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Biographies H-O

HAKE, GEORGE W.

GEORGE W. HAKE, farmer, Sec. 29; P. O. Annaton; better known as "Uncle George," is one of the leading farmers in the town of Clifton, and is noted for his truth and veracity; he was born in 1826, in Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio; was a son of George an Hannah Hake; his father was a cooper by trade; he lived with his parents until 21 years of age; came to Grant Co., Wis., in 1844, in company with his parents; located near Platteville; began encountering both wind and tide for himself four years after his arrival, working on a farm two years for wages; he then bought 120 acres of land, and in company with another young man, bought a breaking team, consisting of several yoke of oxen; in two years, he had improved and paid for his home. In 1851, he was married to Phebe Derwacter, a daughter of Michael and Eliza Derwacter. He has five children -- Sarah F., Phebe A., Loren L., George G. and Mary M. He owns 500 acres of land valued at $11,200, also keeps a dairy; he received a common-school education; has been a member of the Town Board three terms; has been Road Overseer ten years; Treasurer of the School Board for twenty years. Politics, Republican; members of the Disciples' Church; three children married, the rest living with their parents.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HALE, JOHN

JOHN HALE, Sec. 28; P.O. Platteville; was born March 4, 1815, in Somersetshire, England; came to America in 1840, landed at New York City; spent some time in the Pennsylvania and Ohio coal mines, and six months in St. Louis. He married at Cannellton, Ind., Isabella McColloch, and, in the spring of 1842, came to Hazel Green, and engaged in mining there until he came to Lima in 1850. Here he bought his present 80-acre homestead farm, then in a state of nature. The first year was spent in a log cabin surrounded by the dense growth of oak, hickory, etc., which originally covered his and all the adjoining land. He has cleared 65 acres of this, and, besides, owns 70 acres on Sec. 29. Mrs. Hale died July 14, 1864, leaving nine children--John P., Margaret C., Robert C., Sarah A., Elizabeth J., Lafayette, Alvin, George T. and Jacob A. The present Mrs. Hale was Sarah M., daughter of Jacob and Sarah Quick; she was born Jan.9, 1815, in Neversiok, Sullivan Co., N.Y. Jan. 7, 1834, she married in Caroline, Tompkins Co., N.Y., G.A. Graham, who was born June 25, 1815. they removed to Illinois, and, in 1835, came to Platteville, camping-out the night of July 4, 1835, near the site of the city. Mr. Graham went to California in 1849, and died there. He was one of the earliest settlers in Lima, and left six children--Robert, Alexander, William, Maria L., Emma M. and Sarah A.; Mary J. died before her father went to California. Mr. and Mrs. Hale have a most pleasant home, and look back to pioneer days as times when hardships and privations were cheerfully borne that such a home might be finally secured.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

HALE, ROBERT C.

ROBERT C. HALE, Sec. 29; P.O. Platteville; is a son of John and Isabella (McColloch) Hale (see sketch of John Hale); was born March 28, 1848, in Hazel Green, Grant Co., Wis.; came to Lima in 1850, and has since resided here; was for a number of years on a small farm on Sec. 20, and located where he now is in 1873. He married Mrs. Hannah M. (Condry) Reed; she was born in Wayne Co., Ohio, and came to Grant Co. in 1871, with her former husband, William Reed, who died a year later, leaving an only son, James Reed. Mr. and Mrs. Hale have three children--William T., John J. and Jessie May, all born in Lima. Mr. Hale is one of the three owners of a recently purchased portable steam saw-mill, and is at present engaged in operating it in the heavily-timbered districts of Grant Co.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

HAMMEN, JAMES M.

JAMES M. HAMMEN, farmer and proprietor of the Lancaster mill, which was erected in 1860, Sec. 28 ; P.O. Lancaster. Born in this county in 1838 ; settled on his present farm in 1879. Married Myra Moore, a native of New York, and they have four children Eugene, Jennie, Clara and Charles. Mr. H. enlisted in Co. A, 2d Iowa V. C, in 1861, and resigned in 1862 ; was Quartermaster of regiment.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

HARFORD, J. A.

