is a native of Barron Co., Ky.; when he was an infant his parents removed to Indiana; he came from Rock Island Co., Ill., to Platteville in 1847, and that fall began preparations for building the mill on the Little Platte, which was completed in 1848; it is best known as the old Bass Mill; he kept it in operation about fifteen years, and still owns it. The Platteville Woolen Mills were built in 1865. (See history of Platteville.)

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BASYE, S. T.

S. T. BASYE, retired; P.O. Washburn; was born in Illinois, near Jacksonville, Oct. 24, 1826; came to Wisconsin in 1836, with his parents, who died in Grant Co.; bought 40 acres of land in 1847, and farmed three years, then sold and engaged in teaming for seven years in Platteville; then bought 160 acres of land; there he remained for twelve years, when he sold and engaged in business in Washburn, and continued until 1878. His wife, Mary E. Hull, a native of New York, born Feb. 15, 1829, came to Wisconsin in 1846, with her parents; her father died in Wisconsin; her mother resides with a son in Illinois at the age of 88. They were married in 1847; they have four children--Fannie A., now Mrs. J.A. Brown, of Richland Co., Wis.; Ella S., deceased; Ida May, now Mrs. F. W. Cushman; Hattie F., deceased. Owns 200 acres of land, also town property. Member of I.O.O.F., and Past D.D.G.M.; also a Good Templar. Has been Clerk eight years, and is now holding the office. Taught school two winters. Member of the Methodist Church (Recording Steward). In politics, Republican. Delegate to the Lay Conference, held at La Crosse in October, 1879. A man generally interested in the moral affairs of the community, also Notary Public for six years.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

BATIE, WILLIAM

WILLIAM BATIE, wagon, carriage and sleigh manufacturer, Bloomington; native of Canada, born in 1839; came to Grant Co. with his parents in 1850, and located in Bloomington. His father was engaged in farming. The subject of this sketch learned his trade in Bloomington and established his present business in 1862; has been Justice of the Peace; held various school offices, and is at present President of the village of Bloomington; is a prominent member of the I.O.O.F.; passed all the chairs in the subordinate Lodge as well as the Encampment. Was married, in Bloomington, in 1865, to Miss A.A. Stearns, a native of Vermont, by whom he has one son. Mr. and Mrs. Batie are members of the Congregational Church. Mr. Batie has a large shop and employs three men; his business has gradually increased from the start.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Bloomington Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

BAXTER, C. H.

C. H. BAXTER, of the firm of Howe & Baxter, general merchants ; is a native of New York, and was born in Stillwater, Saratoga Co., Nov. 15, 1841 ; he came with his parents in 1857, and they located in Grant Co. ; in August, 1860, he entered the store of George Howe as clerk, and remained until the fall of 1862, when he entered the army, enlisting as private in Co. C, 25th W. V. I. ; he was taken sick on the Yazoo River and discharged ; he afterward raised a company which became Co. K, 47th W. V. I., and was commissioned Captain and was sent to the Department of Middle Tennessee, with headquarters at Tullahoma, and, by order of Gen. Thomas, he became Chief of Ordnance Department, Middle Tennessee, on the staff of Gen. Vancleve and Gen. Milroy, and served in that position until the end of the war. Alter his return from the service he became a partner of Mr. Howe, and since then has been successfully engaged in mercantile business here. Mr. Baxter has served as Chairman of the Republican County Central Committee of Grant Co. for the past five years ; has also served as member of the Town Board ; he was elected the first President of the Veteran Soldiers Association, of Grant Co., and was reelected to the same position. Mr. Baxter was united in marriage, Feb. 20, 1865, to Miss Maria Howe, daughter of George Howe, an old and honored merchant of Lancaster. Mr. and Mrs. Baxter have two children George Howe and Laura.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

BAXTER, H. E.

H. E. BAXTER, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Fennimore; was born in Saratoga Co., N. Y., Oct. 27, 1845; came to Wisconsin in 1855, and settled in Fennimore, Grant Co.; his father died April 12, 1866; his mother died in 1865. Was married to Margaret McWilliams, who was born Sept. 27, 1850; has three children -- Eugene, Lilly M., Mary E. Owns a farm of 140 acres under a high state of cultivation. Has held various town offices. Is radical in principle as a member of the Republican party.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Mount Ida Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BAYLEY, ELIJAH

ELIJAH BAYLEY, (deceased), was born Aug. 2, 1811, at Massena, St. Lawrence Co., N. Y.; he was one of a family of ten children, of whom he was the seventh; the first twenty-five years of his life was spent at or near his native place; in 1836, he came West and spent about three years in the vicinity of Davenport, and Rock Island, Ill., teaching a portion of the time and making occasional trips South for his health; from Rock Island he came to Galena, where he was engaged as clerk in the confectionery establishment of D. A. Barrows for about three years; in 1841, one of the creditors of E. B. Kimball of St. Louis failed, and the stock goods came back into Mr. Kimball's hands; at the suggestion of Mr. Barrows, the goods were entrusted to Mr. Bayley to be taken to some of the mining towns to be disposed of. He selected Platteville as the most favorable point for that purpose, and his success was such that further shipments were made, and a partnership was formed between himself and Mr. Kimball, which lasted till 1852, when Mr. Bayley purchased Mr. Kimball's interest in the business for $30,000; his success continued, and, in 1861, immediately after the death of Mr. Hammond, with whom he had for some time been associated in business, he closed up his affairs as a merchant, and lived in retirement till his death, which occurred Dec. 25, 1878. Mr. Bayley's first wife, to whom he was married in 1844, was Miss Caroline J. Bevans; she died in 1868, leaving three children, one son and two daughters; the son -- Leslie F., born April 13, 1850, and died March 5, 1870; Nora L., is now Mrs. D. B. Jones of Chicago, and Annie S. at home.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BAYMAN, HENRY J.

HENRY J. BAYMAN, farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. Stitzer; was born in 1858, in Liberty, Grant Co., Wis.; was a son of Anton and Mary Bayman. He has lived with his parents for twenty-three years. His father was born in Germany, in 1808; came to America in 1863, halting in Illinois for two years. Henry has five brothers and sisters -- Charles, William, Henrietta M., Mary and Minnie. The three eldest are married. His father and mother are still living.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Liberty Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BEAM, JAMES

JAMES BEAM, farmer; P. O. Blue River; owns 120 acres in Secs. 14 and 23; he was born in Huntingdon Co., N. J., in the year 1816; he is a son of John and Lydia Arch; he spent the early years of his life in his native State, where his time was employed principally as a farm laborer; in the year 1850, he went to Illinois and located in Kane Co., and engaged in farming, remaining there until 1857, when he came to this county and bought some Government land, which he afterward sold, and bought the farm upon which he now lives. He was married in 1841, to Miss Celinda Blain, of New Jersey, by whom he had thirteen children, eight of whom are now living.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Waterstown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BEARDSLEY, HOMER

HOMER BEARDSLEY, Sec. 15; P.O. Bloomington; owns 87 1/2 acres land, valued at $35 per acre; was born in Litchfield Co., Conn., in 1821; came to Wisconsin in 1858; settled on his present farm in 1866. Married Jennette Chapin, a native of Connecticut; they have one child by adoption--Jennie. Mr. B. enlisted in Co. D, 33d W.V.I., in 1862, and was discharged in 1865.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Bloomington Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

BEEBE, HAYDEN H.

HAYDEN H. BEEBE, blacksmith; was born in Platteville June 6, 1849; learned his trade with Butler & Cowley, of Platteville, and has been in business for himself since 1875; in November, 1874, he married Miss Jennie Hoskins, of Platteville, and has two children -- Edith Mazette and Julius De Leslie. His father, William Beebe, was a native of Genesee Co., N. Y.; came to Platteville in the spring of 1845, and is still living in the city.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BEER, JACOB M.

JACOB M. BEER, Sec. 33; P. O. Hazleton; owns 80 acres of land, valued at $25 per acre; was born in Switzerland in 1834; came to America in 1854, and settled in Ohio; in 1861, he came to Wisconsin and located on his farm. Married Sarah J. Barnes, a native of New York; they have three children -- Leonard, Louis and Laura. Has been a member of the Town Board two terms. In 1862, he enlisted in Co. D, 33d W. V. I., and was discharged in 1865.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Wyalusing Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BEETHAM, JOHN

JOHN BEETHAM, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Fennimore; was born in Durham, Eng., Jan. 3, 1817; emigrated to the United States and settled in Rock Co., Wis., in 1851; removed to Grant Co. in 1856. Was married to Mary Marwood May 14, 1840; she is a native of England; born July 2, 1820; they have six children -- Thomas H., John W., Elizabeth, Jane A. and Mary; the four oldest children are married; Jane is a teacher, and Mary lives with her parents. Mr. Beetham is an active Republican. Owns a valuable farm of 120 acres under splendid cultivation.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Mount Ida Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BEETHAM, THOMAS

THOMAS BEETHAM, farmer, Sec. 9; P.O. Lancaster; owns 400 acres land, valued at $20 per acre ; born in Yorkshire, England, in 1843 ; came to America in 1849, and located in Janesville ; came to this county in 1857 ; settled on present farm in 1872. Married Annie Dyer, a native of this county; have four children John, Jessie, Nellie and Frank.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

BEISTHAUPT, LEWIS A.

LEWIS A. BEISTHAUPT, farmer. Secs. 27 and 34; P.O. Lancaster; he is a native of Ohio ; came to Grant Co. in 1860; he enlisted in August, 1862, in Co. C, 25th W. V. I., and served until the close of the war. He was married, Oct. 11, 1859, to Miss Martha A. Strong ; they have five sons and a daughter. The family are members of the Congregational Church. Owns 125 acres of land.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

BEITLER, EDWARD

EDWARD BEITLER, Sec. 35; P. O. Millville; owns 56-40 acres of land, valued at $8 per acre; born in Pennsylvania in 1843; came to Wisconsin in 1855 and settled in this town; located on present farm in 1873. Married Mary Gibbons, a native of this town; they have three children -- Mary Jane, John and Cora.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Millville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BEITLER, LEWIS

LEWIS BEITLER, Sec. 24; P. O. Mt. Hope; owns 240 acres land, valued at $15 per acre; born in Pennsylvania in 1841; came to Wisconsin in 1855; he settled on this farm in 1869. Married Catherine Day, a native of this county; they have two children -- Traverse J. and Clay D. In 1861, he enlisted in Co. C, 20th W. V I.; was discharged in 1865.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BELL, ARCHIE W.

ARCHIE W. BELL, attorney at law, Platteville; is a native of Salem, Columbiana Co., Ohio, born in 1840. His father, Christopher Bell, came to Wisconsin with his family in 1846, and has been a resident of Platteville ever since. He is now hale and hearty, at the age of 74. Mr. Bell studied law in Platteville with Judge S. O. Paine; was admitted to the bar in 1864, and has practiced in Platteville ever since, except when in the army. In January and February, 1865, he with Capt. W. H. Beebe, raised a company for the 44th W. V. I., and he went out as 1st Lieutenant of Co. K, and served till 1865. He was married in Platteville in 1862, to Mary E. Robinson, and has three children living.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BELSCAMPER, BERNARD

BERNARD BELSCAMPER, farmer and blacksmith, Sec. 10; P.O. Lancaster; born in Prussia in 1827; came to America in 1852, and settled in Chicago; followed blacksmithing for nearly one year; then moved to Grant Co., Wis., where he has since lived. Was married in 1855, to Miss Emmaranza Bukl, a daughter of Peter Bukl. Has 80 acres of land; he had the misfortune to lose his house by fire; his loss was $1,600. Has five children; is a Greenbacker in politics, and a member of the Catholic Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

BENNETT, ANSON

ANSON BENNETT, Sections 1, 12, 2, etc.; P. O. Platteville; was born in Franklin Co., Vt., in 1812. He resided in the Green Mountain State until the fall of 1836, when he came to Platteville, coming by the way of the Erie and Ohio Canals, Ohio River and the Mississippi to Galena, thence on the 1st of November, to Platteville. Here he hired out to the veteran pioneer, Maj. J. H. Rountree, and continued in his employ five and a half years. He then bought 80 acres of the Major, and began making improvements upon it. In April, 1850, he married Elvira Jones, born in Oswego Co., N. Y., in 1812; she came West in 1847. Mr. Bennett is a leading member of the Free Methodist Church of Platteville. He now owns 381 acres, a fit reward for the thirty-seven years of toil expended upon the soil of Wisconsin. Mr. and Mrs. Bennett have six children -- Martha E. (Mrs. W. Davis), Susan E., Charles Lyman, Nelson J., Orrin J. and Annie May. Charles L. married Mary E. Aikins, of Platteville.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BENNETT, RICHARD

RICHARD BENNETT (retired); a native cf Cornwall, England, born Sept. 20, 1813 ; he came to America April 10, 1847, landing in New York ; June 10, 1848, he came to Grant Co. ; he was engaged in mining most of the time up to 1870, since which time he has turned his attention to farming, with his SOD, but has lately retired from active business. He was married, June 8, 1833, to Miss Mary Vincent, also a native of Cornwall ; they have had nine children Ann (married), Eliza (married), Charles, Mary S. (married), Philip D. (deceased), Elizabeth (married), Sarah (married) and Ann (married). The son, Philip, enlisted in Co. F, 7th W.V. I., and was wounded July 1, 1863 ; he died July 5, 1863, at the battle of Gettysburg. Mr. and Mrs. Bennett are members of the Congregational Church.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

BENTLEY, E. J.

E. J. BENTLEY, liveryman, has been a resident of Platteville since September, 1853. He was born in Yorkshire, England, Dec. 26, 1836; came to America in 1851, and worked in Elk Grove, La Fayette Co., Wis., till he came to Platteville in 1853. He attended school at the Platteville Academy five winters, working at surveying during the summers, and followed that of teaching till the war broke out. April 1, 1861, he enlisted under the three months' call for troops, and was the second man in Platteville to enlist. He went with the 3d W. V. I., Co. F, and was in the service till August, 1863, when he was discharged. He was with his regiment during the whole time they were out. After leaving the army, he engaged in the livery business, which he has continued up to the present time. He was married Feb. 25, 1864, in Platteville, to Louisa Cheever, and has two children -- Charles and Clara. Was Deputy Sheriff fourteen months under Sheriff Streeter.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BERGMULLER, MAX

MAX BERGMULLER, farmer; P. O. Muscoda; farm contains 80 acres, and is located in Sec. 8, in this town; residence in the village. He was born in Bavaria in 1833, where he was educated, and learned the tanner's trade. After learning his trade, he traveled quite extensively through Europe during six years, working at his trade in different places. He is a son of Simon and Madelina Bergmuller, natives of Bavaria. He came to America in 1853, stopping a few weeks in Milwaukee, and working for Pfuster & Vogel at his trade then came to Muscoda and bought the farm which he now owns. He enlisted November, 1863, in the 2d Wisconsin Battery, which was attached to the Army of the Potomac. He served with them until the close of war, and was mustered out at Milwaukee in 1865. In 1856, he married Miss Christina Neff, by whom he has five children, four girls and one son -- Ludwig -- twenty years old, who assists his father on the farm.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BETINGER, PHILLIP

PHILLIP BETINGER, was born in Germany in 1832, where he was educated, and learned the mason trade; came to America in 1850, locating at Galena, Ill.; remaining there six months, came to this county. In 1863, he enlisted in the 2d Wisconsin Battery, and served with them until the close of war, and mustered out with them in Milwaukee. His home has been in this county since he first came.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BIDDICK, PETER

PETER BIDDICK, (deceased); was born in Cornwall, Eng., in Parish of St. Issey; was a carpenter by trade, and worked in London twelve years at his trade; left England in 1852 and came to America; landed in New York City, and worked at his trade for six months there, and then came to Platteville, Wis., and worked as a carpenter for two years; rented the farm where Mahlon Fawcett now lives, and lost his first wife, Hannah Watson, there, whom he married in England in the year 1846, and who had five children, of which four are living -- Maria, George R., Gideon J. and John T., and one deceased, William, who died May 25, 1875; buried at Platteville; Hannah, his wife, died April 20, 1856; after her death he left the farm and moved to Iowa Co. for one year, then bought a farm from the Government, and, on March 2, 1857, married his second wife, Catherine Rundell, who was born May 3, 1819, and by whom there are two children -- Fred and Irene. Was a member of the Primitive Methodist Church at Platteville, and was also a member of Manchester Unity in England; he died March 17, and was buried in Platteville Cemetery; left to his estate 319 acres of land; the family live on the farm on Sec. 1, which John T. and Gideon rent from the estate. Gideon is a member of the Masonic Order at Wingville, Lodge No. 134.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BIDWELL, DANIEL

DANIEL BIDWELL, of the firm of Bidwell & Briggs, general grocers and meat market, Bloomington; was born in the State of New York in 1838; came West in 1868, and located in Little Grant and engaged in farming; established in the grocery business in Bloomington in 1867, added the meat business in 1871; his business has gradually increased from the start; in the simmer-time, he runs a peddling-wagon through the country. During his residence in Little Grant, he held the office of Treasurer acceptably. Was married, in Wisconsin, in 1874, to Miss Caroline Ball, a native of Grant Co., by whom he has three children--two sons and one daughter. Mrs. Bidwell is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and Mr. Bidwell is a member of the Baptist Church and also of the I.O.O.F. His father died in 1861; his mother is still living, at the age of 76 years. By his square-dealing in business he has gained the confidence of the people.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Bloomington Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

BIEDERMANN, LEONARD

LEONARD BIEDERMANN, farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. Boscobel; born in Austria. In 1848, he came to America, locating in Clayton Co., Iowa, where, for seven years, he followed the butcher business. In 1855, he came to Prairie du Chien, and, for two years, engaged in the same trade. In 1857, he came to Boscobel and engaged in the saloon and butcher business for six years; then built the first brewery, which has since burned, and for the past six years he has been farming. He owns 86 acres of land. When he landed in America he had only $1, and all he possesses he has made by industry and perseverance. He is in fact a self-made man. He was married in 1854, to Christina Krout, who was born in Wurtemberg, Germany. They have nine children -- six sons and three daughters.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BIGGIN, LEWIN

LEWIN BIGGIN, farmer, Sec. 21; P. O. North Andover; born in 1835 in Derbyshire, England; was a son of Thomas and Sarah Biggin, of England; resided there until age of 35, when he emigrated to America; located in the town of Glen Haven, where he has lived since; is a prosperous farmer; has 160 acres of land, valued at $5,000. Was married in 1858, to Mary Parker, a daughter of Thomas Parker, in England; has six children -- Alice M., Thomas, Harry, William L., Sarah A., Joseph. Politics, Greenbacker.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Glen Haven Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BIRK, JOHN

JOHN BIRK, famer, Sec. 25 and 36; P. O. Muscoda; owns 200 acres of land; was born in Prussia near the Rhine in 1811 (the country then belonged to France); was a son of John and Mary Thomas, who were natives of the same place; he learned the tailor's trade with his father, and worked at it until 21 years old, when he engaged in farming; he came to America in 1853, and located in Mahoning Co., Ohio, where for four years he engaged in coal mining; in July, 1865, he came to Muscoda and bought the farm where he now lives. He was married in the old country in 1839, to Miss Louisa Heints. They had three children, two came to this country with him; she died in 1845; in 1846, he again married Miss Margaret Baker, by whom he had one child born in the old country, and eleven in this; one son, Peter, enlisted in the 15th Ohio Battery, and served with it during the war, participating in fourteen battles, he was but a little over 14 years old when he enlisted. Mr. Birk has been an energetic , successful business man.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BIRKETT, ALLEN

ALLEN BIRKETT, deceased, was born in Goole, Yorkshire, England, in 1817. He married Sarah Cooper, also of Goole, and came in 1848 to America. He settled in Platteville, where he died May 10, 1869. His widow now resides with her brother-in-law, George Huntington, Esq., of Platteville.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BIRKETT, JOHN

JOHN BIRKETT, dealer in stock, Hazel Green; born in Lincolnshire, Eng., in 1846; came to America in 1852, and settled in Hazel Green. Married Jane Shellian, a native of this town; they have five children -- Ida M., Lillie B., Phillip, Lucy, Oscar. He is Treasurer of the Village Board.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BISHELL, JOHN

JOHN BISHELL, farmer, Sec. 15; P.O. Lancaster; born feb. 8, 1819, in England; was a son of Richard Bishell. He left England at the age of 31, and located in La. Fayette Co., Wis.; he followed mining for many years. He married, in 1853, Emma Blackburn, and moved to Grant County, near Beetown, where he has since lived; he has been School Treasurer for fourteen years. Has eight children living--Elizabeth, Lucy, Mellissa, Amie, Meallie, Nettie, Edward, Frank and two deceased. He owns 80 acres of land.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

BISHOP, EMMANUEL

EMMANUEL BISHOP, farmer, Sec. 13; P.O. Beetown; born in Pike Co., Penn., 1826; was a son of Moses Bishop. He resided with his father until 1833, he then moved to Luzerne County; lived there for three years, then to Susquehanna County; lived there sixteen years. He married Miss Stephens in 1852, a daughter of Eliphalet Stephens. Mr. Bishop came to Grant County in 1853, located at Cassville, lived there two years, then to Beetown, where he has lived since. Has nine children--Aurora, George, John L., Elenora, Frank E., Jerome, Harley, Carrie A. and Lottie. Has been on Town Board on term, Justice of the Pease one term. Owns 140 acres of land. Republican in politics.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

BISHOP, M. A.

M. A. BISHOP, Platteville, of the Wright House, was born in Huron Co., Ohio, where his parents, Alonzo and Louisa Bishop, settled in 1840, coming from the State of New York. The brothers M. A. and W. H. Bishop removed to Arena, Wis., and came from there to Platteville. The former leased the Wright House in November, 1877, and his popular management has largely increased the custom of this always first-class hotel. His brother has a livery of from fourteen to eighteen horses, and both working in harmony are doing a good, live business.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BISHOPP, HARMON

HARMON BISHOPP, farmer; P. O. Jamestown; born in Prussia in 1822; has 80 acres of land, the probable value of which is $4,000. In politics, a Democrat. He served as a soldier in Prussia. Married Theresa Vosberg; they have five children -- Joseph, Catharine, John, Barbara, Harmon.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Jamestown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BLACK, JAMES A.

JAMES A. BLACK, Muscoda; was born in Montgomery Co., Va., in 1837, on the farm of his parents, Alexander and Elizabeth (McDonald) Black, who were both natives of Virginia, and whose ancestors were among the earliest settlers of that State; his great-grandfather was born in the North of Ireland, but emigrated to Virginia when quite young. Mr. Black came to this State with his parents in 1854; they bought and located upon a farm in Richland Co., where his father died in 1874, aged 74, being born in 1800; his mother died six years later, 1880, also 74 years of age. Mr. Black engaged in farming and milling in Richland Co., and during the year 1871, built the Ithaca Mills, which he conducted for eight years, which he then exchanged for a farm in this town, upon which he moved and lived for two years, when he moved his family to the village. Mr. Black has always been in active life, and has accumulated an estate by his own persevering industry.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BLACKBOURN, GEO.

GEO. BLACKBOURN, farmer, P.O. Lancaster; born in 1799, in England, where he lived up to 1846, when he emigrated to America, and settled in La Fayette Co., Wis.; in 1856, he moved to Grant Co., where he has since lived; he has a farm of 300 acres. He was married at the age of 27, in England, to Miss Nevitte; they has nine children; two of his sons were in the late war; one of them was wounded in battle. Mr. Blackbourn is a republican in politics, and a member of the M.E. Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

BLACKBOURN, G.R.

G.R. BLACKBOURN, farmer, Sec. 4; P.O. Beetown; was born in 1827, in England; he lived there until 15 years of age, then went to New York and lived there thirteen years; he then came to Wisconsin and settled in La Fayette Co.; lived there until 1859; he then came to Grant Co., and located in Beetown, where he has resided since; in his younger days he worked for wages, but later has become a prosperous farmer. He was married in 1855 to Margaret Beadle, a daughter of Thomas Beadle; they have raised ten children--Sarah J., Elizabeth M., William H., Victoria E., George E., Frank E., Charles E., Cora E., Lura D. and Edith M. He has 400 acres of land, valued at $6,000. He was Road Overseer two terms; has been School Treasurer six terms. In politics, he is a Greenbacker.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

BLAINE, JOHN J.

ATTORNEY GENERAL

JOHN J. BLAINE (Rep.) was born May 4, 1875, on a farm in town of Wingville, Grant county, Wisconsin; attended common school and was graduated from Montfort high school, Montfort, Wisconsin; afterwards attended Northern Indiana University at Valparaiso, Indiana, and was graduated from the law department thereof on June 3, 1896. He practiced law in Montfort, Wisconsin, one year, after which he removed to Boscobel, Wisconsin, where he has since practiced law. He served as mayor of Boscobel four terms and member of county board of supervisors of Grant county four years. He was elected to the state senate in 1908 and served in the sessions for 1909 and 1911, but was not a candidate for re-election. In 1912 he was alternate delegate to the Republican National Convention at Chicago, and in 1916 a delegate to the Republican National Convention at Chicago. In 1918 he was, elected Attorney General, receiving 166,543 votes, against 86,226 for Thomas H. Ryan, (Dem.)

Source: The Wisconsin Blue Book (1919) pages 452-453; transcribed by FoFG mz

BLANCHARD, C. A.

C. A. BLANCHARD, farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. Boscobel. Is a native of Morris Co., N. J., but was raised principally in Essex Co., N. Y. After the death of his parents, he went to Connecticut and finished his education. Came to Vinegar Hill, Jo Daviess Co., Ill., in 1846, and remained two years. In 1848, he came to the place where he is now located. During 1844 and 1845, he clerked in a feed and grocery store in New York. In 1846, he went to New Orleans and engaged in getting out ship-timber. In May of the same year, he came to Galena and went to mining. He owns about 250 acres of land, and has cleared it up himself. Has held nearly every town office. Married in 1854, to Miss Martha E. Fitch, who was born in Michigan. They have three children, two sons and one daughter.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Marion) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BLOCK, DAVID

DAVID BLOCK, Platteville, merchant; was born in Baden, Germany, in 1818. Came to America in 1853, and has resided in Grant Co. ever since, most of the time in Platteville. Was never married, and has been in the mercantile business since 1866. He was in the military service in Germany about three years, and participated in three battles, in one of which, in 1848, he was wounded, depriving him of the sight of one eye, and nearly depriving him of the sense of hearing.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BLOYER, JOHN

JOHN BLOYER (deceased), died July 4, 1879; born in Switzerland in 1814, and came to Pennsylvania with his parents when 6 months old, when they engaged in farming in Lancaster Co., where his father died, and he with the family, in 1830, went to Charlestown, Coles Co., Ill., where, in 1841, he married Miss Elizabeth Griffiths, a native of Indiana; he at that time was engaged and learned the carpenter's trade; in 1845, they came to this State and bought a farm near Platteville, on which they located and lived until 1853, when they sold the farm and bought one upon which two sons, George and Frank, with their mother, now live. The farm embraces 960 acres. There are six children living and five deceased; two sons, John and Thomas, died in the army; John was a member of the 14th W. V. I., and Thomas of the 33d W. V. I.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Waterstown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BOBEL, A.

A. BOBEL, proprietor Central House, Boscobel; born in Hesse-Cassel, Germany. In 1853, came to Ohio, the following year to Milwaukee; was clerk in a stove store; from 1856 to 1861, in the wholesale grocery business; then came to Boscobel and started a saloon, afterward opened a small tavern; he enlarged the house from time to time; he then built his hotel known as the Central House, the finest in the county; it was burned Jan. 7, 1881, but was immediately rebuilt. All of his property Mr. Bobel has acquired since coming to the State. Married March 3, 1856. Mrs. Bobel was born in Germany. They have six children, three sons and three daughters.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BOCK, G.

G. BOCK, farmer, Sec. 33; P. O. Muscoda; was born in 1830 in Germany; son of Sebastian and Magtelina Bock; came to the United States in 1852; located in Pennsylvania for one year; then removed to Illinois, remaining but a short time, after which he came to Grant Co., Wis., in 1855. He married, in 1860, Christena Ramma, daughter of Mickle and Catharine Ramma, by whom he has had eleven children -- Joseph V., Lina, Mary N., Catharina, Elizabeth, John, Mattilda, Anna, Emmie, Ida and Otto. He has been School Director three terms, and Road Overseer one term. In politics, he is a Democrat, and in religion, a Roman Catholic. He owns 200 acres of land.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BOCK, HAROLD "HAL"

Television Pioneer
Wisconsin Man Speeds Work in California
by Jay Dee
HOLLYWOOD

As NBC pushes toward completions its $1,300,000 television transmitter atop Mount Wilson near Pasadena, speeding the day when sight and sound broadcasting will span the country, a former Wisconsin farm boy finds himself with large and growing responsibilities. He is Harold (Hal) Bock, a native of Grant county, who is now in charge of NBC's western television department.

At the moment Bock is especially concerned with preparations for the beginning of NBC's telecasting here. What is being done here now has real meaning for the entire country because of the special importance of Hollywood in NBC's projected nation-wide television network which is rapidly becoming a reality.

"The fact that the talent is here made Hollywood the No. 1 center of radio," Bock said in his office at NBC studios. "For the same reason I expect it to be the hub of television. What's more, the talent here is thoroughly camera wise. That, I am sure, will prove very important in telecasts.

"You would be surprised at the number of top stars who are so eager to get going in television that they keep pressing me to tell them when I think they can do it.

"How soon do you think Wisconsin will be seeing live Hollywood shows by way of the air," he was asked.

"If you mean dramas and comedies especially staged for television," Bock answered, "I would say in two to three years. But there is just a possibility, and I would not want to call it more than a possibility as yet, that with the co-operation of The Milwaukee Journal's station, WTMJ-TV, we can put the next Rose bowl game on all the screens it serves."

Difficult Chore
Bock added that he did not mean to imply by this qualified promise that such a telecast would mark the beginning of regular schedules between Hollywood and Milwaukee. "We would have to treat it as a special event justifying much larger expenditure for connecting lines than would ordinarily be advisable. Not until the coaxial cables now being laid reach across the country and booster stations have been built to take care of it will transcontinental telecasting be really established."

At 38, Bock is the youngest NBC department head in the west and at the same time the oldest Hollywood employee of the network in respect to continuous service. He was born on a farm on the edge of Avoca, Wis. His mother, Margaret, died when he was 3 years old. Nine years later his father, the late Herman G. Bock, remarried and brought his wife and son by automobile to Long Beach, Calif, where he went into the real estate business.

In high school there, young Bock got a job as part time reporter on a Long Beach paper and after graduation he continued as a newspaperman. While covering theaters, he became Long Beach correspondent for a west coast theatrical journal and soon was put in charge of the publication's San Francisco office. There in 1930 he wrote what he believes to have been the first radio column in a theatrical trade paper.

His Big Break
Later, while heading up the San Francisco bureau of Variety, Bock took on the added job of nighttime newscasting for NBC.

By 1934 NBC had begun operations in Hollywood and had set up a small studio on the RKO movie lot. Three persons constituted the entire staff. Will Rogers' show originated there and, briefly, Rudy Vallee's. The next year NBC sent Bock down to handle publicity for this station. When Hollywood began to overshadow San Francisco as a broadcasting center, he became western publicity manager, later director of public relations. Two years ago he was placed in charge of the western television department.

Shortly afterward, on his way west from New York, the former Grant county lad returned to the scenes of his boyhood for the first time since he left them at the age of 12. Highlight of this experience was a box social in the Foresters' hall at Muscoda given in his honor by his many Wisconsin relatives, headed by his aunt Edith Bock, postmistress, his uncle Ed, and his cousin Raymond Bock, all of Muscoda.

Bock has been married 11 years to the former Sybil Chism, organist, of Long Beach. Until recently she was on the air at the organ for Lum 'n' Abner, with whom she was associated eight years.

Source: The Milwaukee Journal 29 Feb 1948 - Transcribed by Mary Dutcher

BOCK, JOSEPH

JOSEPH BOCK, of the firm of Bock & Schreiner, abstracts; was born in the province of Alsace, Germany ; received a partly collegiate education ; emigrated in 1857, and after a few months residence at St. Louis, settled at Cassville, in this county, the same year. Enlisted as a private in Co. C, 2d W. V. I., April 19, 1861 ; took part in the battle of first Bull Bun, the skirmishes near Gordonsville, Va., near Richmond Railway and along Rappahannock, Va.; was wounded in both thighs at the battle of Gainesville Va., Aug. 28, 1862; participated [in Burnside's mud march against Fredericksburg; his wounds opened in 1863 and prevented farther active service, and he was mustered out of service in 1864. In 1865, he was elected Register of Deeds for Grant Co., and held that office until 1869, when he engaged in his present business and has the only set of abstract books of Grant Co. Mr. Bock was elected Representative to the State Legislature, and served during the sessions of 1876-77. David Schreiner, of the firm of Bock & Schreiner; is a native of Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, and was born Dec. 21, 1842; emigrated to America, and came to Wisconsin in 1855, and settled in Grant Co.; during the war, he enlisted in August, 1862, in Co. C, 25th W. V. I.; was slightly wounded at Decatur, Ga., and was severely wounded in front of Atlanta, August, 1864, losing the left arm ; served until June, 1865; in 1869, he was elected Clerk of the courts, and held that office eight years ; has held the office of Town Treasurer and Town Clerk, and is now Justice of the Peace. In May, 1869, he was married to Miss Clara Stelzner, from Indiana ; they have two children Laura and Ethelinda.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

BOEBEL, FRED

FRED BOEBEL, farmer, Sec. 20; P. O. Boscobel. Born in Baden, Germany, March 28, 1829; came to America in 1853, remaining in Ulster Co., N. Y., about six months; he then came to Grant Co., where he has since lived. He owns 240 acres of land; he has cleared and improved this farm, with a barn costing about $700; his house cost about $600. All of this property he has earned since coming here. Married in 1857, to Miss Elizabeth Shide; she was born in Baden; had six children, three living -- one daughter and two sons.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Marion) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BOEBEL, PETER

PETER BOEBEL, farmer, Sec. 5; P. O. Boscobel. Born in Baden, Germany; came to Ulster Co. N. Y., in 1854; worked there at the stone-mason trade two years -- the trade he learned in Baden. In 1856, came to Grant Co., where he has since resided. Owns 430 acres of land, which he has improved with a good barn costing about $800, and other improvements. Member of the Presbyterian Church. Married in 1865, to Katherine Brechler; she was born in Baden. They have six children -- five sons and one daughter.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Marion) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BONHAIM, FRANCIS H.

FRANCIS H. BONHAIM, farmer. Sec. 34; P.O. Lancaster; has 160 acres and 40 acres of timber in Harrison ; was born Sept. 11,1 806, in Wythe Co., Va., son of Nehemiah and Isabella (Scott) Bonham. Mr. B. came to Grant Co. in 1827, and made several trips to Virginia, and in 1840 brought his family and settled at Hurricane Grove, and engaged in mining until 1844, when he removed to his farm where he has since made his home. On Dec. 23, 1830, he was married by Rev. Mr. Walters, in Pike Co., Mo., to Mary Ann, daughter of William and Lucy (Oglesby) Novel, of Shelby Co., Ky., where she was born May 24, 1819, then had nine children, ????? William N., married Lizzie Parker, of Salem, Oregon, where they now reside, with three children; Matilda I., now wife of Samuel J. Shelton, of Salem, Oregon ; Calvin K., married Anna Myers, of Salem, Oregon, he having previously married Sophronia Sears ; Charles W., married Dolly Parker, of Canyon City, Oregon, has two children; Mary P., wife of Keuben G. Brooks, of Vermont, now at Hopkinton, Iowa, one child ; Martha Ann, wife of C. M. Jackson ; Lenora, wife of Mark Baldwin, died in the spring of 1878 ; James H. (his second son), died March 12, 1860, at 22 years of age. Mr. Bonham is a Protestant ; in politics is a Republican, and participated in the meeting when the Republican party was organized in Grant Co. ; he has in his possession a sword brought to America by his great-great-grandfather over 200 hundred years ago (he having been an officer in the British navy); the father of Mr. B. was an officer in the war of 1812. Mr. B. is a hearty, jovial old gentleman, and has for twenty years held the office of Justice of the Peace and several other offices, and states that when he settled here, there were no houses between his place and Lancaster, and that he cut the first tree to make the Lancaster road, and that there were only three or four houses on the Potosi road, 7 J miles, and says he has been frequently in the sugar camp of old Black Hawk. Mr. and Mrs. B. celebrated their golden wedding, and received a number of very fine presents, a very fine easy chair from the " Potosi delegation," a $20 gold piece, etc.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

BONHAM, ALEXANDER G.

ALEXANDER G. BONHAM, see. 30 ; P. O. Hurricane Grove ; owns 170 acres of land valued at $40 per acre; born in Pike Co., Mo., in 1823, came to Wisconsin in 1834; settled on his present farm in 1848. Married Elizabeth Kilby, a native of Lincoln Co., Mo., and they have six children Charles O., Lemuel E., Lenora, Lura, Laura and Mable. Mr. B. has been a member of the Town Board, and has also held the office of Justice.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

BOORMAN, JOHN

JOHN BOORMAN, Sec. 28; P. O. Hazleton; owns 320 acres of land; was born in Chautauqua Co., N. Y. in 1829; came to Wisconsin in 1853, and settled in this town; located on this farm in 1866. He married Evaline Brodt, a native of New York; they have nine children -- James, Delilah, Hankinson, Adelaide, Josie, Benjamin, Jennie, Sarah and Evaline.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Wyalusing Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BOOTH, THOMAS

THOMAS BOOTH, Sec. 11; P. O. Elmo; owns 200 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre; was born in England in 1820; came to America in 1840, and settled in this town. Married Rosamond Render in 1844; she was born in England; they have ten children -- John Thomas, Margaret E., Render, Francis, William, George, Samuel, Joseph, Alvin and Charles.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Smelser Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BORAH, EDMOND H.

EDMOND H. BORAH, farmer. Sec. 23; P.O. Lancaster; was born in Kentucky June 2, 1820, of German parentage, who came to Wisconsin in early times. Mr. Borah after coming to Wisconsin worked by the month, then by his labors accumulated a farm of 200 acres of land ; he then went to California, was very successful ; he then returned to Wisconsin, traded for .300 acres of land, nicely improved by his own industry ; he has been engaged in the stock business for about eight years ; he is now in Kansas, where he owns 580 acres of land on the Kansas Pacific R. R. His wife was Sarah M. Kilbey, who was born in Wisconsin, Dec. 29, 1836; they married Sept. 16, 1853; they have four children Kilbey H., born Dec. 29, 1855; Adolph D., July 2, 1857; Nettie, Sept. 16, 1862; Georgie, March 1, 1868. Mrs. B.'s father was born in North Carolina, in 1806 ; came to Wisconsin in 1832 ; died in 1876 ; her mother, Rhoda Parsons, a native of Virginia, now 76 years of age, residing now at Hurricane Corners.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

BOURRET, BENJAMIN

BENJAMIN BOURRET, Sec. 26; P. O. Livingston; was born in Iowa Co., Wis., Dec. 26, 1846; left there with his parents when 6 years of age, and came to town of Clifton and settled on the farm where he now lives; has lived there ever since except the year 1877, when he lived at Belmont and kept the United States Hotel; his father died at home June 22, 1868, and was buried at Platteville, in the old cemetery; his mother was born July 26, 1814, and had thirteen children, of whom nine are living -- Mary S., Frances, Peter, Benjamin, Michael, Josephine, Eli, John L., Henry; the names of those deceased are Matilda, Lewis, Aurilla and Joseph. Benjamin took charge of the farm after this father died, and now owns half of 160 acres. Was married, June 6, 1876, to Martha J. Power, in Shullsburg, Wis.; have two children -- Addie May and Eugene. Benjamin is a member of the I. O. O. F., Washburn Lodge, No. 228, and has passed through all the offices in the lodge.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BOWEN, FRANK A.

FRANK A. BOWEN, farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. Lancaster; was born in 1852, in Trumbull Co., Ohio. He was a son of Moses and Tracy Bowen. He came to Grant Co., Wis., in 1855, in company with his father; located in Liberty; lived with his parents until he was 18 years of age. He was married, in 1875, to Miss Sylvia Gleason, a daughter of A. S. Gleason; but, in 1878, was divorced. He is the owner of 80 acres of land, valued at $1,000. His politics are Republican.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Liberty Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BOYNTON, O. A.

O. A. BOYNTON, liveryman, Platteville; was born in 1818, in Grafton Co., N. H. Was educated at Haverhill. Married Oct. 5, 1840, in Detroit, Mich., to Miss Elizabeth A. Clark, of that place. Came to Wisconsin the 1st of November following, and has been a resident of Platteville since that time. He first engaged in the boot and shoe business, which he followed about three years; then traveled selling dry goods till spring of 1846, when he went into the livery business and also kept the Platteville Hotel till 1853. He continued the livery business till 1863; then sold out and followed farming till 1872, when he again went into the livery business, and has continued it up to the present time. His wife died Aug. 12, 1880, leaving four children, having lost three before her death. The oldest daughter, Mary, is now the wife of C. M. Henderson, of Platteville; Eugene R. is single and living in Nevada; Ida E. and Louis A., at home. Mr. Boynton has been a member of the Village Board three years, and President of the Board one year.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BRADWELL, CUTHBERT

CUTHBERT BRADWELL, P. O. Fair Play; born in England on the 30th of January, 1820; came to America in 1830; remained four years in Schuylkill Co., Penn., and moved to Wisconsin in the spring of 1835, and located at Jamestown; followed mining for some years. Owns 160 acres of land; probable value, $8,000. Is with the Republican party in politics; is a Protestant. Wife's maiden name, Mary Haley; she was born in Ireland; have five children -- Winfield, James, Olive, Emma, Mary.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Jamestown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BRANDON, C. WATT

C. Watt Brandon, editor and publisher; (Rep.) ; b. October 12, 1871, Georgetown, Grant county, Wisconsin; s. of Oscar and Mary Ann (Noland) Brandon; educ. Pub. Shcls. LeMara and Kingsley, Iowa; learned the printer's trade at Kingsley, Iowa, becoming a journeyman in Sioux City, Iowa, 1887; spent a couple of years as a journeyman printer through the South and East, locating in Minneapolis, Minn., 1892; connected with daily papers of Minneapolis, 1892-1904; publisher of The National Gaurdsman at Minneapolis, 1896-1902; located at Pinedale, Wyoming, May 10, 1904; founded and published The Pinedale Roundup until Jan. 3, 1908, when he removed to Kemmerer and purchased The Kemmerer Camera, which he has conducted since; owner News, McCammon, Idaho; owns majority interest in Cokevile (Wyo.) Register; colonel on staff of Gov. S. R. Van Sant, Minnesota, 1902-4; major on staff of Gov. D. M. Clough; Minnesota, 1898; asst. chief clerk Wyoming State Senate, 1911; mayor Kemmerer, 1913-14; re-elected, 1914; mem. 32 deg. Mason, Shriner; mem. Wyoming Consistory No. 1; O. E. S.; Elks; Knights and Ladies of Security; M. W. A.; W. O. W. Address: Kemmerer, Wyoming.

Source: Men of Wyoming, By C. S. Peterson (Publ. 1915) Transcribed by Richard Ramos

BRAY, JOHN

JOHN BRAY, Sec. 25; P. O. Cuba City; owns 75 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre; born in Cornwall, England, in 1829; came to America in 1836, and settled with his parents in Mineral Point; he settled on his present farm in 1857. Married Mary Reed, a native of the same place; they have three children -- W. Howard, Thirza A., J. Morgan. Are members of the Free Methodist Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Smelser Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BREMMER, JACOB

JACOB BREMMER, of the firm of Graham & Bremmer; was born in Prussia on the Rhine in 1842, and came to America with his parents July, 1847; in 1848; they located at Mineral Point; in 1866, he came to Muscoda and embarked in the mercantile business and in buying grain, stock and all kinds of produce; in 1870, he built a steam elevator. He was married in Muscoda in 1867 to Miss Matilda Drone; they have four children -- three sons and one daughter. They are members of the Roman Catholic Church. He has held several town offices, and is a successful business man, and self-made.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BRIGGS, E. W.

E. W. BRIGGS, farmer; P. O. Lancaster; born in Lancaster Co., Penn., April 9, 1836; son of Samuel and Catharine Caley; was wagon making in Platteville three years, and, in 1861, enlisted in the 47th W. V. I., and served two and a half years. March 2, 1862, was married by Frank H. Bonham to Angeline, daughter of Caleb and Nancy (Coombs) Taylor, and had seven children -- Samuel L., born Dec. 2, 1867; Clara M., April 23, 1872; Oscar C., Feb. 10, 1876; Balorus, Oct. 6, 1878; George E., Feb. 20, 1864 (died March 30, 1865); William A., born Aug. 21, 1866 (died July 21, 1868); Lewis F., March 8, 1868 (died Aug. 20, 1870). He settled in Decatur Co., Kan., in 1878. Is a Republican.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Potosi Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BRIMMER, URIAH

URIAH BRIMMER, farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. Boscobel; was born in Otsego Co., N. Y., in 1815; his father, John Brimmer, a farmer, and his mother, Amy Christian, were both natives of New York State; Uriah lived in the State of New York until 1842, when he went to Illinois, locating in Kendall Co., engaging in farming, afterward moving to Kane Co., remaining there until 1860, when he came to Grant Co. and bought the farm upon which he now lives. He was married, in 1835, in the State of New York, to Miss Miranda Rowley, by whom he had eight children, six now living; George, the youngest, enlisted August, 1862, in Col. Moore's 33d W. V. I., serving with the regiment until the war was over; his daughter Sarah was married in July, 1861, to E. C. Miller; he enlisted in the 19th W. V. I., and was discharged for disability; after he regained his health he enlisted in the 33d W. V. I., and was wounded while with the regiment in the Red River expedition, from the effects of which he afterward died.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Waterstown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BRINDLEY, JOHN

JOHN BRINDLEY (Rep.), of Boscobel, Grant county, was born near Boscobel, Grant county, April 18, 1850; graduated from the Wisconsin State University in 1874; is a lawyer; was principal of the Lone Rock grade school in 1877 and '78; elected to the assembly for 1879, and re-elected for 1880, receiving 913 votes against 526 for Thomas Forney, democrat, and 239 for J. W. Bidwell, green backer.

Third District---The towns of Blue River, Boscobel, Fennimore, Hickory Grove, Marion, Millville, Mount Hope, Muscoda, Patch Grove, Watterstown, Wingville, Woodman and Wyalusing. Population, 12,177.

Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1880) transcribed by RuthAnne Wilke

BRINDLEY, JOSHUA

JOSHUA BRINDLEY, (deceased); he was born in the year 1813, in England, and died at Boscobel July 8, 1857; he came to America in 1844, and located in La Fayette Co., where he followed mining for about three years; he then came to this locality and followed farming until 1856, when he opened a butcher shop and meat market; the spring he died he moved on the farm where the family now reside; he once owned part of the land upon which Boscobel is built, and has often plowed where Parker's store now stands. The farm now consists of about 500 acres. Married in 1834 to Sarah Edge, a native of England; they had twelve children, seven of whom are living -- three sons and four daughters; his son William manages the farm for his mother; he also is a native of England; married in 1866 to Mrs. Sarah E. Hardy, and by whom he has three children. Enlisted in 1862, in Co. B, 32d W. V. I., and served until the end of the war; was in the siege of Vicksburg, Spanish Fort, Red River and Meridian expeditions. John Brinkley, Jr., has twice been a member of the Wisconsin Assembly from the Third District -- in 1879 and in 1880.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hickory Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BRINKHAN, HENRY

HENRY BRINKHAN, Sec. 28 ; P 0. Hurricane Grove ; owns 80 acres of land, valued at 840 per acre ; born in Germany in 1829 : came to America in 1857, and settled in this county ; in 1865, he settled on his present farm. Married Sophia Kuhn, a native of Germany ; they have nine children Mary Lizzie, Fred. H., Clara, Edward, William, Annie M., Albert, Ellen Nettie and Fanny Eve.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

BRODERICK, GEORGE

GEORGE BRODERICK, carpenter and builder, Hazel Green; born in England in 1826; came to America in 1849, and settled in this village. Married Eden Thompson, a native of England; have four children -- Frank E., Lillie, May W., George W. Mr. Broderick was a member of the Legislature one term; has been on the County Board of Supervisors and Town Board.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BROOKENS, JOSEPH

JOSEPH BROOKENS, farmer; P.O. Bloomington; born in 1841, in Tuscarawas Co., Ohio; was a son of James Brookens; came to Grant Co., Wis., in 1855; settled in Glen Haven. Enlisted in 1862, in Co. D, 33d W.V.I, and served three years; was in seven battles. In 1865, he located in Beetown. He was married the same year to Miss Drusilla Bair; they had eight children, six living. He has always been a successful farmer, and has 196 acres of land, valued at $6,000. He is a member of the M.E. Church; is a Republican.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

BROOKENS, T.S.

T.S. BROOKENS, Sec. 21; P.O. Bloomington; owns 120 acres land, valued at $45 per acre; born in Ohio in 1833; came to Wisconsin in 1854; in 1864, he settles on his present farm. Married Catharine Ketner, a native of Pennsylvania; they have five children--Rosella, Isabelle, Clyde, Eugene E. and Ora. Mr. B. enlisted in Co. O, 2d W.V.I., in 1861, and was discharged in 1864. They are members of the Congregational Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Bloomington Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

BROWN, FRANK

FRANK BROWN, P. O. Fair Play; native of Baden, Germany; born Oct. 10, 1807; emigrated to Hazel Green in 1844. In politics, a Democrat; in religion, a Catholic. Married Catherine Maus, a native of Germany; born in 1817; they have had six children -- Mary A., Christena, Peter, Francis, Henry, William F. (died April 2, 1872). Peter served in the army in the 25th W. V. I., and was honorably discharged.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Jamestown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BROWN, LUTHER

LUTHER BROWN, Patch Grove. Mr. Brown, who ranks among the pioneer settlers of Grant County, was born May 21, 1796, at Canterbury, Conn. Like other youth of those early times, he assisted upon the farm, occasionally attending school until his scholastic attainments were such that farm work occupied only the summer months, while the winter was devoted to school-teaching. This programme obtained until Mr. Brown had reached the age of 30, when he concluded to try his luck in the Far West. At that time, the pioneer adventurer needed not to go further than Ohio, the main portion of which was but little better than a wilderness. Mr. Brown settled near Ellsworth, Mahoning Co., in the above State, and began the task of converting 100 acres of heavy timber-land into a tract fit for cultivation. While here, he married Miss Fitch, daughter of Deacon Daniel Fitch, who proved a worthy helpmeet. From here, after a severe and wearisome struggle with nature's giants, Mr. Brown removed with his family to the Territory of Wisconsin, and settled upon the broad opens of "Blake's Prairie," within the confines of Patch Grove. The village at this time was hardly known, and the present populous smiling section knew but a few settlers, and these far between. Here Mr. Brown has continued to reside, and where he has raised his family of twelve children, seven of whom are now living, and have families of their own. Mr. Brown is now in his 85th year, and a link between the past and the present, and takes an active interest in everything connected with the county of which he has been so long an honored citizen.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BRUNSON, IRA W.

By Ira W. Brunson.

I was born in Sing Sing, N. Y., May 3, 1805; raised in Danbury, Conn. In 1827, moved to Columbus, Ohio, where I engaged in the hatters' business—being a hatter by trader which I stopped in 1835. In the early part of 1836, left Columbus and came to Wisconsin, in company with my brother Alfred, and Henry Patch, in a keel-boat, down the Ohio and up the Mississippi Rivers ; landed at Prairie du Chien.

That fall, in September, I returned to Ohio, in the stage, to settle up my business ; returned to Wisconsin on horseback, in the winter. Left Columbus the latter part of January ; the mud at that time, was about knee-deep to a horse. Arriving at Fort Wayne, snow was fifteen inches at South Bend, it was again bare ground ; at Michigan City, snow was two feet deep ; at Chicago, it was once more bare ground. I crossed Rock River at Rockford, Ill., on the ice ; stayed over night at the Twelve-Mile-Grove. The only house was a cabin, with neither chink nor daub. In the morning I started north, intending to reach Freeport and stay overnight.

Came to a house when the sun was about an hour high, and inquired the way to Mineral Point; was told to go to the mill and stop overnight, which was about three miles' distance. On reaching the mill, I found it to be a saw-mill, but could find no house. I wandered about in search of a house until it commenced getting dark. I could see a dark-looking place ; thinking it was a grove—houses were then built in or near groves—I started for it, but on reaching the place found neither house nor road ; concluded I would be obliged to stay out all night, and started off in the northern direction, the wind being in the northeast. I kept the right cheek against the wind, so that I would keep the same course. Traveled until I reached a large creek, which, being open, and not knowing anything as to its depth, did not dare to push my horse into it, and concluded to stay overnight there. I turned my horse loose, that he might feed upon the grass above the snow, the snow being about one and one-half feet deep. I then made a path about a rod long, between two trees, and walked to and fro ; not having anything of which I could make a fire, had to keep moving. After walking some time, I began to get tired, and laid myself down, resting my head upon my saddle ; for fear of falling asleep, I took a chew of tobacco. I soon fell asleep. I dreamed I was drinking beer, and I then swallowed my tobacco, and I awoke. I felt sure had it not been for the tobacco I never would have awoke.

I again took the path and again walked to and fro, and watched to see the sun rise, so as to point my compass. At daylight, I found that a gang of wolves were near at hand. Taking my bearings, I found I was on the edge of the prairie and timber land, and about six miles west of the Pecatonica. I then mounted my horse and started east; after I had gone about three miles, I found the road, and then started north. Arrived at the grist-mill and house about 11 o'clock, and after eating dinner started for Mineral Point.

Toward evening, I arrived at a house, and wanted to stop overnight, but was not allowed to stay. I, however, obtained a place to remain about a mile farther on. Next night I stayed at a miner's cabin, on Peddler's Creek, now known as Linden, and the next night arrived at Henry Patch's.

In the following spring, in 1837, opened a store at Cassville, in company with a man named Sellars, and remained there until a house was built at Lancaster by James Bonham, on the same lot now occupied by Burr's store ; moved my goods and started the first store in Lancaster. About the same time, Maj . Price sent out goods by George Cox, and commenced a merchandise business in a log building with frame attachment, near the big spring ; he also was Postmaster. I continued in the merchandise business until 1889.

William Richards kept the first boarding-house in a log-house built by Boice, who formerly owned the land where Lancaster now stands, and sold the same to Maj. Price, who laid out the town of Lancaster.

While he was keeping there, a quarrel arose between him (Richards) and the boarders. The boarders all left, and employed a Frenchman to do their cooking, and had their kitchen beside a log near where the Phelps House now stands ; had their dining-room in a small frame building. on a lot where George Ryland's bank is standing now. Richards afterward moved back to Cassville on his farm. They lived in that way for two or three weeks, not a lady in the town. My brother Alfred and his wife, on their way between Platteville and Prairie du Chien, had broken his wagon, and were obliged to stay overnight, his wife being the only woman in town. In the meantime, Richards was succeeded by Capt. Reed.

The first court held in the county was held in Cassville, in the first of 1837. Judge Dunn was Judge of the court ; John Fletcher was Clerk. The second court was held in the same building that we used as a dining-room.

The first road in Grant County [Laid out by the county.—Ed. ] was laid in June, 1838 Commissioners, J. Allen Barber, James Bonham and myself; Jared Warner, Surveyor; was laid from Brunet's Ferry, on the Wisconsin, to Platteville. Second road in the same year from Cassville to Platteville, by the way of Hurricane Grove ; I was one of the Commissioners. The first assessment in collecting taxes was known as the " tax sale of 1838." In 1839, they found in what is called the Burlington Statute that the law had been changed, forbidding the employment of the Sheriff or Deputy Sheriff in collecting the taxes, and authorized the County Commissioners to appoint a Collector. About the 1st of December, in 1839, the County Commissioners appointed me Collector in the county, which business I commenced to perform immediately ; although cold winter and short days, I made my return in time. The next year, at election, I was elected by the people, and served three years in succession.

Judge Haywood was County Treasurer ; Nelson Dewey, Clerk of County Commissioners. I made my returns to Judge Haywood. The county taxes were collected by a County Collector for eight or ten years, until the State Government came into operation and town system was adopted. The fees of the County Collector (while I was Collector") were 5 per cent for collecting and 5 per cent for advertising delinquent lands, and 25 cents for each certificate of sale. In 1840, the fees amounted to $1,400 or $1,500.

The first celebration on July 4, that was held in the county (if not in the State), was held at Cassville in 1837. Maj. Anderson was President of the occasion, and I had the honor of being Vice President. [This is meant as the first public celebration. Maj. Rountree had celebrated Independence Day in 1827, as mentioned in another place.—Ed.] T. P. Burnette delivered an oration, which was re-published in the Herald a few years ago.

The first Convention held in the State was held at Madison, in the summer of 1838. Maj. John H. Rountree, of Platteville, and Orris McCartney, of Cassville, and myself, went as delegates from Grant County, traveling there and back on horseback.

Grant County, like all other new counties, was in the habit of making a non-resident landholder pay well for the Government; they would assess non-resident land about double that of resident. I have known of land belonging to residents being assessed at $2.50 and non-residents at $5, both pieces lying side by side.

People were generally free-hearted and liberal. If a traveler should come to a miner's cabin or any house and not find any one at home, and he should go in and eat what he wanted, there would be nothing thought of it. For instance: I came to Tom Parish's, who kept a tavern in what is now known as Wingville, just at nightfall. In the morning, I asked what the "hill was." He replied, " I never charge my neighbors anything; " my home was over twentyseven miles from there.

In the early settlement of Wisconsin, there was a gang of desperadoes in and about Snake Hollow (now known as Potosi), who gave tone to the character of the whole country. A dispute arose between Samuel B. Roundtree and William Clark and their crowd on one side, and Moor and Watson on the other, respecting the right of a mineral lot. It first began with a law-suit, and then Moor and Watson gave James Crow, another hard character, what they called "fighting interest " in the lead. Roundtree and Clark were rather afraid to attack Crow themselves; they accordingly employed three men to dispose of him. One night Jim Crow was in a grocery in the upper part of the hollow ; Evans, Cooley and Derrich came up from the lower end of the hollow on horseback, and leaving their horses at the door of the grocery, went in took a drink, saw Jim Crow standing at the fire-place as they again went out the door. Evans turned, holding the door partly open; drew a pistol, fired at his victim, the ball passing through his body, and he fell dead. They jumped on their horses with a loud yell, and went down the follow again. They were finally captured and brought to Lancaster. The examination commenced in the afternoon before Squire Dewey in a log building standing opposite the present site of the Mansion House barn. The building being two stories high, the examination was held up stairs, [afterward changed to down stairs—Ed]. The Sheriff had a guard of about twenty men stationed there on the stairs (they were under my charge and armed with rifles), with orders that no one should go up only as they were summoned. The court continued all night, and the next day about noon they were committed to jail by Squire Dewey. Not knowing that the Sheriff would receive them without an order from Judge Dunn, I started out to Elk Grove to obtain an order to the Crawford County Sheriff. At the same time, Rountree's lawyers sent to a man to get a writ of habeas corpus from Judge Dunn ; we went together. I obtained the order, and the other man the writ of habeas corpus to bring the prisoner there before Judge Dunn. The prisoners were brought before Judge Dunn and were admitted to bail of $2,000 to appear at court. After that, the people were exasperated at seeing murderers running at liberty. They (the people), raised a company of about two hundred men, well armed, and gave orders to Rountree, Clark and all concerned in it to leave the country forthwith, or they should be lashed to a log and sent down the Mississippi River.

When the court met again, the prisoners did not appear. A motion was made to take judgment against the bail, but Judge Dunn said that if the people arose and drove them away, the bail could not be held responsible. None of them dared make their appearance for a long time. I afterward heard that Roundtree died in a hovel in Fair Play. I believe that all engaged in the killing of Jim Crow came to some bad end.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Publ. 1881); transcribed by a Friend of Free Genealogy

BRUNSON, J. W.

J. W. BRUNSON, farmer, Sec. 30; P. O. Mt. Hope; was born in 1805, in Sing Sing, N. Y.; son of Ira Brunson. His father was a stone-cutter by trade, and was drowned one year after the birth of this son, while he was keeping the ferry across the Hudson River, at that time. His mother moved to Danbury, Conn. At the age of 15 years, he became apprentice to the hatter's trade, under Capt. John Foot, with whom he lived until he was 19 years of age; began work for himself in 1824, after the death of his mother; followed his trade at different places for some time, then went to Utica, N. Y., and attended school for six months. He became a member of a Masonic Lodge in 1826. He emigrated to Columbus, Ohio, where he lived nine years, and, in 1836, removed to Grant Co., Wis., locating at Patch Grove; in 1836, he returned to Ohio; came back to Wisconsin in the winter of 1837, riding all the way on horseback, locating at Cassville and began merchandising in company with Mr. Sellers, for a short period; then removed to Lancaster and kept the first store at that place. In 1839, he was appointed Tax Collector for Grant Co., and, in 1840, he moved to Mt. Hope, where he has since lived. He was married the first time in 1829, at Blendon, Franklin Co., Ohio, to Margaret Benton, daughter of Samuel and Aurelia Benton, who died in 1833; was married the second time in 1840, in Crawford Co., Wis., to Henrietta Foster, daughter of Henry and Julie Foster; was married the third time in 1847, to Almina Benton, sister of his first wife. He had two children by his first wife -- Mary J. and Alfred; three by his second wife -- Benjamin F., Emily M., Ida E.; four by his third wife -- Aurelia F., Delford B., Almina, Jennie E. He has been Justice of the Peace for thirty years; Chairman of the Town Board two years and member of the County Board one year. In politics he is a Greenbacker; is a member of the M. E. Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Mount Hope Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BUCK, ERASTUS J.

PLATTEVILLE

Dr. Buck is a native of Heath, Franklin County Massachusetts, and was born September 5, 1828. He is a son of Erastus and Roxanna (Baldwin) Buck. He received an academic education at Nunda, Livingston County, New York; read medicine with Dr. John Turner of the same place, and attended lectures at Jefferson Medical College. Philadelphia, where he graduated in March 1854.

He commenced practice at Towlesville, Steuben County, New York; immigrated to Wisconsin in the autumn of 1856, and located at Westfield, Marquette County, where he practiced until the rebellion commenced.

Dr. Buck enlisted as a private in the summer of 1861; was immediately commissioned as first lieutenant of the Marquette sharpshooters, a company which went into the 7th Regiment of Infantry, but the Doctor did not leave the State as a soldier. In January 1862, he was appointed first assistant surgeon of the 18th Wisconsin; became surgeon the next September, and was with the regiment through the battles of Shiloh and Corinth, and the capture of Vicksburg, thence to the close of the war. Though among the younger class of surgeons, Dr. Buck occupied an honorable position among those of his profession. He was placed on the medical board of operators, a body which determined what operations should be performed, and (as the writer happens to know) performed himself several capital operations, such as the resection of the shoulder and elbow, operations requiring much skill, and in which he was uniformly successful. He was considered one of the best surgeons in the division, and it is not likely his skill was overestimated.

On returning from the South in 1865 Dr. Huck located at Platteville, where he has found his army experience of great service to him. During the last twelve years, while doing a general practice, and making a specialty of nothing, he has had many surgical cases, such as strangulated hernia, fistula and chronic ulcers, and a few of them quite difficult, treating them with marked success. He is United States examining surgeon, and has been for several years.

In politics Dr. Buck is a republican, but makes everything secondary to his profession. In 1861, just before going into the army, he yielded to the urgent request of his political friends so far as to serve them a single term in the legislature, he representing Marquette and part of Green Lake Counties, and acting on the committee on medical science and medical colleges.

Dr. Buck is a firm believer in the general doctrines of Christianity, with a leaning toward the Presbyterian creed.

Miss Sarah E. Trask, of Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, became his wife September 5, 1866, and they have four children.

Dr. Buck had a hard struggle in early life. In procuring his literary education he sawed wood, took care of a school building and acted as sexton of a church, to aid in defraying his expenses, and while reading medicine took daguerrean pictures to accumulate the means for finishing his studies. His education is thorough, and he learned the value of time and the worth of money in procuring it. A failure to early learn that lesson has been the cause of many a shipwreck in life.

Source: The US Biographical Dictionary and Pictorial Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Volume (1877) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

BUCK, E. J.

E. J. BUCK, M. D., Platteville; is a native of Franklin Co., Mass.; was born in the town of Heath in 1828. When 6 years of age his father, Erastus Buck, removed to Livingston Co., N. Y., where he is still living at the age of 84. Dr. Buck was educated in Livingston Co., and graduated from Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia, in the spring of 1854. He at once commenced the practice of his profession at Towlesville, Steuben Co., N. Y., where he remained till the fall of 1856, when he came to Wisconsin and practiced in Westfield, Marquette Co., till the war broke out in 1861. He was a member of the Wisconsin Legislature in the winter of 1860-61, and attended the extra session in June of 1861. In the spring of 1861, he assisted in raising a company of sharpshooters, and enlisted as a private; was appointed 1st Lieutenant but resigned, and the following fall was appointed Assistant Surgeon of the 18th W. V. I. Soon after the battle of Shiloh, in which he was engaged, he was promoted to the position of Surgeon, in which capacity he served till the close of war, and after the first year was one of the "board of operators" of his command. In August, 1868 he came to Platteville, and has practiced in that city since. He was married in 1866, at Beaver Dam, Wis., to Sarah E. Trask, a native of Maine, and has five children, all at home.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BUGGINS, RICHARD

RICHARD BUGGINS, Postmaster and merchant, Mt. Ida; was born in Staffordshire, Eng., Feb. 28, 1824; emigrated to the United States in 1848, and settled in Grant Co., Wis., in 1855. Was married to Harriet Walson. He has filled the offices of Justice of the Peace, Constable, Clerk of Schools, and is at present Postmaster. Is a Radical Republican. Is a member of the Baptist Church. Owns a nice property in the village of Mt. Ida. Adopted Mary Gilder when 4 years of age, who is now the wife of F. M. Simonds.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Mount Ida Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BUNKER, GILBERT R.

GILBERT R. BUNKER, Sec. 14; P. O. Martinville; born in Chenango Co., N. Y., Nov. 10, 1820, and, in 1838, went to Pennsylvania to his parents; worked there with his father one year; in 1839, went to Winnebago Co., Ill. And settled on farm; left there in May, 1851, and came to Wisconsin, and settled in the town of Clifton; bought 160 acres of land from Adam Keith, who bought it from the Government; sold his farm to Nelson Millard in 1870, and bought from Adam Keith the farm known as the Shipley farm; has lived there since except five years, when he lived in Muscoda, engaged in the drug and stationery business. He was married to Nancy Keith in 1846, who is now 53 years old; both are members of the M. E. Church; he has been class leader for twenty years, and is still a leading worker of the church; is also a member of the Town Board; have four children living -- Sarah A., Ellen L., Henry J. and Scott. Sarah was married to Joseph Doran, who lives in Virginia. Ellen L. married Dr. F. D. Stonard, who died Dec. 19, 1880; Henry J. married Sarah A. Fischer, and lives in Martinville.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BURNETT, THOMAS PENDLETON

Mr. Burnett was born in Pittsylvania County, Va., September 3, 1800, and was reared from early childhood on a farm in Bourbon or Spencer County, Kentucky. During this time, he obtained such instruction as he could by the aid of an academy and private instruction from neighboring gentlemen, laboring with his own hands, and afterward teaching, to acquire the means of support while prosecuting his studies. " While reading law, he was favored with some minor offices, such as Constable, Deputy Sheriff, Sheriff, etc., from the fees of which he derived a scanty means of support." Soon after his admission to the bar, he settled at Paris, Ky., where, in the practice of his profession, he is said to have been brought in contact, and often into professional collision, with some of the ablest lawyers in that State. For two years he filled the office of District Attorney. After the accession of Gen. Jackson to the Presidency in 1828, Mr. Burnett, who had been a warm partisan of the General, received October 15, 1829, the appointment of Sub-Agent in the Indian Department, to reside at Prairie du Chien. An accident which occurred soon after, when he was laboring with characteristic zeal and courage to resist the progress of an extensive fire at Paris, and which resulted in crushing one of his legs, confining him to his bed or his room for seven months, and leaving him a cripple for life, determined him to accept the appointment, far as it was below his hopes, rather than attempt to regain his practice after his long illness ; and a severe domestic misfortune aided in procuring this decision. Arriving at Prairie du Chien in June, 1830, he found but two or three American families in the place, except in the garrison at Fort Crawford. The major part of the inhabitants, four hundred in number, were Canadian French and half-breeds, who spoke only French with some Indian languages, all of which were to him unknown tongues." Mr. Burnett was at first disappointed in the country, the people, and the duties of his office, but upon better acquaintance became strongly attached to them all. To the employments of his agency the salary of which was only $500he was permitted to add the practice of his profession, in which he soon obtained some business, including suits prosecuted in behalf of the Government. In 1834, his connection with the Indian Agency ceased, and he devoted himself more completely to the practice of his profession. Some question having been made as to the existence of a vacancy in the office of District Judge, on account of the alleged non-residence of Judge Irwin, Mr. Burnett's appointment to the office was strongly urged upon the President ; but the latter did not recognize the existence of a vacancy. In January, 1835, Mr. Burnett was appointed by Gov. Mason, of Michigan Territory, District Attorney for the counties of Crawford, Iowa, Dubuque and Des Moines ; and he attended the summer terms of the courts in those counties but finding it " inconvenient and unpleasant," tendered his resignation to Gov. Mason, September 10, 1835. In October following, he was elected to the Legislative Council of Michigan Territory, which was appointed to meet at Green Bay, and, on the meeting of the Council in December, he was chosen its President ; but the meeting, which was of doubtful legal validity, was a practical failure. Congress was, however, memorialized at this session in favor of a speedy organization of the Territory of Wisconsin ; and a memorial to the President of the United States in reference to the offices of the contemplated Territory, urged upon him the appointment of its own citizens in preference to persons from other parts of the country. As it was understood that Gen. Dodge would be appointed Governor, Mr. Burnett was urged as a suitable person for the office of Secretary. "If the Secretaryship could not be obtained," we are told, " Mr. Burnett desired a Judgeship ; " that is, he desired to be appointed one of the Judges of the Supreme Court of the Territory, and his friends in Congress, Col. Richard M. Johnson, of Kentucky, and Col. George W. Jones, then Delegate from Michigan Territory, and through their influence Senators Benton and Linn, of Missouri, and Senators Wright and Tallmadge, of New York, earnestly, though unsuccessfully, sought to secure his appointment to one of the two offices named. About the same period, Mr. Burnett is said to have become a member of the Four Lake Company, organized under the lead of Gov. Mason and Mr. Doty, for the purpose of laying out a city in the Four Lake region, which should become the capital of the new Territory.

By the appointment of members of the First Legislative Assembly of the new Territory, as made by Gov. Dodge, upon the basis of a census taken in 1836, Crawford was allowed two members of the House of Representatives, but no member of the Council. The people of that county claimed that, under the organic act, each county was entitled to be represented in each House ; and Mr. Burnett was unanimously elected by them to be a member of the Council. The full number of members authorized by law had, however, been chosen in other counties, pursuant to the Governor's appointment and proclamation, and very naturally Mr. Burnett's election was not certified by the Governor, nor was he admitted to the seat he claimed. During that session of the Legislative Assembly, Mr. Burnett was nominated by the Governor, and confirmed by the Council, as District Attorney for Crawford County, but this was done without his knowledge, and he subsequently declined the appointment, on the ground that the Council " was not legally organized, and that it had not therefore the lawful authority to perform any valid and binding act." This characteristic protest echoed the displeasure of Crawford County at the failure of Gov. Dodge to give them a representation in the Council. Whatever may have been the merits of their claim, it is needless to add that the objection of Mr. Burnett, if sound, would have been fatal to the validity of all acts passed by the First Legislative Assembly, which have, nevertheless, always been treated by the courts as valid. Upon the organization of the Territorial Supreme Court in December, 1836, on the motion of D. G. Fenton, Esq., Mr. Burnett was appointed as its official reporter, a position which he held until his death, some ten years later. The decisions of this court to the close of the term of 1840, were prepared by Mr. Burnett, and published in 1841 by the direction of the Legislature, as an appendix to a volume containing the acts of a regular and a special session of the Legislature. The decisions of 1842 and 1843 were published by Mr. Burnett in a separate volume in 1844.

In 1837, he had removed from Prairie du Chien to Cassville, in Grant County, and subsequently moved to a farm in Mount Hope, on the line of the old military road from Fort Crawford to Fort Winnebago, which he had selected and embellished with taste and care for his permanent home, and to which he had given the name of "The Hermitage." Field, garden and lawn were already taking shape under his eye and hand. A dwelling of stone was planned to take the place of the comfortable log cabin, which had been erected for temporary occupancy. In the winter of 1844-45, and again the succeeding year, Mr. Burnett had served in the Territorial Legislature as a member of the House of Representatives from Grant County, and upon the election of delegates to the first Constitutional Convention in 1846, he was chosen as one of the county's representatives in that body. Mr. Burnett had been confined at his home by disease for some months before the meeting of the Convention in October, and it was not until the 14th of that month that he took his seat. He was assigned a position as a, member of the Committee on Corporations, where he served for about three weeks. October 25, he was recalled to his home by the intelligence of the alarming illness of his wife from typhoid fever. A wagon-ride of eighty-five miles, commenced after an exhaustive day's work, brought him to his home, only to be himself struck down with the fever. Himself, his wife and his aged mother, who had recently come from Kentucky to spend her last days with him, lay prostrated by the same disease, under the same roof and within hearing of each other. " The mother died on the 1st of November, the husband and the wife on the 5th, and on the 7th of that month, when the evening shadows fell on ' The Hermitage,' the bodies of the three reposed side by side, in a beautiful grave at the head of the garden,' " in a spot that the owner had chosen as the burial-place of the family.

On the 10th of November, his colleague, Hon. J. Allen Barber, announced Mr. Burnett's death to the Convention. That body, thereupon, adopted resolutions of condolence, respect and sympathy, to go into mourning by wearing crape on the left arm of each member for thirty days, and adjourned over one day out of respect to the memory of their deceased brother.

Mr. Burnett had acquired great prominence during his comparatively brief career. He was a worthy and valued citizen, eminently gifted, intelligent and useful. " His death created a profound and painful sensation over the entire Northwest, where he had been so well and favorably known."

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin, by the Western Historical Company 1881 - Sub. by a Friend of Free Genealogy

BURNETT, THOMAS PENDLETON

Thomas Pendleton Burnett was born in Pittsylvania county, Virginia, September 3, 1800. He received an academic education, and after being admitted to the bar, settled and practiced his profession in Paris, Kentucky. He was appointed sub-Indian agent at Prairie du Chien, at which place he arrived in June, 1830, and commenced the practice of law. In January, 1835, he was appointed district attorney for the counties of Crawford, Iowa, Dubuque and Des Moines, but resigned the office in the following September. In October, 1835, he was elected a member of the territorial council of Michigan Territory, which was to meet at Green Bay. In 1836 he was appointed reporter to the supreme court of the territory of Wisconsin. In 1837 he settled in Grant county, from which he was elected member of the legislative assembly for that county in 1844, was a member of the first constitutional convention, and died during the session of that body on November 7, 1846.

Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin History and Biography, by Parker McCobb Reed (1882); Transcribed for Genealogy Trails by Tammy Clark

BURRIS, JOHN

JOHN BURRIS, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Boscobel; farm contains 80 acres; he was born in Washington Co., Ohio, in 1814, where he was educated and raised on a farm; his father, John Burris, was a native of Pennsylvania; his mother, Elizabeth McMann, was a native of Virginia; his father was a farmer; three years of his time before coming West was employed as an overseer on a Southern plantation, owned by a Mr. Kegler, a native of one of the New England States; he came to this State in 1840, and located at Belmont, which at that time was included in Iowa Co., where he lived with his brother one year, when he went to Lost Grove and Peddler's Creek, where he was engaged in mining for eight years; in 1849, he went to California, remaining there until 1854; he was engaged in mining there; on his return, he entered 320 acres of land, where he now lives. He has served the town in different offices a number of times. He was married, in 1841, to Miss Sarah Eastman, a native of Indiana, by whom he had thirteen children; six boys and three girls are now living. Asbury, the oldest, enlisted in the 3d W. V. C., in which he served until the close of the war. Mrs. Burris came to Wisconsin with her parents in 1837. Her brother assisted in surveying the State. Her family on both sides were among the earliest settlers of this country, and fought in the Revolutionary war.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Waterstown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BURTON, DANIEL

DANIEL BURTON, farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. Ellenboro; was born in 1815, New Lisbon, Ohio; he is son of Samuel and Mary Burton. At the age of 8 years his parents went to Kindle, Ohio, lived there four years, then to Wayne Co., Ohio; remained for sixteen years, then to Medina Co., Ohio; lived there for ten years, then moved to Wisconsin, located in Wingville, where he lived twelve years, then to Ellenboro, Grant Co., where he has lived since. He was married at the age of 27 years, to Sarah G. Fulks, a daughter of Charles and Sarah Fulks, by whom he had four children, Benjamin and an infant, deceased; living, Joseph and Emily. He was married the second time to Sarah A. Madison, a daughter of Nathan Madison; had six children, four living, William, James, Mary and Samuel. A member of the Evangelical Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Ellenboro Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BURT, DANIEL R.

By Daniel R. Burt.

I first came to the country in 1835, after having made my location at Lancaster, or near where Lancaster now is situated; in 1835, I left that point in company with Lucius Ashley for the object of finding a water-power on Grant River to be used for manufacturing lumber for the improvement of the country, and where, if required, it could be shipped by water to any point on the Mississippi. We left with a horse on the 10th of December, 1835, the snow about four inches deep. Learning that it would be difficult to obtain forage for the horse, we left it with Mr. Fitzgerald, then living some three miles from Lancaster, on the Boice Prairie, and thence proceeded through the Platte timber, and examined the Platte River. Not being satisfied with the Platte, concluded to examine Grant, commencing our examination at the point where now stands the Warehouse on Grant Slough, following it up to the first fall or rapid water, now Burton, where I subsequently built the afore-mentioned mills. We spent some two hours in searching for section lines without success, and darkness began to settle down upon us, and having eaten our last rations at breakfast, though we had killed a fine turkey, concluded we must try to find our way back to the point where we left our horse, having been three days out traveling over a portion of the country never before seen by either of us, without a track or trace of civilized man to guide us. Our three days of travel had led us to almost every point of the compass, zigzag, circuitous and of all directions. Ashley declared he had no opinion of the proper course to be taken and that I must pilot; accepting the proffered berth, we commenced our journey over a country broken up by deep ravines, and covered with timber of which we had never before seen or without any guide to direct us. We had not traveled half a mile before the darkness and brush compelled a halt; breaking up some fine brush to lay my head upon for the night, the snow four inches deep and without anything to eat since morning, I laid myself down to rest for the night, leaving Ashley on guard-duty some twenty feet from me with a double-barrel rifle, and a small fire we had improvised, with instructions to awaken me at 12 o'clock to relieve him. It commenced snowing about this time and was quite dark. The wolves having scented our turkey and our fire, approached rather unpleasantly near with their hideous bowlings, and awakened Ashley's attention, if not his admiration, of their music, interesting him so deeply that he declined to be relieved through the night. Tying a handkerchief over my face, with a heavy overcoat and other heavy clothing, I slept through very comfortably, the snow having fallen about four inches through the night and covering me to that depth. ' I was not in the least disturbed in my sleep; with a large tree at my head, a large cudgel at my side, and a revolver in my pocket and Ashley on guard as above stated. The wolves parted company with us before morning ; as soon as the day appeared clearly, we commenced our journey for the point we had left our horse, distant, as subsequent examinations have shown to have been about ten miles; the snow continuing to fall we reached that point at 9:45 o'clock, coming out of the timber directly on a line from the point of starting from the house. I cannot describe, the force that directed my course during the time and distance of this walk of ten miles, being on a direct line turning neither to the right or left to avoid obstructions, or to accommodate by the topography of the country, I have said I could not describe the force that directed this journey, though I have an opinion, which, without demonstration, remains only an opinion. Be pleased to allow me briefly to notice two other incidents similar, if not parallel. I drove into the Territory of Wisconsin in June, 1836, a span of horses which were used and kept at my place at Waterloo through the summer and winter of that season. In the spring of 1837, after the feed became good, while ranging on the river bottoms, about the 15th of May they disappeared; after hunting for them two days without success, I became impressed that they had left for Tecumseh, Mich., from whence they had been driven a year before. I commenced my journey and hunt four days after they had been seen traveling, as near as I could judge, a direct course to the point named, a distance of sixteen miles, without any road, through an unsettled country; I crossed Little Platte, north of Platteville, there being a cabin at the ford, and the first one seen thus far on my route. I learned that my horses had preceded me three days, stopping but a short time and traveling East, I continued on stopping overnight at Belmont; starting early I continued my journey as near the same direction as possible, crossing the Pecatonica River; about eight miles further on I met two gentlemen of whom I learned that the horses had passed their cabin one-half mile distant about four hours in advance of me, and I became hopeful and pressed on, eight miles further, I came on my horses, caught them and commenced my return well satisfied, giving me food for reflection to determine how it was possible to strike their trails, lose it again, and then again and again lose and strike it, and at last ride directly on them, passing over an unsettled country and without roads, a distance between forty and fifty miles of a wilderness. Again, in June, 1840, I hired this same team to Samuel Ashley to make the journey to Milwaukee, returning by Chicago; on his return stopping overnight eight miles east of Freeport. In the morning the horses were missing from the stable in a manner to impress him they were stolen. He spent three days in a fruitless search through the country and returned leaving all at the place named. I listened and carefully noted every circumstance of their loss and came to the conclusion that the horses were not stolen. I left the next morning for Freeport, and reached the house he had put up at about 1 o clock the next day, examined the stable and the surrounding country ; spent an hour to determine what course to take, concluding at last to follow up a small river, as it was called then by the name of Yellow River, coming down from the west-by-south, and every mile I traveled became more impressed that I should find my horses. The first cabin that I passed in a distance of six miles, was off my route about one-fourth of a mile, and standing on an eminence. On approaching, I was impressed that I should learn something from my horses there. I rode up and meeting a man at the door, made th« inquiry about the horses, and if any had been seen ; he requested me to describe my horses, and when they had strayed; I did so quite minutely, and as soon through he replied, "your horses are in my stable," where I found them, took possession and returned again well satisfied. I have given you one incident, showing the rude manner of crossing streams under pressing and difficult circumstances. It became necessary to communicate with the miners, who had lately settled at Snake Hollow; about the first of August, 1836, S. Ashley and myself left for that purpose, traveling the divide between Grant and the Mississippi, reaching Grant near where the ferry is now kept. The water, too deep to ford and about twelve rods wide, presented rather an unpleasant obstruction ; but the river must be crossed; we improvised a rude raft from a drift-pile, tied the logs together with grape vines, fastening another vine to the head of the raft, Ashley being properly seated with gun, ammunition and my clothes, I swam in and taking the grape vine between my teeth, commenced towing the raft, Ashley and his goods, he sitting as an impression figurehead to the craft, and safely and dryly landing, and in a few moments shot and killed a large buck weighing upward of 200 pounds. I must give an incident in connection with an Indian of the Pottawatomie tribe. Subsequently to the first time I was visiting the place, to find section lines to enable me to locate for the mill, I was traveling on the ice of the river, and at some distance ahead I discovered a movement that impressed me that it was an Indian endeavoring to keep the tree between me and himself; I had no arms but a small revolver. I soon discovered that it was an Indian with a gun ; on approaching opposite the tree he left it and came down on to the river, and walked with me about one mile; when approaching a tree near the river, he sprang upon the bank placing the tree between me and him ; I did not feel overly comfortable until I had passed out of the range of his rifle, occasionally looking over my shoulder with peculiar feelings during the time. The next October, I met him again, took him home with me, kept him overnight and treated him friendly and kindly, and in two weeks he came back with his family, hunting and spending the winter near me. I purchased all the meat and fowl of him at 1 cent a pound. He remained off and on for three or four years ; he was sometimes threatened by the hunters if he did not leave, but always came to me for protection. Usually having six or eight men working for me, he felt quite safe. He called himself Monamonquett. For a few of the first years of my residence at that place, it was splendid hunting and fishing ; I have often seen herds of thirty deer feeding at a time, not sixty rods from the house, and in the winter when chopping timber between Grant and the Mississippi, the deer would feed on the tops of the fallen timber, often in herds of twenty. You could meet with flocks of turkeys, from ten to forty, by traveling a short distance in the timber.