J. A. HARFORD, Sec. 6; P. O. Wyalusing; owns 150 acres of land; born in Shelby Co., Ky., in 1831; came to Wisconsin in 1854, and settled in this town. Married Sarah Malin, a native of Kentucky; they have six children -- Preston, Jennie, Taylor, Clara, Earnest and May. Mr. Harford has been Justice of the Peace twenty-two years; has also been Chairman of the Town Board.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Wyalusing Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HARKINS, THOMAS

THOMAS HARKINS, physician and surgeon, Muscoda; is a son of William and Axey Rosencrans, who were natives of Susquehanna Co., Penn., where Thomas was born. His father was a drover, which was his principal business; was also engaged in farming. The Doctor spent his childhood under the paternal roof, and read medicine with Dr. Partridge, of Montrose, Susquehanna Co., Penn., and graduated at the old Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia, which was established by William Penn. In 1850, he came to this State, and located at Hudson, St. Croix Co., and engaged in practice with Dr. R. Hayt, where he remained until November, 1854. His health failing, he came to Lancaster, Grant Co., where he followed his profession until the spring of 1856, when he came to Muscoda. In the fall of 1864, he enlisted as high private in the 44th W. V. I.; the following March, was promoted to Surgeon of the regiment, with the rank of Captain, and was mustered out with the regiment Aug. 28, 1865. In 1866, he located at Highland, Iowa Co., and resumed practice, where he remained until 1874, when he started on a tour through the West, and traveled through Kansas, the Indian Territory, Arkansas, Missouri, and for six weeks through New Mexico, returning to Muscoda in 1880, and resumed practice.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HARMS, JOHN

JOHN HARMS, Sec. 2; P. O. Platteville; born in Hanover, Germany, in 1812; came to America in 1838 and settled on this farm. Mr. Harms has held quite important public offices; was elected to the Legislature in 1863, and has been a member of the Town Board a number of years.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Smelser Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HARPER, M. A.

M. A. HARPER, farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. Hazel Green; owns 210 acres of land, valued at $45 per acre; born in Greene Co., Penn., June 3, 1814; came to Wisconsin in 1847, and located on his present farm. In 1841, he married Hester J. Lewis, who was born in Harrison Co., W. Va.; they have eight children -- Charles, Salona, Virginia, Albert, Crawford, Carrie, Cornelius A. and Mildred. Are members of M. E. Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HARRIS, JOSEPH

JOSEPH HARRIS, farmer, Sec. 3; P. O. Hazel Green; owns 400 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre; born in England in 1823; came to America in 1844, and settled in Hazel Green, and engaged in mining; located on his present farm in 1855. Married Rebecca Bawden, a native of England; they have eleven children -- John F., Mary E., Rebecca, Joseph, Charles, Ethelinda, Jacob, Nettie, Thomas, Belle and Allie. Mr. Harris has been a member of the Legislature three terms; elected in 1860, 1869 and 1871.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HARTFORD, W. P.

W. P. HARTFORD, Beetown; born in 1853, in Henry Co., Ky.; was a son of J. A. Hartford; came with his father to Grant Co. in 1854; began doing for himself at the age of 14; followed many different occupations for a living; was a school-teacher eight years; has been a Captain, clerk, cook and roustabout on a steamboat; is a self-made man. Graduated in Louisville, Ky.; he was appointed in charge of the Dispensary; finally located to Beetown, and began his practice. He was married the 12th of December, 1889, to Miss Carrie E. McDonnell, a daughter of E.S. McDonnell, of Moline, Ill.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

HARVEY, JAMES

JAMES HARVEY, proprietor of the Twelve-Mile House; P. O. Fairview; owns 157 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre; born in England in 1840; came to America in 1842 with parents. Married Susan Lukey, a native of this county; they have three children -- Nellie, Lukey and Isaac. Mr. H. has been a member of the Town Board one term, and Assessor one term.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HARVILL, JOHN M.

JOHN M. HARVILL, Sec. 1; P. O. Brodtville; owns 120 acres of land, valued at $15 per acre; born in Illinois in 1839; in 1844, his parents removed to Wisconsin and settled in Beetown; located on this farm in 1864. Married Harriett Tryon, a native of this county; they have five children -- William E., Annie L., Frank D., Edgar R., John M. In 1861, Mr. Harvill enlisted in Co. F, 7th W. V. I., and was discharged in 1864.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Wyalusing Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HATCH, S. A.

S. A. HATCH, Sec. 12; P. O. Bloomington; owns 240 acres land, valued at $40 per acre; born in Montgomery Co., N. Y., in 1836; came to Wisconsin in 1867, and settled on this farm. Married Nancy Abrams, a native of the same county; they have six children -- George, Charles, Emma, James, Ora and Nancy. Mr. Hatch has held different town offices; has been a member of the Town Board.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HATCH, WILLIAM J.