There have been many large fish stories told, but never in quantity and ease of catching have I ever heard anything equal to the demonstrated facts presented for the first years of my settlement. With a seine of twenty feet in length, I have caught a wagon load in thirty minutes and some of them weighing thirty pounds ; from the ford up to the dam the river would be literally filled with fish. To throw a stone into the river at the point named, it would seldom fail of killing one or more, and by striking a spear into the water, not aiming at any, you would bring out from one to three fish. I spent twenty-two years at Waterloo, the largest portion of them were prolific with wild and exciting scenes, with pressing business bringing excitement and happiness, and, at this time, casting the vision backward over seventy-eight years, I consider this period of twenty-two years, the happiest portion of my life, and since removing to this place. East Dubuque, I have spent a portion of each year at that place. I have sold all of the 6,000 acres once owned in Grant County, with the exception of something over 200 acres, and have now retired from business.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Publ. 1881); transcribed by a Friend of Free Genealogy

BUSHNELL, ALLEN RALPH

ALLEN RALPH BUSHNELL, of Lancaster, of the firm of Bushnell, Clark & Watkins, lawyers, was born on his father's farm on West street, in the town of Hartford, Trumbull Co., Ohio, July 18, 1833. His father. Dr. George W. Bushnell, now over 80 years of age, and- possessed of remarkable vigor, still lives on the old farm upon which he settled, then in the dense woods, in 1824; he is a native of Connecticut, as was also his wife, Sally Bates, now deceased, Mr. B.'s mother. Mr. B.'s early life was that of the usual farmer's boy, going to district school summer and winter term, until big enough to help on the farm, and then working on the farm through the farming season, and going to school winters. When 14 years of age, the Hartford High School was started, and he put in a few terms there. Here the intention of becoming a lawyer was formed. His school education was completed at Oberlin and Hiram Colleges, where he pursued a special course of study to fit himself for that profession, teaching school winters to help pay expenses. In the fall of 1852 he came to Wisconsin, and taught school that winter at Block House Branch, near Platteville. The following spring he went back to Ohio and resumed his studies until the fall of 1854, when he returned to Platteville, and has ever since then made Grant Co. his home. He studied law with Judge Stephen 0. Paine, at Platteville, was admitted to the bar of the Fifth Judicial Circuit in the fall of 1857, and on December 1 of the same year, opened an office, and commenced the practice of his profession at Platteville. In the fall of 1860, he was elected District Attorney of Grant Co. On the breaking-out of the rebellion, he resigned that office and enlisted as a private in the " Platteville Guards " Company, which on going into Camp Randall in the summer of 1861, was made Co. C, 7th W. V. I., and elected him its 1st Lieutenant, 8. J. Nasmith, an old soldier of the Mexican war, being made Captain. He served with his regiment in the Iron Brigade, mostly in Virginia; was in various battles and skirmishes ; was promoted to Captain in 1862, and discharged for disability in 1863. On returning to Platteville, he in the winter of 1863-64 resumed the practice of law. On the election of the Hon. J. T. Mills to the position of Circuit Judge, on his invitation, he removed to Lancaster, occupied his law office, closed up Judge Mills' legal business, and has continued the practice of his profession there ever since. In 1867, he took into partnership in law practice. Col. John 6. Clark. R. A. Watkins, Esq., was added to this firm Jan. 1, 1880, forming the present firm. Mr. B. was married in 1867, to Miss Laura F. Burr (daughter of Addison Burr, Esq., and his wife Martha Barber, of Lancaster), by whom he had three children, only one of whom, his daughter Mabel, is now living; Laura died in 1873. In 1875, he was married again to Miss Mary F. Sherman (daughter of Cyrus Sherman, deceased, and his wife, Fanny Barber, of Lancaster), his present wife, by whom he has had one son who died in infancy. Mr. B. has paid little attention to politics, but was a member of the Legislature of 1872. On the erection of the " village " into the " City of Lancaster " in 1878, he was elected its first Mayor. His residence is pleasantly situated in the northwest quarter of the city, on Bushnell street, and the northern continuation of Madison street.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

BUSS, A. J.

A. J. BUSS, marble dealer, Platteville. Has been in his present business in Platteville since the spring of 1870. He was born in Erie Co., N. Y., six miles east of Buffalo in 1847. His father Abram Buss, came to Wisconsin with his family in 1854 or thereabouts, and settled in La Fayette Co., where he resided till 1873; then removed to Darlington, Wis., and remained there till his death Nov. 26, 1877, at the age of 72. Mrs. Buss died about seven months previous at the age of 73. Mr. Buss learned his trade in Mineral Point, and worked there till he came to Platteville. He was married in Platteville, Aug. 18, 1874, to Miss Hattie E. Loofbourrow, and has two children -- Mabel and Nellie.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BUTLER, ALEXANDER

ALEXANDER BUTLER, wagon and carriage maker, Platteville; has been a resident of Platteville since September, 1854. He was born in Moon, Allegheny Co., Penn., in 1832. He went to Ohio in 1852, and lived in Lima, Allen Co., till he came to Platteville in 1854. He learned his trade before he left Pennsylvania, and has always worked at the business since. In addition to his carriage making, he is now engaged in selling farming implements in company with H. J. Traber, of Platteville. He has been twice a member of the City Council, and has been chief of the fire department ever since its organization in 1874, and was one of the charter members of the hook and ladder company. He was married in Platteville Jan. 1, 1855, and has six children.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CABANIS, GEORGE E.

GEORGE E. CABANIS, carpenter and builder, Sec. 10; P. O. Big Patch; owns 55 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre; born in Green Co., Ky., in 1815; when he was 7 years of age, his parents removed to Sangamon Co., Ill.; they were among the earliest settlers of that county. In 1832, he enlisted in the Black Hawk war, under Gen. Whiteside and Capt. Goodin; two years later, he removed to New Diggings, La Fayette Co., and prospected for lead; in 1845, he located permanently where he now resides. Although not an office-seeker, Mr. Cabanis has held important offices; in 1872, he was elected to the State Legislature; in the town has been Town Clerk, Superintendent of Public Schools and Chairman eight or nine years. He married Mary Ann Lauterman, a native of Illinois; they have one child -- James H., whose biography appears elsewhere; have lost one son -- Jasper -- who died in 1862.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Smelser Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CABANIS, JAMES HENRY

JAMES HENRY CABANIS (Rep.), of Georgetown, was born in Springfield, Illinois, December 25, 1838; received an academic education; is merchant by occupation; removed from Illinois to Wisconsin in 1845, and settled at Georgetown, where he has since resided; was town clerk in 1862, 1871, 1872 and 1878; was elected to the assembly for 1881 and re-elected for 1882, receiving 940 votes against 493 for H. Robbins, independent, and 14 for E. Wetherbee, greenbacker.

(Grant County -- First District -- The towns of Clifton, Ellenboro, Harrison, Hazel Green, Jamestown, Lima, Paris, Platteville and Smelser. Population, 13,107.)

Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1882), pgs. 546-547; transcribed by Mary Saggio

CAIRNS, ANDREW

ANDREW CAIRNS, farmer, Sec. 5; P. O. Little Grant; was born in 1845 in Delaware Co., N. Y.; was a son of Alexander and Margaret Cairns, now of Grant Co.; lived and labored for his parents until 30 years of age; came to Grant Co. in 1860, located on Little Grant, and is still residing upon the old homestead. Has kept the Little Grant Post Office for five years. He was married in 1874 to Cornelia Abraham, a daughter of Ezra and Margaret Abraham; they have two children -- Everett and Charles. Politics, Republican. He has been Pathmaster two terms, School Clerk two terms, Assessor two terms, and is Chairman of the Town Board at present. Is the owner of 560 acres of land, valued at $11,500; has always been a farmer, and a prosperous one as such, and is one of the most enterprising men in the community where he resides.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Little Grant Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CALKINS, A.

A. CALKINS, Sec. 35; P. O. Brodtville; owns 255 acres of land, valued at $20 per acre; was born in Warren Co., Penn., in 1836; came to Wisconsin in 1850, and settled with his parents in this town. Married Mary Patch, a native of Danbury, Conn.; they have four children -- E. M., Charles D., William and Arthur. Mr. Calkins has held different town offices, Treasurer of Town Board, etc., etc.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Wyalusing Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CALLIS, JOHN B.

LANCASTER

John Benton Callis, son of Henry Callis, was a farmer, and Christina Benton, was born in Fayetteville, North Carolina, January 3, 1828. The Callises were Huguenots, originally from France; the Bentons were from Scotland. Henry Callis moved to Tennessee in 1834, and to Lancaster, Grant County, Wisconsin, in 1840. After receiving a very slight common-school education, young Callis commenced reading medicine with Dr. J. H. Higgins, of Lancaster, giving three years to the study, but for want of means to attend lectures, and not feeling satisfied with the profession, he abandoned it. He went to St. Paul, Minnesota, in 1849, and, with John R. Irvin, built Fort Gaines, now called Fort Ripley, at the mouth of Crow Wing River. In 1851 he went to California, across the plains; became largely interested in diggings at different places, selling goods at the same time. In 1853 he went to Central America, there spending a short time; sailed from Graytown to New York, and thence returned to Lancaster in the autumn of that year. Here he followed merchandising until the old flag was insulted in South Carolina. He raised a company for the 7th Wisconsin Infantry, and became captain of Company F. This regiment, with the 2nd and 6th Wisconsin and the 19th Indiana, composed the famous "Iron Brigade." At the battle of Gainesville, Virginia, August 28, 1862, all the field officers of the 7th were killed or wounded, and Captain Callis was placed in temporary command of the regiment. In the following March he was promoted to major, and a few months later to lieutenant-colonel, having command of the regiment after that date. At the battle of Gettysburg, July 1, 1863, while at the head of his regiment, he was slightly wounded twice about nine o'clock in the morning; continued to fight on, and was in the charge which resulted in the capture of the entire brigade of General Archer. In the afternoon of the same day he received a ball in his liver and lungs, which still remains in his lungs. He lay on the field forty-three hours, the rebel army in its advance and retreat passing over him. He being unfit to be taken away. General Early placed a guard over him, and he was finally taken to the house of a Mr. Buehler, at Gettysburg, where his wife joined him three weeks later, and within three months, by careful nursing, he was able to return to Wisconsin.

Colonel Callis bought a flouring-mill at Anaton, ten miles from Lancaster, and ran it awhile by the aid of an agent, but his heart was all the time with the boys in blue at the South, and in 1864 he joined the veteran army corps. President Lincoln appointed him military superintendent of the war department at Washington, with the rank of major in the regular army. Before he was able to ride on horseback he went out to Fort Sumner in an ambulance and fought against Generals Early and Breckenridge in their raid on Washington, the day being won by the fortunate aid sent out by the army of the Potomac.

Subsequently he was promoted to colonel, and a little later to brigadier-general, for meritorious services during the war, and particularly for gallantry at the battles of Antietam, Gainesville and Gettysburg.

General Callis assisted in carrying out the reconstruction acts in his military district, his headquarters, and at length his home, being at Huntsville, Alabama. For his assistance in that line he received great credit from the departments at Washington.

While a resident of Alabama, General Callis was elected to the fortieth congress from the fifth district. He was on the committee on enrolled bills and on one or two others, and was the father of the original Kuklux bill, which passed the house, but was killed in the senate.

At the close of the fortieth congress General Callis returned to Lancaster, where he has since resided, and carried on the real-estate and insurance business, still suffering from the ball in his lungs.

In politics, he was in early life an old-line whig; then a republican until 1872, and a reformer since that date.

He has a wife and five children, having married Miss Mattie Barnett, of Lancaster, in 1855.

General Callis has the "Annals of Congress" complete from 1799, and is quite familiar with the legislative history of the country.

Source: The US Biological Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Volume (1877) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

CALLIS, JOHN BENTON

CALLIS, JOHN BENTON, a Representative from Alabama; born in Fayette, N. C, January 3, 1828; in 1841 moved to Tennessee and later to Wisconsin; entered the Union Army as lieutenant and was promoted to captain of the seventh Wisconsin infantry August 30, 1861; major January 5, 1863; lieutenant colonel February 11, 1865; brevet colonel and brigadier general of volunteers March 13, I860, for efficient and meritorious service; captain of forty-fifth infantry and brevet major March 7, 1867, for gallant and meritorious service in the battle of Gettysburg, Pa.; resigned February 4, 1868; after the war took up his residence in Huntsville, Ala.; elected as a Republican to the Fortieth Congress (March 4, 1867-March 3, 1869); moved to Lancaster, Wis.; member of the state assembly 1874; returned to Huntsville; died in Huntsville, Ala., September 24, 1898.

Source: "A Biographical congressional directory From the 1st ( 1774) to the 62nd (1911) Congress"; By United States Congress; Publ. 1918; Transcribed for Genealogy Trails by Andrea Stawski Pack

CALVERT, MICHAEL

MICHAEL CALVERT (deceased); born in England in 1810; emigrated to this country in 1831, and settled in Galena and followed mining, then removed to Fair Play, Grant Co., Wis., where he died; since his decease the family have kept hotel; in politics he was a Democrat; in religion, was of the Protestant faith. Was the father of ten children -- Sarah, Mary, John, Joseph, Lizzie, Maggie, Maria, William, Ned, Martha.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Jamestown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CAMERON, PETER H.

PETER H. CAMERON, farmer, Sec. 36; P. O. Fennimore; was born in Perth, Scotland; emigrated to the United States with his parents in 1845, and settled in Grant Co., Wis., there being a colony of brave Scots located here. He enlisted in the 7th W. V. I. Aug. 19, 1861, and was in active service until by sunstroke he was disabled, and was discharged Oct. 17, 1862. Mr. Cameron was married Feb. 19, 1865, to Ellen E. Dyer, who was born in Grant Co., Wis., Sept. 19, 1843; she was a daughter of Abner Dyer. Mr. Cameron has four children -- Frank A., aged 14 years; Alice, 12 years; John, 7 years; Niel, the youngest, 3 years. Mr. Cameron is a leading Democrat; has filled the office of Chairman of Board of Supervisors, Assessor, etc.; he is a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity and owns a valuable farm of 244 acres, one of the best in the town.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Mount Ida Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CAMPBELL, DANIEL

DANIEL CAMPBELL, Sec. 17; P. O. Patch Grove; owns 200 acres of land, valued at $20 per acre; born in Scotland in 1821; came to America in 1835 and settled in Toronto, Canada; came to Wisconsin in 1846 and located in Bloomington; located on present farm in 1861. Married Sarah Jane Forter, a native of Ireland; they have three children -- Matilda, Peter and Maggie.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Millville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CAMPBELL, GEORGE P. B.

GEORGE P. B. CAMPBELL, carpenter and lumberman; P. O. Lancaster; born in Indiana July 18, 1835; son of George and Rachel (Preston) Campbell, who came to Grant Co. in July, 1844; settled at Waterloo two years, Potosi one year and Lancaster two years; then bought the mill business established in 1854 by Mr. Irish, and afterward owned by Hampton & Walker in 1866. The mill runs seven months of the year with eighteen-foot head, and will cut 2,000 feet in ten hours. Mr. C. was three years in the 25th W. V. I., and draws a pension. He has been Constable several years, and is a Democrat. He was married March 13, 1853, to Sarah Taylor, of Potosi, who died July 3, 1877, leaving eight children -- Amanda, wife of Robert Greener, of Minnesota; has two children -- Prudence E. and John; Frank and Sarah are twins; Sarah is wife of Henry Foster, of Minnesota; Henry A. and German W. His second marriage was on Aug. 20, 1879 to Sarah L., daughter of Oliver F. and Jane Ann Keene, of Little Grant. She was born Jan. 13, 1860, and has one son -- Preston A., born July 9, 1880; owns 3 1/2 acres of land, house and saw-mill.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Potosi Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CARDEY, RUSSELL

RUSSELL CARDEY, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Potosi; born in Tioga Co., N. Y., May 8, 1817; son of John and Jane C. (Stephenson) Cardey; came to Galena, Ill., in 1839, and three years after to this place; owns 100 acres of land. He was married, Aug. 25, 1842, at Hamburg, Erie Co., N. Y., by William Hamilton, to Mercy A., daughter of Aaron and Jane (Slater) Hampton, who was born July 16, 1813, in New Jersey. Their children are George W., who married Regina Roesch, and has four children -- William R., Ida, Ella and Roy. Mr. Cardey is a Republican and Methodist, and was in the patriot war. When he settled here, his nearest neighbor was one mile, and the next seven miles away. He also states that a bear drove his pigs from the pen, and he shot three rifle balls (using a shot gun) into the brute, and the next morning found him and took him home.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Potosi Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CARL, VALENTINE

VALENTINE CARL, farmer; P. O. Platteville; was born in December, 1824, near the historic town of Sarbruck, in Rhenish Prussia. Up to the age of 14, he was in school; then for a year in a blacksmith-shop. He came to America in 1840; landed at New Orleans; thence came to Platteville. For twenty years, he followed mining in various parts of Grant Co.; then settled on his present 123 acres. He married Mary Klebenstein, who was also born near Sarbruck, and came to America in 1845, landing at New York City. They were married in Platteville, and have seven children -- Mary, Louisa, Margaret, Annie, John, George and Katie, all born on the homestead farm, as were two deceased children. Mr. Carl and wife belong to the Old-School Presbyterian Church, of which he has been a Trustee.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CARLEY, D. W.

DR. D. W. CARLEY, physician and surgeon, Boscobel; born in Otsego Co., N. Y. At the age of 22, commenced the study of medicine with Dr. Charles M. Turner, Tompkins Co., N. Y.; graduated at Rush Medical College, Chicago in 1856. He then came to Platteville and formed a partnership with John D. Wood; they continued about six months. In 1857, came to Boscobel. Was commissioned, in 1862, 2d Assistant Surgeon of the 33d W. V. I.; held this position till February, 1864, when he resigned on account of ill health; returned to Boscobel, where he has since been engaged at his profession.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CARLISLE, W. N.

W. N. CARLISLE, dealer in general merchandise, Cuba City; business established in December, 1879; born in Pickaway Co., Ohio, in 1843; came to Wisconsin Sept. 17, 1877, and located in this village. Married Ella Smith in 1870; she was born in La Fayette Co.; have one child -- William Henry. Mr. C. enlisted in Co. E, 49th Ohio V. I., in 1861, and served three years; was in all the battles that regiment participated in until the battle of Stone River, where he was wounded in five different places.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Smelser Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CARRIER, T.

T. CARRIER, firm of Carrier & Co., hardware; born in Chittenden Co., Vt.; when a boy he came with his father to Ohio; October, 1848, came to Jefferson Co., Wis.; here he followed the wagon-making business for five years; in 1854 came to Grant Co., engaged in farming about four years; in 1858 came to Boscobel, started a wagon-shop which he afterward traded for a hotel, run it about eleven years; was elected Sheriff in 1853, served two years; in 1875, he established the present business; has been Chairman and President of the City Board. Married, in 1852, to Amelia Powers; she was born in Gardner, Me.; they have three daughters.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CARTER, W. E.

W. E. CARTER, attorney at law, and senior member of the law firm of Carter, Carter & Cleary, Platteville; is a native of Sussex, England; born in November, 1833; came to America in the spring of 1850, and settled in Lancaster, Grant Co., Wis., where he read law with J. Allen Barber, and was admitted to the bar in the fall of 1856. In January, 1861, he came to Platteville and went into the partnership with the late Stephen O. Paine, with whom he was associated till the death of Mr. Paine. He then took his brother, George B. Carter, into partnership with him, and Jan. 1, 1881, took in the junior member of the firm -- T. L. Cleary. Mr. Carter represented his district in the State Legislature three consecutive terms -- in 1877, 1878 and 1879 -- and is at present a member of the Board of Regents for the State University.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CARTER, WILLIAM E.

William E. Carter, Platteville, is a native of England, having been born near Brighton, Sussex county, November 17, 1833, and was self educated. Coming to this country he became a resident of Lancaster in 1850, and studied law with J. Allen Barber during the years of 1855 and 1856, when he was admitted to the bar at that place. Commencing practice at Lancaster, he subsequently continued it at Platteville, to which he removed in 1861, and where he still resides. His partners in the profession have been Stephen O. Paine, George B. Carter and T. L. Cleary. Mr. Carter is not only prominent as a lawyer, but has held offices of importance. As a regent of the State University he is serving in his second term; has been United States court commissioner since 1870, and was member of the assembly for the sessions of 1877, 1878 and 1879, in which he served on the judiciary and other important committees, and was a leading republican member of the house. When the republican national convention convened in Chicago in June, 1880, Mr. Carter served as a delegate and took an early part in bringing forward the name of James A. Garfield for President. At the state republican convention of 1877 he was nominated for attorney-general, which he declined.

Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin History and Biography, by Parker McCobb Reed (1882); Transcribed for Genealogy Trails by Tammy Clark

CARTHEW, JOHN

JOHN CARTHEW, Postmaster at Rockville, and member of the firm of John Carthew & Bro. (Thomas H. Carthew). The parents of Mr. Carthew -- John and Eliza (Nanc) Carthew -- were natives of Cornwall, England, and emigrated to America in 1833. Mr. John Carthew was married in 1875, to Frances Jones, of Potosi, and has two children -- Raymond J. and Harry. He assumed the position he now fills, and started a general grocery store, in 1856. In 1867 to 1870, he served with distinction in the Legislature -- he being a stanch Republican, and the district largely Democratic.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Potosi Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CARY, JOHN

JOHN CARY, Sec. 1; P. O. Bloomington; owns 200 acres land, valued at $50 per acre; born on this farm in 1851. Married Mary Greer, a native of Pennsylvania; they have four children -- Pearl, George, Katie and John. Mr. Cary is Chairman of the Town Board.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CASE, ALANSON

ALANSON CASE, meat-market, Boscobel; is a native of Lorain Co., Ohio; worked on a farm with his father until about the age of 18, when he came to Racine Co., Wis.; continued farming here about five years, then returned to Lorain Co.; bought a steam saw-mill which he run several years; he then came to Crawford Co., Wis., and bought a farm of 120 acres, improved and afterward sold; then went to Pittsburg, Penn., remained about two years; in 1875, returned to Crawford Co., bought and improved his present farm, consisting of 120 acres; October, 1880, he removed to Boscobel and opened his meat-market; has been Chairman of the town of Marietta, Crawford Co.; was the first Treasurer of the town of Union; is a member of the Odd Fellows and United Workmen. Married, in 1844, to Miss Eunice Kenny; she was born in New York; they have four sons.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CASPAR, PETER

PETER CASPAR, farmer; P. O. Jamestown; son of Peter Joseph and Ann Clara Caspar; was born near Coblentz, Prussia, July 8, 1829. His father came with his family in June, 1842, to the United States, and settled in Milwaukee. Here his father died in August, 1850. The mother moved to Smelser in 1857. Peter remained at home until 1853, when he commenced business for himself. He was married, July 15, 1853, to Miss Maria C. Messersmith, of Jamestown. They have nine children -- Elizabeth, now Mrs. Bonn, living in Smelser; Catharine, Now Mrs. Keier, in Beetown; Peter at home; Anna C., now Mrs. Hafner, in Jamestown; Josephine, now Mrs. Pickel, in Smelser; Margaret at home; Andrew at home; Ferdinand at home and John at home. Mr. Caspar has been Chairman of the Town Board of Paris, and member of the County Board since 1867, and still holds the office. He was County Commissioner under the Commissioner system of county government. In 1869, he was elected Justice of the Peace, and successively since. He has been Clerk of School Board for the past twenty-five years. He is a member of Wana Lodge, No. 4, A., F. & A. M., and of Hoffmung German Lodge at Lancaster of I. O. O. F. He is a Republican in politics.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Paris Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CASPER, JOHN P.

JOHN P. CASPER, farmer, Sec. 35; P.O. Beetown; was born in 1820, in Prussia, Germany; a son of Michael Casper; he was 26 years of age when he emigrated to America and located in the fertile regions of Grant Co., Wis. He was married in 1852 to Barbara Sike, daughter of Peter Sike; they have eight children--Mary, Peter, Joseph, Willie, Frank, Nicholas, Christian and Anna. He has been School treasurer one term. Has 240 acres of land, valued at $2,500. In politics, he is Democratic; is a member of the Catholic Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

CENFIELD, JOHN D.

JOHN D. CENFIELD, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Potosi. Born May 6, 1838, in Switzerland, son of John Louis and Frances (Bulomy) Cenfield; came to Buffalo, N. Y., in 1856, and, after one year, went to Watertown, Wis.; then to this place. Owns 100 acres of land. Married May 16, 1871, by Rev. Nicholas Mayne, to Mary Isabel Williams. (See B. F. Williams.) Has five children -- Anna Janette born March 14, 1872; John David, Nov. 7, 1873; Eugene Nathan, Jan. 17, 1876; Rhoda Grigsby, July Frank Henry, Dec. 12, 1880. Mr. Cenfield was three years in Co. H, 25th W. V. I. He started for Pike's Peak April 10, 1860, prospecting one year, and came home in December of the same year. In 1866, started on another mining tour, and arrived in Colorado in May, and returned to Potosi in November, 1870, having crossed the plains about fourteen times in his travels.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Potosi Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CHANDLER, J. M.

J. M. CHANDLER, dealer in drugs and medicines, Hazel Green; established in 1853; born in St. Louis Co., Mo., in 1815; came to Wisconsin in 1837, and was engaged in mining for several years, until he engaged in the drug business. Married Annie Austin in 1839; she was born in Switzerland; have eight children -- Francis M., John, William, Gustavus V., Thomas C., Martha Ann, Mary C. and Annie E. Has held all the different town offices of any importance.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CHAPMAN, CHARLES

CHARLES CHAPMAN, farmer; P.O. Bloomington; born in 1842, in England; came to Wisconsin in 1867 and located in Grant Co., near Beetown. He was married in 1869 to Miss Anna Magongin; they have three children. Mr. Chapman is a son of William Chapman, who is well known throughout England. Is a Greenbacker. Has 96 acres of land, valued at $3,500.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

CHAPMAN, THOMAS

THOMAS CHAPMAN, Platteville; was born in Huby, East Ridney, of Yorkshire, England, March 27, 1815; came to America in 1838, reaching Platteville July 25, without a dollar in his pocket. He spent the first winter at mining; then rented a farm for five years; began $500 in debt, and at the end of two years began the butchering business, which he carried on together with his farming until the expiration of the lease. Mr. Chapman is the veteran butcher of Grant Co., he having followed the business steadily from 1841 to 1874. John Watkinson was his first partner. In 1853, he formed a partnership with J. F. Kirkpatrick, which partnership he continued up to the retirement of both from business. Mr. Chapman is the owner of several farms -- one of 340, and one of 140 acres in Platteville, 80 in Smelser, 160 in La Fayette Co., 160 in Iowa Co., 240 in Kossuth and Wright Counties, Iowa, and a farm of 140 acres, part in Platteville and part in Harrison. He married Sarah Kay, who died leaving four children -- Robert, Elizabeth A., Mary J. and Sarah M., the latter died in 1880. The second wife, nee Elizabeth Richards, died also, leaving four children -- Sarah M., John, William and Nora. All the children were born in Platteville. The present Mrs. Chapman was Mrs. Fannie S., widow of John Bonson, one of the pioneer settlers of Platteville. Mr. Chapman served one year as Assessor of his town; Treasurer two years, and Supervisor six years. He is a member of the Primitive Methodist Church, and is a Freemason. His home is now outside the city limits of Platteville, where he has 13 acres, in addition to the hundreds mentioned above.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CHAPPELL, EDWARD

EDWARD CHAPPELL, retired farmer, Platteville; was born in November, 1813, in Camborne, Cornwall, England, where his younger days were spent at mining. In 1839, he came with his family to America, and spent a number of years in the coal and iron mines of Pennsylvania. Later, he was one of the owners of a Greencastle, Pennsylvania, foundry, and, still later, interested himself in farming. In 1856, he sold his farm, and came West, purchasing of J. C. Wright the splendid 270-acre farm, which he still owns. It was a prairie farm, under improvement, though Mr. Chappell has since erected a new house upon it, and is located partly in Smelser and partly in Elk Grove. Since 1876, he has been a resident of Platteville. His wife was formerly Eliza Pearce, of Illogen Parish, Cornwall. They have eleven children -- Edward, born in England, Mary J. (Mrs. James Ivey), John M., William C., Ann E. (Mrs. John Rogers), Sarah (Mrs. Abel Gill), Gilbert, Alfred P., James R., Thomas L. and Anna M. Eight of the children were born in Pennsylvania, and the two youngest on the Elk Grove homestead. The eldest daughter resides near Parkersburg, Iowa, and six of the others are on farms of their own in Taylor Co., Iowa. Edward is farming in Elk Grove, and Thomas is on the old farm. John M. is also a farmer in that town. The children and grandchildren of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Chappell number about sixty. Mr. Chappell is a Democrat, and served five terms as Chairman of Elk Grove. Is a member, with his wife and most of his children, of the M. E. Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CHASE, F. R.

F. R. CHASE, merchant, and member of the firm of Sanford & Chase, Platteville; is a native of Niagara Co., N. Y.; was born in 1833. In 1834, his parents removed to Trumbull Co., Ohio, and came from there to Platteville in 1855, where they continued to reside till their death. F. R. Chase was engaged in the drug business in Platteville from 1861 to 1865, then sold out in 1867, went into general merchandising, in company with R. C. Sanford, which he has continued up to the present time. He was married in 1862, in Whitehall, Ill., to Miss Jennie McCollister, and has three children -- Albert, Mary and Jennie. He has been Alderman two terms.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CHATFIELD, DARIUS

DARIUS CHATFIELD, farmer; P.O. Lancaster; was born in 1833 in Wyoming Co., Penn.; was a son of John Chatfield; came to Grant Co., Wis., in 1855; located in Beetown; in 1862, he moved to Blake's Prairie, and has lived there every since. He was married in 1869 to Mrs. Phebe Shaw; they have two children--Betha and Roy C. He owns 40 acres of land, valued at $1,800. Is a Republican.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

CHESEBRO, THOMAS R.

THOMAS R. CHESEBRO, Superintendent of toll bridge over the Wisconsin River, Muscoda; was born in Stonington, Conn., Dec. 19, 1825; came to Platteville, Wis., in September, 1836; his first business education commenced with Isaac Hodges, at Platteville; first came to Muscoda in 1855, and engaged in the mercantile business until 1861, when he was appointed Under Sheriff, which position he held four years; was then appointed Postmaster at Lancaster, which position he filled creditably for almost seven years; returned again to Muscoda in 1873, and was appointed Superintendent of the toll bridge, which position he still holds; in an early day, he volunteered to go to the Mexican war, and was changed into the Dodge Guards to gather Indians, guard and remove them; this was in 1847; was in the 41st W. V. I., Co. A; enlisted in 1863 in the 100-day service, was mustered out at expiration of time. Married in 1850, to Miss Eliza J. Wiley, a native of Pennsylvania, by whom he has one son. Mr. Chesebro is a prominent member of I. O. O. F., an active citizen in all matters pertaining to the welfare of the community; outspoken and honorable in his dealings; what he has made was by his own personal industry.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CHURCH, J. B.

J. B. CHURCH, farmer and merchant, Sec. 2; P. O. Mount Ida; born in 1826, in Onondaga Co., N. Y., was a son of Ezra and Rachel Church; when he was 6 years of age, his father moved to Chautauqua Co.; his father died when he was about 14 years of age, and he was obliged to work wherever he could get anything to do to support himself and mother. At the age of 21, he married Mary, daughter of Amos and Livonia Parker; he built a saw-mill in company with his brother, and followed the lumber business for four years; he then came to Grant Co., Wis., in September, 1853; located in Little Grant, where he has 230 acres of land, valued at $6,000; has had ten children, six living -- Francis H., Charles W., Wallace W., P. A., Ida R. M., Emma S. In 1880, he built a store in Mount Ida, although he had been merchandising for two years on his farm; the winter of 1872, he visited Florida for his health. He was a member of the Town Board four years; Town Assessor eleven years; Justice of the Peace fourteen years; School Clerk thirteen years. He is a Royal Arch Mason. Politics, Greenbacker; was an enrolling officer at the time of the war.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Little Grant Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CLARK, JOHN CG

COL. JOHN CG CLARK, attorney at law, of the firm of Bushnell, Clark & Watkins, was born in Morgan Co., III., July 31, 1825 ; he came to Wisconsin first in 1837 ; subsequently resided in Missouri several years. In 1847, he graduated from Illinois College, and returned to Wisconsin and engaged in mining ; from 1849 to 1853 inclusive, he was employed in surveying Government lands in Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa and Missouri, and became familiar with all the hardships and exposures of such a life, surveying during that time perhaps as much land as any man in the State. In the fall of 1853, he was appointed Deputy Clerk of the Circuit Court of Grant County; in 1854, he was elected Clerk of that Court, and was re-elected in 1856, and again in 1858, to the same office, and in 1860, was elected to the Legislature. On the breaking-out of the rebellion, he went into camp with Co. C, 2d W. V. I., intending to go into the field with that regiment, but was prevented by a call of an extra session of the Legislature; on its adjournment, he entered the military service as Lieutenant and Quartermaster of the 5th W. V. I., and was with that regiment in all its campaigns until May, 1863, when he was commissioned Captain and Provost Marshal of the Third District of Wisconsin ; in February, 1865, he was commissioned Colonel of the 50th W. V. I., and was sent to Missouri and placed in command of the First Sub district, composed of some half dozen counties, with headquarters at Jefferson City, till in July, when he was sent to Kansas, and for the first time was in command of his whole regiment ; subsequently, he and his command were sent to the Upper Missouri among the Indians, where they remained till June, 1866 ; his regiment scouted over Missouri among the bushwhackers, and at Fort Leavenworth at the time of the mutiny, demonstrated that it was among the most reliable in the service ; he keenly felt that the 50th was abused, and that insubordination was rewarded when mutinous regiments were mustered out before their term of service had expired, and it was sent out on the plains, where it could not by any possibility be discharged till long after. He was admitted to the bar in 1861, but did not commence practice till 1867. He has held many minor offices, such as Chairman of the Town Board, County Board, and Mayor of the oily ; was Chairman when the railroad was built, and was prominent in devising the ways and means, and in assuming the responsibilities .that insured its construction ; he has been active in advancing the interests of his locality in educational matters, and was instrumental in securing the erection of perhaps the best schoolhouse in the State for the money expended in its construction. In 1874, he was a prominent candidate for Congress from this District, and again in 1880, but had his name withdrawn. He is connected with the Masonic order, and has served his lodge ten years as Master ; he is also identified with the Odd Fellows ; in 1878, he was Grand Master of the order in this State, and is now Grand Representative to the Sovereign Grand Lodge, re-elected in June, 1881. He was united in marriage, Feb. 19, 1852, to Miss Minerva A. Pepper, a native of Mineral Point, daughter of Harvey Pepper; they have one daughter Alice, now Mrs. B. R. Tiel, of California and one son William Harvey Clark, now in Lancaster.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

CLARK, HARVEY

HARVEY CLARK, groceries, etc., Boscobel; born in Steuben Co., N. Y.; came to Richland Co., Wis., in 1856; followed the carpenter trade eight years, then came to Boscobel and continued the carpenter business till 1862, when he enlisted in the fall in Co. C, 20th W. V. I; served about four months; was discharged on account of physical disability, then returned to Boscobel, continued the carpenter trade till the spring of 1875; he then opened a drug store, continued it about four years; February, 1880, started his present business. Married, in 1854, to Eliza J. Skiff, of Yates Co., N. Y.; they have four children -- two sons and two daughters.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CLARKE, P. A.

P. A. CLARKE, M. D., physician and surgeon, is a native of Newport, R. I., and was born Jan. 8, 1827. Received his education in New York State; studied medicine and attended lectures at Yale College and at the State University of Michigan, and graduated at Albany Medical College in June, 1854. After practicing medicine at Galena for one year came to Dunluth, Ill., where he continued practice until 1868, when he came to Lancaster, and since then has successfully practiced his profession here. In 1856, Dr. Clarke was united in marriage to Miss Mary A. Little, a native of Fairplay, Wis., and daughter of Dr. George Little. Dr. and Mrs. Clarke, have two sons George W., attending professional school in Dubuque; William H., attending the State University.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

CLAUER, FREDRICK JOHN

FREDRICK JOHN CLAUER, proprietor of Reliance Mill, Patch Grove; was born in Bavaria, Germany, Aug. 21, 1846; came to America and direct to Mineral Point in the year 1869; then to Mifflin, where he worked in the Star Mills for William Bainbridge five years; then to Galena, Ill.; then to Cassville, Wis.; then to Patch Grove Sept. 1, 1880. He is a fine miller, and has a good business at the mill, which is one of the best in the county. His wife, Ella, daughter of Fridmund Goldman, of Linden, Iowa Co., Wis., was born in 1853; they married in 1874, and have three children -- George H., born in 1875; William C., 1877; Oscar E., 1879. A member of Mifflin Lodge, of A., F. & A. M. Was in the army in the old country.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CLEARY, (FR.)

FATHER CLEARY CELEBRATES THE SILVER JUBILEE OF HIS PRIESTHOOD.
CATHOLIC CHURCHES JOIN.
THEY MAKE THE EVENT ONE WHICH THE VETERAN PRIEST WILL NOT SOON FORGET.

St. Charles Catholic church was crowded to the doors yesterday morning during the special service in honor of the twenty-fifth anniversary of the ordaining of Father Cleary to the priesthood. The pope had sent his special benediction for the occasion, and the people, not only of the parish over which he ministers, but of all the parishes of the city, joined in making the event one which Father Cleary and his friends can never forget.

A quarter of a century ago, July 9, 1872, Bishop Heiss, of Milwaukee, conferred upon him the ordinances of the priesthood. He had been prepared for the holy office at the college of St. Francis, in Milwaukee, and his work for over twenty years was in the state in which he was reared to manhood and in which his parents still reside.

Father Cleary was born within sight of the Bunker Hill monument, in 1849, and he has never forgotten that he was an American. With his parents he came West, settling near East Troy, Walworth county, Wis., where his parents still live on their original homestead, hale and hearty, in spite of their seventy-eight years. Father Cleary's first station was at Boscobel, afterward he went to Platteville, then to Sinsinawa, and lastly to Kenosha, Wis. A little over four years ago he came to Minneapolis and preached for some time in halls, but his congregations grew, and he was led to build St. Charles church, over which he still is the honored priest. The church was dedicated about three years ago, and its congregation is one of the most active and aggressive in the city.

At the service yesterday Father Cleary's parents and two brothers were in attendance. One brother, T. L. Cleary, is assistant United States attorney for the district of Wisconsin, residing at Platteville, and the other is Dr. M. H. Cleary, of Galena, Ill.

The jubilee ceremony yesterday morning consisted of the solemn high mass in which Father Cleary was celebrant, Father Christie deacon, and Father Ward, of Beloit, Wis., who was ordained at the same time with Father Cleary and who was a college friend, was subdeacon. Dr. Dagnan, of New Richmond, Wis., was master of ceremonies. The choir was reinforced by a large number of volunteers from other churches, and the music was exquisite. The sang Marzo's "Messe Solemne," a splendid production for such an occasion.

Source: The Saint Paul Globe, 12 July 1897; transcribed by MD

CLEMENS, JOHN

JOHN CLEMENS, farmer and stock-raiser, Sec. 36; P. O. Cuba City; born in this county; owns 166 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre. Married Sarah Nichols, a native of Benton, La Fayette Co., Wis., in 1869; they have three children -- Laura, John L. B and Mable J. Mr. Clemens is the son of Christopher Clemens, a native of Cornwall, England; born in 1815, and emigrated to America in 1842.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Smelser Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CLEMENTS, JAMES W.

JAMES W. CLEMENTS, farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. Platteville; born in Herkimer Co., N. Y., April 24, 1831, and came to Wisconsin in 1879; he now owns 160 acres of land nicely improved. He enlisted in Company E, 154th N. Y. V. I., was wounded and taken prisoner at the battle of Fredricksburg, Va., and taken to Richmond, afterward exchanged and was with Sherman on the march to the sea. His wife, Amanda Francis, was born in Genesee Co., N. Y., June 6, 1837; married in the year 1854; they have five children -- Ella J., born Sept. 18, 1855; Hattie, born Sept. 16, 1857; Alma, born Aug. 21, died Sept. 17, 1876; Lida, born July 9, 1866; Neal, born May 22, 1877. In politics, Republican; in religion, liberal believer.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Ellenboro Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CLEMENTSON, GEORGE

GEORGE CLEMENTSON, attorney at law, is a native of England, and was born March 13, 1842. His parents came to this country in 1849 ; came West to Wisconsin the same year, and located in Grant Co. ; grew up and received his education in this State. Read law here and completed his law studies at the State University of Michigan ; was admitted to the bar in March, 1868 ; after his admission, he engaged in the practice of law. In November, 1869, he associated with Hon. Allen Barber, and since then he has successfully practiced his profession in this and adjoining counties, and the firm of Barber & Clementson has a leading position as members of the bar in this section of the State. In the fall of 1868, was elected District Attorney, and held that office for four years. Since then he has been repeatedly solicited to accept of the nomination for office, but has steadily refused, preferring to devote all of his time to the interests of his profession. He was united in marriage, May 10, 1869, to Miss Mary Burr, a native of Vermont; they have four children George B., Joseph A., Martha and Bessie.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

CLEMONS, J. B.

J. B. CLEMONS, Sec. 16; P. O. North Andover; owns 80 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre; was born in Livingston Co., N. Y., in 1833; came to Wisconsin in 1843, and located with his parents at Cassville; he settled on his present farm in 1815. Married Emma Duncan, a native of Canada; they have four children -- Scott, Clara, Stella and Etta.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Glen Haven Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CLIFTON, JANE M.

JANE M. CLIFTON, Sec. 14; P. O. Martinville; born in Chenango Co., N. Y., Jan. 1, 1831; left there in 1838, and settled in Coles Co., Ill., on farm with her parents; came to town of Clifton in 1844; in 1856, settled on the farm where he now lives. Was married to G. T. L. Clifton, in 1846, by Rev. Ross J. Perry; her husband died in the house where she now lives, Sept. 8, 1872, of consumption, and was buried in the Rock Church Cemetery; he was a local preacher in the M. E. Church for twenty years. Mrs. C. is also a member of that church; she has now 97 acres of land, and built the house they now live in, about ten rods from the old log cabin; has had nine children -- Elmore T., James, Lewis D., Curtis, living; Sarah E., Elias, Ora Ann, Nelson A., Eddie E., deceased, all buried in Rock Church Cemetery.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CLIFTON, WILLIAM

WILLIAM CLIFTON, farmer, Sec. 2; P.O. Washburn; was born in St. Charles Co., Mo., May 23, 1817. His father removed to Callaway Co., Mo., soon after, and resided there until William was about 13 years old, when he moved back to St. Charles. He came to Grant Co., Wis., in 1834, being attracted by the lead mines, and followed mining about ten years; then combined farming with mining. He first settled on a farm a little north of his present home; this he soon exchanged for his present farm, now containing 144 acres; this farm, originally mostly heavily-timbered, had been somewhat improved before he bought it, a few acres being cleared and a stone house built, but his own toil and skill have brought farm and buildings to their present state. Large quantities of excellent lime have been burned. He was married July 21, 1839, to Miss Frances Ann Basye, second daughter of Dr. J. J. Basye, the pioneer physician and minister of Platteville. They have had twelve children, five of whom are still living--E.W., J. Newton, Rev. J. Theodore (now Pastor of the Third Congregation Church, St. Louis, Mo.), Rev. Joseph J., of the Rock River M.E. Conference, Ill., and Carrie (now Mrs. Arnett). Their youngest daughter, Anna Belle (Mrs. Hoppin), died recently at La Crosse, leaving a little girl, which the fond grandparents accepted as a loving legacy and solace in their declining years, bringing to them unwonted sunshine and gladness. Mr. and Mrs. C. are among the oldest members of the M.E. Church in this section of the country. Mr. C. has served on the Town Board of Clifton and Lima, principally as Chairman, many years, as is very much esteemed by all who know him.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

CLOUGH, JOHN B.

JOHN B. CLOUGH, farmer, Sec. 3; P. O. Lancaster; was born in Piscataquis Co., Maine, Dec. 5, in the year 1835; emigrated to Boone Co., Ill., in the year 1839 with his parents, then to Wisconsin October, 1843; settled in Highland, Grant Co., now Iowa County, then to Ellenboro, Grant County, in the year 1845. His father died December, 1868; his mother in July, 1878. He owns 330 acres of land, north half of Sec. 3 town Ellenboro. His wife, Mary A. McKnight, born Sept. 26, 1854; they have no children. In politics, Republican; in religion, Free Thinker. Has been District Clerk and Director, Justice of the Peace and Clerk. His father was a Baptist. Mrs. Clough's father was Andrew McKnight, born in County Down, Ireland, May 13, 1817; came to Mineral Point 1846; enlisted in Company A, 33d W. V. I., 1862; lost his health in the war, died May 3, 1876. Her mother was Prudence Cromwell, a native of County Down, Ireland, born May 8, 1819; came to Canada with her parents where they died. They were married in the year 1843, and they have ten children -- Elenora; James, who was in the 33d W. V. I.; Thomas, in the 47th W. V. I.; Margaret, Andrew, Mary A., Sarah, Christiana, Edmond, Olive.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Ellenboro Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CLOUGH, SOLOMON

SOLOMON CLOUGH, farmer, Sec. 11; a native of Maine; born in Sangersville Aug. 19, 1832. He moved to Illinois with his parents in 1839; and, in the fall of 1843, they came to Grant Co. Feb. 10, 1854, he was married to Miss Frances Shaw, a native of Illinois. They have one adopted daughter -- Ella A. He has been a member of the Town Board, and was Chairman of the same for a number of terms, and is at the present time. He has been Treasurer of the School Board over sixteen years.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Liberty Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

COATES, BENJAMIN M.

BENJAMIN M. COATES, deceased. He was born in New Harmony, Ind., in 1819; in about 1837 came to Platteville, followed mining several years, removed to Beetown and continued mining; in 1849, went to California; returned in the winter of 1853, and, in company with Samuel Moore, built a linseed oil mill; ran it about eighteen months, then sold out his interest to Mr. Moore; went to Muscoda, engaged in merchandising with Jonathan Moore; they continued about two years, when he sold out to Mr. Moore, and opened another store; this he carried on till 1863, when he came to Boscobel and commenced business, the firm being Palmer & Coates; they closed out their business about 1866; since then he has been engaged in banking here till his death, which occurred Aug. 27, 1880. He has held the office of Internal Revenue Collector about three years; was member of the Assembly during 1869 and 1874. Married Miss Mildred La Follette March, 1854; she was born in Cincinnati, Ohio; have one daughter -- Mrs. Parr.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

COATES, LEONARD

LEONARD COATES, one of the representative pioneers of Platteville, was born Aug. 8, 1814, in Yorkshire, England. Here he spent his early life in the mines. In May, 1836, he came to the United States, arriving June 26, 1836 in Platteville. Beginning as a miner on his own account, he followed it until 1838, when he and James Vineyard built a furnace on the Rountree Branch. This furnace they operated three years, at the end of which time Mr. Coates took a contract by which he "cleaned up the old furnaces of Thomas Perrish, on the Blue River; also did some mining at Centerville and Franklin; returning in 1841 to Platteville, he engaged in mining until the fall of 1844, when, in company with Robert Chapman, he re-purchased the old Vineyard-Coates furnace. During 1847 Mr. Coates operated the Shullsburg furnace, then owned by himself and partner. The partnership was dissolved in 1848, although Mr. Coates continued smelting until in 1873. He was conspicuous in securing railroad privileges to Platteville, and has ever been in the foremost ranks of its most public-spirited citizens, having served as Mayor and City Treasurer. His elegant brick residence was completed in 1870, it making a most pleasant resting-place for one like him, who has spent a long and active life in the turmoil of the business of his nineteenth century. He married Jan. 2, 1852, Miss Caroline Gear. She was born in Columbus, Ohio, and has been a resident of Platteville since 1840. Their only child, Lucy A., born in Platteville, is the wife of W. H. Diffenbacher. Mr. and Mrs. Coates united with the Platteville M. E. Church in 1857, since which time Mr. C. has been class-leader almost without interruption.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

COATES, WILLIAM S.

WILLIAM S. COATES, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Boscobel; born in Philadelphia, Penn., but removed when a child with his parents to Indiana, where he engaged in farming. In 1836, came to Platteville, Wis., and there followed farming and mining until 1856, when he moved here, where he has always resided since. Owns 120 acres of land, all the improvements upon which have been made by himself. Has been a member of the Town Board several years, and has held a number of school offices. Was married in 1842 to Miss Cynthia Cain; she was born in Tennessee. They have five children -- two sons and three daughters; Jefferson, the eldest son, died Jan. 27, 1880, aged 37 years.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

COLBURN, T. J.

T. J. COLBURN, born Oct. 28, 1825, in Orange Co., N. Y.; early in life he lost his father, the widow and mother removing to Chittenden Co., Vt. Here T. J. Colburn received his schooling, and grew to man's estate. In February, 1845, he came to Platteville and engaged in farming until 1851, then went overland to California. Here he sought the smiles of the golden goddess until 1853, then sailed for Australia. In the spring of 1854, he shipped from Australia to Peru, where he did his first work as a carpenter. Upon his return to Platteville, in the summer of 1855, he again took up the plane and saw, working as a carpenter until his second visit to California in 1861. He mined gold in that State and Nevada until his final return to Platteville in the fall of 1864; worked at his trade until 1872, then removed to his pleasant suburban home. He has 14 acres, and is engaged in small fruit culture and in raising poultry. He has also a desirable house and lot in the city. He has been a member of the Platteville Congregational Church for many years, and a member of the choir since his first settlement there. In 1870, he was, by the Board of Regents, appointed Professor of Music in the Platteville Normal School, and filled that position three years. He married Miss Margie, daughter of Paul Jeardoe, a pioneer settler in Platteville, where she was born. They have six children -- Willis P., Mabel, Margie, Philip, Olive L. and Roy, all born in Platteville. Mrs. Colburn is also a member of the Congressional Church, her father now residing in Lima.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

COLE, ORSAMUS

ORSAMUS COLE, Madison, comes of Revolutionary stock, both of his grandfathers having served in the patriot army when the colonies revolted against British rule. He was born at Cazenovia, Madison county, New York on the 23d of August 1819. His father was Hymeneus Cole and his mother's maiden name was Sarah Salisbury. Orsamus completed his literary education at Union College, Schenectady, graduating with the class of 1843. Having prepared himself for the practice of the law he moved to Chicago, but after a few months in that then unpromising field he proceeded to Potosi, in Grant county, the thriving center of an extensive lead-mining district. There, in the year 1845, he established himself in the practice of law in partnership with William R. Biddlecome. Two years later he was elected a member of the second constitutional convention of Wisconsin, which body he entered as a young and comparatively unknown man, but speedily assumed a leading position in its debates and deliberations. When the convention had closed its labors the esteem and respect in which he was held was not bounded by party lines and it required no special gift to foresee the brilliant career he would achieve in the history of Wisconsin.

In 1848 Mr. Cole was made the candidate of the whig party for representative in congress from the second district, comprising the whole of the western portion of the state, and perhaps the largest district in area in the Union. The democratic candidate was A. Hyatt Smith, and the free-soilers supported George W. Crabbe. The result was the election of Mr. Cole, who became a member of the thirty-first congress coincidently with the inauguration of Zachary Taylor as President of the United States. His service in the national legislature was such as he can look back upon with eminent satisfaction. He was a whig of the whigs and had never allied himself with the distinctively anti-slavery party, which, as we have seen, had opposed his election. Many whigs under the magnetic influence of Henry Clay, the revered leader of the party, supported measures of compromise on this issue; but Mr. Cole was not a man to yield to any influence that would move him to compromise with wrong. It involves no partisanship to say at this day that his recorded vote against the fugitive slave law stands to his enduring honor.

At the close of a single term in congress Mr. Cole resumed the practice of the law at Potosi. In 1853 the whig party, already moribund, held a state convention and nominated the late Henry S. Baird for governor and Mr. Cole for attorney-general. Subsequently all the candidates excepting Mr. Baird withdrew their names to enable the disaffected elements and others to combine and nominate a new ticket which would better unite the opposition to the democratic Barstow ticket. With E. D. Holton for governor, Mr. Cole was put on the new ticket for attorney-general, although he did not attend either convention, nor did he desire the nomination. This new movement eventuated in the formation of the republican party the succeeding year. The entire ticket suffered defeat.

When the supreme court was first organized to consist of a chief justice and two associate justices, those positions were filled by the election of E. V. Whiton, A. D. Smith and Samuel Crawford. Judge Crawford drew the short term, which expired in 1855. In the spring of that year he was nominated by the democrats for re-election and Mr. Cole was made the candidate of the young republican party. The result was the election of the latter. He has been a member of that tribunal ever since, having been four times re-elected associate justice, the last time, in 1879 by 33,000 majority.

In November 1880 the position of chief justice was vacated by the death of E. G. Ryan. Judge Cole had served under E. V. Whiton, Luther S. Dixon and the deceased, and had been senior associate justice for over twenty years. There was a very general sentiment that he should be placed at the head of the court, and Governor Smith gave effect to this feeling by appointing him chief justice. At the election in April, 1881, this choice was enthusiastically ratified by the people. It should be added that so far from seeking the promotion Judge Cole was with difficulty induced to accept it.

Judge Cole's leading characteristics are a temper of singular equability, a strong and well-balanced mind, and a conscientiousness extending to every detail of duty. Add to these exhaustive learning and an almost instinctive apprehension of the principles of law and equity and it is not clear what is wanting for the equipment of a perfect judge. A man of unaffected diffidence and the reverse of combative, he has yet, in a remarkable degree the courage of his convictions. Early in his career upon the bench there came before the supreme court a question in which his views separated him for a large wing of his own party and antagonized a heated popular sentiment, but he asserted them without hesitation or equivocation. At the election that soon followed he was opposed in consequence by an independent republican candidate in the person of James H. Knowlton, and it is probably that his election was due to democratic support, but it need not be pointed out how complete is his vindication in the present attitude of the party that he then offended.

Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed Publisher (1882) transcribed by Peggy Thompson

COLLIER, R.

R. COLLIER, dealer in dry goods, groceries, boots and shoes, Patch Grove; was born in Cheshire, England, April 13, 1829; came to America in the year 1849; settled at Salem, Ohio, where he learned the trade of shoemaker. In the year 1852, he came to Patch Grove, Wis.; worked at his trade for 16 years; in the year 1869, he began in the general mercantile business; built in the year 1879 a storeroom 26x45, with hall above known as Collier's Hall. His wife, Ruth Ann Millard, was born in Northampton Co., Ohio, Penn., Feb. 20, 1821. Married in Ohio March 16, 1853; they have four children -- Francis A., born Feb. 8, 1854, died July 16, 1854; Mirah, born Sept. 14, 1855; twins, Ida and Ada, born March 16, 1858; died March 19, 1858. In politics, Republican. In religion, his wife is a Spiritualist; he is a Free-thinker. A member of the Good Templars.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CONDRY, DAVID

DAVID CONDRY, farmer, Sec. 20; P.O. Platteville; was born in Pennsylvania Jan. 16, 1834; removed to Wayne Co., Ohio, with his parents; to Wisconsin Dec. 8, 1870. Owns 60 acres of land, made part of the improvements. His wife Sarah, Homer, was born in Mercer Co., Ohio, Oct. 4, 1842. Married May 4, 1865; they have seven children--Mary J., born Feb. 26, 1867; William E., born Oct. 19, 1868; Charles F., born Feb. 22, 1870; Emma R., born May 11, 1872; David H., born March 11, 1874; Henry F., born Sept. 2, 1876; Robert Roy, born June 15, 1879. In politics, Republican. Owns one-third interest in steam saw-mill in company with T. Calloway and Robert Hale, located in Ellenboro, Grant Co.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

COOK, ADAM

ADAM COOK, Sec. 2; P. O. Livingston; was born in Ireland in 1825; came to America in 1833, and stopped in Illinois for one year, and then came to the town of Clifton, Wis., and settled on the place where he now lives; bought 135 acres from land agent at Mineral Point. Was married at the age of 18 to Nancy Thatcher in Canada, by whom there are seven children -- Benjamin, Semantha, Levi, Rachael, Cecelia, Elizabeth, Ira; was divorced in 1879, and was married to Mrs. Ellenor Bayley May 2, 1880, who was born in Watertown, Jefferson Co., N. Y., July 7, 1849, and came West with her parents and settled at Lancaster; she has four children by her first husband and two by her second -- Frank M. and Murtel F. Mr. Cook was in the French war in Canada at the age of 14, and was also in the late war eight months in the 47th W. V. I. Mrs. Cook is a Baptist.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

COOLEY, SHERMAN

SHERMAN COOLEY, farmer, Sec. 30; P.O. Platteville; was born in Connecticut March 14, 1876; emigrated to Trumbull Co., Ohio, in 1832; to Belmont, La Fayette Co., Wis., in 1857; then to Grant County, August, 1870; bought 55 acres, now owns 100 acres of land with fine improvements; house 18x24, wing, 16x24, two stories; barn 34x40, 16-foot posts, basement stable. His wife, Diana Day, a native of Vermont, born Aug. 9, 1811. Married at Granby, Conn., Oct. 14, 1830; they have had eight children--Mary J., now Mrs. Everett, resides in Trumbull Co., Ohio; Franklin B. left home 1861 for Colorado, remaining in Nevada about then years, since which time they have not heard from him; Rhoda L., now Mrs. G.S. Whitcher; Roswell D., carrying on the farm; was born Feb. 21, 1838; his wife, Mary J. Kile, born in Canada, Feb. 15, 1843; married April 15, 1874 in Nebraska; they have two children--Carrie and Edward L. Richard S. residing in Waverly, Neb.; Alfred S., residing in Lincoln, Neb., Timothy M., residing in Lincoln, Neb., engaged with an engineering party; Lewis E., general merchant, Cobb, Iowa Co., Wis. In politics, Democrat; in religion, Free-thinker; has held the office of Justice of Peace in Ohio and La Fayette Co., Wis.; has held the school offices in this district. Oct 4, 1880, there were seventeen grandchildren, five great-grandchildren. The Grant County Witness says of their golden wedding:

"On Monday, the 14th inst.., one of those anniversaries occurred, which but few ever see, the celebration of the fiftieth year of their married life. Yet this event was duly celebrated in Lima, Monday. At 1 o'clock P.M. , the hour fixed, there assembled the following persons of the family and invited guests: Uncle Morgan Colley, of Granby, Conn., a brother some eight years younger than Sherman and the jolliest old Yankee that ever hailed from the ancient lands of the Pequods and Mohegans. He knows all the genealogy of the Colley and Holcomb family back, away back in the history of Connecticut, well not exactly to Adam, but to the Big Injun, who was scalped in the Fairfield Swamp, in 1764; and if they had any numerous or amusing characteristics, or if any event occurred in their career on which to found a good story, 'Uncle Morgan' remembers it; G.S. Whitcher and family, whose wife was the eldest of their children present; R.D. Cooley, wife and two children, of Waverly, Neb.; Alfred S, Cooley, wife and three children, of Eagle, Neb.; L.E. Cooley, wife and child, of Cross Plains, Wis.; Mr. William Beebe and wife; Mr. Lane and wife; J.H. Holcomb and wife, the last three named are cousins to the Cooleys, their mother having been a Holcomb; Mr. E. P. Dickinson, wife and Miss Ina Dickinson; Mr. John Burney and wife, Miss Lima Burney; Miss Ella Dougherty.

"The best of feeling prevailed. Pap Cooley's face was all over smiles, and Mother Cooley seemed equally happy, while Uncle Morgan, humorous and joyous, told some of his queerest stories. 'I tell you I was there,' said he, 'and, Diana. I thought you was the purtiest gal that ever went into the Granby Meetin' House. I was at the wedding, I know how they were dressed. Sherman wore a swallow tailed coat, a bell crowned plug hat, and I suppose the accompanying costume of that ancient time. Mrs. Lane says ' the bride wore a drab colored silk dress, a while belt around the waist, a sash attached, a deep ruffle around the neck and a white silk head-dress.'

"The belt referred to she wore as ornaments on the present occasion, it having turned a golden color by the fifty years intervened.

"It was a joyous occasion, and why should it not be? There is a proverb that 'It is our privilege to enjoy ourselves in this world, and that if we do not it is our own fault.' No use of putting on a long face, and always be in the straight jacket of restraint considering this life a probationary state, making a hell of earth, as Byron says, to merit heaven; living with elongated faces as though the grave was photographed before us, with hell in the background, but let us rather make the best of that which we are sure of, and enjoy ourselves in this world; why, a person can experience plenty of enjoyment after they are fifty years old. I have a strong belief and an abiding faith that there is lots of fun in this vale of tears yet, and expect to see plenty of it or, to say the least, my hopes are very buoyant on that point.

"The cat that sits in the corner and washes its face with its paw and purrs is a better type of happiness than the old cat under the stove, that lays and burns its back, and yeaws and spits at every one that passes. Let us, then, be contented and happy, enjoying ourselves, and those around us will be more likely to, as our course of action on this point is reciprocal and mutual. Fifty years of married life, and half a century, of mutual cares and joys, reciprocal in its experiences for better or worse, happy in the love and society and friendship of their family, and more happy if that life has been agreeable in the society of each other. And as time moves us along as it surely will to least scenes, as life's milestones fly past more rapidly, as the loom of land on the other shore rises to view, our affections, our friendships will be nearer, purer and truer. No jealousies which the aggressiveness of earlier life begets and fosters, when our old friends--we are brethren. How much more firm and enduring than the friendship, the attachment between husband and wife, considering the relation, its fruits, its consequences. If they have endeavored to make each other happy, to please each other, then will they be pleased in each other's society. For the philosophy is based on reciprocal mutuality. And they can look back on the past, so well expressed by Burns.

"There were four of their children present with their families. The eldest daughter, Mrs. Mary Everett, of Cortland, Trumbull Co., Ohio; Richard and Timothy Cooley, of Nebraska, were absent."

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

COOMBE, THOMAS

THOMAS COOMBE, Sec. 22; P. O. Hazel Green; owns 140 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre; born in La Fayette Co., Wis., in 1844; came to this county in 1850, and removed to his present farm; he is the son of William Coombe, a native of England.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

COOMBS, EDWARD P.

By Mrs. R. Chambers.

My father, Edward P. Coombs, first came to the West from Fayette County, Penn., in the spring of 1834 ; at that time, Wisconsin was almost an unknown region. He first worked at Mineral Point, but, during the summer, looked out and bought his future home in what is now the southwest part of Lancaster, on Section 29, I think. That fall, he returned to Pennsylvania, bringing with him some of the products of the new country, among which was onions raised from geed something that was unknown in his old home. In the spring of the following year (1835), he moved his wife and family, consisting of six children, two boys and four girls, to their new home. Six weeks were occupied in the journey from Pennsylvania to what is known as Hurricane Grove. While they were waiting for a boat at St. Louis, the celebrated chief Black Hawk arrived at that city with a number of his followers on a steamer. On arriving at Cassville, my father left his family there while he went ahead to procure teams to transport them and their effects the remainder of the distance. He soon returned with some of his neighbors with their ox-teams, and in these they set out for the new home. Two days were occupied in making the journey of less than twenty miles, all hands staying over the night of the 1st day of May at the cabin of Silas Burt in Old Beetown. They found these early settlers very kind and hospitable. Upon arriving in the Hurricane, they went to live in the cabin of Martin Bonham until their own was erected. Young Bonham was a young, unmarried man, keeping at the time a " bachelor establishment, and when he heard that there were girls in the family that had just arrived, he said he hardly knew which way to run, his clothes were so ragged. However, he concluded to come in from the field where he was, and, until the day of his death, the family found him ever a kind neighbor and friend. Little did we children know in those times of toys or playthings, one china doll dressed in silk and hung up in state was all I remember seeing, and that was, of course, too good to be used on any occasion. When our parents went to town they would bring us a treat—some green apples which were an object of much curiosity. One thing that made a lasting impression on my childish mind was a storm that occurred in the summer of 1844 or 1845, I think. It came up so suddenly that those who were any distance from home did not have time to get there. My brother was plowing in the field when he perceived it coming and unhitched his horse and started for the house, but was forced to abandon the attempt and seek shelter under a straw-stack, from which shelter he saw the roof of the stable carried away. The rain poured in torrents, and terrific flashes of lightning and peals of thunder rent to air. It seemed as if the wind would sweep everything before it. My married sister was alone in her home when the roof of the house was taken off, and she was left standing in the middle of the floor, and the rain pouring in torrents around her. When the storm had abated, we counted from our window thirteen trees that had been leveled, and I think the woods in that vicinity will still bear traces of the great storm.

My father was by trade both a carpenter and a blacksmith, and, when he came to Wisconsin, he found employment for a share of the time in making chairs, tables, bedsteads, coffins, and, in fact, everything in this line needed by settlers in a new country. To-day, after the lapse of more than thirty years since his death, we find specimens of his handiwork. He had served for a time in the war of 1812, and contracted a disease from which he never recovered, although he was never a pensioner. He died in March, 1849, but from the ravages of another disease than this.

In 1849, began the great Californian exodus from this county. A few went out in the spring, scouts as it were of the hundreds and thousands that were to follow. The next spring, the excitement ran still higher ; young men were getting their traps together, loading their covered wagons, to which were hitched two, four or six horses, or oxen, as the case might be, and setting off for their five months' trip across the plains. The excitement continued for several years, until it was dreaded to see spring come, as it seemed as if every one who could would go ; at times it was doubtful what we would do for inhabitants, so great was the exodus. In the spring of 1854, the writer, being duly commissioned by J. C. Cover, the Town Superintendent, began a new career as teacher. My first school was in District No. 5, Town of Lancaster, where I had twelve pupils, and received $10.50 per month, boarding myself. Of those twelve pupils, one, Francis M. Irish, 18 dead. The remainder are, I think, all living. Six of the boys were soldiers in the war for the Union. Five returned to their homes when peace was declared. Three of the girls became teachers.

Of my family of ten children, seven are now living. My mother, eighty-one years of age is living with my brother in Hurricane Grove.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Publ. 1881); transcribed by a Friend of Free Genealogy

COOMBS, J. ALLEST

J. ALLEST COOMBS, farmer: and carpenter, Sec. 31 ; P.O. Lancaster; a native of Grant Co., son of Ed. P. and Nancy Coombs, who came to Grant Co. in 1836, from Pennsylvania ; his father died in 1849. In August, 1864, enlisted in the army; he served until July, 1866. In April, 1867, he was married to Miss Almira Morrell, native of Grant Co., a daughter of Ruel Morrell. They have three children Alfred, Ed. C. and Millicent.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

COONS, JOHN R.

MAJ. JOHN R. COONS
BY J. W. SEATON.

While the evidences of hopes deferred and visions ruptured were only too numerous during the early settlement of the new diggings, still all who came and went out from the mines were not failures. Many succeeded in business beyond their most sanguine expectations and others arose from the humble occupation of miners to fill the most responsible and exalted positions in the land. Many were in affluent circumstances and from the first ranks of society and came here for the purpose of extending their business and adding to their wealth.

A well preserved and fine example of the latter class who engaged my respect and admiration, thirty years ago, was Maj. John R. Coons, a man who derived his patent of nobility from the hand of nature. He hailed from the "Blue Grass State "the land of Henry Clay, of Prentice, the Breckenridges, the Marshalls those men of giant intellect and universal fame, the home of heroes and some of the fairest specimens of the " gentler sex " that ever came from the hand of a Divine Creator. Springing from such a source, the Major was no exception to his race, or disparagement to his kind. His gentlemanly bearinghis pleasing conversation his generous nature and abiding friendshipbespoke the true Kentuckianand the truer man. He was no adventurer or common fortune-hunter, but with good business qualification, a sound constitution, and a will to encounter and overcome all difficulties, he sought to win his way by true merit and probity alone. Coming to St. Louis in 1808 while yet a boy and while it was but a small French village, his chances for an education were limited, though he became an adept in penmanship, a good calculator, and stored his mind with useful miscellaneous reading. The French, patois of the place he spoke with the glibness and familiarity of his mother tongue. At this time the old French habitues who were gathered in and around St. Louis and Carondolet, in their modes of living, habits, customs and social intercourse, were a peculiar people, and in all things a law unto themselves. Hunting and fishing was their chief employment in summer, and the winter season was one unbroken round of gayety and fun. The sound of the festive violin filled the air; and the Creole girls, dressed in their gauzy robes of pink and white tarlatans, the sweet carnation of the rose glowing on their warm, olive cheeks, and love beaming from every nook and corner of their " soft, dark eyes," moved with angelic grace through the "mystic mazes of the dance" and led captive many a willing heart. The quaint ga?e roof of their houses their vine-covered balconies and jessamine wreathed windows that greeted the first glow of morning and around which tenderly lingered the last beam of the evening sun, reminded the elders of the sunnier skies of their once beloved France, and made the life of the younger float like an idyl set to the sweet, monotonous melody of whispering trees and the still music of the ceaseless flow of the mighty river. In heavenly scenes like these, what eared they for the grosser things of life ? The earth, air and waters yielded the supplies of nature without coaxing or cultivation; and Eden, before the fall, was not a happier place" Mirth, with thee I mean to live " was their motto and they forgot it not. Little dreamed these light-hearted, fun loving Frenchmen of the great change that was so soon to be wrought in their vine-covered gardens and primitive cabins. And yet many of them are still living, to look abroad upon a vast city, its streets surging with the ever restless throng of trade and the mighty river, on whose beautiful moon-lit banks they danced the gay quadrille, converted into the mart of a continent and the highway of a nation's commerce. Gigantic steamers now moor in the place of the frail bark canoe and rough bateaux, in which the hardy voyageurs of fifty years since, pursued their dangerous travels ; the lightning-winged train usurps the paths of the patient mule across the plain, instead of peltries and robes from the mountains, bringing the exhaustless treasures of a then unknown land, and teas, spices and the golden products of Far Cathay. Such has been the change witnessed by a generation still living, and in place of the rude hamlet, a city has sprung up, rivaling in wealth, influence, potency and importance, many of the most renowned cities of the old world. While a young man dwelling here, Maj. Coons witnessed these gay scenes and the rapid changes taking place around him, and became imbued with the spirit and enterprise of its people. For a long period the American Fur Company made St. Louis one of the principal points of its extensive business ; and from here in the spring, annually went forth the long wagon trains of supplies, to the plains, the mountains, the head-waters of the majestic rivers that lave this inland city, to the remote trading-point of Santa Fe, and returned again in the fall, laden with fur, peltries, silver and the rich spoils their emissaries had gathered in.

Of this wealthy and widely influential company the Major became a trusted employe, and, in the year 1827, was sent to the Upper Lead Mines and assigned to a clerkship with Gratiot, Choteaux & Co., a branch of this famous house, located at Gratiot Grove, Wis. Their business was smelting, selling goods and trading with the Indians for furs and Uncle Sam's annuities, and no doubt, at this period of uncertain values, it was found a very profitable one.

Nothing occurred to interrupt their prosperous trade until the spring of 1832, when rumors of an advance of the warlike Sauk (or Sac) Indians, up the valley of the Rock River, became rife in the settlements, and soon culminated in the Black Hawk war. At this critical juncture, no one knowing the magnitude or proximity of the danger that surrounded them, the peaceful pursuits were neglected, and every precaution for safety and defense was taken. Block-houses were constructed, forts built and the women and children hustled into them, and the men organized and armed, ready at a moment's warning to ward off or go in the pursuit of the wily foe. In all these preparations and forays, Maj. Coons took an active part, and, although his valorous deeds were not recorded in every bulletin from the field of battle, as were those of some others less worthy, his services were untiring and highly appreciated by his superiors. His family being removed to safer quarters, the house they occupied at Old --?a strongly built log house one and a half stories highwas converted into a place of defense and garrisoned with soldiers. When peace was restored, the family returned, and his eldest son, Henry (the amiable and gentlemanly Town Clerk of Potosi), well remembers playing soldier when a boy and shooting out of the port-holes from the chamber. He was braver then than he is now. Several guns were left by its heroic defenders, and, in handling them afterward, one was accidentally discharged, the contents going through the floor and lodging in the bed beneath, luckily unoccupied, or Henry might have become a "poor motherless boy " for his carelessness.

Maj. Coons was one of a detachment sent out by Col. Gratiot in search of the Hall girls, two beautiful young ladies who were spared at the dreadful massacre of their father's family and neighbors, on Rock River. They were taken captives by one of Black Hawk's roving bands, and a reward of $2,000 being offered" for their rescue, by Gen. Atkinson, they were afterward brought in to the fort at Blue Mounds, by three Winnebago Indians, who received the reward, hut being suspected as spies, were ordered from the fort and to proceed at once north of the Wisconsin. The girls were in a most destitute and forlorn condition, but received the warm sympathy of the ladies in the fort, by whom they were properly clothed and soon after restored to their friends.

Peace being finally restored by the capture of Black Hawk and the destruction of his band at the bloody battle of Bad Ax, Maj. Coons was relieved from further duty and returned to private life. He soon after obtained what was called a "smelter's grant" from the Government and removed to Dubuque, which, though not open to settlement, was fast being filled up with miners, tradesmen and adventurers. He built his furnace on the Catfish, near the present site of the Rockdale Mills. Here he enjoyed the confidence of the miners, and did a lucrative business, though paying thousands of dollars to the Government in the shape of rent. His tax rule was afterward reversed and the money refunded, but unfortunately for the Major, he did not give the matter his prompt attention, and to the extent of his loss the Government profiteth.

Belmont, the once famous capital of Wisconsin, next attracted his attention, and here we find him running one of the largest dry goods stocks in the West. During his absence from home, on one occasion, his shrewd and far-sighted wife, took it into her head to visit the land office at Mineral Point, and when the Major returned he found himself the owner of some of the finest farming lands in this section of the country. The strangulation of the young city in its infancy, by the removal of the seat of government to Madison, blighted its future hopes, and determined the Major to find a place of brighter prospects and more commercial importance. That place was Potosi. And thither he came, like Joseph of old, out of the land of Egypt, with his family and his fortune. Hooper, Peck & Scales were then heavily engaged in the mercantile business at Galena, and with them an alliance was formed and a branch house established, under the firm name of Coons, Wooley & Co., in that part of the village of Potosi then and still known as Lafayette. Here, in 1836, the Major erected the first frame store building in Potosi, shipping the material for its construction from Cincinnati by the way of the Ohio River. It stood immediately above the residence of the late James P. Chapman, though now reduced to the menial grade of horse stable on the farm of Nick Bonn. Its internal arrangements and finish were a marvel of beauty and elegance. Piles of valuable goods adorned its shelves and counters, and its capacious cellar and wareroom were plethoric with staple groceries and choice liquors. But, alas ! for things material as well as things spiritual ! The disease of debt was already fastened upon the vitals of the parent house, and the offspring was not exempt from its taint. The credit system predicated upon the inflated, worthless currency of the Illinois banks, had collapsed. Gen. Jackson had issued his famous specie circular, and down to this rock basis all must come. No man or firm in business could withstand the wild tempest of bankruptcy and disaster that swept through the length and breadth of the land. All toppled and many went down. Hooper, Peck & Scales tried to weather the storm, but it was of no use. The proud firm and its dependencies were taken from their anchored foundations, twirled in the air, and dropped in one common wreck. Some of the members emerged from the ruins with a few dislocated joints and bruised limbs, but poor Maj. Coons was a cripple for life, and almost a penniless man. He never overcame the shock or recovered from the deep injuries. Quietly and unostentatiously, he pursued the even tenor of his life, gaining, as best he could, a livelihood and an education for his little familytill, wearied at last with the unequal struggle, he bent his proud form and "slept with his fathers." Well do I remember the hour and the event ; and when they told me the old man had passed from his humble home to his heavenly rest, I said within myself, It is wella true, a warm and generous heart hath ceased to beat ; a kind, a just and upright soul has burst the prison bars of death, overcome the rough and rugged storms of life, and found a shelter in a happier home.

"Methinks I hear the parting spirit say It is a dread, an awful thing to die."

Uh ! no, it cannot be. No vain regrets ; no sorrowing words e'er linger round the dying lips ; no tears bedew the eyelids of the dead. Affection, love, forgiveness, faith and hope the faltering voice and failing breadth alone imparts ; and on the marble cheek the smile of love and hope immortal reigns. And so he died. Twenty yearsswift, fleeting, ever-hurrying years of time, nave fled since then, and still in loving hearts his memory lives embalmed. Although he sleeps within a lonely dell, far from the busy walks and strife of men, the wild rose blooms around his grave ; the feathered tribes of spring pour forth their sweetest notes, and come to build their nests amid the quiet trees ; the dews of Heaven fall gently o'er the springing grass and budding flowers ; he hears, he heeds, he knows it not ; yet, from this lonely bivouac of the dead comes forth the fragrance of a noble life, and sheds its hallowed influence around the name, the grave of John R. Coons.

Source: "History of Grant County Wisconsin", by the Western Historical Company - Sub. by a Friend of Free Genealogy

COOPER, CATHERINE

MRS. CATHERINE COOPER, housekeeper, Sec. 36; P. O. Lancaster. Catherine Cooper, better known as Mrs. Catherine Specht, was born in 1845, in Germany, a daughter of Henry and Elizabeth Specht; lived with her parents until 20 years of age; came to America in 1860, with her father; located at Lancaster for a few years, thence to Little Grant. Married in 1863, Andrew Cooper; lived with him seven months, when they separated; have one child -- Herman Cooper; she has been a hard-worker, and has accumulated some wealth; she has a fine storeroom on Maple street, Lancaster. She is a member of the Lutheran Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Little Grant Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

COPPIN, ALFRED

ALFRED COPPIN. An honorable position among the farmers of Dwight township, Richland county, is willingly accorded to this gentleman by his associates. He occupies one of the well-developed farms of the county and is greatly respected in the community where he has spent nearly twenty years.

Our subject was born in Cornwall, England, November 1, 1849, and was a son of Thomas and Mary (Spurr) Coppin, both of whom were natives of England. They came to America and made their home in Perth county, Ontario, where the father died. They were the parents of three children, two sons and one daughter, of whom our subject was the eldest.

Alfred Coppin, at the age of twelve years, came with his parents to Canada and grew to manhood in Perth county. He resided there until 1879, when he went to Richland county, North Dakota, and has been a continuous resident of that county since. He entered a homestead claim to land near Hankinson and placed good improvements on the place, disposing of the property later. He settled on the farm which he now occupies in Dwight township, in March, 1882. His home is on section 24, and he is the owner of one hundred and sixty acres of tillable land. He has placed such improvements on the place as are usually put on a model farm and his good management and careful work are evidenced by the general appearance of the entire estate.

Our subject was married, in Richland county, North Dakota, March 17, 1882, to Miss Ella J. Gudger, daughter of David Gudger, who served nearly three years in the Civil War and was killed at the battle of Gettysburg. Mrs. Coppin was born in Grant county, Wisconsin, and is a lady of retinement and good education. She was one of the first teachers in Richland county and was engaged in that profession in Wahpeton. Two children have been born to bless the home of Mr. and Mrs. Coppin, named as follows: Archie T. and Mary E. Mr. Coppin is a man of prominence in his community and has been called upon to serve in various official capacities. He has held important township offices, including school offices, and was a member of the board of supervisors. He is always found standing on the side of right and justice and his work for his community is willingly and faithfully performed.

Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Janice Louie

CORNELISEN, B.

B. CORNELISEN, proprietor of Empire House, Hazel Green; born in Prussia in 1825; came to America in 1848, and his first settlement was in Galena, where he was engaged in mining until 1853, when he married Mary Kirchberg, and removed to Jamestown, and was engaged in distilling for two years, when he sold out to William Clise, and was engaged in hotel keeping and dealing in hardware until 1867, when he removed to this village; he has nine children -- Augusta, Dora, Mary, Francis, Henry, Josephine, Martha, Frank, Phillip.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

COSTLEY, JAMES

JAMES COSTLEY, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. Highland; was born in 1810, in Glenmore, Ireland, son of William and Mary Costley; his parents died when he was 9 years of age, and he lived with his uncle, Michael Costley, until he was 12 years old; he then began doing for himself. He was married in 1843, to Catherine Sullivan, daughter of Daniel and Ellen Sullivan, by whom he has had six children -- Daniel Y., William G., Nancy L., Mary A., Ellen E., Richard Y. He came to the United States in 1850, locating in Highland, Iowa Co., where he lived for ten years; then going to Castle Rock in Grant Co., where he has lived since; has been Road Overseer one term; in politics, is Republican; is a member of the Roman Catholic Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Castle Rock Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

COWDUROY, WILLIAM

WILLIAM COWDUROY, dealer in general merchandise, Platteville, was born in London, England, in 1836; came to America when only 15 years of age, landing in New York City, in the spring of 1851, without a single friend or acquaintance in that city. He soon obtained employment as a clerk at $5 a month and board, but soon had his wages raised to $13 per month. He remained there till 1853, then came to Wisconsin and resided in Platteville till the spring of 1856, when he went to La Crosse, Wis., and stayed till the spring of 1859. He then went to St. Louis, Mo., and was in the State and County Assessors' Office till 1861. He then returned to Platteville, with his family, and was in the Pay Department of the Missouri State Militia about one year, since which time he has been in business in Platteville. He was married in Platteville, in September, 1857, to Miss Lizzie Elgar, a native of London, England. She died May 21, 1879, leaving two children -- Lizzie and Harry. His second wife, to whom he was married in October, 1880, was Miss Lizzie Campbell, of Platteville.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

COX, J. H.

J. H. COX, house, sign, carriage painting and paper hanging, Hazel Green; established business in 1877; born in Hazel Green in 1850. Married Mary J. Goard, a native of St. Louis; they have three children -- Elmer, Evaline and Esther. Are members of the Primitive Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CRAWFORD, JOHN J.

JOHN J. CRAWFORD, of the firm of Crawford Bros., creamery, Hazel Green; born in Hazel Green in 1856; he is the son of Jefferson Crawford, a native of Greene Co., Penn., born in 1809; he came to Wisconsin in 1832, and engaged in lead mining and smelting; he died in 1868. Jefferson Crawford, Jr., was born in this village in 1852.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CROFT, CHARLES

CHARLES CROFT, farmer and minister, Sec. 12; P. O. Wesley; was born in 1840 in Yorkshire, England, son of William and Rebecca Croft; he received a common school education, and emigrated to America in 1842, locating in Rock Co., Wis., where he lived for eleven years; going thence to Grant Co., where he has lived since. He was married in 1860 to Sarah Hutchison, daughter of Joseph and Mary Hutchison, of Grant Co.; they have eight children -- Mary R., William J., Ferguson A., Flora E., Charles E., John W., Bertha J. and Ethel A. Has 240 acres of land. He enlisted in 1864, in Co. C, 25th W. V. I., and served seventeen months; was in four battles, and was wounded at Decatur, Ga., in the right arm. He has been a minister in the United Brethren Church since 1878, and previous to that date was a minister in the Primitive Church. Politics, Republican.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Mount Hope Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CRONIN, EDWARD

EDWARD CRONIN, M. D., Platteville; is a Pennsylvanian by birth, having been born in the city of Philadelphia Feb. 22, 1812; his earlier years were passed in that city. Arriving at the proper age, he entered the freshman class of the University of Pennsylvania, where he graduated in the literary department in 1842. Upon leaving the University, young Cronin immediately commenced the study of medicine with Prof. John K. Mitchell, of Jefferson Medical College. In 1844, the young student formed one of the graduating class at the above-named college, coming forth a full-fledged M. D. After receiving his diploma, Dr. Cronin started for the West, rightly conjecturing that the star of empire was setting in that direction. He first settled in Platteville, where he continued in practice until 1850, when attracted, as were others, by the golden tales of California, he started for the Western Slope. Reaching Sacramento during the terrible cholera epidemic, when the citizens were dying off at the rate of four or five hundred a week, the young physician turned his attention to the work at hand, remaining in attendance at the hospitals until the terrible scourge had passed over. He then went further up the country to the Frazier River, where, upon the north fork of this stream, he afterward discovered what turned out to be two good claims. He remained here until 1853, when he returned to "the States" and settled at Galena, where he remained until 1860, when he returned to Philadelphia and attended lectures at Jefferson College, during the winter of 1860-61. He then changed his residence to Platteville, where he remained until 1864. The year following found him practicing in Philadelphia. In 1867, the Doctor returned to the West and located at Mineral Point, including Platteville in his ride. In 1872, he changed his residence to Platteville, where he has since been engaged in practice. The services of Dr. Cronin are by no means confined to a local area, but the circuit of his labors extends far out into adjoining sections.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CROUCH, M. F.