WILLIAM J. HATCH, Sec. 11; P. O. Bloomington; owns 160 acres land, valued at $45 per acre; born in Montgomery Co., N. Y., in 1831; came to Wisconsin in 1868, and located with his brother, S. A. Hatch, in this town; he is a son of Joseph Hatch, who was also born in New York.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HAWLEY, GIDEON

GIDEON HAWLEY, carriage manufacturer and grain dealer, Platteville; is one of the earliest settlers in Southwest Wisconsin, his father, Aaron Hawley, was a native of Vermont; he went to Illinois at an early day and from there to Wisconsin in 1827, and settled in what is now Grotiot, La Fayette Co., his family joining him in 1828; he was killed in the Black Hawk war in 1832, and his family returned to Sangamon Co., Ill., near Springfield, where they remained till 1836, and then came back to La Fayette Co., Wis. Gideon Hawley was born in 1822, in Sangamon Co., Ill.; learned the carriage maker's trade in La Fayette Co., Wis., commencing at the age of 18; came to Platteville in the spring of 1846, and has been engaged in carriage making there ever since, except a year on a farm near Platteville, in 1868, he added grain dealing to his other business and still continues it -- or rather that part of the business is carried on by his sons under the firm name of T. C. Hawley & Co. Mr. Hawley was married in 1843, in Dubuque, Iowa, to Miss Sarah Y. Clark, of that place, and has had nine children, four of whom are still living -- Frank A., Albert C., Theophilus C. and Harry G. Lost five -- Newton and Perry (twins), Jessie B. and two died in infancy.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HAZELTON, GEORGE C.

GEORGE C. HAZELTON,of Boscobel, was born in Chester, Rockingham county, New Hampshire, January 3, 1833; graduated at Union College, Schenectady, New York, in 1858; studied law; was admitted to the bar in the state of New York, and settled in Boscobel, Wisconsin, in 1863, where he has since practiced his profession; was elected district attorney of Grant county in 1864, and re-elected in 1866; in 1867 was elected state senator, and chosen president protem, of the senate, and was re-elected to the senate in 1869. He was elected to the forty-fifth congress as a republican. Re-elected to the forty-sixth congress, receiving 11,695 votes against 11,603 for Owen King, greenbacker. He was re-elected to the forty-seventh congress, receiving 16,286 votes against 12,941 votes for M.M. Cothren, democrat.

Source: Blue Book of the State of Wisconsin for (1882) page 522; transcribed by Tammy Clark

HAZELTON, GEORGE C.

GEORGE C. HAZELTON, of Boscobel, was born in Chester, Rockingham county, New Hampshire, January 3, 183x; graduated at Union College, Schenectady, New York, in 1858; studied law; was admitted to the bar in the state of New York, and settled in Boscobel, Wisconsin, in 1863, where he has since practiced his profession; was elected district attorney of Grant county in 1864, and re-elected in 1866; in 1867 was elected state senator, and chosen president pro tem. of the senate, and was re-elected to the senate in 1869. He was elected to the forty-fifth congress as a republican. Re-elected to the forty-sixth congress, receiving 11,695 votes against 11,603 for Owen King, greenbacker. He was re-elected to the forty-seventh congress, receiving 16,286 votes against 12,941 votes for M. M. Cothren, democrat.

Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1883) Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

HAZELTON, GEORGE COCHRANE

GEORGE C. HAZELTON, of Boscobel, was born in Chester, Rockingham county, New Hampshire, January 8, 1833; graduated at Union College, Schenectady, New York, in 1858; studied law; was admitted to the bar in the State of New York, and settled in Boscobel, Wisconsin in 1863, where he has since practiced his profession; was elected district attorney of Grant county in 1864, and re-elected in 1866; in 1867 was elected state senator, and chosen pro tem. of the senate, and was re-elected to the senate in 1869. He was elected to the forty-fifth congress, as a Republican, receiving 15,582 votes against 13,034 votes for P. A. Orton, Democrat. Re-elected to the forty-sixth congress, receiving 11,695 votes against 11,603 for Owen King, Greenbacker.

Source: Blue Book of Wisconsin (1880) transcribed by Grace Greenwald

HAZELTON, GEORGE COCHRANE

GEORGE COCHRANE HAZELTON, Boscobel, the subject of this brief biography, prominent among the leading self-made men of Wisconsin, is a native of Chester, Rockingham county, New Hampshire, where he was born January 3, 1833, the son of William and Mercy J. Cochrane Hazelton. His father traced his ancestry back through many generations of sturdy Englishmen, and in his own life exemplified many of those traits of sterling manhood which have characterized the active career of his son. After many years of mercantile life he turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, settling on the homestead which had been in the family name for three generations, and there reared a family of six children, of whom George was the fifth. He was a man of firm convictions, and took a decided stand against every form of oppression, and sternly maintained what he regarded as the right. In politics, he was formerly a Henry Clay whig; but upon the formation of the republican party warmly espoused the principles of that cause and cherished them until his death. The mother of our subject is descended from an old and noted scotch family, and is a woman of rare intelligence and womanly virtues, and to her influence and training is to be attributed much of that nobleness of character which pervaded her new England home, and which showed itself in the lives of her children. Always taking an active interest in current topics, she entered heartily into the discussion of political and other questions, around her own fireside; and even now, at the advanced age of more than four-score years, she is in the full possession of all her faculties, and keeps herself well-informed on the public issues of the day.