M. F. CROUCH, farmer; P. O. Boscobel; born in Chautauqua Co., N. Y., in 1823; followed farming there till 1856, when he came to Grant Co.; settled on a farm at Potosi. In 1864, removed to Fennimore and continued farming there. He owns a farm of 160 acres, also property in Boscobel. He has always been connected with school interests since coming to this county; when in Fennimore he was Justice of the Peace two years. In 1869, he removed to Boscobel where he has since resided. Married in 1842 to Miss M. H. Hogle; she was born in Genesee Co., N. Y. They have seven children, five sons and two daughters.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CURRY, CALVIN

CALVIN CURRY, farmer, Sec. 35 ; P.O. Lancaster. He was born in Butler Co., Ohio, Nov. 2, 1797. He came to what was then called New Diggings, but now La Fayette Co., in May, 1833, and lived there for several years ; he then went to Jo Daviess Co., Ill., where he remained until 1855, and then came to Grant Co. He was married in 1821, to Miss Jane Danile, a native of Indiana. They have five daughters and four sons living, and have thirty-two grandchildren and thirty great-grandchildren.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

CURRY, HALSEY S.

FIRST SERGEANT HALSEY S. CURRY. This gentleman is a leading farmer of Cass county, wherein he was one of the pioneer settlers. He has developed a fine farm and has a comfortable home and pleasant surroundings. His residence is on section 4 of Rochester township.

Our subject was born in Tompkins county, New York, July 23, 1841, and was a son of Edwin H. and Rachel (Upkyke) Curry, who were natives of New York and Pennsylvania, respectively. His parents were farmers and removed to Kane county, Illinois, in 1842, and from there to Grant county, Wisconsin, where the mother died in 1882 and the father in 1896. The grandfather of our subject, James Curry, was a Methodist Episcopal divine and engaged in the ministry forty years, and passed away in the state of New York. Our subject had three brothers and two sisters, and his eldest brother was killed in Gainesville, Virginia, in 1862. He was a member of Company I, Seventh Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. He has one brother now in Cass county, North Dakota.

Mr. Curry was reared and educated in Illinois and Wisconsin, and July 8, 1861, enlisted in Company I, Seventh Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and served four years and one month. He was with the Army of the Potomac and participated in the following battles: Second Bull Run, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Fitz Hugh Lee, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Spottsylvania Court House, Laurel Hill, North Ann River, South Ann River and Cold Harbor. He was wounded by a shot in the left hand June 30, 1864, at Petersburg, and was discharged at Detroit, Michigan, in July, 1865, with the rank of first sergeant. At the close of the war Mr. Curry located at Muskegon, Michigan, and remained there until the fall of 1880, when he went to North Dakota and located in Barnes county. He resided there until 1889 and then removed to his present home in Cass county. He raised the first crop in the portion of Barnes county in which he located, and was a prominent early settler. He now conducts the threshing business each season and has prospered in this line of work and has made some valuable improvements in implements and methods. He has a good farm with all necessary buildings which are of a substantial nature.

Our subject was married in Wisconsin, in 1864, to Miss Synthia A. Tyler, a native of Iowa. Eight children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Curry, as follows: Ulysses E., Edna E., Myrta A., Halsey S., Edwin C., William W., Lincoln C. and Lydia G., all of whom are living. Mr. Curry has served as chairman of the township board, and has held various school offices and is actively interested in public affairs. Politically he is a Republican, and is a member of the Masonic fraternity. He is prominent in Grand Army Republic affairs, and is senior vice-commander for North Dakota.

Source: History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Mary Saggio

CURRY, JOHN C.

JOHN C. CURRY, Glen Haven Hotel; born in 1842 in Jo Daviess Co., Ill.; was a son of James and Jane Curry; lived there for three years, then went to Stephenson Co., and lived there until 1855; then to Grant Co., Wis.; located near Lancaster; lived there until he enlisted, in 1864, in Co. A, 41st W. V. I.; served five months; came back and lived with his parents until 1866. In the same year, he was married to Miss Eliza Tisherness, a daughter of Louis and Mary Tisherness; moved to Beetown in 1872; resided there for seven years; then to Glen Haven in 1879. Is the proprietor of the Mississippi House; has three children -- Alma, Albert B., Louis C. Politics, Republican; Road Overseer four terms; School Director two terms.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Glen Haven Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CURRY, THEO K.

THEO. K. CURRY, Buffalo Springs, of the thirty-ninth legislative district, was born at Boscobul, Wis., January 4, 1876. Came to North Dakota in May, 1884 and is at present engaged in farming. Has held several minor offices. He was educated in the common schools of this state and at the Valley City State Normal. He is married and has three children. He was elected representative as a progressive republican.

Source: North Dakota Blue Book, 1913 Legislative Manual, Published under the direction of Thomas Hall, Secretary of State, 1913. Submitted by Linda R.

CURTIS, A. W.

A. W. CURTIS, Sec. 27; P. O. Patch Grove; owns 133 1/3 acres land, valued at $40 per acre; born in Schenectady Co., N. Y., in 1840; came to Wisconsin in 1866, and settled on this farm with his parents. Married Paulina Norton, a native of the same place; they have four children -- Addie, Charles, George and Laura.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CURTIS, GEORGE K.

GEORGE K. CURTIS, farmer and carpenter; P. O. Burton; born in Torrington, Litchfield Co., Conn.; son of Loren and Phebe (Pritchard) Curtis; came to Harrison in 1863, and to Burton in 1869. July 7, 1866, married by Loren Wade, to Harriet, daughter of David and Catharine (Klindeings) Burkholder; has three children -- Eldora, Daniel E., Rosa E. Enlisted February, 1865, in Co. G, 47th W. V. I., and was out nine months. Is at present in charge of the United Brethren Church, at Pleasant Grove, seven miles east of Darlington, which has thirty-two members; was licensed by Platte River Mission Conference December, 1879. His mother was a descendant of Hotchkiss, who came over in the Mayflower. His father was of French descent (Curtis) of Canada.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Waterloo Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

CURTIS, JOHN

JOHN CURTIS, Sec. 11; P. O. Fairview; owns 260 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre; born in Cornwall, England in 1832; came to America in 1847, and located in Hazel Green; settled on his present farm in 1876. In 1859, he married Mary Ann Lukey; she also was born in Cornwall, England; they have eleven children -- Francis, William, Thomas, Mary, Emma, James, Isabella, Olive, Charles, Walter and Susan Ann.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

DAGGETT, P. A.

P. A. DAGGETT & SON, loan and insurance agency, Muscoda. Pliny A. Daggett was born in Massachusetts in 1843; came direct to Wisconsin in 1856 and located in Iowa Co., where he engaged in farming up to the time of moving to Muscoda, and engaging in the insurance business, which was in 1873. His business has gradually increased to its present mammoth proportions, viz., $10,000 per year. His duties became so arduous, he was obliged to take his son, Floyd L. Daggett, into partnership with him in 1880. They represent twelve of the best fire and life insurance companies in the county, and make a specialty of loans on farm mortgages. By square dealing and strict attention to business they justly merit their constantly increasing business. P. A. Daggett was married in Iowa Co., to Miss Margaretta L. Floyd. Her father was one of the earliest settlers of Iowa Co., having moved there in 1832. They have one son -- Floyd L., born in December, 1862. He has held the office of Assessor for two years; was the clerk of the first high school in Muscoda, and took an active part in organizing the same. Is a member of A., F. & A. M., of which lodge he is Master for the second term. Is also a member of the I. O. O. F., and was installed as Noble Grand Jan. 14, 1881. He has always taken an active part in all matters pertaining to the welfare of the place. He is Democratic in politics; is a self-made man.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

DAILY, GEORGE

GEORGE DAILY, wagon-maker, Washburn; was born in Dauphin Co., Penn., Aug. 3, 1826; came to Wisconsin in 1857; resided in Lancaster about seventeen years, then came to Washburn; owns 80 acres of land. His wife, Adelia Carrie, was born in Trumbull Co., Ohio, May 30, 1833; married Oct. 28, 1848; they had eight children--Eleanor, Albert, Isabel, Lewis, Martha (deceased), George, Lyman, Cyrus. In politics, Republican; in religion, a liberal believer.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

DARLINGTON, CHARLES H.

CHARLES H. DARLINGTON came to Muscoda from Illinois in November, 1874, and, in partnership with H. W. Glasier, then a resident here, issued the first number of a four-column quarto (neutral in politics), the Muscoda News, on December 5. On the 1st of January, 1876, Mr. Glasier sold his interest. In August, 1876, the Skirmisher, a small campaign paper of editorial matter, was begun and continued through twelve issues. About November was begun an educational journal, the Educator, which reached a circulation of nearly five hundred. March 1, 1877, the News was enlarged to a seven-column folio; May 1, 1877, it was suspended, and July 4, the Educator made its last appearance. September 1, publication of the News was resumed (a Republican paper), four column folio, printed at home. In January, 1878, the form was altered to a six column folio, and Christmas Day, 1880, it was first issued as a five column quarto.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

DARNALL, MOSES W.

MOSES W. DARNALL, minister and farmer, Sec. 35; P.O. Hurricane Grove; born in 1810, in Estill Co., Ky., where he lived four years; moved to Bourbon Co. until 1822, then to Edgar Co., Ill., until 1834, thence to Iowa Co., Wis., near Mineral Point; Followed mining; then to Grant Co., near Centerville; lived there fourteen years; moved to Beetown in 1855; has 82 acres of land, valued at $1,500. In 1839, married Nancy Booth; had five children, two of whom are now living--Rachel J. and James; one died in infancy, one killed at Gettysburg, another murdered for his money in Nebraska. Politics, Republican. Is a Free-Will Baptist minister. Has been Road Overseer one term.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

DAVID, FRANK A

FRANK A DAVID, of the firm of David & Woodward, druggists, Muscoda; was born in Iowa Co. in 1855; is a son of Isaac David and Cecelia Rouark, who were among the early settlers of Iowa Co. He learned the trade of druggist, and was educated at Platteville; established his present business in 1874; was appointed Pastmaster in 1876, just at the age of 21 years, and has held the office acceptably to the public ever since. In 1875, he was married to Miss Ella Jameson, of Rock Co., by whom he has one daughter. Mr. David is a stanch Republican, enterprising, and a first-class business man. The firm carry a large stock of drugs, groceries, and, in fact, everything that is called for, making a specialty of wall paper, etc.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

DAVIDSON, ROBERT

ROBERT DAVIDSON, farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Mt. Hope; was born in 1830 in Scotland; was a son of Robert and Jeanette Davidson; came to the United States in 1857; located at Ryegate, Caledonia Co., Vt., and lived there seven years, following farming; thence to Liberty, Grant Co., Wis., in 1865; lived there three years; then to Little Grant, where he has since lived. He was married in 1857, to Mary Ross, a daughter of James and Jane Ross; they have seven children -- Robert M., James R., John H., Jesse M., Mary J., Mattie A. and Sarah G. Has 224 acres of land, valued at $3,500. Has three brothers and one sister in Vermont, where his parents live. Is a member of the United Brethren Church. His politics is strictly Republican. Has been Director of the School Board one term.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Little Grant Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

DAVIDSON, W.

By W. Davidson.

In the spring of 1828, I arrived at Galena, situated on what was then called Fevre River the Indian name of which was then said to be Ope-a Le-pee. At that time. Galena was submerged by the river, and presented rather a dull prospect; but I thought of an old adage, "keep a stiff lip and a light toe nail, and you may come out yet ;" and so I have—at the middle of the horn. I then became acquainted with a few men in Galena, who afterward proved to be friends indeed. After looking around a few days and making many inquiries, Yankee-like, I commenced digging at Scrabble—since called Hazel Green. I started a prospect hole, expecting to find a mineral lode in a few days ; but I found out that success was not so much in hard labor as in good luck ; and being a stranger, if I discovered a lode, the country was then staked off in what was called mineral lots, agreeable to the mining regulations, I would either have to fight my way through fifty claimants or be swindled out of my prospect.

After a few months labor in that way, and finding nothing, I started to view what was then called Sugar Creek Diggings. T. D. Potts had then made what was considered a valuable discovery; but I thought differently, and so it turned out. The first night on our journey we reached Col. W. S. Hamilton's diggings. He had made a valuable discovery ; it is now Wiota —so named by the Colonel himself. We then started for the Blue Mounds and spent the night with Col. E. Brigham ; he had made what was then considered, as it has since proved to be, a valuable discovery. He treated us very kindly and told us " our hats were chalked. We then went to what was called the Cole, Downing & Dudley Diggings, then supposed to be proven for four million pounds of mineral, but they did not turn off more than half that amount. Mineral was then low in price. We then went to John Messersmith's diggings ; his prospect was fine. We got there the best dinner I had met with in the country. At that time, owing to the low price of mineral, and living some distance from market, and having a large family to provide for, Mr. Messersmith was only able to secure a comfortable support for his family. Times have since changed, the old man and his boys persevered, and have been well repaid for their enterprise. We next went on to the Dodgeville diggings, and there found a town, as it was then called, with five or six cabins, and in three of them " rot-gut " whisky and poor tobacco were sold ; since then quite a village has grown into existence there.

We then journeyed to what is called Mineral Point, which there went by the name of Little Shake Rag. After looking round the various diggings, I returned to Scrabble and moved my provisions, tools and furniture, consisting of blankets, spider, frying-pan, etc., into the neighborhood of Little Shake Rag; I found that . neighborhood staked off; and after spending three weeks or a month, and not getting permission to dig where I wished, I pulled up stakes and moved off. My next mining was in the neighborhood of the old Buck lead, near Galena, but meeting with the same luck as formerly, I moved into the vicinity of the Finney patch, which was discovered in the fall of 1828 by men of the name of Clark, who sold to Finney four-fifths and to one Williams the other fifth. Finney afterward swindled the men out of some $250 he was to have paid them in July, 1830. I struck a vein of mineral that yielded 97,000 pounds, and paid one-third for ground rent. This was the custom when you dug on a lot where mineral had been raised and sold. Part of that mineral I sold at f7, and the next spring I sold the last 50,000 at |12 per 1,000. The next fall we struck a vein that turned off 600,000 of mineral that brought $18 per 1,000 ; and in the spring of 1839 I struck another vein, south of the second, that turned out 405,000. The range altogether produced over two millions of mineral. The old Finney patch turned off 2,000,000 more, and good diggings there still.

In May, 1832, I bought a horse and rigging, and rode as a volunteer, serving in Dodge's squadron during the Black Hawk war. During that campaign I saw more of human nature than I had before in several years. We had many difficulties to encounter, of which a majority of the present population can form but a faint conception. But to return to my occupation. I have done what no other man has done in these mines. I have worked on one mineral lot for seventeen years and worked in the ground all that time; blasting occasionally, winter and summer, and never used an air pipe. I have been well paid for my labor ; having toiled late and early—no eight hours have answered me for a day's work. After the sales of the reserved land I moved to my present residence to watch my timber and dig mineral in the winter. Unless some unforeseen occurrence should take place, I expect to end my days in Wisconsin.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Publ. 1881); transcribed by a Friend of Free Genealogy

DAVIS, EDWARD Sr.

EDWARD DAVIS, Sr., blacksmith, Platteville; was born in Flintshire, North Wales, in February, 1826; son of Robert Davis; he learned his trade in Wales, and came to America in 1849 from Manchester, England, where he had been living about eight years, and has been in Platteville ever since he emigrated; he worked four and a half years in the plow-shop of Joel Potter, and since that has been in business for himself. He was married in Manchester, England, to Margaret Roberts, who died in Platteville, leaving four children -- Emma (now Mrs. Samuel Jones, of Platteville), Elizabeth and Adeline at home, and Edward Jr., who was married Dec. 25, 1879, to Miss Inez, daughter of Stephen Dunbar, a merchant of Monticello, Green Co., Wis.; they have one child, Iva Gretta. Edward, Jr., learned his trade with his father and is now in partnership with him, firm of Davis & Son.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

DAWSON, JACOB

JACOB DAWSON, farmer, Sec. 12; P. O. Rockville. Has 400 acres and some mineral land. Born Jan. 1, 1823, in Clark Co., Ky., son of John and Drusilla (Judy) Dawson; came here in 1847, from Rollo Co., Mo., and, in 1852, settled on this section; followed mining some years. Married, May 11, 1852, by Esq. Lord, to Lydia, daughter of John and Lydia (Stephenson) Fuqua. Had eleven children -- John H., born Aug. 23, 1854; married Etta Ashhart, and is in California; has one son, Willie, born Nov. 11, 1850. Sophia C., born Oct. 18, 1855; Lizzie J., Feb. 11, 1857; Abbie, April 1, 1858, (teaching school at Rockville); Martha E., March 16, 1862; Lucy A., Dec. 11, 1866; Mahala, July 2, 1868; Effie U., Sept. 8, 1873. Libbie Ann, born March 10, 1853; died Dec. 9, 1853. Mary, born Jan. 24, 1860; died Oct. 17, 1864. Jacob Grant, born Jan. 12, 1864; died April 16, 1865. Mr. Dawson is not an office-seeker, but has held several offices in the county. Is a Democrat. His father was a soldier in 1812.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Potosi Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

DE TANTABARATZ

M. De Tantabaratz and the Deserted Village.
BY J. W. Seaton

Paris, not the brilliant metropolis of France, the city of prisons and palaces renowned for its gay boulevards and dark Rues, the mistress of fashion and the mother of communism, but its namesake on the Platte, the little waif that perished in its infancy thirty years ago. It was, and still remains, a strange, sequestered spot. Its site was a point where, through pine crowned hills and widening meadow bottoms, the Big Platte joins its main tributary of the same name with the diminutive prefix. Here, their confluent waters reflecting the dark foliage of the native trees which cover its green banks, and casting the shadows of the high, receding Bluffs far up the slope on either side, mingle in silence, and in those days formed a channel sufficiently wide and deep to float the largest craft that ever came up from the Mississippi, the distance of five miles below.

This virgin purity is disturbed and the calm shadows broken by the sharp prow of a heavy boat that makes its way slowly up the placid waters of the united river. The squirrel with noisy chatter makes a scampering retreat to the safe security of a lofty tree, and from its tall tower scans with curious eye this unwonted presence. The birds flutter, astonished and amazed, to a neighboring thicket. This intrusion is unparalleled.

Tou Le Jon contemplates with a smile these retreats of the animal kingdom before his presence, and moves on up the river till he comes to the place of its separation. Casting off a line and making it fast to a large Cottonwood, the boat's crew go ashore, and while they are engaged in preparing their first meal in the wood, Tou Le Jon has surveyed the ground, mapped out the place, and commenced the work of founding a city. A few months pass, a clearing has been made, streets, public squares and grand avenues have been staked off and defined, a log shanty or two has been built and Paris on the Platte has become an historical fact.

From this date, 1828, we mark its rise, progress and decline, comprising a period of barely two decades. Tou Le Jon has money, and, under the quickening influence, Paris soon grows into respectable proportions and notoriety. A smelting furnace, a store, a two-story frame hotel, a public boarding-house, built from hewn logs, with a long porch in front, were among the few noticeable buildings first erected. If some ancient surveyor of the place should chance to read this sketch, and take exceptions to its topography, I beg leave to remind him here that all history is involved more or less in doubt or obscurity, and when it depends upon oral traditions for facts, a few discrepancies and achronisms are unavoidable, however much the writer may aim at accuracy and truth. There are but few living now who have carried the early history and events of the mines so freshly in their memory that they can relate them with any degree of certainty, or without committing some serious mis-statements as to time, place and persons.

Coming down to the year 1830, I find the name of De Tantabaratz, (sometimes called Detan and Detantebar for short) has usurped the place of and overshadowed all others in the history of Paris. He was the Napoleon of his time, whose single name involved the history of all others, and gives form and luster to the age in which he lived. He was a young man from St. Louis, and came as an assistant clerk in the establishment of Tou Le Jon. He had not been long there when he arose to be chief manager, and soon succeeded to the control and ownership of the whole concern. Enterprising, prompt, active, generous to a fault, and possessed of an unlimited credit both in Galena and St. Louis, he apparently prospered, and under his sway Paris flourished and became a lively prospective city. The peculiarities and generosities of the man soon became proverbial throughout the mines, and the influx of trade, pleasure, amusements and business centered around his name. At balls and parties, horse-races and public gatherings Detan was seen to put in an early appearance, and wa? a bright, particular star upon the occasion until (as it sometimes happened) he got a little obscured by too much wine. Then some friendly hand would put him in his little " bunk " and "nature's sweet restorer, balmy sleep," would soon make all things fair and lovely. The ladies smiled in his presence and courted his company, because they saw husband, home and family joys reflected in his countenance, and the men did the same for the more potent reason that he was a whole-souled, jolly, good fellow, from whom they could get the loan of a dollar, a suit of clothes or a mining "stake" on credit. At this time, David G. Bates was well-known throughout the mines as a wealthy, influential citizen of Galena. He was the owner of much valuable property, made advances on lead, operated a furnace, ran a store, and was regarded as one of the solid men of the place. In the usual course of business, Detan became intimately acquainted with him, and as acquaintance often ripens into confidence, the two were soon upon the most confidential business terms. Bates was a money loaner upon occasion, and Detan often had occasion for the use of large sums of money. While everything remained smooth and promising. Bates advanced him freely. But there is a tide in the affairs of men which, if not wholly scanned, leaves them night and day on the shores of poverty. It was likely to be so in the case of our hero Frenchman and Bates, as a careful man began to look after him and his affairs. This led to a coolness between them, an altercation followed, and finally open hostilities. The casus belli is not apparent at this distance of time, and I will not attempt to explain it, but it was given on the part of the Frenchman, and resented by his quondam friend and backer. Bates, being a man of Southern birth and education, could only be governed in the settlement of the dispute between them by the rules governing all Southern gentlemen, laid down in the code of honor. Accordingly, he challenged De Tantabar to mortal combat. The latter readily accepted the challenge, thinking, no doubt, thereby to cancel a debt of honor and an honorable debt at one and the same time. He knew nothing, however, about the use of the chivalrous weapon, the pistol, but had handled the broadsword and was skilled in the art of its use. He had served in the Horse Guards of Napoleon in some of his later campaignshad fought at Wagram, Austerlitz and Waterloo, and cloven the head of many a luckless grenadier. So for that matter was not afraid to fence with Harry Lorraquer, and could thrust with the deadly accuracy of a Spanish guerrilla. Being the challenged party, the choice of weapons was left to him and he chose, as may readily be supposed, his favorite one, limiting the fight to broadswords on horseback at close quarters ; the place of meeting to be on the banks of the Fevre River, somewhere near the site of the present woolen-mills. The affair soon became public, and was bruited over the whole mines. The belligerents were both men of reputed wealth and standing, and one at least a known professional in the Code Duello, therefore it created at once a widespread sensation, and a decided interest was immediately manifest on all sides.

There being no penal or other law in force at this time to prevent these bloody encounters, no place of private meeting was selected and no secrecy enjoined. All was done,openly and above board. Here and there squads of men might be seen openly discussing the cause of the quarrel, the right and wrong of the issue, the knowledge each was supposed to have in the handling of weapons, the chances of either's success in winging or killing his antagonist were talked about as a matter of common sport, and each arranged himself upon the side as he happened to be friend or foe. The nearest and only law official in the mines at this time was Hugh K. Colter, late Probate Judge of Grant County, and he was only a Justice of the Peace, holding a commission from Gov. Lewis Cass, of Michigan, his court (if it had reached that dignity) being held at White Oak Springs. His business was to call a jury to settle mining claims, make collections, hold inquests on mysteriously dead men, and attend to such other matters as Dight afford a liberal compensation for the small amount of legal stock kept on hand. Police and other preservers of the public peace being a figment of a more recent civilization, were then unknown and unneeded. Cabin doors were never locked, and petit larceny was a crime flat could not be committed, as every man was at liberty to walk in and help himself to whatever could be found or his necessities might require. But to return to my legend. There was no law in these days that white men were bound to respect but the law of right and justice and woe betide the man who violated its provisions or undertook to intercept its execution. Consequently the preparations for the meeting to adjust the difficulties in this case were uninterrupted.

From the bottom of an old sea-chest, Detantabar draws forth the jeweled relic of his young valor, which he has religiously kept and guarded all these days, and as he draws the gleaming blade from the sheath, and remembers the blood which he has scrupulously wiped from its shining surface in former times, his black eye kindles, the warm red blood goes bounding through his veins, and once more he is anxious for the fray.

On this memorable occasion, Free Williams (who does not know Free? a living archaeological monument of the mines standing in Ellenboro) espouses the cause of the French; becomes the friend and adviser of Detantabar; and in this connection has given his name to posterity if not to immortality - Sic itur aatra. He immediately puts his principal in training, but after a few passes (in which Free uses an imaginary sword in shape of a walking-stick and becomes flora de combat), Free satisfys himself of Detan's ability to cope with his adversary in the coming struggle and rests upon his laurels.

On a cold, bleak, windy morning in the month of April, in the year 1830, two horsemen might have been seen riding leisurely along toward the village of Galena. The mud was very deep, and, as yet, the plank road leading out to the Four Mile House had not been built ; and, for that matter, the Four Mile House. In the absence of the latter, and the lack of definite information as to the number and distance of "cool springs," the riders would frequently halt by the wayside and refresh themselves from a willow-covered flask that each in addition to the other means of defense, carried in a deep side pocket. The one of medium stature and heavy set, sparkling black eyes, aquiline nose and ruddy complexion, is none other than the hero of the coming fightMonsieur De Tantabaratz, of Paris, Sieur le Platte. He rides his horse like one accustomed to the saddle, sitting erect and adjusting himself gracefully and easily to the movements of his animal as she moves forward at a gentle pace. The other, mounted on a similar colored animal, which he bestrides with the freedom of a moss trooper of the last century, when scouring the borders for the King's red coats, is no other than our friend Free Williams, of Ellenboro. No sword was attached to his thigh, though the strict laws of duelling demand that the second should be armed in like manner to his principal. But Free was never a cavalryman in Napoleon's army ; he had only been a scout in the Black Hawk warand that happened two years laterand he had not yet received his sword. In this dilemma, he did, as every brave and sensible man has done before and since, the next best thing. He armed himself with a couple of huge navy pistols which he had borrowed from an old salt, and which were now gracefully swinging from the horn of his saddle. Behind him were fastened a pair of large saddlebags, containing well, no matter what ; the true Missourian on horseback always carries this truly convenient receptacle of miscellaneous plunder. He can't ride without it. It would despoil the seat of his cogitations and upset the equilibrium of his quadruped. Thus mounted and equipped, the twain enter Galena, and, riding up in front of Billy Bennett's hotel, where a large crowd have already assembled, report themselves ready for business. Both dismount, and, throwing their bridles to the bystanders, enter the nearest saloon and call for Bourbon straight. Having thus in a degree fortified the inner man and lifted their spirits to an elevation above the fear of danger, they remounted their horses and rode off, accompanied by the crowd, to the field of honor, where an equal number of spectators have already collected. Leaving his principal in charge of friends, Free advances to the front. He takes in the situation at a glance, draws from the right hand holster one of his "man-killers," loaded to the guard with buckshot, swings it above his head as he brings his fiery charger to a pose upon his his hind legs, and proclaims from his stentorian lungs that the time has arrived when there must either be a fight or a foot race. Bust, the second of Bates, who is already in waiting, responds to the call and announces the presence of his principal, but protests against the barbarity of using cold steel when the pistol is the only authorized and legitimate weapon used between gentlemen upon such occasions. Free don't see it in that light, and takes a big oath that he will blow them all to H(arper's Ferry) and back again if they do not immediately set up their man and let Detan hack him down like a dog. It is a perilous moment. Bates and his friends, however, are not to be inveigled into so unequal a contest as is now clearly presented before them. They see " death in the pot"and in the cool, quiet reserve of the Frenchman, and the glittering steel that he knows well how to wield, a disgraceful disarmament in the first encounter, ugly gaping wounds and perhaps death and the grave. To one, however brave and undaunted in the presence of danger, these thoughts, when he himself is the subject of them, produce a subduing influence. It was so now. The friends of Bates come to his rescue and solicit a conference. It is granted. The belligerents are brought together, mutual explanations follow ; the offensive language is withdrawn, and the maudlin crowd who had come to witness the fun, disappointed and chagrined at the unexpected and pacific turn of events, like " my Uncle Toby," utter a curse on all cowards in general, and Bates and Detan in particular, then adjourn to Patrick Connor's saloon on the levee, to slake their sorrows in the Lethean draught.

Having thus honorably vindicated himself in this delicate affair, in which he displayed a remarkable degree of coolness and self-possession, Detan, accompanied by his ever-faithful valet, returned triumphantly to his home on the Platte. His fame now grew brighter than ever, and wherever his name was mentioned, it was always with that due reverence that attaches to manly bearing and undisputed courage.

Confidence was again fully restored in his business relations, and, for a number of years, Paris continued to grow and flourish. A catastrophe, however, was fast approaching that was to extinguish its name and fame forever. The year 1837 was one memorable in the history of the county for financial ruin and devastation. All classes were more or less involved, the business of the country, East and West, being transacted upon a credit basis. This being removed by the effects of the famous specie circular, and the removal of the Government deposits from the banks under the administration and bold action of Gen. Jackson, depression, failures and calamities followed in rapid succession. From this time forward, Paris began to show signs of weakness and decay. Potosi, which had first started at La Fayette, on the banks of the Grant River, had shot up like a meteor to the "Head of the Hollow," and in prosperity was was now rivaling and bidding fair to become a bigger city than Dubuque. The Sun of another Austerlitz was now about to set on another Frenchman besides Napoleon, and with a weakness that once manifested itself in the mind of the great Emperor, De Tantabaratz, knowing the desperate condition of his affairs, and seeing no escape from the disgrace of failure and the horrors of consequent poverty, contemplated that act of self-destruction, attributed then as a disease of the French nation, but now thoroughly Americanized and fearfully prevalent in the land, which, in the summer of 1842, he carried into execution in a peculiarly sad and fearful manner. Desmoulie (called Demoole), a silvery-headed old man who had come, too, from the vine-clad hills of France, with his pockets full of Louis d' Org, was regarded as a solvent partner in the firm of De Tantabaratz, and through his means the credit of the firm was long sustained. Among others, a Galena merchant, named Hempstead, having made some heavy advances on lead, came up one day for the purpose of investigating matters, and, if possible, securing himself from the probable contingency of loss. He broached the subject to De Tantabaratz in a manner at once opprobrious and insulting, and finally, in direct language, accused him of falsehood. The delicate feelings of the noble-minded Frenchman were deeply hurttoo deeply for resentment. He merely replied, " Mr. Hempstead, you are the first man that ever accused me of falsehood and you shall be the last." He came to Potosi, purchased a rope and some tallow candles at a store, passed out, and was seen no more alive.

His mysterious disappearance excited the deepest concern ; some alleged that he had absconded with a fabulous sum of money and gone to France ; others, that he had been foully dealt with, while yet others charitably suggested that he had gone to St. Louis on urgent business, got on a spree, and would soon return. Time sped on, and there came no knowledge of his whereabouts.

To the west of the present road leading from Potosi to Galena, not far from Archer's Perry, there is a deep, dark ravine extending up a mile or so in view of the bluffs that front upon the river. It is still, as it was then, a dismal, unfrequented place. God's sunlight never reaches it no cheering ray ever penetrates within its gloomy precincts. Led by that mysterious or unseen power that brings to light the hidden crimes of human life, and often unveils the secret of the murderer's heart, a hunter, bewildered on his. way, found himself within this wild and cheerless place. As he hurries along half-alarmed and wholly bewildered, he sees, or imagines he sees, the body of a man suspended from the elbow of a deformed tree. Fully convinced that it is no phantom of the brain, he recovers his courage and advances nearer to the swinging body. Dissolution already marred the face, yet he could not be mistaken - the form, the well-known garments, so neatly folded and laid aside. It was, indeed, poor "De Tantabar." He had seen no escape from the scorn that follows blasted greatness, and here, amid the stern rocks and silent woods, he had launched his bark into the sea of eternity.

From that time, an evil genius seemed to hover over the city on the Platte. Gradually it was outstripped by its younger and enterprising rivals and fell into decay. To-day its deserted houses stand solitary and forsaken, a roosting-place for " bats and owls," while the fateful shades

"Glimmer as funeral lamps, Amid the chills and damps Of the vast plain where Death encamps."

Source: "History of Grant County Wisconsin", by the Western Historical Company - Sub. by a Friend of Free Genealogy

DEAN, CHARLES K.

CHARLES K. DEAN, farmer, Sec. 36; P. O. Boscobel. Mr. Dean was born in Glastonbury, Hartford Co., Conn., Sept. 29, 1820. November, 1844, he came to the West and made Michigan his first stopping-place. The year following, he came to Walworth Co., Wis., where he bought and improved a farm in this county, and remaining there until 1848, when he returned to the Eastern States. Ill health admonished him to again try the Western air, and he returned to his Walworth County farm in 1851. He soon after engaged with the Milwaukee & Prairie du Chien -- or, as it was then known -- Milwaukee & Mississippi Railroad and first entered Grant County as an employe of this road in the fall of 1853. During 1853 and 1854, Mr. Dean was engaged with others in the preliminary survey, and location of the road between Madison and Prairie du Chien; while engaged here he worked the right of way, descriptions and platting of the same. In 1855, he was made Division Engineer of construction from Muscoda to Woodman bridge, his residence at this time being in the "Hall House" situated on the present site of the city of Boscobel, and for some time himself and Mrs. Dean were the only inhabitants of this site. In company with others, Mr. Dean selected a location for a railroad station, and purchased 240 acres of land covering a portion of the ground now occupied by the city. In 1856, he severed his connection with the company, and removed to his present farm on the southwest quarter of Section 36, where he again engaged in the occupation of farming. This farm, so beautifully situated, encircled by the verdured hills, has been his residence up to the present time. While Boscobel yet formed a part of Marion Town, namely, from April, 1857, to the same month in 1858, Mr. Dean served as Chairman of the Town Board of Supervisors, and since the erection of Boscobel into a separate town, he has served twice as Assessor, and once as Chairman of the Town Board. Mr. Dean was elected to the Legislature of 1858, which had in charge the investigation of the La Crosse Land Grant Corruption, and the revision of the statutes. Of late years, Mr. Dean has resolutely set his face against all tenders of office, preferring to remain one of the sovereigns, rather than seek the brief bubble fame, as a servant of the sovereigns. On the 21st of April, 1861, two companies of troops were organized at Boscobel, both of which Mr. Dean had been instrumental in organizing, and of the first he was almost unanimously chosen First Lieutenant. This company subsequently became Company C, 2d W. V. I. Lieut. Dean served as Adjutant of the regiment at the battle of Bull Run, and continued to serve in this capacity until honorably discharged, May 18, 1863. At Beverly Ford, August 11, 1862, Lieut. Dean was taken prisoner, and together with Pope's officers, was given a taste of rebel prison regime during a month's confinement at the renowned Libby Prison at Richmond. Mr. Dean has been a frequent contributor to different journals on a variety of subjects. Detesting the abominations in high places, which have become so prevalent during this latter portion of the nineteenth century, his trenchant pen has always been among the first to prick these unsavory bubbles as they appear. Although denied the advantages of a liberal education when young, Mr. Dean has always been a close student, which in turn has brought him to a liberty of thought that, however, is the result of well-grounded convictions. Possibly he may be impolite, speaking after a worldly fashion, in this independence which leads him to a free and vigorous expression of his sentiments upon all subjects of popular interest. It is one of Mr. Dean's well-grounded articles of belief, however, that mental independence is the best expression of true manhood. Among other bits from his facile pen, is the following sentiment inscribed originally in a young lady's album: "Golconda gems; gems dug from the earth wheresoever found, are bought and sold for money, but no number of them can give luster to the mind. Ignorance and vice personified, may wear them. The inbred jewels of the mind: Virtue, affection, constancy and sympathy, best exemplified in the life of a true woman, are priceless gems resplendent in a priceless setting."

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

DEITZMAN, JOHN S.

JOHN S. DEITZMAN, Sec. 13; P.O. Washburn; was born May 12, 1844, in Pennsylvania; came with his parents to Wisconsin in 1848; settled in the town of Mifflin; at the age of 21 years he left home and worked out, driving team for $18 per month, then rented a farm and commenced for himself, and continued to rent land for four years, then bought the farm where he now lives, which originally contained 186 acres, but has added to it until he now owns 400 acres; 300 is under cultivation and 100 in timber. Was married to Sarah Ann Miller April 9, 1865, who was born in Sullivan Co., Ind., March 25, 1839; they have eight children, viz, Anderson B., Charles W., Rosa A., Alice M., Elmer F., John A., Perley E., Lula S. Mr. Deizman has been a member of the School Board eight years; has been a dealer in live stock, and is at present raising and feeding stock on his farm.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

DELANEY, P. J.

P. J. DELANEY, saloon and billiard hall, Muscoda; born in Ireland, County Wexford, in 1836; came from the old country in 1853, and located in Janesville, Wis.; came to Grant Co. in 1859, and located in Muscoda. He was in the employ of Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad previous to starting the present business, which he established in 1871. In 1859, he was married to Miss Katherine James, a native of Ireland, by whom he has three children -- two sons and one daughter -- all living at home. The family are all members of the Roman Catholic Church of Muscoda. Mr. Delaney has always been a hard worker, and has built up around him a nice property, and has a flourishing business.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

DeLAP, W. E.

W. E. DeLAP, Postmaster, Boscobel. Is a native of Monroe, Wis.; came to Boscobel about 1860; was employed as clerk in a dry goods store from 1871 to 1879, when he received the appointment as Postmaster. Married in 1875 to Miss Amelia Taylor; the lady being a resident of Platteville, Wis. They have one son.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

DEUEN, SAMUEL

By Samuel Deuen.

I came to Grant county on the 20th of April, 1832, passing my first night on Wisconsin' soil at Sinsinawa Mound, where some two or three cabins had been erected. The next morning I learned that a party of U. S. Surveyors had made rich discoveries of lead ore at Potosi, and started thither at once, having neither track nor path to follow or guide me. I crossed Big Platte River at its confluence with Little Platte, a place known as Paris, composed of a smelting establishment and a small store, owned by a Mr. DeTantabar.

Proceeding on my way, I came to a place where a dozen men or so busily engaged in building a cabin—the first white man's structure ever erected on the site of Potosi, and the property of Messrs. Ham and DeTantabar, the former of whom, I believe resides at Dubuque at the present time. A number of us pitched our tent and went to work. Potosi grew, and its population, mostly miners, rapidly increased. By the first of June there were upward of a hundred persons in the place—the square, I might almost say, of the original number I found there on the 21st of April preceding.

All went on prosperously until one night about 11 o'clock, when a man rode wildly into camp bearing the news of Stillman's defeat by the Indians at Rock River. We were all badly scared, turned tail and fled, some toward Galena, some toward Jamestown, and some toward Platte. Only two men had the courage to stand their ground and risk their scalps. The next day we recovered from our fright, assembled in considerable force, and held a sort of council of war. Some were for building a fort right there in the diggings, others thought it would be rather a good thing to go to Galena. Hearing that a company was organizing at Cassville, three others and myself set out for that town at once. Where British Hollow now stands we found a cabin occupied by Terrence Gail, his wife, and three children, and at Hurricane the shanty of Messrs. Hodges and Shanley stood open to receive us. Then on we went, across the hills and far away fording Grant River and entering Beetown, then comprising only about three cabins, all told and inhabited principally by an elderly gentleman named Arthur. Had the place and its surroundings looked a little more flowery, we should have set it down as the spot where Mr. Tennyson's Arthur went to heal him of his grievous wound :

" The island valley of Avilion,
Where falls not hail, or rain, or any snow,
Nor ever wind blows loudly ;
but it lies Deep-meadowed,
happy, fair with orchard-lawns,
And bowery hollows crowned with summer's sea."

At Cassville we found Capt. Price building a fort and organizing a company of soldiers. Upon telling him what we came for, he desired to know whether we would or could do any fighting. We said "Takeoff your coat and let's have a round." He said he guessed he'd take us anyhow. So we were mustered in at once and forthwith put on duty. Our company were known as Rangers, and were employed in "ranging" the country between Grant River and the Wisconsin, a tract which we traversed a great many times and whereon we killed eight or ten Indians and made twelve or fifteen prisoners.

When the strife was over and the smoke of peace rose from all that region, which was m September, of the same year, we returned to Potosi and resumed our picks and gads and shovels as though we had not been off making history at all, but had only gone a-fishing or had been fooling around for our health, as it were.

Late in the fall of 1832, reports reached us of rich and remarkable mineral discoveries at Dubuque. I was lured thither, of course, but the weather being bitter cold, and houses rather scarce, I made my way back to Potosi with as little delay as possible. In February of the next year, the Government sent soldiers to Dubuque to keep miners from working on the mineral lands there until after the ratification of a certain treaty with the Indians. This was done about that time, and work in the mines went on as usual.

At the time of which I write, farming was hardly thought of in Grant County, though the attention of many was beginning to turn toward the pursuit. Several persons were breaking ground for farms at Boice Prairie, preparing to get their means of sustenance at the surface of the earth instead of delving for it wearily toward the center. Corn and potatoes were about the only crops raised, though it was seriously feared that the latter could never be brought to maturity in a climate like this. The cultivation of wheat and oats came afterward, and proved encouragingly successful. Oats then cost $1 a bushel, corn 75 cents. Pork and flour were shipped to us from below somewhere, the latter cost us $18 per barrel and the former $28. The first steamboat in spring was always eagerly looked for, our provisions usually running rather short before the close of those long and dreary winters. Game, however, was abundant at that time, and fortunately for us we could generally depend in part upon that source for a supply of excellent meat.

Some time in the fall of 1833, I went to Platteville, where I found only about two or three rude structures called houses. Maj. Rountree and family were there, James R. Vineyard and family, and a Mr. Phelps. There may have been others, but if so I am unable to recall them now.

It was in 1834, I think, that Mr. Aaron Boice built the first house ever erected on the present site of Lancaster. (This was built by Nahem Dudley.—Ed.) This stood near the Big Spring, and hard by the spot where now the woolen mill stands.

The first store ever started in Potosi was opened there by Messrs. Wheeler & Price in the fall of 1832. Five years later, in 1837, James R. Vineyard and one or two others engaged in mercantile pursuits at British Hollow. About this time Mr. DeTantabar had a store and smelting works at Paris, a point on Platte River, frequently visited by the largest Mississippi River steamboats. In 1841, Mr. DeTantabar became involved, and failed in business. This so discouraged him that he willfully sought his own salvation by means of a rope. And from that fatal day an evil genius seemed to brood over Paris, exerting a mysterious and uncanny influence which has brought about desolation and decay, and has obliterated almost every trace of what was once a flourishing village.

In 1837, the famous "Long Range " was discovered at Potosi, and flush were the times in those diggings then. There was incessant wrangling in regard to the ownership of this range, making black eyes and broken heads matters of common occurrence. A notorious character known as Jim Crow was then in his prime—the best man, in fact, on the ranch, who could "l am any galoot" in the diggings. Three men were hired to shoot Jim at sight. The assassins went to their victim's stopping-place with the fatal weapon concealed under a cloak. They accomplished their work, were arrested and sent to Prairie du Chien for safe keeping. Some time after they were released on bail and returned to Potosi, where they devoted themselves with great assiduity to drinking, gaming and the kindred vices, proving a greater terror to the community than Jim Crow had ever been. They kept right on in their wicked course until ordered to leave the country by the people of Potosi, Boice Prairie and British Hollow. They departed and after they were out of the way, Mr. Harper, a merchant at Potosi, was arrested, tried, and proved guilty, his own clerk convicting him, of loading the pistol with which Jim Crow had been murdered. He was given two days to settle his affairs and leave the country, which he did, glad to get away so easily. The same day, we sent two other men across the river with orders never to return, and Potosi breathed freely for a time.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Publ. 1881); transcribed by a Friend of Free Genealogy

DEWALL, F. VAN

F. VAN DEWALL, photograph artist ; is a native of England, and was born in the city of London Oct. 28, 1821. He grew up there, and served an apprenticeship of seven years as mechanical engineer. He emigrated to America in 1845, and came West to Wisconsin in the same year, and located in Grant Co. ; entered some land, and began making a farm. In 1861, he established his present business in Lancaster, and, for the past twenty year.", has continued the business here, taking all kinds of portraits, from miniature to life size, and is the oldest artist in this section of the State. In 1852, he was united in marriage to Miss Ann Russell, from Ohio. They have seven children William, Frank, Emma, Mary, George, Carrie and Walter.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

DEWEY, LEWIS E.

LEWIS E. DEWEY, Sec. 8; P. O. Patch Grove; owns 122 ¼ acres of land; born in Jefferson Co., N. Y., in 1833; came to Wisconsin in 1839; settled in Patch Grove; located on present farm in 1861. Married Harriet Dunn, a native of this State; they have six children -- Jane, George, Joseph, Edward, Albert and Laura. Mr. D. has been a member of the Town Board about fifteen years.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Millville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

DEWEY, NELSON

MR. DEWEY has been a conspicuous character in Wisconsin for more than half a century, and unless Moses M. Strong be accepted, is personally familiar with more men, events, facts, and political secrets than any man now living. About these matters, however, he was never very talkative, having been a believer in an early admonition by James Buchanan: "Say little and write nothing for the public eye."

Mr. Dewey is the son of Ebenezer and Lucy (Webster) Dewey and was born in the town of Lebanon, State of Connecticut, on December 19, 1813. The following year his parents removed to Otsego County, in the State of New York, where his youthful days were spent in the town of Butternuts, now Morris. The early education of Mr. Dewey was commenced in the district school of that place. At the age of sixteen he was sent to Hamilton Academy, then under charge of Prof. Zen's Moore, in the town of Hamilton, Chenango Co., N. Y., where he remained three years. Among his classmates was William Pitt Lynda, for many years Member of Congress from Milwaukee, and Prof. J. W. Sterling, of the University of Wisconsin, both now deceased.

After leaving the academy Mr. Dewey taught school in the town of Morris one year, after which he read law, first with his father then with the law firm of Hansen & Davis, and later with Samuel S. Bowne, of Cooperstown. Leaving Bowne's office in May, 1836, for -Wisconsin, he arrived at the lead mines on the 19th of June, and in Cassville, his present home, in Grant County, on the Mississippi River, about a week later. He was admitted to the bar on an examination held by Charles Dunn, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the Territory of Wisconsin, in 1838, and practiced law with J. Allen Barber (deceased) until May, 1848.

At the first election of county officers in Grant County, in 1837, Mr. Dewey was elected Register of Deeds. He moved to Lancaster the same year, where he lived seventeen years. While residing there he held various county offices, and was elected to the Territorial Legislature three times, once being chosen Speaker of the House of Representatives, and Vice-President of the Council.

In May, 1848, Wisconsin having been admitted to the Union, Mr. Dewey was elected by the Democrats to be its first Governor, over John H. Tweedy, by a majority of over 5,000. The various departments being new, the functions strange and numerous, and many of the subordinates unused to public service of any kind, his position was one of many difficulties and required great patience and care. For the first time all State matters were divorced from Federal control; appointments must be made in spite, or at the dictation of local influence; responsibility for errors was transferred from Washington to Madison, and there was the general pressure and chaos attendant upon a new order of things on a large scale. So well, however, did he discharge the duties of his office, that he was re-nominated and re-elected, in 1849 by a larger majority than before for the full term of two years. In January, 1853, at the end of his second gubernatorial term, he retired to private life, but at the first opportunity, during the fall of that year, was called out again, being nominated for the State Senate in the 16th District, and elected over Orsamus Cole, now Chief Justice of the Wisconsin Supreme Court, by a majority of three votes.

In 1855 he removed to Cassville, which has been his home since, except five years, from 1858 to 1863, during which time he lived in Platteville. While living in Lancaster he was chosen chairman of the Town Board one term, and also Chairman of the County Board of Supervisors one term. He was Director of the School Board which built the first school-house in Lancaster. While at Platteville he was twice elected President of the Village Board, and was Director of the School Board that built the brick school-house at that place. He was Chairman of the Town Board of Cassville seven years, and was director of the School Board that erected the new Cassville school building. In 1873 he was appointed State's Prison Commissioner by Gov. Taylor, and for half a century has been a member or nominee of every Territorial and State Convention held in Wisconsin by the Democratic party, besides being many times a delegate to their national conventions for nominating candidates for President, and frequently on the State electoral ticket, either as district elector or elector-at-large.

Everywhere, though quiet and reserved, he was a familiar figure, with his long, double-breasted frock coat of black broadcloth, Byronic collar and intensely black beard and hair. Gov. Dewey was always a man of strong will and modest actions. It is said that the numberless honors with which his party has adorned his life, came always, without solicitation, and in all his positions of trust no one has ever thought of questioning his integrity. In his notions and habits he has been as changeless as in his political principles, and it is said that, until this sketch was prepared, the public had no knowledge of the day or place of his birth.

Note:-Gov. Dewey died at his late home in Cassville, July 21, 1889.

Source: "Portrait and Biographical Album of Green Lake, Marquette and Waushara"; By Acme Publishing Co., Chicago; Publ. 1889; Pgs. 124-126; Transcribed and submitted by Andrea Stawski Pack

DEWEY, NELSON

NELSON DEWEY, Cassville, the first Governor of Wisconsin after it became a state, is a native of Connecticut. He became an early settler of Cassville, Grant county, Wisconsin, and practiced law. On the organization of that county, in 1837, he was chosen register of deeds. He was a representative from Grant county in the second legislative assembly of Wisconsin territory, chosen in 1838; was speaker of the House during the fourth, or extra session of twelve days in August, 1840, and the latter year he was reelected. In 1842 he was elected a member of the council, and during its fourth session of thirty days' duration was its president. On May 8, 1848, he was elected governor of Wisconsin by the democratic party, and was sworn into office June 7, following. He was installed on the first day of January, 1850, retiring on the fifth day of January 1852. He has been one of the board of directors for the state prison. Governor Dewey early gave up the practice of law to enter upon official duties, from which he has now retired.

Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed Publisher (1882) transcribed by Glenda Stevens.

DICKERSON, C. H.

MRS. C. H. DICKERSON, notions, toys, etc., Boscobel; is a native of Somerset Co., Penn.; at the age of 8 years, she came with her parents to Platteville; soon after her marriage, which occurred in 1853, they came to Boscobel. Her husband soon after received the appointment of Postmaster, which position he held about fifteen years; he died Nov. 10, 1876, aged 49 years. After his death, Mrs. D. held this office about four years. They have had seven children -- five sons and two daughters.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

DICKINSON, CHARLES F.

CHARLES F. DICKINSON, Sec. 35; P. O. Patch Grove. Owns 200 acres of land, valued at $30 per acre; born on this farm in 1857. Married Amelia Parker, a native of this county; they have two children -- Justice and Alma. Mr. D. is a son of J. M. Dickinson, who was born in the State of Massachusetts; he came to Wisconsin in 1837, and located in Cassville. He married Amanda Hamilton, a native of Massachusetts, and they had two sons and two daughters.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

DICKINSON, E. P.

E. P. DICKINSON, Sec. 31; P.O. Platteville; was born May 26, 1819, in the town of Johnson, Trumbull Co., Ohio; in early life, he followed the trade of carpenter and joiner; in 1845, he came to Wisconsin, locating on a farm in Harrison. Three years later, he settled in Lima, where he has owned several different farms; has resided on his present farm of 80 acres since 1853; also owns about 100 acres in Ellenboro; was Treasurer of the town of Lima eighteen years, and served twice as Assessor and four or five years as Chairman of the Board of Supervisors; until 1868, he worked more or less at his trade. He married, in Trumbull Co., Ohio, Fanny S. Whitcher, who was born in Lisbon, Grafton Co., N.H.; when she was 10 years of age, her people settled in Michigan, and later moved to Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Dickinson have nine children--Elizabeth, John, Loraine, Samuel, Phebe J., William, Everett, Ina and Charles; four of these, Loraine, Elizabeth, Samuel and Everett, are in the San Juan Valley, Cal.; William is in Arizona, John in Nebraska and the others in Lima.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

DICKINSON, ED.

ED. DICKINSON, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Patch Grove; was born in Patch Grove, Grant Co., Wis., Aug. 7, 1843; his parents were natives of Massachusetts, who came to Wisconsin in 1838, and settled at Cassville and went into business; he died June 22, 1877; his mother died Dec. 4, 1870, leaving a family of four children -- Sarah, now Mrs. Thomas; Charles, on the homestead. Edward owns 100 acres of land finely improved; has made what he has by his own industry. His wife, Martha Bryan, a native of Patch Grove, Grant Co., Wis., a daughter of William and Cynthia Bryan, who came in 1835, and settled at Patch Grove, Wis.; she was born May 11, 1846. They married Nov. 9, 1870; they have had two children -- Harley, born Aug. 14, 1872; John born, May 27, 1878. In politics, Republican; in religion, liberal believer. Has held the office of Constable several times.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

DICKINSON, ENSIGN P.

ENSIGN P. DICKINSON (Rep.), of Platteville, was born in Johnston; Trumbull county, Ohio, May 26, 1819; received a common school education; is a carpenter and joiner, and is also engaged in farming; came to Wisconsin in 1844, locating near Platteville, where he continues to reside; was town treasurer for eighteen years; assessor two years; chairman of town board in 1874, '75, '76, '78 and '82; was elected member of assembly for 1883, receiving 1,116 votes, against 962 votes for George S. Whitcher, democrat.

Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1883) page 491; transcribed by Tammy Clark

DICKSON, JOSEPH

By Col. Joseph Dickson, in 1855.

My parents were natives of Pennsylvania, and emigrated to and settled in St. Clair County, Ill., in the year 1802, where I was born January 28, 1805. That county was then a frontier region and but sparsely inhabited, except a small district of country on the American Bottom, settled mostly by French people.

In the year 1818, my father and family moved to within nine miles of where Springfield, the present capital of the State, was afterward located, where I assisted my father in building the first white man's log cabin in Sangamon County, where I remained until the spring of 1827, when I emigrated with many other young adventurers to what was then called the Fever River Lead Mines, making the journey from Keokuk, on the Lower Mississippi Rapids, on foot through an entirely uninhabited wilderness, packing my provisions and blankets, in the month of March.

I spent the first summer in mining until the 15th of August, when I commenced improving a farm one and a half miles south of where Platteville is now situated. The next spring I plowed up twenty acres of prairie land, and planted and raised a crop of corn that season, which I think was the first field of corn raised in what is now Grant County. I continued to carry on farming until the spring of 1832, when I exchanged it for mining.

The Black Hawk war commenced in the month of May, when, on the first intelligence of hostilities by the Indians, I joined a mounted company of volunteers raised at Platteville. At the organization, I was selected Orderly Sergeant in John A. Rountree's company, and in that capacity I served one month, when, in consequence of the absence of the Captain, I was chosen to command the company, and thus served about one month. Then, by the order of Col. Dodge, I took command of a spy company, and continued in that capacity in front of the army during the chases to Rock River, Fort Winnebago and to the Wisconsin Heights ; and, at the latter place I, with my spy company, commenced the attack on a band of Indians who were kept in the rear of the retreating Indian army, and chased them to the main body of Indians, when we were fired at several times but without injury, and I returned to the advancing army without loss or injury to my command.

After the battle of the Wisconsin Heights, and the army was supplied with provisions, we again pursued the Indian trail, and I took the lead with my company and followed to the Bad Ax River, by command of Gen. Atkinson. At the Bad Ax I discovered the evening before the battle, the trail of Black Hawk with a party of about forty Indians, who had left the main trail and gone up the river, which fact I reported to the Commanding General. On the next morning, my company encountered and engaged a company of Indians at a place near to where I had the evening before discovered the trail of Black Hawk and his party. " During the battle at ensued, my command killed fourteen Indians, and, after a short time, say an hour's engagement, Gen. Dodge with his force, and Gen. Atkinson with his regular army, arrived at the place where I had engaged this party, consisting of about forty Indians ; and, about the time of their arrival, we had killed and dispersed the whole party. The main body of the enemy had gone down the river, after they had entered on the River bottom. I pursued with my .command, passing Gen. Henry's brigade formed on the Mississippi bottom ; I crossed the slough and engaged a squad of Indians, who were making preparations to cross the river, after which we were fired upon, and returned the fire of several bands or squads of Indians, before the army arrived. I and several of my men were wounded before the other troops came up.

After the battle was over, I was taken with others on board of a steamer, which came along soon after, to Prairie du Chien, where I was properly cared for and my wounds received suitable attention. Since which I have spent a short period in Illinois, and the balance of the time to the present I have devoted myself to agricultural pursuits on my farm, four miles southwest of Platteville.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Publ. 1881); transcribed by a Friend of Free Genealogy

DIFFENBACHER, W. H.

W. H. DIFFENBACHER, dentist, Platteville; is a native of Crawford Co., Penn., born in 1836; studied dentistry with his uncle, David Diffenbacher, in his native county, from 1855 till 1858, then came to Platteville and has practiced there since. He was married in 1861, in Platteville, to Miss Ella Coates, and has had seven children, only two of whom -- Genevieve and Lillian -- are now living; they lost five sons -- Harry, aged 8 years; Freddie, 8 months; Leonard, 9 months; Willie, 9 years, and Eddie, 14, the last two in September, 1879, of diphtheria, Eddie on the 23d and Willie on the 24th, and they were both buried on the 25th, which was the nineteenth anniversary of their marriage. His father, Frederick Diffenbacher, was in the mercantile business in Meadville, Penn., and W. H. clerked in his store from the time he was 8 years of age till he commenced studying dentistry. Mr. Diffenbacher, Sr. removed to Peru, Ill., in 1861; went from there to Boone Co., Iowa, and died there in 1868.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

DIXON, JACOB

JACOB DIXON, blacksmith, opened his present shop in May, 1880. He came to Lancaster in November, 1873, and worked for D. H. Budd one year and a half, when Dixon & Co. bought out the business of wagon and carriage making and general blacksmithing. The firm names were Dixon, Hurley & Stewart ; they did a prosperous business for two years, when, by mutual consent, the firm was dissolved, and business closed. Mr. Dixon then worked for John Pollock, and remained with him until he established his present business; he is also agent for farming machinery. A native of Fulton Co., N. Y; born Sept. 25, 1827 ; son of Baltes Dixon. He spent the early years of his life on the farm, and at the age of 17 commenced to learn his trade. In 1848, he was married to Hannah Ellsworth of same county; she died March 23, 1862. In 1863, he was married to Miss Mary Jane Barney; they have two sons and two daughters Walter R., Anna Lucretia, Jacob Jr., and Goldie, an infant daughter.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

DODGE, DAVID

DAVID DODGE, lumberman, Lancaster; born in Erie Co., N. Y., May 29, 1848; son of Daniel and Mary (Harwood) Dodge. Married April 25, 1872, by Noble Johnson, of Delaware Co., Iowa, to Jennie, daughter of C. V. Steers; she was born March 7, 1853; have two children -- Willis C., born July 15, 1873; Frank L., Oct. 5, 1877. Mr. D. enlisted in Co. B, 1st U. S. A., and served one year. Is a Republican and a First-Day Adventist. Was four years lumbering in Iowa, and is now erecting his mill on Sec. 2, in Waterloo; has 30 horse-power and a 56-inch saw; cuts 5,000 feet in twelve hours, with five men.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Waterloo Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

DODGE, FRANKLIN A.

DODGE Franklin A, Le Sueur. Physician (R). Born Oct 11, 1862 in Beetown Wis, son of John and Catherine E (Perrin) Dodge. Married Dec 31, 1890 to Alma M Poehler. Educated in public schools Bloomington Wis; Univ N Y City Medical College 1886. Has been engaged in the practice of his profession in Le Sueur to date. Pres Farmers State Bank; member American Medical Assn; Minnesota State, Minn Valley and Nicollet and Le Sueur County Medical societies.

Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

DOLL, JOSEPH

JOSEPH DOLL, farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. Burton; 352 acres; born April 1, 1820, at York, Penn.; son of Joseph and Susan (Hoar) Doll; came to Grant Co. in 1854, and soon after to Waterloo (now Burton), where he worked at his trade (cooper) three years. Married Oct. 22, 1843, in Knox Co., Ohio, by Rev. William Maynard, to Mary Ann, daughter of Nathan and Penelope (Worman) Head, who was born Aug. 20, 1820. Had eleven children -- Jones A., born Jan. 27, 1846, married Jennie Hallaway, now in Kansas; Mary Jane, born Dec. 26, 1848, wife of Frank P. Mink, has four children living; Oliver, born Sept. 24, 1849, married Theresa Oakleaf, has five children; Sarah Alice, born Dec. 14, 1851, wife of George Potts; Amanda E., born Sept. 5, 1853, wife of John H. Hunt, of Burlingame, Kan., had four children, one living -- Myrtie; Henry T., born Nov. 16, 1857, married Minnie Elwell; William B., born Aug. 9, 1859; Charles E., born Jan. 4, 1863; and an adopted daughter, Lou, born Jan. 23, 1865, been with them five years; Margaret Ann, born July 29, 1844, and died March 11, 1853; Thomas R., born Nov. 6, 1855, died Jan. 11, 1858; John W., born Jan. 27, 1868, died May 11, 1868. Mr. Doll is a "Congregational" Democrat, and has held office several years in his town. In 1880, the steamer Penguin, Henry Specht, proprietor; John Specht, Captain; Henry Specht, Engineer, ran up the Grant River fifteen miles, and took wood and supplies, corn, etc., from Mr. Doll's barnyard. He states that in 1857, the snow covered the stocks of corn, and was seven feet deep on the level, also that hay sold in Dubuque at $120 per ton, and that his brother chased a deer from the yard, and caught and killed it after a short race, the deer being unable to run in the snow. Mrs. Doll's parents left Maryland when she was 3 years old, and settled in Hampshire Co., Va.; she left there at 15 years of age, and went to Ohio, where she remained until her marriage. The maternal grandfather and grandmother of Mrs. Doll were of English and German descent. Her mother died about four years ago, aged 82 years; the father is living in Mt. Vernon, Ohio, aged 80 years, Jan. 29, 1881. The mother of Mr. Doll was 83 years of age when she died, fourteen years ago.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Waterloo Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

DONOHOO, J. V.

J. V. DONOHOO, retired farmer, St. Rose; born in Maryland in 1809; came to Wisconsin in 1846, and settled in Hazel Green; removed to this town in 1849. Mr. Donohoo has been twice married; his second marriage was to Mary Ann O'Neill, a native of Ireland; he has three children -- Patrick M., Sarah E. and C. T. Are members of the Roman Catholic Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Smelser Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

DORTLAND, HENRY

HENRY DORTLAND & SON, dealers in lumber, sash, doors, blinds and building paper, Glen Haven. Henry Dortland was born in Prussia in 1828; came to America in 1847 and located in Kenosha; came to Glen Haven in 1873. Married Mary Pluecker, a native of Prussia; they have five children -- Henry, Frank, William, Mary and Amelia; Frank, his son, was born in Kenosha.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Glen Haven Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

DOYLE, ARTHUR

ARTHUR DOYLE, Sec. 26; P. O. Cuba City; owns 236 acres of land; born in Ireland in 1841; in 1853, he came to America and settled in Hazel Green; located on his present farm in 1866. He married Catherine Walsh, a native of Illinois; they have five children -- Andrew, Nicholas, Mary Ann, Patrick and Charles. Are member of Roman Catholic Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Smelser Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

DREIS, JOSEPH A.

JOSEPH A. DREIS (Reverend Father); P. O. Potosi. Was born in Milwaukee Dec. 7, 1849, son of Philip and Catharine (Pfeil) Dreis, formerly of Nassau and Baden, Prussia. His parents now reside in Milwaukee; has three brothers -- Henry, Antony and Philip; also, three sisters. Henry is now at St. Francis' Seminary. There he, also, fitted himself for the Church; orders conferred Dec. 17, 1872, by Archbishop Henni. At present, in charge of St. Thomas' Church of Potosi, and St. Andrew's at St. Andrew's (formerly known as "Dutch Hollow"), where he resides, both churches embracing 1,000 to 1,100 members. St. Andrew's Church was organized in 1846, with seven families as members, and Father Tusck in charge. The corner-stone of a new church building was laid Oct. 13, 1875, and is now completed and out of debt, and is one of the finest inland churches in the State; cash subscriptions of $20,000 were made and voluntary labor to the amount of $10,000 more finished the church and school-house; and the Sisters of St. Francis occupy a substantial residence, being a part of the church property. Father Nicholas Thile, Superintendent. Construction dimensions of building, as follows: Size, 46x110; height of wall, 30 feet; height of tower, 130 feet; foundation, 9 feet high and 3 feet thick; chapel, in the basement; 3 bells, weighing 400, 700, 1,200 pounds.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Potosi Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

DRIESBACH, “HERR”

The Galena (Ill.) Courier publishes a letter from a correspondent in Potosi, Wisconsin, who says:--”Tired of this itinerant-Benedic life, about three years ago, the Herr took to himself one of the most intelligent and amiable of the Buckeye daughters, and removed to this place, where he had purchased himself a beautiful farm, and where he has retired to cultivate the earth and make for himself a pleasant home.”

Since then the Lion Tamer has visited Dubuque; and the editor of the Express of that city, gives the following interesting recognition:

“Last evening we, with two companions, walked up the street with a very worthy farmer from within one mile of Potosi, Wisconsin, who talked about his pigs, geese, and ducks, and with what success he tilled him. As an instance of his successful till he stated that he sold the product of fifty feet square of his farm, of which he kept an account, for forty-three dollars. Hence it may be seen that this farmer, Herr Driesbach, has some skill as well as pride in his farming. Our chief object in taking this walk was that the Herr desired us to witness a meeting between himself and old pets of the menagerie, which he had not seen for more than a year, and which, of course, we were most anxious to witness, to see whether time, travel and change had obliterated from their recollection their old master. On entering the canvass which was before the audience began to collect, Herr Driesback desired us to stand before the cage of the Bengal tiger, he remaining at the door the while. This tiger, from some old score, had just as old a grudge against him, and days of yore managed to give a marked demonstration of the fact. This cage was selected for the first test of recognition. While we were stationed immediately in front, Herr came sauntering along, carelessly habited in a farmer’s costume, and as he neared the cage the tiger’s eyes began to glisten with great brilliancy as they bore directly upon him, and at the same time a low guttural growl began to rise in his throat, which burst out in a ferocious howl as he leaped at the bars to get at him when he passed by. This experiment was tried several times with the same result, and when at length Herr spoke to him, his rage knew no bounds, leaping at the bars, he dashed his paws out to tear him, and only ceased when his old master walked out of his sight.

“The next place we were desired to remove to, was the large cage containing a large lion, two leopards and a lioness. We mentioned them as it is the order they stand in the cage, it being divided into apartments. As Herr approached this cage the lioness caught sight of him, and her eyes beamed with pleasure, while her tail wagged a glad recognition. On his coming up to her she appeared frantic with joy, and when he spoke to her and presented his face to the cage, she kissed him, and placed her paw in his hand with all the air of intense affection.

“Indeed, while he was in her presence, she did not know how to control herself, but would lick his hands while he attempted to pat her, roll over, reach out her paws to him and press her nose between the bars as though she would like to have had a closer presence. While Herr was talking to the lioness, the old lion in the other end of the cage began to get jealous and grumbled, for he too had recognized his old friend. Herr said to him, “Billy getting jealous?” and then walked up to him, when the creature crowded against the bars to get closer to him if it were possible, and kissed his face and licked his hands, with as great demonstrations of delight as the other. The leopards too, in the same cage, knew their old master, and watched him as they lay with their nose, close to the bars with evidence pleasure, and seemed highly pleased as he spoke to them.--In all our days we do not recollect any exhibition that gave us so much satisfaction as did this meeting of old friends, and while we watched them in their congratulations, we could not make up our mind which was the most delighted, Driesbach to know that he was not forgotten by these affectionate creatures, or that they were once more in his presence. While we were watching Herr and his old companions the crowd began to gather in, and our companions and self departed highly gratified at the result.”

Source: American Volunteer, 1 Oct 1857; transcribed by MCK


Herr Driesbach, the “lion tamer,” has settled down quietly upon a farm near Potosi, Wisconsin. Instead of the caresses of lions and tigers, he has had the good sense to take to his arms a blooming Buckeye girl, and quietly smoke his meerschaum in the door of his cabin. So says the Potosi Republican, whose editor recently paid him a visit.

Source: The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW), 20 Oct 1855; transcribed by MCK
DRINKWATER, GEORGE

GEORGE DRINKWATER, Sec. 15; P. O. Martinville; was born in England in 1840; left there with his parents when he was 10 years old, and came to America, where they settled in the town of Clifton, Wis., rented a farm from N. Millard for two years, when his father bought a farm for himself and George; in 1869, bought the place where he now lives, containing 112 acres, and was married to Mary E. Rieser, who was born in Ohio Feb. 13, 1847; have four children living -- William A., George W., James L. and Frank; one deceased, Annie.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

DUNCALF, THOMAS

THOMAS DUNCALF, farmer. Sec. 17 ; P.O. Lancaster. Owns 140 acres of land, valued at $20 per acre. Born in London, England, in 1831. Came to America in 1866 ; located on present farm in 1874. Married Ann Jackson, a native of Cheshire, England, and they have six children Thomas, Samuel, Mary, Walter, Halford and Susan.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

DURLEY, W. P.

W. P. DURLEY, Register of Deeds of Grant Co.; is a native of the State of Indiana; was born Oct. 12, 1830. When he was only 4 years of age his parents came West to this Territory and settled in this county, about six miles southwest of Platteville, on the "'Little Platte ;" they were among the earliest settlers in this section of the State ; they lived near an Indian sugar camp and Indian burying-ground the Indians used to camp near there. Mr. Durley was raised on a farm, and in Platteville, and, after reaching manhood, engaged in mining. When the war broke out he enlisted, in 1861, in Co. C, 7th W. V. I. He was severely wounded in the battle of South Mountain, Sept. 14, 1862 ; was also wounded ac the battle of Gainesville, Va., Aug. 29, 1862, and was discharged March 19, 1863, on account of wounds received in action. Was elected Register of deeds for Grant Co., in 1876, and was re-elected in 1878, and again re-elected in 1880. was united in marriage July 4, 1865, to Miss Harriet A. Hoadley, a native of Grant Co. They have four children George H., Robert H., Jennie M., Linda May.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

DYER, WILLIAM J.

WILLIAM J. DYER, farmer. Sec. 10; P.O. Lancaster; owns 80 acres of land, valued at $25 per acre. He was born in this county in 1846. In 1869, he settled on this farm. He married Sarah E. Borah, also a native of this county. They have three children William, Ruby and Laura. Mr. Dyer enlisted in Co. K, 47th W. V. I., in 1865, and was discharged in the same year.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

DYSON, GEORGE

GEORGE DYSON, retired, Platteville; was born in 1826, in Meltham, Yorkshire, England; earned his trade of stone-mason in his native place. He came to America in 1848, residing in the New England States until 1850; that year he came to Platteville, and for eight years worked at his trade; he then began farming, and continued it until 1871, then spent a year in the village of Platteville; he then spent three years on a farm of 240 acres which he now owns, in Lima; since 1874, he has resided in the city, where he owns two houses and lots. He married Miss Sarah Brown, a native of Lockwood, England; their only child, a son -- Nathaniel -- born in Meltham, Yorkshire, is now in Washington Territory. Mr. Dyson has served on the Village, Town and County Boards; is a member, with his wife, of the P. M. Church of Platteville.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

EARL, HARMON H

HARMON H. EARL, of Fennimore, is one of the few remaining pioneers of the northern part of Grant county. He was born in Windham, Portage Co., Ohio, March 8, 1816, son of Robert and Lydia (Hubbell) Earl. His father was a native of New Jersey, and the Earl family was formerly from England, whence three brothers came in Colonial times, one of them settling in New Jersey, a second one in Virginia, and the other in New England. They have numerous descendants throughout the Union, and from them Harmon H. Earl is descended.

Robert Earl was one of five brothers, Jacob, Joseph, Robert, James and Walter. The eldest of the family was Betsy, who married John Caldwell, and died in Ohio. Nancy married Thomas Lee, and died in Iowa. Robert Earl married in Huntington, Penn., Lydia Hubbell, and located in Trumbull county, Ohio. In 1816 they settled in Windham, Ohio. Here they passed the balance of their lives. Mrs. Earl died in the fall of 1849, and Robert married again, his second wite being named Bissell. He died in 1857. The record of Robert Earl is that of a man of upright character, and he was a faithful member of and a deacon in the Congregational Church. He was a farmer by occupation. Harmon H. Earl was the fourth in a family of nine children, four sons and five daughters. One of the sons, Adna, died in childhood, and the others all reached mature years. Harmon H. and one sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Cabaness, of Bloomington, Ill., are the only children of their parents now (1900) living. Eber, the eldest son. died in Kentucky. Susan and Jane were twins; Susan married Harvey Millard in Ohio. and died at her home near Spencer, Iowa; Jane married Frederick Palmer, and died in Missouri. Lydia married Daniel Richardson, and after his death married Rev. Mr. Wilson, a Congregational minister; she died in Kansas City, Mo. Sarah married Daniel Howard, and died in Illinois. Aner, the fourth son, married Sarah Knott: he died in Litchfield, Minn., some years ago.

Harmon H. Earl lived in his native place until he was twenty-two years of age, when he married Roxie Wheeler, who was born in the town of Solon, Cortland Co., N.Y., June 25, 1816, and was a daughter of Jesse and Nancy (Tucker) Wheeler, natives of Connecticut. Her father died when she was in her eighth year, and later her mother, with four children, moved into Cattaraugus county, N.Y., where one of the daughters, Clara, died. Soon afterward the mother and remaining children removed to Ashtabula county, Ohio, where she married Hiram Hough. In 1838 the family went to southern Illinois, and lived there seven years. In 1846 they came to Grant county, and settled on land in the town of Fennimore. Mr. and Mrs. Hough died at the home of a son, Mrs. Hough surviving her husband several years. Roxie, Mrs. Earl, was the eldest of her mother's children. Laura, the next in the family, married in Ohio A. L. McElwain, and died at Council Bluffs, Iowa. Their brother, Josiah Wheeler, died in Monona. Iowa. There were five children born to Mr. and Mrs. Hough, three of whom are living: Hiram and Aretus G. live at Oakland. Iowa; Sylvia is the wife of D. R. Walker, of Boscobel. William and Harlow, the eldest and youngest, respectively, are deceased.

Mr. and Mrs. Harmon H. Earl were married Feb. 25, 1838, and the following autumn moved to southern Illinois, where they remained seven years, and then went to Jo Daviess county, in the same State. Three years later they went back to the old home farm of Mr. Earl, in Ohio, and in 1850 came to Grant county. Mr. Earl's father was a soldier in the war of 1812, and our subject entered a land warrant received by him, that called for 160 acres. Later he bought an adjoining forty acres, making a fine farm of 200 acres. For twenty years they lived on this farm, and then made their home in Fennimore, selling the place a few years later. Since 1868 they have lived retired. They have had nine children, but only Olive and William are living. Olive married H. B. Lewis, of Fennimore. William, also a resident of Fennimore, is a carpenter and builder. He married Nellie Wilkinson, and they have four children, George, Bennie, Olive and Harold. The deceased children of Mr. and Mrs. Earl were: Lydia, who married C. W. Loney, died in February, 1876. George died at the age of twenty-three. Nancy married William Loney, and died a few years ago. Arthur died at the age of fifteen. Olive E. died in infancy. Sarah died in 1848, at the age of three years. Robert E. died in infancy. Mrs. Earl had a son by a previous marriage, Samuel Armstrong, a resident of Fennimore. In 1900 Mr. and Mrs. Earl had fourteen grandchildren, and eighteen great-grandchildren. Mr. and Mrs. Earl have been residents of Grant county for half a century, and their married life covers a period of sixty-three years. They still enjoy good health, and are passing their declining days in placid comfort. He was originally a Whig, and later a Republican, but has voted with the Prohibitionists for a number of years. He has held at different times many offices of trust and honor; was postmaster at Fennimore for fifteen years, Justice of the Peace nine years. and assessor of Fennimore for two years, 1851 and 1852. He and his wife have been members of the Methodist Church for more than sixty years, and he was a licensed local preacher for more than thirty years.

Source: Commemorative Biographical Record of the Counties of Rock, Green, Grant, Iowa, and Lafayette, Wisconsin, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, and of Many of the Early Settled Families; J. H. Beers & Co., Chicago (1901). Transcribed by MCK.

EASTMAN, GEORGE W.

DR. GEORGE W. EASTMAN, Platteville; the son of Hon. Samuel Eastman and Jane Eastman, was born in Strong, Franklin Co., Me., March 29, 1824; as a lad he received a good common-school education, afterward attending an academy, and, at the proper time, entered Dartmouth College, from which he graduated, in the medical class, in 1844. In the spring of 1850, the young doctor turned his face toward the setting sun and located at Platteville, which place has since been his home. In the year 1852, he was united in marriage to Miss Anna S. Monroe, of Boston; they have three children -- Jessie, Mary G. and Julia. During the war of the rebellion, Dr. Eastman was commissioned Surgeon of the 16th W. V. I., in which capacity he served one year, when he was appointed Medical Inspector of the Seventeenth Army Corps; this office he held for the two years succeeding, making a total of three years' service, when he returned and once more resumed the practice of his profession at his old home.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

EASTMAN, GEORGE W.

EASTMAN, GEORGE W., M.D., who passed away at his residence in Platteville, Grant county, Oct. 24, 1900, had been for sixteen years engaged in the banking business at Platteville. He was born in Strong, Franklin Co., Maine, March 29, 1824, and was a son of Hon. Samuel and Jane Eastman. The Eastman family came from a long line of New England ancestry which settled in Maine at an early date. Many of its members occupied honorable places in civic and business life. Hon. Samuel Eastman, the father of the subject of this sketch, served many years as a member of the Executive Council of the State of Maine. The eldest son, Hon. Ben. C. Eastman, came to Wisconsin in 1840, settling at Platteville, where he soon attained eminence as a lawyer; he served as secretary of the Territorial Council from 1843 to 1846, and was elected to Congress in 1850, serving two terms; he died as his home in Platteville in 1855. Another son, Col. H. E. Eastman, served through the Civil war as colonel of the 2d Regiment Wisconsin Cavalry, dying a few years ago at Benton Harbor, Mich., where he owned the celebrated Eastman Springs.

Dr. Eastman’s elementary education was obtained in the common schools, and supplemented by an academical course, and after due preparation he entered Dartmouth College, from which institution he graduted with the medical class of 1844. In the spring of 1850 the Doctor came to Wisconsin, and located in Platteville, where he was actively and successfully engaged in the practice of his profession until the outbreak of the Civil war, at which time he was commissioned surgeon of the 16th Wis. V. I. After serving in that capacity one year he was appointed medical inspector on the staff of Gen. J. B. McPherson; this office he held for the two succeeding years, when he returned to Platteville and resumed his extensive private practice.

In 1852 Dr. Eastman married Miss Anna S. Munroe, daughter of Edmund S. Munroe, a leading business man of Boston, Mass., and this and this union was blessed with three daughters and one son: Jessie, Mary E. (deceased), Julia, and George Edmund (who died in infancy), all natives of Platteville.

From 1850 until 1882, excepting the three years he was at the front during the war, the Doctor was in continuous practice in Platteville. From 1881 to 1884 he resided in Milwaukee. In 1884 he organized a private bank which later became the First National Bank, of which he was at once elected president, serving in that incumbency until his death. This bank has from the beginning done a profitable and extended business, and is still expanding, being recognized as one of the strongest and best managed monetary institutions in the county. At a regular meeting of the board of directors, held Oct. 30, 1900, the following testimonial of respect was read, and on motion duly seconded, and was by unanimous vote ordered to be spread upon the records, given to press for publication, and a copy of the same presented to the family of the deceased:

In the death of Dr. George W. Eastman, one of the charter stockholders of this bank and its president from its organization until the day of his death, we recognize the loss of a personal friend and valued counselor, one who was true to every interest of this bank, a man of unquestioned honor, integrity and fidelity, whose presence will be sadly missed in this board of directors. In his memory we offer this testimonial of our friendship for him, of our recognition of his sterling worth as a man, and our sense of personal bereavement in his death.

Dr. Eastman ever stood at the “head and front" of progressive movements in Platteviile, and invariably exercised his influence and liberally applied his means to the promotion of its welfare. He was a gentleman of expanding views, as well as of profound learning, filled with generous impulses, and stood before his fellow-men as the embodiment of the highest type of manhood. In his death Platteville lost one of her most honored citizens, the medical profession a wise counselor, and the family a kind husband and indulgent father. Dr. Eastman was a great lover of animals, was decidedly poetical and musical, and possessed great humor and sentiment. He was very fond of his home and family, and the center of attraction therein. After his death his executors found many medical accounts for services rendered to his neighbors and friends, which he had marked “balanced,” evidently at a recent date. thus showing his kindness of heart by contributing his services without charge to those whom he thought might need their money for other uses.

Source: Commemorative Biographical Record of the Counties of Rock, Green, Grant, Iowa, and Lafayette, Wisconsin, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, and of Many of the Early Settled Families; J. H. Beers & Co., Chicago (1901). Transcribed by MCK.

EASTMAN, J. F.

J. F. EASTMAN, harness-maker, Hazel Green; established in 1856; born in Canada in 1825; came to Wisconsin in 1846, and located in this town. Married Mary Ann Beeman, a native of Canada; have three children -- E. W., Hannah Mellissa and Leroy D. Mr. Eastman is the son of Levi S. Eastman, who was born in Vermont in 1800; in 1802, he went with parents to Ottawa, Canada, where he lived until 1845, when he removed to Hazel Green, Grant Co. He married in 1823, to Margaret Buchanan, a native of Ireland; they had twelve children -- six sons and six daughters.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

EASTMAN, N.

N. EASTMAN, farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. Georgetown; owns 240 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre; born in Canada in 1838; came to Wisconsin in 1847, and settled in this town. Married Margaret Cooper, a native of Missouri; they have six children -- Grant, Orville, Lillie, Elva, Maudie and Claud. Mr. Eastman has been a member of the Town Board one term. Are members of the M. E. Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Smelser Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

EATON, S. W.

REV. S. W. EATON Pastor of Congregational Church; is a native of Framingham, Middlesex Co., Mass., and was born Dec. 25, 1820; he grew up to manhood in that State. After receiving his preparatory education , he entered Yale College and graduated in Class of 1842 ; pursued his theological studies in Yale Theological Seminary and in Union Theological Seminary, New York City, and was ordained Jan. 28, 1848. He came West to Wisconsin in 1846 (while it was yet a Territory in October, 1846), and accepted a call to become Pastor of the Congregational Church of Lancaster, Jan. 1, 1847, and since then, for a period of over one-third of a century, he has served as the faithful, acceptable Pastor of this church. In 1856, he took a vacation on account of ill health and went abroad, spending a part of the year in Europe. In 1862, he was Chaplain of the 7th W. V. I., and remained in the service three years until the close of the"war, and was at Appomattox Court House at the final surrender. During his absence, the church had no settled Pastor ; in fact. Dr. Eaton was the first Pastor of the church and its only one, and this church was his first charge and his only one ; and there are very few churches in this country where the relations between Pastor and people have been so pleasant and undisturbed for so great a length of time. On the 20th of May, 1847, Dr. Eaton was united in marriage to Miss Catharine E. Demorest, a native of the city of New York. They have four sons James Demorest, Pastor Congregational Church, Bound Book, N. J.; Edward Dwight, Pastor Congregational Church, Oak Park, III; Samuel Lewis, physician ; Charles Woodhull, physician, Des Moines, Iowa.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

EDWARDS, JAMES

JAMES EDWARDS, dealer in hardware, stoves and tinware, Hazel Green; established business in 1873; born in this town in 1847; is the son of Thomas Edwards, a native of England. In 1871, he married Mary A. Metter, a native of Devonshire, England; they have five children -- Addie L., Elizabeth Ann, George M., John I., Thomas Porson.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ELLIS, WILLIAM R.