Under the influence of such a home and such training, George passed the first sixteen years of his life, spending his summers in hard work on his father's farm, and during the winters attending the district school. Here his character was formed; and here was instilled into him that independence of thought, that strong belief in the equal rights of all men, and that fearlessness of expression which have characterized all his doings. He learned by experience the lessons of hard necessity, and being thrown upon his own resources for means to gain that education after which his ambition reached, he cultivated, early in life, a sprit of self-reliance which revealed to him the strength of his own powers and enabled him to stand on his own independence.

At the age of sixteen years, with the purpose of preparing for college, he entered an academy at Derry, New Hampshire, and afterward continued his academical studies at Dummer academy, in Oldtown, near Newburyport, Massachusetts, under the instruction of Professor Henshaw, who was afterward a noted teacher in Rutgers College, New Jersey. During the years of his preparatory study he devoted a portion of his time to teaching in the country districts, being thus enabled to defray his expenses and secure means sufficient to enable him to enter upon his collegiate course. He was a thorough and close student, and such had been his diligence and application, that he was prepared to enter the sophomore class of Union College, at Schenectady, New York. During his college training he was under the instruction of the venerable and celebrated president Nott. In college he maintained a high standing of scholarship, paying his expenses by his own work, and in 1858 graduated with honor, and during the same year was admitted to the bar at Malone, New York.

During the following five years, until the fall of 1863, with the exception of a few months spent in the treasury department at Washington, D.C., he was actively engaged in the practice of his profession at Amsterdam and Schenectady, New York, and there laid the foundations of his succeeding professional career. Prior to this time, his elder brothers, William and Gerry W. Hazelton, the latter of whom is at present United States district attorney at Milwaukee, had settled in Wisconsin. This fact, together with his desire for a wider field for the employment of his talents, decided him to remove to the west. He was now thirty years of age; and having decided where his future home was to be, although possessed of but small means, with a firm faith in his own merit and ability, he wedded Miss Ellen Van Antwert, of Schenectady, a lady of fine accomplishments and attainments, and with her settled at Boscobel in Grant county, Wisconsin, where he still resides. Life with all its opportunities was now before him, and with a mind richly stored by his years of study, he was prepared to enter with vigor into his work, and make for himself a position and name. In early life he had taken an active part in debating societies and the college lyceum, and having a native talent for oratorical display, he became known for his power in that direction. These gifts were now brought into full play, and gained for him a marked success as an advocate, and soon secured to him an extensive and lucrative law practice.

In November, 1864, one year after settling in his new home, he as elected district attorney for Grant county, and two years later reelected for a second term. In 1867 he received an election to the state senate, and was chosen president pro tempore of that body, and in 1869 was reelected to the same office. His ambition, however, was to gain a reputation as an able lawyer, and with a view to establishing himself more firmly in his profession, he devoted the next five years to close and diligent practice in the state and United States courts. His success was most marked.

During all his life he had been a close observer of men and events, and kept himself well informed on all questions of both local and national interest. And being by nature a leader, with his varied attainments and rich experience, it was but natural, when his fellow-citizens were seeking a man to represent them in the national legislature, that they should look to him. He was first elected to that body in November, 1867. At this time the majority of congress was democratic, and Mr. Hazelton, being a staunch republican, found few opportunities, to test either his ability to work, his knowledge of politics, or his skill in debate. Notwithstanding these adverse circumstances at the opening of his public life, he stood firm with the minority, and whenever opportunity offered, by his readiness and ability, and force in stating a point, soon began to command the attention of the house. In 1878, when he received a re-nomination, the leading question in his district, the third Wisconsin, was finance.

Was the nation to have an honest dollar and keep faith with its creditors, or was it to enter upon another era of paper inflation? Upon this question Mr. Hazelton had clear convictions and took a decided stand for a speedy return to specie payment as the only sure road to future national prosperity. With a majority of his district against him, he took his stand upon the republican financial platform; and although democrats and greenbackers combined to defeat him, he overcame the majority by his persuasive arguments, and was elected to the forty-sixth congress. During this congress, in February, 1878, he delivered a masterly speech on the Powers of Government, and in it showed a thorough knowledge of the political phases of the question, and exhibited a boldness of thought that showed that he had been a careful student of political history. His greatest effort, however, and that which ranked him among the best orators of the house, was on the subject of national banks. It was speech in favor of honest money and national good faith, and was widely published at the time and commented upon by the daily press. During the fall of 1879, at the time of the congressional canvas in California he went thither in response to an earnest invitation and assisted in the campaign, and to the efforts of no man outside the state, more than his, was due the republican victory that followed. In 1880 he delivered a famous address at Arlington cemetery on Decoration day, and there took a bold stand that endeared him to the assembled veterans, and proved to them that they would find in him a warm friend, who would leave undone nothing that could be done to secure justice to those who had risked their lives for the union. During this same year he was re-nominated for a third term to congress and elected by a majority ranking among the highest ever given any man in that district since the close of the rebellion. In social life Mr. Hazelton is a most genial companion, and by his many estimable qualities has attracted to himself a host of warm friends. Of four children who have been born to him, two are now living.

Frank and outspoken, and firm in his own convictions of the right, he is ready always to maintain what he believes; and at the same time no man is readier to acknowledge a fault or make amends for a wrong. Mr. Hazelton is a fair example of perseverance, industry and self-reliance, and now, in the very prime of his powers, well illustrates what may be accomplished by hard work and a faithful adherence to an honest purpose.

Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

HAZELTON, GEORGE COCHRANE

GEORGE COCHRANE HAZELTON was born in Chester, Rockingham Co., N. H., Jan. 3, 1833. He came of good stock, his father, William Hazelton, tracing his descent back through many generations of English ancestry. His mother, Mercy J. Cochrane, comes of an old and noted Scotch family. The homestead in which he was born had been in the possession of their family for three generations. His father was, for many years, a merchant, but finally turned his attention exclusively to the farm, and there raised a family of six children, of whom George Cochrane was the fifth. Up to his sixteenth year the life of George was that of a New England farmer boy. There was plenty of hard work during the summer, and the district school and chores during the long, cold winters. As was the case in such New England homes, politics was always a subject of family debate, and our young lad listened to his father and mother and the elder brothers as they discussed the questions of the National bank, the tariff and free trade, which was soon to be supplemented by that more absorbing topic -- the anti-slavery agitation. In these family debates, the mother always took a leading part. At that time she was noted for the keen interest she took in public affairs, and now, at the ripe age of eighty-two years, she possesses all her faculties intact, and keeps herself well informed on the issues of the day.

The elder Hazelton was a Henry Clay Whig, and a Republican by natural inheritance, when that party came into existence; and he cherished its principles to the day of his death. In this wide-awake and intelligent New England family, George naturally grew up a firm believer in the equal rights of all men, and with decided convictions as to the wisdom of the policy ofprotection for American labor.

When he was sixteen years old, he entered an academic school at Derry, N. H. Here he prepared himself for college at Dummer Academy, in Oldtown, near Newburyport, Mass., under the instruction of Prof. Henshaw, who was afterward so well known in connection with Rutger's College, in New Jersey. There was no royal road to learning for the sons of this New Hampshire farmer. A home he could give them. In all other respects they must make their own way in the world; and George soon knew what it was to teach school in country district, and board around. By this, and similar means, he educated himself; and so well was he prepared, that he entered the sophomore instead of the freshman class of Union College, at Schenectady, N. Y. Here, he had for President of the Faculty the venerable and celebrated Doctor Nott. And here, as in other places, he supported himself until he graduated in 1858. In the same year he was admitted to the bar at Malone, N. Y. One of the curious incidents of political life in our country is to be found in the fact that Judge James, a member of the 47th Congress from New York, was one of the four judges before whom young Hazelton appeared at Malone for examination. It is needless to say that the veteran lawyer from the Empire State and the rising young advocate from the West are warm friends.

After being admitted to the bar, with the exception of a few months spent in the Treasury Department at Washington, D. C., he practiced law at Amsterdam and Schenectady, N. Y., until the autumn of 1863, when he decided to settle in the West. His elder brothers, William and Gerry W. Hazelton, the present United States District Attorney for Milwaukee, had settled in Wisconsin some years previous. To be in their vicinity was the principal reason of his settling, in September, 1863, at Boscobel, in Grant County, Wis., where he has since resided. If there is any one trait that pre-eminently marks the character of Mr. Hazelton, it is self-reliance. Our great philosopher, Emerson, in his essay on this admirable trait of American character, says: "A sturdy lad from New Hampshire or Vermont, who, in turn, tries all the professions, who teams it, farms it, peddles, keeps school, preaches, edits a newspaper, goes to Congress, buys a township, and so forth, in successive years, and always, like a cat, falls on his feet, is worth a hundred of these city dolls. He walks abreast with his days, and feels on shame in not studying a profession, for he does not postpone his life, but lives already. He has not one chance, but a hundred chances."

Mr. Hazelton was all this, and more, for he had the profession which he had struggled to obtain, and which he still loves. With a firm faith in his capacity to make his way upward and onward in life upon his own individual merits, and having decided, in September, 1863, where his home was to be, in the following November, poor as he was in this world's goods, but rich in more than "a hundred chances," he wedded Ellen Van Antwerp, of Schenectady, N. Y., an accomplished lady, who has been to him a helpmeet in the highest and truest sense of the word. Four children have blessed this union, two of whom -- the eldest boy Harry, and the only girl, Alice -- are deceased. George and John Hampdon still live to cheer the home and bless the hearts of their parents.

Having decided on a home and found a wife to preside over it, the self-reliant young lawyer went to work to win that which he came to Wisconsin for -- a place among men. There were no shilly-shally efforts, but direct, forcible work. He had his chosen profession. He was a born orator. The country debating schools and the college lyceums always had special attractions for him. In his new home, these natural gifts were soon brought into full play. In November, 1864, he was elected District Attorney for Grant County, and, in 1866, was re-elected for the second term. Nor did this rapid progress cease here, for we find him elected to the State Senate in 1867, and he was chosen President pro tempore of that body. He was again elected to the Senate in 1869. Feeling that he must gain a more solid reputation in his profession, we find him, at the expiration of his last term in the State Senate, giving five years of close and diligent attention to the practice of law in the State and United States Courts. Here he soon became known as one of the leading lawyers of Wisconsin. His success as a jury lawyer was most marked, and soon gained him an extensive practice and a wide experience.

If anything, he was an active and ardent Republican. Each recurring canvass found him vigorously engaged. The result was that he was again called upon to represent his fellow-citizens, this time in the National Legislature, being elected to the Forty-fifth Congress, in November, 1876. He entered Congress at a time when he found himself numbered among the Republican minority. This was peculiarly unfortunate, for the Democratic majority, through their committees prepared and controlled all legislation, and never willingly allowed any Republican to do any work, or take any part that would test either his ability to work, his knowledge of politics, or his skill in debate. His real public life commenced under these adverse circumstances. But he was not thus to be repressed. Whenever opportunity offered, his readiness and ability to state a point with rare terseness and force soon began to command the attention of the House. Such was the state of affairs with him when he was re-nominated in 1878. The leading question in the Third Wisconsin District was finance. Briefly stated, it was this: Shall the National have an honest dollar and keep faith with its creditors, or shall we enter upon another era of paper money inflation. All of Mr. Hazelton's convictions as to what was not only the best policy, but the soundest politics, made him believe that a speedy return to specie payments was the only sure road to future national prosperity. Although a majority of the voters of his district seemed against him, he never wavered for an instant. He was re-nominated in 1878, and at once took the stump on the Republican financial platform. Both Greenbackers and Democrats united to beat him, and it was only by the most persuasive speeches and untiring labor that he overcame the majority, and was re-elected to the Forty-sixth Congress.

In the first session of this Congress he had his first opportunity to show the real quality of his intellect. In February, 1879, when the majority were openly threatening the immediate repeal of the re-construction measures, he delivered a speech on the "Powers of Government," in which he not only exhibited a thorough knowledge of the legal and political phases of the question, but a boldness of thought in applying principles that clearly showed that he had been a close student of our political history. In the following April, when the same majority were attempting to impede the resumption of specie payments, he spoke on the subject of the National Banks. This speech, made in favor of honest money and national good faith, was one of his greatest efforts. It attracted much attention at the time, and was widely published and commented upon in the daily press. His efforts during this session ranked him among the best orators in the House, and, in the autumn of that year, he was invited to go to California and assist in the canvass in that State. The election was for members of Congress, and it was regarded as the test case of the coming national campaign of 1880. The Republicans carried that State, and no one man from outside of it contributed more to that success than Mr. Hazelton. He has, if any man has, the courage of his convictions. He was invited to deliver an address at the famous Arlington cemetery, on Decoration Day, 1880. Here he made a wide departure from the usual line of thought followed by most speakers on similar occasions. He said that we had apologized long enough for conquering the rebellion, and then he told the assembled veterans that the Union soldiers, living and dead, in putting down the rebellion had accomplished a work such as had never been accomplished before. This speech was also published in the daily press, and Union soldiers all over the land spoke of it in the warmest terms. The soldiers have in him a warm and energetic friend, and as more than a score of grateful pensioners can testify, and whether as a member of the committee on invalid pensions, or in helping along a case delayed in the pension office, he omits no effort to see that justice is done. In 1880, he was re-nominated for the third time, and most triumphantly re-elected, his majority ranking among the highest ever given for any man since the close of the rebellion.

In consideration of his marked traits of character: He did not die young; he is strong in his likes and dislikes, and often frankness itself in expressing them; he sometimes wounds the feelings of sensitive people, not that he would wrong any one, but being a man ofpositive convictions, and of a most sanguine temperament, he is almost the ideal of a "blunt man," and speaks just as he thinks. In a word, he has that good, but very impolite habit of saying "yes," or "no," at once. Such a man must, at times, wound his friends and embitter those whom political and other reasons have made his enemies. But once let him see that he has been wrong, and, like all men of his temperament, he is the first to acknowledge his error. Nor does he cherish animosity toward political opponents in his own party. When once a struggle has been ended in caucus or convention, if he and his friends have been defeated, it is the end of the battle with him, no matter what personal interests may have been at stake, and he is one of the first to hold out his hand, and say, "All, right, boys; we did our best to bet you, but now we are with you." When he says this, it means no half hearted work either. On the other hand he possesses, in the highest degree, the power of attaching men to him. Often he has been heard to speak, in the warmest terms, and with real emotion, of the many helpful and faithful friends he has found since his home has been in Wisconsin. "Whatever of success I have had," said he, "I owe to them." That his energy and ability as a lawyer and a man of politics, his fidelity to his principles and to his friends, are known and appreciated by those who are best acquainted with him, is shown by the fact that they have steadily called him to higher and more important duties. He is now in the prime of his mental power.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HEFFERNAN, MAURICE

MAURICE HEFFERNAN, Sec. 4; P. O. Georgetown; owns 240 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre; born in Canada in 1829; came to Wisconsin in 1856, and settled on his present farm. Married Elizabeth J. Sims, a native of England; they have eleven children -- John, William, Albert, Henry, Apply, James, Mary, Oscar, Walter, Oliver and Jesse. Are members of the Methodist Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HEILERMANN, CHARLES

CHARLES HEILERMANN, Sec. 21; P. O. North Andover; owns 691 acres of land; born in Germany March 1, 1828; he landed in America the 1st of July, 1849; in July, 1854, he returned to Germany, where he remained until 1865, when he again came to America and settled in Clayton Co., Iowa; in 1867, he came to this county. Married Annie Greve, a native of Hanover, Germany, born Oct. 23, 1832; they have three children -- Mary Elmonde, Peter William and George Herman. Mr. H. has been a member of the Town Board three years.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Glen Haven Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HELLBERG, G. A.

G. A. HELLBERG, cooper, Platteville; was born Dec. 4, 1837, in Jonkoping, Sweden. He learned his trade in Sweden of his father, who was a cooper, and left home when not quite 16 years old; he worked in Stockholm and Gothoborg, Sweden, Fredrickshull, Norway, and Abo in Finland, Russia. He was a member of a military organization called the "Free-Will Sharpshooters." and was a Corporal at the time he left Sweden; while there, he took the sixth Government prize for sharp shooting in a company of 450 men; he belonged to one of the oldest families in Sweden; held the office of Poor Master for two years, and was Secretary of the Workingmen's Association, and Captain in the Fire Department of his native village; came to America in 1867, worked a few months in Chicago, and about one year in Rockford, Ill.; came to Darlington, Wis., in 1869, and to Platteville in 1870; does brewery work and all kinds of first-class work. He was married in 1860, in Sweden, to Anna Maria Wallender, and has three children -- Gustaf Syver, Anna Alfrida and Hedwig Maria.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HELLER, SEBASTIAN

SEBASTIAN HELLER, farmer, Sec. 22; P. O. Boscobel; born in 1832 in Baden, Germany; in 1853, came to Ulster Co., N. Y., where he remained two years, then came to the town of Marion, Grant Co., where he has since resided. He now owns 120 acres of land; this he has acquired by his industry since coming here. Married, in 1866, to Mary Henkel; she was born in Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany; they have eight children -- four sons and four daughters.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Marion) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HENDERSHOT, PHILIP D. Sr.,

PHILIP D. HENDERSHOT, Sr., saddler and harness-maker, Platteville; was born in Smoky Hollow, Canada, 1822; learned his trade in Canada, serving four and a half years; came to Platteville in April, 1846, and has followed the business there ever since; he made the first saddle and the first trunk ever made in Grant Co., and also made the first Scotch horse-collar in the State of Wisconsin, while in Milwaukee on his way to Platteville. He was married in St. Thomas, London District, Canada West, in 1844, to Miss Sarah, daughter of Henry Buchanan, and has five children living -- James, Rachel, Sylvester, Philip D. and Sarah; Rachel is now the wife of R. R. David, of Ortonville, Minn., and the sons all living in Platteville; the eldest son James, was in the army during the last seventeen months of the war, in Co. A, 50th W. V. I.; he is married to Miss Laura E. Squires, of Platteville, and Sylvester to Miss Mary Conly, of Mifflin, Iowa Co. Mr. Hendershot has been engaged in farming and mining in addition to his other business most of the time since he has been in Platteville, and now owns a farm of 30 acres adjoining the city plat; he has been School Director and Marshal of the village, and was a mail contractor for about nine years.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HENDERSON, ALBERT T.

ALBERT T. HENDERSON, M. D., Annaton; born in 1815 in Huntingdon Co., Penn.; was a son of John and Rebecca Henderson; lived with his parents until 22 years of age; was a graduate of the select academy at Huntingdon, Penn., and also a graduate at the medical college at Philadelphia; he began his practice in Huntingdon with his father, who was also a physician; then moved to Greene Co., Ohio, for two years; thence to Michigan for one year; thence to Illinois for seven years; thence to Austin, Tex., where he enlisted in the Mexican war and served one year, and in 1848, he came to Platteville, Grant Co., Wis., and in 1850, he went to California where he lived nineteen months, then returning to Grant Co., Wis., where he has since lived and followed his profession. He has been married three times, first in 1851, to Amanda Haywood, a daughter of Judge Haywood; second time to Mealie Barchar; was divorced from both of them; was married third time, in 1868, to Melissa A. Nealy, a daughter of Pierce Costley; have two children -- Sarah M. and Margaret J. He enlisted in 1863, in the 3d W. V. I., Co. B; served nineteen months; was wounded in the mouth. Is a Republican.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HENDY, G. C.

G. C. HENDY, merchant, Platteville; is a native of Dodgeville, Wis., born in 1847. His father, Samuel Hendy, was born in Cornwall, England, Parish of Breage, in February, 1820, son of James and Priscilla (Thomas) Hendy. His mother, whose maiden name was Ann Shephard, was born in March, 1820, also in Cornwall, England, Parish of Mullion, daughter of Thomas and Ann (Mitchell) Shephard. Mr. Hendy, Sr., came to America in June, 1842, and resided in Dodgeville, Wis., from that time till 1866, since which time he has resided in Platteville; soon after coming to Platteville, he bought out the book-store of McCurn & Griswold, which he carried on till 1874 in company with his son. G. C. Hendy then sold out to his partner and retired from business; since which time the present proprietor has carried on the business alone. G. C. Hendy was married in 1877, to Miss Julia, daughter of John Kemler, Esq., one of the pioneers of Platteville, and has two children -- John Kemler and Clarence Augustus.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HENKEL

HENKEL& WENZEL, proprietors of saloon and restaurant. This business was established in December, 1874, in their own building, which was constructed the same year.
HENKEL, GEORGE

GEORGE HENKEL, farmer, Sec. 21; P. O. Boscobel; born in Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, May 5, 1824; he worked at the mason trade about twelve years before coming to this country; in 1851, came to Pennsylvania; also followed this trade there about four years; in 1855, came to Lancaster, Wis.; worked at this business one year, when he removed to his present farm. Owns 366 acres; he has improved this farm, with a substantial barn, cost about $800; his residence cost about $600; has been Assessor one year, member of the Town Board seventeen years; is Town Treasurer; has held this office the past eleven years; is also a member of the School Board. Married, in 1855, to Anna Weirich; she was born in Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany; they have six children -- four sons and two daughters. Are members of the Presbyterian Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Marion) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HENKEL, PETER

Peter Henkel is a native of Germany, born March 8, 1840, a son of Henry and Mary (Fritz) Henkel, who both died in Germany. He came to Lancaster direct, arriving there June 15, 1858; he was engaged in farming until August, 1862, when he volunteered as a private in Co. C. 25th W. I. V., Capt. Ferguson. He went to the front in Minnesota, where he was detailed to watch the Indians; afterward sent to Cairo, and thence to