WILLIAM R. ELLIS, farmer, Sec. 31; P. O. Annaton; was born in 1833, in Pulaski Co., Va.; was a son of Washington and Agnes Ellis; lived with parents till 21 years of age. Came to Wisconsin at the age of 15, with his parents, in 1848, locating at Ellenboro, Grant Co., Wis..; labored on a farm for wages three years, and, in 1859, he married Elizabeth Cox a daughter of John and Agnes Cox, who were farmers by occupation. His wife was one of a family of five children; William Ellis being one of a family of ten. He had ten children -- John M., Abraham L., Emma A., William H., Lily B., Elzaphan, James H., Phebe E., Earnest O. and Reatha S. Is the owner of 160 acres of land, valued at $3,000. Enlisted in the 25th W. V. I., Co. H, under Capt. Swan; served three years. He then returned to Grant Co., locating in Clifton, in 1865, where he has since lived; has been prosperous as a farmer; has one child deceased, Elzaphan. Has one son, John Ellis, who was married in 1880, to Miss Anna Hildreth, of Mineral Point. Has been Road Overseer one term. Republican in politics; and a member of the Disciples' Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ELSTON, A. C. VANDERWATER

A. C. VANDERWATER ELSTON, of the firm of Elston & McIntyre, general store and dealers in live stock, railroad ties, etc., Muscoda; was born in Unionville, Orange Co., N. Y., Sept. 9, 1845. He is a son of S. B. and Hannah E. Myers, both natives of New York, and whose ancestors were among the earliest settlers of that State. In 1855, they came to Muscoda, where he bought the Wisconsin House, and kept the hotel for fifteen years; then bought a farm in the town of Eagle, Richland Co., and retired from the hotel business. He died in the war of 1879. H. C. V. Elston came to Muscoda with his parents in 1855, and lived with them until 1863, when he engaged as clerk in the store of McDonald & Graham, where he was employed four years, when he went to Chicago, and took a course in the Commercial College of Bryant & Stratton; returned to the employ of McDonald & Graham, where he remained until the spring of 1867, when he engaged with the Merchant's Union Express Co. at Milwaukee as private secretary for the General Manager, H. B. Honsdale. Returning to Muscoda November of the year, he went into business as partner with Peter B. McIntyre. The copartnership continued for ten years, under the firm name of McIntyre & Elston, when Mr. McIntyre retired from the firm, transferring his interest to his son, since which time the firm has been McIntyre & Elston. He was married, Dec. 16, 1864, to Miss Julania Lane, who was born in Platteville, and a daughter of Henry C. Lane, who came to Platteville from Warren, Ohio, in 1837, first engaging in blacksmithing, after the hardware business. He retired from business thirteen years ago. Mr. E. has two children -- one boy and one girl. He has always been in active business life, and accumulated his estate by his own persevering industry.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

EMERY, ALRERT W.

ALRERT W. EMERY, farmer and smelter; P. O. Rockville; has 600 acres of land, some of it mineral; also has residence at British Hollow, where he sometimes resides; was born Feb. 24, 1816, near Warrenton, Va.; son of Wm. And Ann (Brooks) Emery; his grandfather was English and his grandmother German; he came to Grant Co., Nov. 31, 1839, having located at Galena and Dubuque a short time; was married March 23, 1843, by Cyrus K. Lord, Esq., of Potosi, to Eliza, daughter of John and Mary (Thomas) Nichols, who was born Aug. 29, 1822; had three girls and two boys, of whom three are now living -- Elizabeth Ann, Vergenia (Jennie) wife of Theodore T. Kinney of Potosi; they have one child, Frances. Mr. Emery has been in office most of the time since residing here, on Town Board twelve years, County Commissioner several years, and Magistrate several terms, and in 1857 and 1858 represented his district in the Legislature. When he came here there were but very few settlers in Potosi -- Chapman, Coyle, McDonald, Brock, Maderina, John and James Hull, and a few others. His son, Albert, died in 1877, aged 24 years, and William died in 1875, aged nine years. The grandfather of Mr. Emery died at the age of 97 years, having been wounded in the Revolution. The father of Mr. E. was in war of 1812 and assisted to defend the city of Washington at the time it was burned by the English, he being under command of Gen. Barney; he died at the age of 85 years.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Potosi Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

EMERY, J. C.

J. C. EMERY, farmer, Sec. 13; P. O. Rockville; son of Rev. Edward and Margaret (Endecott) Emery, now of Lancaster, Wis.; married, Nov. 10, 1878, by Rev. Edward Emery, to Abigal, daughter of John and Maria Chester, of Harrison, born Nov. 10, 1856; has a son, Edward Chester, born Sept. 30, 1879; has one brother and five sisters; works the farm with his brother, J. T. Emery, who was born May 22, 1855, and is unmarried; has 75 acres of land.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Potosi Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ENGLAND, FRANCIS

FRANCIS ENGLAND, wagon-maker and blacksmith, Patch Grove; was born at Somersetshire, England, in 1844; he came to America with his father, who now resides in Canada. He came to Wisconsin in 1863, and learned the trade of blacksmith at Beetown with Robert Hicks; engaged in business at Patch Grove in July, 1875. His wife, Mary R. Barrows, is a native of Wisconsin; they were married in 1867; they have six children -- Rosa, Francis, Charley, Birdie, Daisy, Susan. In politics, Republican; in religion, liberal believer. Owns town property and 100 acres of land in the town of Millville.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ESTABROOK, CHARLES E.

CHARLES E. ESTABROOK (Rep.), of Manitowoc was born in Platteville, Grant county, Wisconsin, October 31, 1847; received an academic and normal school education, graduating at Platteville Normal School in 1870; is a lawyer by profession; moved from Platteville to Manitowoc in 1871, and has resided there since. He enlisted in August, 1864, in Co. B., 43d Wis. Inf.; served with regiment until close of war; was city attorney of Manitowoc from April 15, 1874, to December 15, 1880; was elected member of assembly for 1881, by a vote of 1,410 against 930 votes for Adolph Piening, democrat; was re-elected for 1882, receiving 851 votes against 732 for George Paukratz, democrat.

(Manitowoc County -- Third District -- The towns of Centerville, Newton, Manitowoc Rapids, Manitowoc and the city of Manitowoc. Population 13,153.)

Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1882), page 551; transcribed by Mary Saggio

EVANS, CHARLES ROUNTREE

EVANS, Charles Rountree, attorney; born Lancaster, Wis., April 4, 1863; son Jonathan and Sarah (Kilbourne) Evans; paternal grandfather Jesse B. Evans, paternal grandmother Anna (Shingle) Evans; maternal grandfather John Kilbourne, maternal grandmother Laura (Gridley) Kilbourne; Welsh and English descent; graduate of University of Wisconsin A.B. and A.M. 1881-1907; member of K. of P., Elks, Naval and Military Order of the Spanish-American War, American Bar Association; City Attorney of Chattanooga 1887-1891; County Attorney (Hamilton) 1894-98; Commissioner of Registration 1894-96; Captain of Company M, Sixth United States Volunteer Infantry, appointed by President McKinley; served at Chickamauga and in Porto Rico; Commander of Provost Grand Army at Chickamauga Fork 1898; 1884 admitted to practice in Circuit and Supreme Courts of Tennessee; Federal courts and United States Court of Appeals; Military Judge of Arecibo, West Indies, 1899; Professor of Law in Law Department University of Chattanooga since 1899 and Dean of law faculty since 1901; occasional contributor of articles published in popular magazines; editor article on "Reformatories" in Cyclopedia Law and Procedure; author of article on "Partnership;" Republican candidate for Presidential Election at Large 1900; nominee of Republican party for Congress 3rd district Tenn., 1910.

Source: Who's Who in Tennessee, Memphis: Paul & Douglass Co., Publishers, 1911; transcribed by Kim Mohler

EVANS, JONATHAN H.

JONATHAN H. EVANS, Platteville; was born near Philadelphia, Penn, Oct. 29, 1830; served an apprenticeship as printer in the office of The Cumberland Valley Whig, at Shippensburg, Penn.; emigrated with his father to Wisconsin in May, 1846, and settled on a farm in the town of Kendall, La Fayette Co.; attended the Platteville Academy 1851-52, teaching a country school during the winter; in the fall of 1852 entered the store of Samuel Moore as salesman. Married Miss Sarah Kilbourne of Columbus, Ohio, Nov. 7, 1855; was elected Register of Deeds of Grant Co., serving two terms, from January, 1857, to January, 1861; was with the Army of the Tennessee during the Rebellion, serving as sutler of the 33d W. V. I. Since 1864 he has been engaged in the mercantile business in Platteville. In 1869, was elected President of the Board of Trustees of the village of Platteville, in 1870, and in 1870-71 represented said village in the County Board of Supervisors; in February, 1872, was appointed by Gov. Washburn member of the Board of Regents of Normal Schools, and successively re-appointed by Gov. Taylor in 1875, by Gov. Smith in 1878 and 1881; was elected Vice President of the Board in 1877, and, upon the death of President Starr in 1879, succeeded to the Presidency, to which position he has since been twice elected. Mr. Evans has devoted some attention to the study of natural science, and has a fine collection of minerals and fossils in the State Normal School at Platteville; is a member of the "Illinois Natural History Society" and the "Wisconsin Humane Society." He is a zealous member of the Masonic Order; was made a Master Mason and member of Melody Lodge at Platteville Feb. 22, 1854; received the Royal Arch degrees in June following, and the degree of Knight Templar at Madison, Wis., February, 1872. The fraternity has honored him with many marks of confidence, as he has served in nearly all the offices of the local orders, and has, at different times, been a delegate to the Grand Lodge, Grand Chapter and Grand Commandery of the State. He represented the Royal Arch Masons of Wisconsin in the General Grand Chapter held at Baltimore, Md., in 1871, and at Nashville, Tenn., in 1874; has been continuously for the past fourteen years an officer of the Grand Chapter of the State and during the years 1874-75 was honored with the highest position within the gift of the order by being elected Grand High Priest. He has been for the past six years the accredited Masonic representative to the Royal Arch Masons of Wisconsin from the Masons of Kentucky, South Carolina and New Jersey. As a citizen, Mr. Evans is distinguished as a type of the Christian gentleman who, scrupulously exact in all his dealings, generous to the poor and considerate to the unfortunate, will ever be esteemed in his public capacity, and valued as the conservator of that which is equitable in the private walks of life.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

FAHERTY

FAHERTY & O'NEILL, dealers in general merchandise, Hazel Green; business was established in 1854. The senior member of the firm, Mr. John Faherty, was born in Baltimore in 1803; came to Wisconsin in 1845, and settled in this town. Married Catherine Delton, a native of Kentucky; have two children -- Thomas and Lizzie. In 1866, Edward O'Neill became a member of the firm; he was born in Illinois in 1840. He married Elizabeth Faherty in 1866; she was born in Illinois; have two children -- Charles and Estella. In 1862, Mr. O'Neill enlisted in Co. B, 90th Ill. V. I., and served three years.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

FARNSWORTH, SAMUEL H.

SAMUEL H. FARNSWORTH, farmer ; P.O.Lancaster; residence one mile east of the court house. A native of New York; born March 3, 1813, in Clinton Co., a son of Phillip and P. (Parsons) Farnsworth. His father was a native of Vermont, and his mother of Long Island. They lived sixty-seven years together on the same farm, his father dying at the age of 93, and his mother at 87. Mr. Farnsworth is the fourth- child of nine children. He spent the earlier years of his life on the farm, and resided seven years in Franklin Co. He was married in Clinton Co., Feb. 19, 1837, to Miss Cynthia Hazen. They came to Lancaster in June, 1858 ; lived in the village tour years, and then moved on to his farm, which he had purchased on his arrival. They have six children living Charles, George, Mary, Zeruah, Lillie, Nathan. His sons, Charles and George, were volunteers in the war of the rebellion. Charles went to the front as a private, on account of disability was discharged ; re-enlisted in the cavalry, going as Second Lieutenant, returned First Lieutenant. George served three years a private, participating in sixteen engagements. They are now engaged in railroading as engineers. His wife died May 19, 1878, aged 60 years.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

FAVOR, H. W.

H. W. FAVOR, of the firm of Sawyer & Favor, drugs, books, paints, oils and fancy groceries, Boscobel; was born in Bristol, N. H.; worked on a farm till about the age of 16; then was employed as a clerk in a store about eleven years; then followed the clothing business about three years; in 1863, he came to Boscobel; engaged in the produce business several years, then opened a grocery with Mr. Smith; continued this two or three years; in 1870, he, with Mr. Sawyer, established this business. Is City Clerk; has held this office three or four years. He was married in 1860 to Miss T. H. Gage, of Enfeld, N. H.; she was born in Nashua, N. H.; they have one daughter.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

FAWCETT, MAHLON

MAHLON FAWCETT, Sec. 26; P. O. Washburn; was born in Frederick Co., Va., Sept. 15, 1802; came with his parents to Belmont Co., Ohio, in 1809, where they settled on a farm; lived there till 1835, when he moved to Greene Co., Ohio, and commenced farming, at which place he remained four years; then went to Paintersville, Ohio, and commenced as a merchant and continued as such for eight years. He then bought in a grist-mill, and was in that business two years, and, in 1853, moved to Grant Co., Wis., and settled on Sec. 34, on the farm then generally known as the J. D. Morett farm. He was a millwright by trade, and worked at that more or less until he was 50 years old. Moved from Sec. 34 to the place where he now lives. Is a member of the M. E. Church, but was raised a Quaker, and remained so till 30 years old. Was Chairman of Town Board and member of School Board eight years. Was married to Jane Gilchrist, Jan. 10, 1828, in Belmont Co., Ohio; she died Nov. 6, 1831, and was buried at Flushing Cemetery. Had two children by first wife -- Jefferson H. and Sylvanus S. Was married the second time to Sarah Beattie, Sept. 17, 1833, in Belmont Co., Ohio; by this marriage there are fourteen children, of whom ten are living -- Evelyn, Beattie, Clinton, Mahon, Salathiel, Sarah C., Mary Etta, Lorenzo D., Julia M., Clarence A. Those deceased are Joktan, John T., Harriet Jane and one other unnamed. Sarah E. Beattie was born in Virginia Oct. 1, 1810. His son Mahlon was in the 33d W. V. I.; his son Beattie left home in 1857, and has been gone ever since; is now in Custer City, Idaho. Mahlon Fawcett owns 100 acres of land -- 80 acres in Sec. 26, and 20 acres timber in Sec. 34; has voted for every President since Jackson, always voting the Whig ticket, and, since then the Republican, except when he voted for John P. Hale. His son Clinton now lives in Montana.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

FAYANT, VICTOR

VICTOR FAYANT, of the firm of Fayant & Happler, Muscoda; carrying on butchering business; was born at Tallahassee, Fla., in 1840. He is a son of Bartholomew and Elizabeth Becker, who were natives of France; when 2 years old, he moved with his parents to New York, and afterward to Schuyler Co., Penn. During the winter of 1857 and 1858, they came to Muscoda. He was married in 1865, to Miss Eleanor Sterling; they have six children.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

FERN, JOHN

JOHN FERN, smelter, Hazel Green; established in 1853; born in England in 1827; came to America in 1830, with parents and settled in Sinsinawa Mound; went to Iowa in 1834, and lived until 1877; when he removed to this village. Married Elizabeth Spensley, a native of England, in 1848; she died in 1875. He has six children -- William, Ellen, Lillie A., Frank, Charles and Robert.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

FINNEGAN, MICHAEL

MICHAEL FINNEGAN, farmer; P. O. Lancaster; was born in 1852, in Ireland; came to America in 1855, in company with his father; located in Indiana for two years; then to Illinois for one year; thence to Grant Co., Wis., in 1859, locating in Liberty, where he has lived since. He is a single man; has a fine farm of 200 acres. In politics, a Greenbacker, and is a member of the Catholic Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Liberty Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

FISH, MILLER

MILLER FISH, farmer, Sec. 30; P.O. Platteville; was born in Connecticut Aug. 20, 1818. Came to Wisconsin in 1855; a carpenter by trade; bought 40 acres of land; now owns 95 acres and works at his trade. His first wife, Celista Pritchard, was born in Connecticut in 1816. Married in 1843, died in 1862. They had three children--Colinus, who enlisted in Co. I, 10th W.V.I., in October, 1861; taken prisoner at the battle of Chickamauga; taken to Libby; then to Andersonville, and escaped twice, but was recaptured by hounds when nearly in the Union lines; released from Salisbury Prison at the close of the war. Anson H., in Crawford Co., Wis.; Mary, now Mrs. Meekin Marshall, in Iowa Co. Second wife was Elizabeth Evans, who was born in Ohio in 1828. Married in 1863; they had two children--Samuel E., and Elizabeth J., deceased. In politics, Republican. In religion, liberal believer. Has been Clerk and Director of Schools. The second wife had two children by a former marriage--Eva, deceased, and Joseph, at home.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

FISHER, WILLIAM

WILLIAM FISHER, P. O. Livingston; was born in Cornwall, England, March 7, 1825; learned the blacksmith trade and went to London, where he worked at his trade about a year; then went to Cambridgeshire, England, and worked there eighteen months; he then returned to Cornwall, and went into business for himself in the Parish of St. Issey. Stayed there two years, and, in 1871, came to America with his family, and settled in Martinville, town of Clifton, Wis., where he started a blacksmith-shop; he remained at Martinville nine years, when he removed to Livingston, and built the first blacksmith-shop in the village. He married Arabella Nance, July 17, 1849, in Oxton, London, England, who was born in Cornwall Padstow, England. They had four children, of whom two are living, Sarah Ann and William; deceased are Charles F. and Mary Jane. Charles was buried at Rock Church Cemetery, and Mary Jane in Parish Church Cemetery, St. Issey, England. Mrs. Fisher has been a member of the M. E. Church nine years; Arabella was a member of the Church of England. Mr. Fisher is a member of the Good Templars.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

FITZGERALD, CORYDON

CORYDON FITZGERALD, farmer. Sec. 21 ; P.O. Lancaster ; a native of Grant Co. In January, 1865, he enlisted in Co. K, 47th W. V. I., and served until the close of the war. Feb. 23, 1873, he was married to Miss Hattie Green, also a native of Grant Co., town of Fennimore. They have a son and three , daughters. In politics, Mr. Fitzgerald is a Republican.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

FLANAGAN, J. C.

J. C. FLANAGAN, grocer, Platteville; is a native of Huntingdon Co., Penn., born in 1838, and came to Platteville in 1862; he enlisted in February, 1863, in Co. K, 44th W. V. I., and served till the close of the war as Sergeant of the company; after his return from the army he worked at blacksmithing three years and at painting about six years; since April, 1875, he has been engaged in the grocery business. He was married in 1868 to Miss Mary R. Covell, daughter of E. W. Covell, a native of Madison Co., N. Y., who came to Platteville in 1842, and resided there until his death, Aug. 28, 1878, at the age of 66. Mrs. Covell, whose maiden name was Rebecca Kendall, is still living in Platteville at the age of 75. Mr. Flanagan has three children -- Jennie B., Susie C. and George L.; one son, Carlos, died Feb. 5, 1877, at the age of 4 months.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

FOLTS, RANSOM B.

RANSOM B. FOLTS, Jamestown; was born in New York in 1843; occupation, mining; in politics, he is a stanch Republican. Married Ann Thurtell, of Jamestown, Wis.; they have two children -- Edward R. and Eva May. Served in the army; enlisted in Georgetown, in Co. I, 25th W. V. I. Are of the Protestant faith, but are not members of any denomination or sect.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Jamestown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

FORD, W. W.

W. W. FORD, merchant, Stitzer; was born in 1849, in Williamsfield, Ashtabula Co., Ohio; is a son of A. J. and Clorinda Ford; began for himself at the early age of 13 years; he worked two years for H. Johnson on a farm; he then took an eastward course, locating for two years in New York State; then wended his way to Grant Co., Wis., in 1866, where he followed farming for two years; then went to Kentucky for one winter, going to Cleveland, Ohio, in the spring, where he resided for two years clerking; then returning to Grant Co., Wis., followed farming for two years. He married Miss M. N. Brackett, a daughter of A. M. and Mary Brackett, of Little Grant; then returned to Cleveland, Ohio, and once more clerked for Southward, Clark & Co., for eighteen months, when he returned to Grant Co.,in 1874, followed farming for two years near Lancaster on the old Barber farm; he then followed staging for three years; then to Stitzer; has three children living -- Grace, Fred and Fay; one deceased, William; has been Treasurer of School Fund for one term; has kept Post Office at Stitzer for two years. Politics, Republican; Justice of the Peace two years.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Liberty Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

BENJAMIN F. FOX

The subject of this sketch was born in Rochester, N.Y. July 3, 1822. He came West with his parents, when quite young, residing in Illinois and Missouri. He learned the trade of Saddler and Harness maker, and worked at his trade in Galena, Ill., and Platteville, Wis. From the latter place he responded to a call for volunteers, enlisting at Prairie Du Chien in Captain Wiram Knowlton's company, the Dodge Guards, Wisconsin Volunteers, in July 1846. In 1847 he re-enlisted, and was discharged September 3d, 1848. The regular troops who occupied Fort Crawford having been ordered to Mexico the Volunteers were placed in charge to protect the frontier from the Indians and assist in their removal to the new reservation in Minnesota. Mr. Fox was promoted during the first year of his service from private to corporal, orderly sergeant and 2d Lieutenant, and on his re-enlistment was again commissioned as 2d Lieutenant, holding two commissions signed by Henry Dodge, governor of Wisconsin. On the 1st of June, 1848, he was ordered to Fort Atkinson, Iowa, to take charge as the Commandant of the Post, with sufficient men under his command to protect the fort and the soldiers' families left there by Capt. Morgan's company of Iowa volunteers, who were assisting in removing the Indians. June 14th, 1848, Mr. Fox was united in marriage to Miss Julia B. Plum, at Garnaville, Iowa, who accompanied him to Fort Atkinson, then fifty miles from any post-office, store, or signs of civilization. Eleven children were the fruits of this union, two of whom died in early infancy. Nine survive him: Butler G. and Ben C. Fox; and Mrs. W. T. McNelly, of Globe, Arizona; Mrs. W. L. Marcy, of Annapolis, Md., Mrs. E. V. Carter, of Ashland, Oregon; Mrs. W. A. Scott, Harry C., Charles D. and Herbert E. Fox, of this city.

In the last week of August, 1848, Lt. Fox was ordered to Prairie Du Chien, where he was mustered out of the service, Sept. 3, 1848, by Col. Garland.

By appointment he served over a year as deputy recorder and treasurer under Sanford L. Peck, when in 1855 he was elected to the office by a majority of 355, his opposing candidates being Peck and Stockton. He was again re-elected in 1857, having served two terms.
Mr. Fox was a charter member of the Masonic and Odd Fellow lodges at Garnaville, in both organizations taking an active and interesting part, and very much attached to the principles inculented [sic].
Politically, Mr. Fox was a democrat, with which party he affiliated all his life. He was generally in the conventions, and always took an active part in their deliberation and in the councils, serving acceptably and with fidelity and honor as a member of different committees.--North Iowa Times

Source: Arizona Silver Belt (Globe City, AZ), 14 May 1887; transcribed by MD

FORMANACK, FRANK J.

FRANK J. FORMANACK, a prosperous and enterprising agriculturist of Dwight township, Richland county, has been a resident of Dakota since his boyhood, and is well known as a gentleman of true worth in his community. He makes his home on section 32, and is surrounded by all the adjuncts of a model country home.

Mr. Formanack was born in Bohemia, December 15, 1852, and is a son of Albert and Anna Formanack, who were early settlers of Richland county, North Dakota. Our subject came to America with his parents when but six years of age, and the family settled in Iowa county, Wisconsin, where he passed his boyhood days, and at the age of thirteen years went to Dakota, and has since been a resident of Richland county, and has followed the pursuit of agriculture, with the exception of two years spent in the employ of the government in surveying. He entered claim to one hundred and sixty acres of land, and also pre-empted eighty acres on section 32, in Dwight township, of which property he is still the fortunate possessor. He has improved his land and erected substantial and commodious farm buildings, and made it a fit habitation.

Our subject was married in Grant county, Wisconsin, to Anna Lawrence, a sister of M. Lawrence, of Dwight township, whose history will be found elsewhere in this volume. Mrs. Formanack was born in Bohemia. They have one adopted daughter upon whom they have bestowed the name of Anna. Mr. Formanack has held numerous school offices, and served as township supervisor, and is a zealous worker for the upbuilding of his community. He is one of the rising young men of Richland county, and is held in the highest esteem by his associates.

Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Maggie Saggio

FOULKS , EDWARD

EDWARD FOULKS (deceased); was born Feb. 14, 1812, in Wales; at 16, he came to America and began work on the Pennsylvania railroads and canals; in 1835, he came to Wisconsin and engaged in the mines about Dodgeville and Mifflin, being one of the first Welsh settlers in what is now Iowa Co.; about 1845, he came to Lima and settled on the farm where he died Dec. 15, 1876. His wife was formerly Ann Burney; they were married in Lima, she having come here in 1845, from Pickaway Co., Ohio, her birthplace; they had seven children--Mary, George, Thomas, Sarah, Ellen, Emma and Ida, all born in Lima. Mr. Foulks was a hard-working and upright man, who earned and left a good farm and home.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

FULLTERTON, T.M.

By T. M Fullerton. I arrived from Missouri, in Grant county, on Sunday morning, July 22, 1837. We slept on the bank of the Mississippi River at the mouth of Platte River the previous night. What is now Potosi was the point we were aiming to reach. The place was known throughout the mines as " Snake Hollow." Among the first discoveries of mineral was a rich deposit in a cave, on the west side of a ravine two miles in length. Several thousands of pounds of this mineral was white as chalk, and very pure, resembling chalk, except in its remarkable weight. In exploring this cave, the miners, in winter, discovered many snakes in a torpid condition; hence the name given to this locality. In 1837, a few houses had been erected at the mouth of the " hollow " and named La Fayette. Nearly a mile further north, another group of shanties was called " The Hollow," and afterward Van Buren, which was the name of the post office. About a mile further north was the "Head of the Hollow," afterward known as Jackson. These three parts were, by Legislative act, in 1839-40, called Potosi, and the post office so named. Southeast of La Fayette nearly a mile, opposite the mouth of the Grant River, and being the ferry landing on the Wisconsin side, began to be a village called Osceola.

My destination at first was La Fayette, where I was selling a small stock of goods on commission. There was a similar establishment up in the hollow. But the inhabitants were chiefly adventurers engaged in mining, and except such things as they needed there was little call for merchandise, there being but a half-dozen or so of families in the southern part of the county. As a matter of course the society was rough, and morals were almost dispensed with. Drinking, gambling, stabbing and shooting were far too common, and " Snake Hollow' became throughout the mines notorious for its wickedness.

In 1837, there was, between " The Hollow " and " The Head of the Hollow," a small log Catholic chapel, the only evidence of Christianity to be found there. A priest resided there, and his little plantation bell called his people to occasional worship. During that year, Rev. John Crummer, an Irishman, came once or twice to preach the Gospel as the Methodists understand it. He was the regular " circuit rider " on a circuit embracing all of Wisconsin west and south of Blue Mounds. The preaching-place was a very small miner's cabin in which the family ate, slept and lived. The room did not exceed twelve by fourteen feet in size. The congregations were able to get in and room to spare. In August, 1838, the Illinois Conference sent Rev. Isaac I. Stewart to the Platteville Circuit, which embraced all of Grant and parts of other counties. During the spring of 1839, Rev. James G. Whitford, just returned from the Indian Mission at Caposia, now in Minnesota, came as Mr. Stewart's assistant. In the latter part of that year a class was formed, consisting of Thomas Clayton, Leader, Thomas J. Crockwell, Local Preachers; John Crockwell, Catherine C. Crockwell, George Medeira and wife, James R. Short and wife, and Jonah Pedlar and wife. They had been members before coming to the place. A weekly prayer-meeting was established, and preaching was had once a fortnight, all in the small residence of J. R. Short.

In the conference year of 1839-40, Rev. H. W. Reed was in charge of the circuit, and Mr. Whitford continued as assistant. They had thirty-two regular preaching-places in four weeks. In December, 1889, we began a Sabbath school, the first, I think, in Grant county. We had procured a log house for meeting purposes, about fourteen by sixteen feet in size, formerly used as a drinking saloon, and the scene of several stabbing and shooting affrays. It became our chapel for several years, and was the spiritual birthplace of many sinful souls. On the 2d of January, 1840, Messrs. Reed and Whitford began special revival services, assisted sometimes by neighboring local preachers. It was my good fortune to be the first fruits of that revival. During the three weeks the meeting continued, forty-two were converted and joined the class of Methodists already organized. The awakening was general and the reformation of the place was very marked. The influence did not stop with the meeting, but continued for more than a year. During the summer of 1840 Rev. James Gallaher, an Evangelist, formerly Pastor of a Presbyterian Church in Cincinnati, Ohio, held a series of meetings, and organized a Presbyterian Church, but left them without a Pastor, and they soon began to decline.

Out of the Methodist revival several went out to preach. Robert Langley, a tailor, intemperate and profane, was reformed and converted. He subsequently became a member of the conference, did good service in the itinerant ranks, and died in the ministry at Reedsburg, August 16, 1874.

William Vance was our chief infidel, being a correspondent of infidel papers and a lecturer of his neighbors. He did all he could for two weeks to hinder the revival, but finally yielded to his convictions, was converted and preached several years as an itinerant. He went South and I lost track of him.

James W. Simpson went among the Chippewa Indians as a teacher, intending to be a missionary, but was thwarted in some cherished purpose, became a trader with the Indians at St. Paul, and gave up all pretensions to piety, dying some ten years ago. This writer, after fifteen months of activity in church work at Potosi, went to Iowa County in March, 1841, and became a " circuit rider," continuing, with two interruptions for a short time, to this day.

Before leaving Potosi, arrangements were well on the way for building a Methodist Church, which was completed and occupied soon after.

On the 10th of October, 1840, the first temperance society was organized, called the " Snake Hollow Grant County Temperance Society." The pledge adopted was :

"We will neither drink nor make use of any ardent spirits or alcoholic liquors, unless for medicinal purposes in cases of sickness, believing ardent spirits are of no benefit to man in his daily pursuits of life ; we will, therefore, discountenance, and, so far as lies in our power, prohibit the use of them in our respective places of residence." Nineteen signatures were appended. The officers were : William G. Thompson, President ; William Drake, "Vice President ; Lansing D- Lewis, Corresponding Secretary; John H. Dodson, Recording Secretary; and Robert Langley, Treasurer.

The annual meeting was held in just three months, January 11, 1841. There were then one hundred and two members. The officers then elected, were Hon. James P. Cox, President George Madeira, Vice President ; T. M. Fullerton, Secretary ; R. Langley, Treasurer ; C. C. Drake, T. J. Crockwell and Simon E. Lewis, Managers.

Although we had no vote in the Presidential election of 1840, excitement ran high, and " Tippecanoe and Tyler, too," was a thrilling watchword. George Medeira had recently come to the place with a stock of goods. He purchased and moved his family into a small log house, but proceeded to build a good frame residence on the same lot. Into this he had just moved when the convention nominated Harrison for the Presidency. Immediately he had his carpenters enlarge the door of the old log house to six feet in width. A fence board was used for a latch extending clear across the door, and six inches beyond it. To this was attached a three-quarter inch rope, going through -the door, and a block of wood four inches square, and ten inches long, fastened on the outer end of the rope. On the walls outside were stretched all the coon-skins he could procure. Then he moved his furniture and family back to the log cabin, and lived there till after election. This illustrates the feeling on one side with the "latch string always out," and the other side was equally enthusiastic.

This Medeira was a very excitable man. In 1830, he lived in a miner's hut a mile or more south of Mineral Point, where, in a fit of jealousy, aggravated with liquor, he mortally stabbed a worthy young man with a penknife. He was arrested in Galena, and was the first man ever put in jail there, as stated in the weekly Gazette of that city, February 18, 1881. He was indicted at Mineral Point for murder, the indictment quashed on some technicality, and never renewed. While living in Potosi, he was an active and useful member of the Methodist Church, a very kind and benevolent man. But his excitable nature sometimes led him into rash acts, causing him much sorrow, and not a little expense. When I left that village for an itinerant life, meaning to go afoot for want of means to buy a horse, he presented me with one, saddled and bridled, saying, " Take him in the name of the Lord," and accompanying me out of town on another horse, with blessings.

During the first three years of my residence in Wisconsin, the frost, in September, killed all the corn and other late crops. The seed was from the South, and not acclimated. It was a universal belief that the country was "too cold for corn." No one claiming that fruit could be raised here, could obtain credit for sanity. Again, it was the general opinion that the country would never be settled, except by transient miners, because fuel and building material could never be obtained, except by importing. These current beliefs came fresh to me, when, after forty years' absence, I passed over the prairies of 1837, and found the orchards bending under their thousands of bushels of apples, the corn like the plentiful years of Egypt, and the farmers consuming wood to get it out of the way of the plow. Shullsburg, Wis., February 23, 1881.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Publ. 1881); transcribed by a Friend of Free Genealogy

FRANK, GEORGE R.

GEORGE R. FRANK, Muscoda; was born in the town of Gray, Cumberland Co., Me., May 2, 1824. Attended the common school, also the high school at Gray's Corner and Westbrook Seminary; taught school four winters in Maine, commencing at 17 years of age. Left home in March, 1845, went to Boston; thence to Buffalo, N. Y., and in September, to Chicago; thence to Galena, and from there to Benton, La Fayette Co., and taught school during the winter. In the spring of 1846, came to Grant Co., and engaged in teaching, speculating and farming till 1875, and then purchased a farm just over the line in Iowa Co. Has a farm of about 500 acres, and is engaged in stock-raising. In 1848, married Matilda Price in the town of Harrison, Grant Co.; she was born in Indiana, and came to Grant Co., with her parents, in 1836, when she was but 6 years old; her parents, Zachariah Price and Elizabeth Price, live at Mankato, Minn., and are engaged in farming. Have seven children -- Alpheus E., attorney, Deadwood, Dak.; Charles E., broker, Virginia City, Nev.; Florence C., wife of Charles J. McKittrick, merchant, Muscoda; Noma E., William E., George E. and Freddie are living at home. Has held the offices of Town Clerk, Town Superintendent of Schools, Justice of the Peace, Town Supervisor and member of the County Board of Supervisors. Has been Deputy U. S. Marshal, Deputy U. S. Collector and Assistant Assessor of Internal Revenue. In August, 1862, raised Co. B, of the 33d W. V. I.; was chosen Captain and commissioned August 16, 1862, and served three years; was commissioned Major of the regiment Feb. 4, 1865, and mustered in as such at Spanish Fort, Ala., April 5, to take effect March 2, 1865; was in all the battles and skirmishes in which the regiment was engaged, including the battle of Coldwater, siege of Vicksburg, Red River expedition, battle of Tupelo, battle of Nashville and siege of Spanish Fort; was in the charge that broke the rebel line in the first day's fight at Nashville; was wounded while leading the advance on Spanish Fort. His father Alpheus Frank, died in Portland, at the residence of his daughter Mrs. Eliza Haskell. He was one of the substantial farmers of Gray, a man of the strictest integrity, of quiet and unassuming manner, and was held in high esteem by a large circle of friends and acquaintances. He passed his life in Gray, and there reared a large family.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

FRANKLAND, MATHEW

MATHEW FRANKLAND, stock-dealer and butcher, Hazel Green; born in Yorkshire, England, in 1820; came to America in 1850, and settled in Grant Co., and engaged in mining for a short time. Married Elizabeth Daykin, a native of England; they have seven children -- Ann, Dinah, Mary J., John S., Isabella, Lizzie Annie, Mathew.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

FRAZIER, SAMUEL

SAMUEL FRAZIER, Sec. 19; P.O. Platteville; was born Jan. 27, 1822, in York Co., Penn,; nine years later, his parents removed with him to Wayne Co., Ohio; from there with a brother--William Frazier--he came to Apple River in 1843; spent eighteen months in the mines and returned to Ohio. In her native county (Wayne), he married Elizabeth Burns, and with her and two children he again came to Wisconsin, in 1851, locating upon his present farm of 141 acres, which he had purchased while in Ohio. The small log cabin stood upon the only cleared acre, and into this Mr. Frazier moved his family. The thirty years spent here have not been wasted, as may be seen by the homelike farmhouse and capacious barn, surrounded by the well-tilled fields, once a forest. Mrs. Frazier died Oct. 17, 1865, in Ohio; she left six children--Hector V., Mary E., John J., William C., Thomas J. and Frank E. The present Mrs. Frazier was Mary J. McClurg, born in Ellenboro, and a daughter of William McClurg, who lives on an adjoining farm in Lima. Mr. and Mrs. Frazier have four children--Millie M., Louise E., Daisy and Samuel F. The two oldest of the ten children were born in Wayne Co., Ohio, and the others on the Lima homestead. Mr. F. is a Republican, and has been Justice of the Peace, Supervisor, etc.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

FRENCH, L. D. Sr.

L. D. FRENCH, Sr., miner and auctioneer, Beetown; was born in 1804 in Virginia; lived there until 1831; went to New Orleans; lived there until 1833; followed clerking; then to Dubuque for three years, then to Iowa City for one year, then to Galena for five years, then to Elizabeth for two years, then to Galena for two years, then to Coon Branch, Wis., one year, then to Shullsburg one year, then to Menomonee one and one-half years, then to Fair Play one year, then to Vinegar Hill two years, then to Rockville two years, Lancaster five years, then to Beetown twenty-two years. Was married in 1847, to Rhoda Pafford, daughter of William and Jane Pafford; have eight children--Eunice J., Lorenzo D., Mary E., Margaret A., Reuben, Mewrod C., Louette, William A. Politics, Democratic.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

FRIEDRICH, E. R.

E. R. FRIEDRICH, harness-maker and member of the firm of H. C. Doscher & Co., Platteville; was born in St. Clair Co., Ill., in 1843; his father, Ferdinand Friedrich, was a native of Germany, and came to America and settled in Illinois; then came to Wisconsin, and has been a resident of Platteville ever since. E. R. Friedrich learned his trade in Highland, Iowa Co., Wis., and commenced business for himself in Platteville, in 1868, in company with Michael Oswald, with whom he continued a year and a half; then bought out his partner, and run the business alone till January, 1876, then sold out to H. C. Doscher, and bought in again in 1876; he enlisted Aug. 15, 1862, in the 27th W. V. I., Co. G, and was in the service till September, 1874, and was with his regiment the whole time. He was married in October, 1864, in Highland, Iowa Co., Wis., to Maria J. Fry, and has two children living -- Edward Ferdinand and Gustave Ernest, and lost one son -- Otto, who died March 3, 1880, aged 5 years. Mr. Friedrich has been a member of the Village Board two years in succession.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

FRUIT, PERRY

PERRY FRUIT; P.O. Washburn; was born in Madison Co., Ill., Oct. 26, 1819; continued to live there until 1846, when he came to Grant Co. and bought the farm he now resides upon of the Government, built a home, and has lived here ever since. He was married to Miss Matilda Lampkin, of Madison Co., Ill., in 1841; they have six children living--I. I. (who graduated at the Platteville Normal School and is now practicing law at La Crosse), Nancy Ellen (now Mrs. A. E. Rundell), Martha G. (now Mrs. Brazelle), Henry D. (also a lawyer), Julia N. (now Mrs. E. A. Biddick), and James P., living at home. Mr. Fruit owns about 600 acres of good farming land as the reward of many years of honest toil. He is one of the pioneer members of the M.E. Church here. Assisted in building the first church in the town of Clifton. Is a staunch temperance man and member of the Good Templars, and has been a member the Town Board many years.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

FRY, JOHN L.

JOHN L. FRY, farmer, Sec. 2; P. O. Lancaster; was born in Mercer Co., Penn., April, 1825; came to Wisconsin with his parents. He owns 160 acres of land, which he has made by his own industry. He enlisted at the age of 18 in Company B, 43d W. V. I., in September, the year 1864; was at the battle of Johnsonville, Tenn.; discharged at the close of the war. His wife, Hannah Hake, was born in Wisconsin, 1829; daughter of Elias and Nancy Hake, now residing in Clifton, Grant Co., Wis. Married Oct. 1, 1867; they have five children -- Virgil, Virginia, Ruby, Prudence, Luella. In politics, Democrat; in religion, liberal believer; Pathmaster in 1880.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Ellenboro Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

FRY, THOMAS

THOMAS FRY, Sec. 3; P. O. Martinville; born in Mercer Co., Penn., Oct. 24, 1836; left there at the age of 15, and went to Iowa with his parents, where they farmed three years; left there and came to Ellenboro, Wis., where he worked on a farm with his father till 1861; then removed to town of Liberty, where he broke prairie till the fall of the same year, when he enlisted, in 1861,in the 10th W. V. I., Co. F; was in the ranks eighteen months, and was then mustered in as wagoner, and continued as such till 1864. After being honorably discharged, he came home to town of Liberty, and went to farming for himself; rented for five years and then bought 167 acres on Secs. 11 and 12; lived there eight years and then moved to the place where he now lives. Owns 160 acres in Sec. 3. Was married to Orrel Bacon, by B. F. Wyne, Esq., of Platteville, Oct. 2, 1861. She was born July 15, 1843. They have eight children living -- Irene P., Addie B., Willie J., John, Aurora, Nellie, Homer, Alta.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

FUNSTON, W. J.

W. J. FUNSTON, dentist; was born in Coshocton Co., Ohio, in 1840; when an infant his parents removed to Jefferson Co., Ohio, where he was brought up. He enlisted there in August, 1862, in the 52d O. V. I., Co. E, as a private, and was in the service till the close of the war; he was with his company about six months, and was then detailed as Adjutant's clerk, and acted in that capacity till the close of the war. He studied dentistry before the war with Dr. John McKinley, of Uhrichsville, Ohio; after the war, he practiced about six months in Plattsburg, Mo., after spending a few months in Ohio, then came to Wisconsin and spent a short time with his parents in Richland Co.; came to Platteville in December, 1866, and has practiced there since, except from December, 1873, till April, 1874, he spent in California practicing a part of the time in San Francisco.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

GADE, FRED

FRED GADE, farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. Boscobel; is a native of Mecklenberg, and, when in Prussia, followed the milling trade for ten years, and at Mecklenberg four years, and fifteen years he followed farming; in 1874, he came to Clayton, Iowa, and, in 1875, came to the town of Marion; here he engaged in milling running the Red Mill, now known as the Marion Center Mill, for four years, then went to farming. Owns 200 acres of land. He was married in 1859 to Miss Mena Hagen, who was a native of the same place.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Marion) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

GARDNER, D. E.

D. E. GARDNER, Professor of Mathematics and Music in the State Normal School at Platteville, was born in Adams, Jefferson Co., N. Y., in 1837. He was educated in his native State, and commenced teaching in a private school in Jefferson Co. when 20 years of age, and continued in that three years; he was then Professor of Mathematics in Hungerford Collegiate Institute, at Adams, N. Y., for five years, from the time it was established till it was burned in 1867; he then came West, and for six years was Superintendent of Schools and Principal of the High School at Neenah, Wis., and in the fall of 1874 was elected to his present position. He was married in 1864, at Adams, N. Y., to Miss Ella Underwood Brown, of that place, and has two children -- Bertha Lucile and Mabel Pauline.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

GARDNER, DAVID

DAVID GARDNER, one of the now deceased pioneers of Grant Co., was born March 4, 1816, in County Meath, Ireland. When in his 17th year, he came to America, and spent some years in various Eastern and Southern States. During the Seminole Indian war, he was in New Orleans; in 1840, he reached Galena, and soon after made his first visit to Platteville and vicinity. Here he worked in the "leads" about the Whig settlement, and spent one winter in a cabin built where Straw & Co.'s furnace now is. He was one of the discoverers of the old "Boots" range of mineral, which famous deposit is still being worked, and a branch of it on his own farm by his own sons. He married in Galena, Mary Murphey, who survives him. He died Nov. 1, 1876, leaving seven children -- John M., David P., James V., Mary E., Dennis J., Bridget and Cecilia, all born on the old homestead farm. Mr. Gardner settled upon this farm as early as 1843, and here the widow and three eldest sons have a good home. The youngest son is now reading law in the office of the Hon. W. E. Carter, of Platteville. Mr. Gardner was a steady and industrious farmer and miner, and a man who is remembered by many old friends and neighbors.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

GARDNER, OLIVER P.

OLIVER P. GARDNER, farmer, Sec. 21 ; P.O. Lancaster. Owns 40 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre. Born in Kentucky, in 1824. Came to Wisconsin in 1837 ; located on his farm in 1871. Married Lucy Ann Vedder, a native of New York, and they have four children Lovilla J., Abby Ellen, Effie J. and Allen Eugene. Mr. Gardner enlisted in Co. H, 25th W. V. I., in 1862, and was discharged in 1865.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

GARNER, BENJAMIN

BENJAMIN GARNER, farmer. Sec. 36 ; P.O. Lancaster. Born in Huntingdon Co., Penn,, May 10, 1826. Came to Wisconsin in 1850 ; bought 100 acres, now owns 217 acres of land, improved, with good brick house, two stories, 24x30, with wing 24x26 : barn, 57x26 ; crib, 24x22 ; carriage house and other good outbuildings. Enlisted in 1861, in the 20th W. V. I., Co. E; mustered out in 1865. His wife, Catharine Sork, born in Blair Co., Penn., July 23, 1826. They were married in 1846 ; they have nine children Solomon, born in October, 1847 ; died Aug. 24, 1854 ; Reuben, born Nov. 27, 18 died Aug. 25, 1854; Mary Ann, born Feb. 23, 1854; died Aug 27, 1854; Benjamin, born Oct 1, 1855 (in Nebraska) ; William, born Feb. 27, 1838 ; died Aug. 20, 1859 ; Levi, born April 14, 1860 ; Lizzie, born May 14, 1863 ; Sarah J., born June 8, 1866; Matilda, born Aug. 22, 1871 ; died Aug. 27, 1873. In politics, Republican. A Presbyterian and Elder. Has been Treasurer and Director of schools.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

GARNER, JEREMIAH

JEREMIAH GARNER, farmer, Sec. 27; P.O. Beetown; born in 1822 at the Salt Works, Gallatin Co., Ill.; was a son of Jerred Garner, who was a native of Loudoun Co., Va., and was near Pigeon Diggings, in 1839, where Jerry set out to enjoy the pleasures of the world in his own behalf. He followed mining for sixteen years; thence to Beetown in 1847, where he has since lived; has been a farmer, miner and hotel keeper; has been Treasurer of the School Board; has 213 acres of land. Politics, Greenbacker; is a member of the Congregational Church. He was married in 1846, to Winey J. Callis, a daughter of Henry Callis, and sister to Hon. J.B. Callis; she was born in 1831, in North Carolina; have had nine children--town of whom are living--Mattie J. and Willie G.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

GARNER, WASHINGTON M.

WASHINGTON M. GARNER, miner, Sec. 32; P.O. Beetown; was born in 1825, in Hamilton Co., Ill., was a son of Jarred and Martha Garner. In 1833, he moved to Warren, Ill.; resided there until 1839, then to Grant Co., Wis.; located to Pigeon Diggings, near Lancaster; was there until 1847, when he moved to Beetown, where he has since lived. When a boy, he attempted to learn the printing business. Was married in 1849, to Mary A. Edwards, a daughter of Mathew Edwards; have ten children. Has been on Town Board four terms, was Town Treasurer three years. Has been a farmer and hotel-keeper. Politics, Greenbacker.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

GARSIDE, EDWARD H.

EDWARD H. GARSIDE, farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Patch Grove; was born at Massillon, Ohio, May 2, 1833; came to Wisconsin in the year 1845; was raised on the farm, and now owns 100 acres of the same and part of the place; the old home is surrounded by the old evergreens planted by his father many years ago. His wife, Elizabeth Henderson, was born in Virginia in 1849; they married Feb. 11, 1863; by this union they have three children -- Edith, George and Elizabeth. In politics a Republican; in religion, Congregational; has been Trustee of the church; Treasurer many times. Also, Clerk of the District, member of the Town Board in the year 1875.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

GARSIDE, HUGH

HUGH GARSIDE, deceased; was born at Cheshire, England, July 28, 1798; came to America in 1830; settled in New York; then came to Ohio; then to Wisconsin in the year 1845; entered 120 acres of land, built the old log cabin; he died at Bloomington, Wis., in 1876; his wife, Sarah Bagshaw, a native of Cheshire, England, born June 28, 1802; they married in 1825, and had seven children, three living -- Sarah, now Mrs. Rhoads, now in Ohio; Edward; Mary, now Mrs. Beardsley. His brother, William, was in the 33d W. V. I., and was drowned at Vicksburg, Miss. The First Congregational Church of Blake's Prairie, was organized in the house of Mr. Hugh Garside.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

GAY, GEORGE F.

GEORGE F. GAY, physician and surgeon; was born in Clayton Co., Iowa, May 12, 1848; is a son of John M. Gay, deceased, who first saw the light in the Shenandoah Valley, in Rockbridge Co., Va. He was by profession a civil engineer, and finished his education in Richmond, Va., during the years 1816, 1817 and 1818, and was employed by the Government twenty-five years, during that time surveying nearly all of the Northwestern country. His ancestors were natives of North of Ireland, and three brothers -- John, James and Robert -- emigrated to America in the year 1730; they landed in Philadelphia, and settled as farmers in the interior of Pennsylvania, where they remained until the year 1740, when they moved to Virginia and settled on the north bank of the James River. The descendants took an active part in the Revolutionary war, and the father of John Gay was commissioned a Lieutenant at the commencement of the war, and served until its close. John Gay, although he was born, lived and educated in a slave State, was a decided Abolitionist, and strongly advocated those principles. He was an exemplary Christian, and for fifty years was a Ruling Elder in the Congregational Church; he died in February, 1878, at the ripe age of 81. He served in the Black Hawk war with the rank of Major, and fought by the side of Abraham Lincoln (who held the rank of Captain), at the battle of Bad Ax. He and Mr. Lincoln were warm personal friends for many years. His wife's maiden name was Sarah Thomas; her ancestors had lived in Virginia for several generations; she also was born in Rockbridge Co., Va. Dr. George F. Gay, at the age of 10, came with his parents to Crawford Co., Wis.; where he remained for ten years, when he commenced the study of medicine. He graduated at Rush Medical College, Chicago, Ill., with the class of 1875 and 1876; after graduation he located at Bloomington, where he practiced his profession for three years, and married Miss Minerva Woodhouse. He came to Muscoda in March, 1880, where he has since practiced his profession.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

GELBACH, LEWIS

LEWIS GELBACH, farmer. Sec. 30 ; P.O. Hurricane Grove. Owns 180 acres of land, Valued at $40 per acre. Born in Prussia in 1833. Came to America in 1846, and settled in Pennsylvania ; came to Wisconsin in 1857, and located in Lancaster where he lived until 1869, when he removed to this farm. He married Sophia Napp, a native of the same place, and they have eight children John, Charles, William, George, Mary, Nettie, Frederick and Ida.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

GENZ, CONRAD

CONRAD GENZ, proprietor of Galena Hotel, Hazel Green; born in Germany in 1827; came to America in 1851, and located in Galena; in 1858, he came here and engaged in present business. Married Annie Salzman, in 1867; she was born in Prussia; has one child -- George. Mr. Genz has two children (by a former wife) -- Herman and Louis. Are members of Roman Catholic Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

GERHARDS; JOSEPH

JOSEPH GERHARDS; P. O. Potosi; saloon and grocer; born in Germany in 1835; son of Hubert and Mary (Massung) Gerhards; came to New Orleans with parents in 1845; in 1846 to St. Louis, Mo., and in 1847 to this place, engaged in farming, mining, butchering and dealing in stock; in 1859 was married by Rev. Mr. Zuber, of St. Andrew's to Josephine, daughter of Anton and Mary Ann (Pluemer) Hupper; has ten children from 6 weeks to 21 years of age, all living; was five years on Town Board; owns eighty acres of land, mostly mineral.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Potosi Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

GEYER, JOHN

JOHN GEYER, physician and surgeon, Muscoda; born in Austria July 31, 1846; he is a son of Lorenzo and Anna (Krater) Geyer, both natives of Austria. He received his preliminary education in the old country, and pursued his medical studies at the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City, and graduated at Wooster University, Cleveland, Ohio, Feb. 24, 1876. He first located, after graduating, at Allegheny City, and remained there until 1878, when he moved to Lawrence, Mass., where he engaged in his profession until 1880, when he came to this State, and located at Platteville, remaining there but a short time, when he came to Muscoda. He came to America in 1866. He was married May, 1870, to Miss Lina B. Mueller, of Pittsburgh, Penn., her father being an old physician there, and with whom the subject of this biography was associated for six years previous to his graduation. They have three children -- one boy and two girls.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

GIBSON, JOSHUA

JOSHUA GIBSON, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Potosi; born Nov. 22, 1827, son of James and Mary (Palliser) Gibson; owns 69 acres of land; has lived in this county since 1840. Married Feb. 3, 1859, to Mary Palliser (see Joseph Palliser); has eight children -- Sallie E., born Nov. 3, 1862, now Mrs. Price, of Potosi; Joshua E., born Feb. 25, 1864; Ella L., born Feb. 10, 1860; Ida M., born Dec. 17, 1866; Annie E., born Sept. 28, 1868; Joseph P., born Oct. 8, 1870; John D., born Jan. 30, 1874; James W., born Dec. 7, 1880.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Potosi Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

GILLHAM, JOHN

JOHN GILLHAM, Platteville; born Dec. 22, 1819, in Madison Co., Ill.; son of Charles and Clarinda Gillham, who settled in Grant Co. in 1835. The sons of Charles Gillham engaged in mining at Big Patch, J. G. Gillham following the "diggings" and farming until 1850, when he went to California, and for two years sought his fortunes in the gold mines; returning, he began farming near Belmont, Wis. In 1862 he made a second visit to the Pacific Slope; on his return in 1863, he sold his Belmont farm, and settled in Platteville. The summer of 1864 was spent by him in the United States service, as a Private in the 41st W. V. I., he returning on sick leave shortly before the final discharge of his regiment. He settled in his present pleasant home in 1872. J. G. Patterson, a former owner of the property, had established a nursery here, which has secured to Mr. Gillham an unusually large, fine orchard, besides other fruit and ornamental trees. He married Miss Mary L., daughter of Ashabel and Eliza Haggett; she was born April 25, 1829. An adopted daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Gillham is now the wife of Frank White, of Lancaster. Mr. and Mrs. Gillham belong to the M. E. Church of Platteville. The father, Charles Gillham, died on the day of the capitulation of Gen. Lee, in April, 1865. Mrs. Charles Gillham died Sept. 28, 1879.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

GLASSON, JAMES

JAMES GLASSON, farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. Hazel Green; owns 196 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre; born in Cornwall, England; in 1820, came to America in 1840, and settled in Jo Daviess Co., Ill.; two years later, he removed to this county. Married Jane Warner, a native of England; they have six children -- James, John, Richard, Benjamin, Harriet and Jane.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

GLENN, EDWIN

EDWIN GLENN, Sec. 19; P. O. Wyalusing; was born in this county in 1844. Married Mary Pace, a native of this county; had two children -- Walter E. and George. In 1862, he enlisted in Co. K, 31st W. V. I., and was discharged in 1865. He has held different public offices; elected Chairman in the spring of 1881.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Wyalusing Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

GLENN; WILLIAM N.

WILLIAM N. GLENN; P.O. Washburn; was born in Cleveland Co., N.C., Oct. 9, 1816; lived there until he was about 11 years old, when his family moved to Bond Co., Ill., where he lived many years. Here he married Miss Cynthia J. McCracken, whose people moved from Tennessee to Bond Co. Mr. G. has followed farming all his life, and when he came to this county, in 1856, rented the place he now owns for three years; then resided on a place near by, but, for the last seventeen years, has owned the farm he now resides on, consisting of 80 acres, west one-half southeast one-quarter Sec. 13. The farm was originally heavily timbered, but there was about 30 acres cleared when he first rented the place. He has cleared the remainder himself. Mr. and Mrs. G. have had eleven children, seven of whom are now living--Sarah, Washington R., Martha, Eli B., Charlotte V., Phillip Lincoln and Cynthia E. Mr. G. has been a member of the M.E. Church for forty-eight years, a local minister for twenty-five years; assisted in forming the M.E. Church in Washburn, and has been a Trustee most of the time since. He has been an active temperance man, uniting with the Washingtonians, Sons of Temperance, Good Templars and Blue-Ribbon men, giving his influence and active sympathy to every effort made to stay the tide of intemperance and promote the cause of sobriety and total abstinence in the community where he lives.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

GOODRICH, GEORGE

Goodrich George H, Anoka. Druggist. Born July 8, 1860 in Platteville Wis, son of Nehemiah and Delia (Culver) Goodrich. Married Aug 22, 1888 to Mary A Funk. Educated in public schools and Wis State Normal School. Began drug business in Winterset Ia 1881; in Minneapolis 1884-86; moved to Anoka 1886 and had been engaged in drug business to date; in firm of Goodrich & Jennings. Dir Minn Pharmaceutical Mnfg Co. Mayor of Anoka 1892-94; member State Board of Pharmacy 9 years; pres for 4 years. Member Masonic fraternity.

Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Nancy Overlander

GOODSELL, HENRY

REV. HENRY GOODSELL, Pastor of the M. E. Church, Platteville; was born in Sussex, England, in February, 1841, in the parish of Ewhurst; son of John and Mary (Jarman) Goodsell. When 17 years of age, he left home and friends to seek his fortune in the New World. He remained a few months in Oneida Co., N. Y., then made his way to Lena, Ill., where he soon obtained employment. In 1862, he left Illinois for Minnesota, and entered Hamlin University, at Red Wing, where he worked for his board, and pursued his studies till 1866, finishing a scientific course in that year. Immediately after graduating, he entered the ministry of the M. E. Church, in the Minnesota Conference, and was first stationed at Mazeppa, Goodhue Co., Minn., where he remained three years; he was then in Lark City, Wabasha Co., Minn., two years; when returned to Goodhue Co., was stationed at Zambrota three years. He came to Wisconsin in 1875, preached in Hudson one year, Prescott, Pierce Co., three years, and came to Platteville in the fall of 1879. He was married in St. Peters, Minn., Oct. 4, 1869, to Miss Sarah, daughter of Rev. C. H. Savage, of the Minnesota M. E. Conference. She was a native of Highland Co., Ohio. They have three children -- Julia, Glenn and Guy.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

GOULD, CHAUNCY

CHAUNCY GOULD, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Fennimore; born in Bolton, Canada, in 1820; removed to Vermont in 1838; went to California in 1849; came to Wisconsin in 1853, and settled in Grant Co. Was married in Canada in 1853, to Flavia A. Bronson, who was born in Canada in 1833; they have two children -- George B., born in 1855; married Margaret Borah in 1875; is a resident of Sac Co., Iowa; Emma J., born in 1860; married John Borah, Dec. 30, 1880; resides at home. Mr. Gould has held various town offices; has been Town Clerk a number of years, Justice of the Peace, and has been a member of the Board of Supervisors of his town; is a Radical Republican. Owns a valuable farm of 130 acres, under a high state of cultivation.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Mount Ida Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

GOVIER, CHARLES

CHARLES GOVIER, farmer. Sec. 7 ; P.O. Lancaster. Owns 360 acres of land, valued at $25 per acre. Born in England in 1834. Came to America in 1855, and settled in Illinois; located on present farm in 1870. Married Belle Atkins, a native of England, and they have five children Ellen, Linda, Edwin, Fred and Rolia.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

GRAHAM, JAMES L.

JAMES L. GRAHAM, blacksmith; P. O. Burton; born March 27, 1837, in Virginia; son of Alexander and Elizabeth (Deigh) Graham; came to Grant Co. in 1860; at Big Patch two years. On July 4, 1862, he enlisted in Co. F, 20th W. V. I., and was out three years. Married Aug. 13, 1866, by B. F. Mayne, of Platteville, to Mary E., daughter of Pliny and Rosanna (Bulson) Holmes, born Jun 13, 1848; they have no children. In 1855, Mr. Graham struck a lead one mile south of Fair Play, and sold one-fourth interest for $4,000; his partners -- Cook, Kincade and Mace -- are all dead. Mace became a prominent man and resided at Dubuque, where he died a year ago.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Waterloo Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

GRAHAM, T. J.

T. J. GRAHAM, of the firm of Graham & Bremmer, general merchants, grain and live stock dealers, Muscoda; was born in New York State in 1832, and came to Wisconsin in 1836 with his parents, who located at Platteville, Grant Co.; he first worked on a farm and then went to California in 1849, and afterward returned to Richland County; came to Muscoda in 1864, and established the mercantile business, which he has followed so successfully. In 1853, he was married to Miss Mary E. Sharpe, a native of Indiana, by whom he has four children -- two sons and two daughters. He has been Chairman of the Town Board and was in Legislature in 1877; is a prominent member of A., F. & A. M.; has been a merchant for thirty consecutive years, and what he has made was by his own hard work. The firm do the largest business on the line, running three warehouses besides their large store and stock business.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

GRAHAM, WILLIAM A.

WILLIAM A. GRAHAM, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Lancaster; was born in New York Dec. 26, 1816; removed to California in 1850; came to Grant Co., Wis., in 1854, and settled in Fennimore. Was married to Mrs. Nancy Wells in 1854; she was born Dec. 27, 1832; Mrs. Graham was first married to Amos Frey, by whom she had one son -- Amos Frey, Jr. -- born Jan. 20, 1852; Mr. Graham has three children -- Charles N., W. S. A. and Philip S. In politics, Mr. Graham is a Republican. Has a valuable farm of 1132 acres, one of the most valuable in the county.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Mount Ida Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

GRATZ, HENRY

HENRY GRATZ, farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. Stitzer; was born in Germany in 1827; is a son of Eustace Gratz; he lived with his parents until 25 years old; he came to America in 1852, locating in Chicago for one and a half years; then to Indiana for four years, working on a railroad, but soon wending his way to Hazel Green, Grant Co. for four years; then on Yellowstone River for two years, returning to Hazel Green for one and a half years, and in 1865 he enlisted in the 44th W. V. I., Co. K; served seven months or until the end of the war. He was married in 1854, to Mary Kaufman, a daughter of George and Margaret Kaufman; has ten children -- Louisa M., George F., August E., Mary Ann, Rosa W., Henry G., William G., Minnie, Lewis and Sophia C. Politics, Republican; has been Pathmaster one term; has 160 acres of land; is a member of the Evangelical Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Liberty Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

GRAVES, BENJAMIN A.

BENJAMIN A. GRAVES, Sec. 2; P. O. Platteville; born in Mercer Co., Penn., Dec. 11, 1825. Married Miss Lurancy Ray July 25, 1845; she was born Feb. 14, 1828, in Trumbull Co., Ohio. In 1848, they came to Wisconsin, where Mr. Graves began as a teamster in this town; he afterward rented farms for a number of years until enough was earned and saved for the purchase of a farm of his own in 1858. This farm he sold to a brother in 1875; he then bought his present 107-acre farm of George McFall. Mr. Graves is a member of the U. B. Church, and a Republican; has been Constable, etc. During the last eight months of the rebellion, he served as one of the 44th W. V. I. Have eight children -- George, Roswell, Mary A., Arnold, Martha, Lulu, Lurinda and Hattie; they lost two -- Joab, aged 6, and Lorenzo, aged 2.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Harrison Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

GRAY, GEORGE

GEORGE GRAY, proprietor of Grant Mills ; P.O. Lancaster. Born in Scotland in 1830. Came to America in 1848, and located in New York State, where he remained three years, and then he came West and located in Iowa ; came to Grant Co. in 1870, and purchased the Grant Co. Mill, farm and water-power. Has always followed milling, learned the trade in the old country. He has all the improved machinery, and makes a No. 1 flour ; has a good water-power, and keeps everything in good shape. The mill is located on the "Big Grant," three miles from Lancaster, does mostly custom work. Mr. Gray is a bachelor, of a happy disposition, taking great comfort in his business, and among his stock. Republican in politics.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

GREENE, HENRY P

HENRY P GREENE grocer and stationer. Is a native of Wisconsin, and was born in Grant Co., Sept. 6, 1847. During the war, he entered the army; enlisted in Co. P, 7th W. V. I.; was severely wounded, and lost his arm at the battle of Petersburg, and remained in the service until discharged in New York City in April, 1865. In 1878, he engaged in his present business. Was united in marriage September 17, 1880, to Miss Florence Nathan.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

GREENE, S. R.

S. R. GREENE, proprietor of livery stable,. Lancaster. Commenced business in April, 1879, Potosi Grant Co a son of A. J. and Sarah (Lyons) Greene. Mr. Greene attended the schools of Potosi which he left at the age of 1 5, and went into the stage business. Having a natural taste for horses, he continued the business, and, in 1870, commenced running a daily stage-line from Potosi to Dubuque until 1873, when the C, C. & D. & M. K. R., was completed to Spechts' Ferry. Having been taken in by his brother as a partner, they then ran a daily stage from Specht's Ferry to Lancaster, which they afterward discontinued and bought the stable in Lancaster in December, 1878. Mr. Greene was married April 22,

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

GREER, JOE

Joe Greer Killed
Rodeo Star, Ex-Sheriff Car Crash Victim

Galena, Ill., Jan 25--(Special)--Famed circus and rodeo performer and owner and former sheriff of Grant County, Joe Greer, 62, was killed instantly early today in a three car accident near Galena.

The car Greer was driving crashed into the cab of a semi-trailer truck which has [sic] been sidewiped [sic] by a small farm pickup truck. The truck drivers escaped unhurt. Greer was hurled from the car by the impact of the collision.

Greer and his son, Harry, held a 14 year grip on the Grant County sheriff's office from 1928 to 1942. Elected in 1928 and re-elected in 1930, Greer was ineligible to succeed himself in 1932 because of the state law banning more than two consecutive terms for sheriffs.

FATHER, SON ALTERNATE

Harry was proposed for the position in 1932 on the condition his father serve as deputy. The son had served under his father. The alternate dynasty continued until 1942 when the father was defeated in the Republican primary by Alois Klaas. Greer ran as an independent in the election, but was defeated again.

Greer earned a statewide reputation for his war against bootleggers and moonshiners frequently penetrating heavily wooded areas to flush his quarry. Even after the Severson law, Wisconsin's counterpart of the national prohibition act, was repealed, Greer continued his raids under the federal law.

A rain on Bishop's Island, in the Mississippi River April 24, 1930, led to the fatal shooting of Edward Foht by Greer. A coroner's jury exonerated the sheriff from responsibility in the shooting when it found that a warning bullet fired over Foht's head ricocheted from a tree and struck the victim as he was running away.

TELLS FATHER'S STORY

Harry, in an interview in Milwaukee Sept. 3, 1931, gave the following account of his father's career.

"Dad worked his act up from 'mud shows'--traveling in a wagon--through half a dozen small circuses to Sells-Floto and Ringlings'. Been a professional rider all his life.

"Got kicked over the heart by a jumper once. Another night at Madison Square Garden, a horse fell on dad. Crushed the left side of his face. Almost killed him. Think he'd go to the hospital? No. Mother patched him up. In a hotel room.

TRICK SHOT

"Ever see dad's trick riding act and watch him rope? Good with a gun, too. Used to shoot chalk out of guy's mouth. That's hard. Roping steers isn't allowed in this state. Humane society. But where they do allo wit [sic] dad roped 'em for fun. Many a good boy's died roping steers."

The Greers sold most of their rodeo stock to Movie Cowboy Gene Autry in 1941, but the next year, herds of Burma cattle and buffalo were grazing in Greer pastures near Lancaster, Wis. The Greers were planning a new show.

Early last year, the Greers tourned [sic] in their Cassville, Wis., circus and radio show.

Surviving in addition to the son are a granddaughter, JoMoe; two brothers, Harry, Brownsville, Tex., and Robert, Minneapolis, and a sister, Sylvia, Chicago. Funeral services will be from Hoskins Chapel at Lancaster. The details will be announced when Harry arrives from California, where he was with the rodeo.

Source: The Milwaukee Sentinel 26 Jan 1946 - Transcribed by Mary Dutcher

GRIBBLE, JOHN

JOHN GRIBBLE, dealer in general merchandise, Hazel Green; business established in 1855; born in Cornwall, England, in 1812; came to America in 1839, and settled here, and engaged in mining for a few years. Married Mary Middleton in 1852; they have six children -- Thomas M., William, Elizabeth, Alice, Drusilla and Grace; has one child (by a former wife) -- John H, now traveling for a Milwaukee firm. Mr. Gribble has been on the Town Board two terms, and other offices of less importance.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

GRINDELL, JOHN

JOHN GRINDELL, cabinet-maker, Platteville, was born in Canada in 1828; came to Wisconsin in 1849, and settled in Platteville. In the spring of 1850 he went to California, returning to Platteville in the summer of 1852. In 1864, he enlisted in the 41st W. V. I. (100-day men) and went out as First Lieutenant of Co. A, and in February, 1865, enlisted in the 47th W. V. I., and served till the close of the war as First Lieutenant. He was married in the fall of 1852, to Miss Susan Cook, daughter of David Cook, of Beetown; has had six children -- Ada J., John H., Albert J., Daniel E., Susan May (deceased) and Arthur B. He has been Town Treasurer, and was President of the Village Board in 1879.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

GRINDELL, JOHN L.

JOHN L. GRINDELL (Rep.) was born at Marion, Iowa, in 1882. He received his education in the public schools and the University of Wisconsin, graduating with the class of 1905. He taught school for 10 years, being principal of the schools in De Soto, Shell Lake and Cumberland. Since 1908 he has been engaged in the retail marble and granite business in Platteville, first as a partner in the firm of John H. Grindell & Son but now as sole proprietor. He was elected to the assembly in 1918 by 1,810 votes, receiving 1,919 votes to 109 for J. N. McLeod (Ind.).

Source: The Wisconsin Blue Book (1919) page 483; transcribed by FoFG mz

GRINDELL, WILLIAM

WILLIAM GRINDELL, cabinet-maker; Platteville; was born in Canada in 1820; came to Buffalo, N. Y., and learned his trade, and in 1845 came to Platteville, where he has been in business ever since. He was on the School Board of Platteville about thirty years in succession, and has been on the Village Board several terms; his first wife, to whom he was married in Buffalo, N. Y., in 1843, was Miss Lydia Cook, she died in 1855, and in 1857 he married Miss Margaret McMurry, of Platteville, he has nine children living, three sons by the first wife, and three sons and three daughters by the second wife. One daughter, Miss Lillie Grindell, is Assistant Teacher in the Rock Graded School of Platteville; she was educated at the Normal School, of Platteville and commenced teaching in 1877; the first year at Ellenboro, Grant Co., then one year in Dodgeville, and is now on the second year in her present position.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

GRINTER, D. P.

D. P. GRINTER, physician and surgeon, Glen Haven; has been engaged in the practice of medicine since 1845; he was born in Russellville, Ky., in 1820; he went to Iowa in 1845 and located at Garnavillo; he soon after removed to Guttenburg, and thence in 1860 to this place. Married Louisa Sixbey, a native of White Pigeon, Mich.; they have two children -- Myron and Cora. Mr. Grinter also carries on quite an extensive grain and commission business in partnership with his son, Myron, who was born in Guttenburg in 1855.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Glen Haven Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

GROENE, CHRISTOPHER

CHRISTOPHER GROENE, farmer, Sec. 2; P. O. Annaton; was born in Prussia March 20, 1832; came to America in 1858, and direct to Wisconsin; worked in Lancaster for C. Hollaway five years, then rented one year; he then bought 160 acres of land, made the improvements and has made all by his own industry. His wife, Lizzie Holenberge, was a native of Europe; they married in 1862; she died in the year 1871, and left five children -- William, Charles, Amelia, Ella, George. His second wife was Christina Hoffmaster, born in Germany Nov. 13, 1841; came to America in 1860. Married to Henry Teist March, 1868; he died 1872; they had two children -- Herman and Menia. Married to Mr. Groene April, 1873 they have one child -- Bertha. In politics, Republican; a Presbyterian. Has been Treasurer o District No. 8.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Ellenboro Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

GROTE, HERMAN C.

HERMAN C. GROTE, of the firm of Grote & Unbrager, planing-mill and manufacturer of all kinds of furniture, Muscoda; was born in Westphalia, Prussia, Oct. 6, 1830, where he was educated. He came to America in 1847, and located first in Milwaukee, where he worked for Mr. Sehenek at the furniture business (who is now in the same business in Milwaukee), three weeks for 95 cents; he then went to Galena, Ill., where he learned the trade of cabinet-making and turning, remaining there until 1854, when he came to this State and located in Platteville, where he worked at his trade, and in February, 1855, he came to Muscoda and established the cabinet and turning business. He married in 1854, at Platteville, Miss., Jane Mann, a native of England. They have seven children; the oldest son is now engaged in the carpenter trade at Viroqua.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

GRUSHONG, JAMES

It was in the spring of 1826 that I started from Missouri for the newly discovered mines near Galena. The country was then uninhabited, only few places showing evidences of the previous presence of the white man. From the lower rapids to Rock Island there were no signs of settlement. At the latter place there was a fort garrisoned with United States troops. From Rock Island again to Galena there stretched out on either side a wilderness broken only by the numerous Indian towns which lined the west or Iowa side. Those little docks with their long piles of wood which are now so numerous along the great river's banks were then unknown; and the means of obtaining the supply of wood needed for the steamer's furnaces was as primitive as the country itself. Fifteen axes were included in the list of necessaries needed by the steamer, and when fuel run short the boat would be " laid to " alongside one of the numerous islands that dotted the bosom of this broad estuary, and fifteen pairs of stout arms would bring the ashes in crashing ruins at the feet of the choppers. These trees would then be cut into two or three lengths and rolled onto the lower deck, where they would be worked up more at leisure as the boat proceeded up the stream.

On arriving at Galena, we found that present thriving city to contain only three houses, and a smelting furnace, owned and run by a man named Comstock. It was an old-fashioned log furnace, but little better than the earlier furnaces in use by the Indians. All the land was owned by the government, who stood ready to give lots to any one who would occupy. In case mineral was found it had to be delivered to a licensed smelter, who was supposed to turn over to the government the sixteenth then demanded as rent for the land. A strong suspicion grew up among the miners in after times that these agents did not allow the government to benefit much by this tax, and as the mines became filled with the miners from all quarters, this practice of paying government rent was more honored in the breach than in the observance.

As I have said when I first arrived at Galena, there were but few residents there ; in fact, they might almost have been counted on your fingers, but during the year a great immigration set in that soon built up the town.

Just about the time of my arrival the Hard. Scrabble mines had began to show indisputable signs of heavy leads of ore, and accompanied by Henry W. Hodges, Thomas Shanley, Eli Perkins and Kidge Williams, I started for these mines. After having first obtained the following permit:

James Grushong is hereby permitted to dig or mine on United States land which is not leased or otherwise rightfully occupied. He is not to set fire to the prairie grass or woods, and deliver his mineral to a licensed smelter and comply with all regulations. Charles Smith, Acting Agent and Superintendent Lead Mines, Fevre River.

Fevre River, April 30, 1826.

There were no teams in the country, or at least none that we could get, therefore we procured a pirogue and loaded it with provisions, including a barrel of pickled pork and a barrel of flour, and started for the Hard Scrabble. Arriving there we found two or three cabins, in one of which were John Ewin, McKnight and Steve Thrasher. Another was occupied by a Frenchman, who was married to a Menomonee squaw, and speaking of the Frenchman reminds me of a joke he played on some Indian friends who had come to pay him a visit. Having first worked upon their imaginations until they were fully inoculated with the belief that the whites were conspiring to attack and massacre them, and had hid themselves in a hazel thicket near by, the Frenchman came to the miners' cabins and induced us to come over and furnish the grand finale to the plot. Accordingly, armed with a few fowling pieces, unloaded save with powder, we crept to the thicket where the Indians were lying in a tremor of fear and excitement. With a veil and a discharge of firearms we broke in upon them. Our yell was nothing to theirs, as with abound like a frightened deer, each one of the crowd broke from the covert and struck out in a bee-line for Galena, fully persuaded that their pursuers were close on their track. Some of them did not stop running until they got to Galena, where they reported the other portion of the party massacred by the miners. They found out their mistake afterward, while we all had a hearty laugh over their scare. Although they learned of the trick that had been played, they were too thoroughly frightened ever to return.

I remained mining with fair success at the Hard Scrabble until September, when I returned down the river. Light-draft steamers, capable of running at all times of the year, whether the river was high or low, were then unknown. The few boats running could only ply between the up-river places during the high water of spring and early fall. Consequently my companions and myself secured a pirogue and started down the river. We passed canoes without number, laden with corn and Indians, but they were peaceably inclined, as in fact were all the Indians in early times, their weaknesses being whisky and tobacco. The last part of our trip we were without provisions for two days and nights, and got nothing until we reached " White's," at the head of the rapids, where we obtained a " square " meal, that tasted extremely good after our long fast.

I came back in the spring accompanied by my brother, and started mining on the Coon Branch of the Fevre River, now included in La Fayette County. While here the Winnebago scare broke out. One night we were awakened about 12 o'clock by a great noise, cattle lowing, dogs barking, and a terrible racket generally, and upon turning out in the morning, found it was settlers fleeing from the Indians. Not being particularly frightened ourselves, we remained where we were, and continued raising mineral, and soon after the country quieted down, with the surrender of Red Bird and We-kaw, and settlers gradually returned to their homes.

When coming up the next spring I took the land route. There were eight of us in the party. We were obliged to head all the rivers, as we did not care to expose ourselves to an involuntary bath in attempting to ford them. Not a house was seen from the foot of the lower rapids until we reached Apple River. Previous to reaching the Apple our provisions ran low, and for a two days' stretch we were obliged to tighten our belts, as the only way of counteracting the gnawings which beset us in that portion of our anatomy, which should have been filled with something more substantial. At Apple River we found a sort of tavern kept by a landlady. Upon reaching it one of the party went in and ordered dinner for sixteen persons. The meal was prepared, and after we had filed in and taken our seats, the landlady instituted inquiries as to the whereabouts of the other eight. We told her that we thought those present could do ample justice to the preparations which had been made, and if anything was left we would institute a search for the others. The landlady saw the joke, and it is needless to say that there was no reason to look for any more of the party. The meal was disposed of by those present.

This season my brother and myself went on a prospecting tour up to the Pekatalic. On our return trip in the fall we passed over the present site of Lancaster, where no indications of the present village were visible, the only inhabitants being wolves, deer and other wild animals. We crossed over what is now known as Boice's Prairie, and while looking for a place to camp for the night, we heard a dog bark, and upon following up the sound, found a cabin inhabited by a man named Allen and his wife. Allen's father also lived with them. From the appearances about the house, I should think they must have come there at least a year before, although I do not recollect whether we asked them the question. The men were engaged in mining. Further on down the Platte, my brother's horse was bitten by a rattlesnake while we were following a path through the woods. We killed the snake, and feeling sure the path must lead to a cabin somewhere, I told him to take my horse, ride on, and get some sage tea and sweet milk if he could ; he was gone some time, but came back with the tea and milk. In the meanwhile the horse had swollen to an enormous size, but we dosed him with the sage tea and the milk. The tea did its work, as I felt sure it would, and by sundown the horse was able to move, and we started on for the Menomonee diggings. I did not go to the cabin where my brother got the sage, but it was situated on the Platte, and they must have been living there a year or more.

In 1832, during the Black Hawk war, I was at Coon's Branch, about two miles from Hazel Green. There was a great excitement, and companies were formed for defense against the Indians. Two men were needed at Hazel Green to make out the complement necessary to draw arms and equipments. My partner and myself enlisted, but did not do any fighting, as the company was not ordered out, and all through the- trouble we continued our work on the Branch, and raised 47,000 pounds of mineral out of a hole we only paid $40 for. The Indians were pretty thick, and frequently we would not see white men for a week. A Mr. Cottell was my partner here. I went back to Missouri again, and, in the spring of 1833, I came back. During the winter following, I and my brother mined again on Coon Branch, and raised 40,000 of mineral. I went back and returned in 1836 to Galena, and brought up a considerable number of cattle and horses. When I got to Galena, I had about $100 in " wild-cat" money, and while fooling around there, lost my pocket book. I went to Farnsworth & Furguson, and told them I was broke, and they let me have $50. I then helped my folks, who were on the way to the Hurricane, up as far as Hazel Green. There I determined to get that money back some way, and so went to prospect for a lead. I took an auger and went out, and the first hole I dug into I raised a chunk weighing 100 pounds. We took out 15,000, and then sold it out. I struck another lead and raised considerable mineral out of it, and then let my brother have it, and he raised 60,000 out of it, and, in three months after I left Galena, I had $500 ahead. We went to the Hurricane district in 1836. I think Harvey Bonham went there in 1833. I know he was there some time before we came, as sixteen of his hogs strayed down near us, weighing about 120 pounds apiece. I bought them for $60. I had to pay $1 a bushel for corn that winter for them, and my brother thought it was a poor transaction ; but the next fall pork went up to $10 a hundred and I had 1,000 pounds to sell off from this drove, besides what we wanted for our own use.

There were but few families in that section then ; but little farming had been done. People were just beginning to find out that they could raise good crops in this country. Deer, wolves and wild-cats were plenty in those days. I have seen, often, droves of from thirty to forty head of deer running through the woods. Wild bees were also numerous. Bee-trees could be found most anywhere in the woods. A bee -hunter who came here in early times found seventy-five bee-trees in the woods west of Lancaster, between there and Beetown, which he afterward sold for a horse. Although others were not quite so lucky as this, still no one had to go long without honey, if they cared to look up the trees.

In 1839, myself, Joe Bonham and Gen. Brown struck the Pigeon Diggings. The first hole I sunk I struck mineral in good sized chunks. I first sunk a claim on the old Bonham range. There has probably been 3,000,000 pounds of mineral taken out since. George Cox, of Lancaster, and a man named McMillan owned two forties, and George Jones, with a partner, struck a good lead on it, but kept it covered up for awhile. Finally, I secured a sixth interest for $300 after some dickering. The lead was as good as I expected. At one time we had 300,000 pounds of mineral on the ground that we had raised out of this lead. We raised 18,000 pounds one day with five or six hands. Mineral then averaged about $16 a thousand. Altogether a million and a half pounds were raised from this lead. Among other lodes of importance there is the Black lode, owned by Maj. Anderson, Clark and Roundtree, which turned out about 300,000 pounds. Bonham and McDonald struck one that turned out 500,000 ; and I struck mother that turned out 300,000.

Of the early settlement in other parts of the county, I cannot say much. I know, however that Tom Himer was at Cassville as early as 1824. He and some others went with some horses up to the Selkirk settlement, and on his return down the river, he stopped at Cassville, and remained a short time. He lived in a cabin formerly built by a Frenchman. Himer afterward came to the Hazel Green diggings.

In 1886, when I was up through there. Price was keeping a store in the new settlement, ind Mr. Ramsey was working a farm a short distance out. We bought some corn of his raising It that time. A Mr. Forbes was also there keeping a tavern.

In the early part of the settlement of the county, the in-comers were miners almost without exception, but in the years along about 1840, and later, bona fide settlers began to arrive, although it was a long time before their work began to show. The change in the aspect of the country between the time I landed from the old pirogue at Hard Scrabble and the county as it stands to-day is almost beyond belief. But all must yield to the law of progress.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Publ. 1881) transcribed by a Friend of Free Genealogy

GUDGER, CHARLES H.

CHARLES H. GUDGER occupies a prominent place as a well-to-do and prominent member of the farming community of Dwight township, in Richland county. He makes his home on section 20, and has a fine farm, upon which he has placed such improvements as entitle it to rank among the finest pieces of property devoted to agricultural pursuits to be found throughout the community, and has been instrumental in developing and promoting the growth of this section of the county.

Our subject was born in Wisconsin, September 15, 1853, the third in a family of seven children born to David and Mary (Deits) Gudger. His father was a soldier in the Second Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteers, and after serving about three years, was killed at the battle of Gettysburg, and the mother of our subject survives.

Charles H. Gudger was reared in Grant county, Wisconsin, and received a common school education. He worked out at farm labor in Grant county, until 1872, when he went to Dakota, and in the fall of that year filed claim to one hundred and sixty acres in Center township, Richland county. He partially improved his farm, and then sold his right and for five seasons was employed on a flat boat, running from Breckenridge, Minnesota, to Winnipeg, Manitoba. He then engaged in railroad work, first as brakeman, later, baggageman for three years, and finally spent two years as conductor on what is now the Great Northern Railroad. In 1882 he again settled in Richland county, and has since been engaged in farming in Dwight township. He owns one hundred and sixty acres of land, which is well improved, and he has gained a competence to tide him over a rainy day if need be.

Mr. Gudger was married in Center township, Richland county, June 12, 1890, to Miss Anna Burton, who was born in England, and was a daughter of Charles Burton. One child was born to Mr. and Mrs. Gudger, Charles F., who died when about one year of age.

Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Maggie Saggio

GUERNSEY, GEORGE M.

GEORGE M. GUERNSEY, life and fire insurance agent, Platteville; was born in Tioga Co., Penn., in the village of Tioga, Oct. 4, 1828; son of Levi B. Guernsey, who was a native of Amenia, Dutchess Co., N. Y.; Mr. Guernsey came to Wisconsin in 1858, and taught school in Milton, Rock Co., two years; in 1860, he came to Platteville and took charge of the Platteville Academy, which he conducted about seven years, till it was changed to a Normal School and was Professor of Mathematics in that school about one year, and since 1868 has been in his present business; he was County Superintendent of Schools from 1874 to 1878; he was married in 1856, in Pennsylvania, to Miss M. J. Roach, and has two children living -- Tommy and Maude.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

GUNDLAH, HERMAN

HERMAN GUNDLAH, Sec. 10; P. O. Livingston; was born in Fulton County, Ill., June 23, 1854, and has always engaged in farming; commenced for himself at the age of 18, on the homestead, at the death of his father, and then, in 1878, bought the farm where he now lives from his brother, and owns 80 acres. Was married to Catharine E. Runkel, in Germantown, Juneau Co., Wis. They have one child, Ferdinand P. Is a member of I. O. O. F., Washburn Lodge, No. 228.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio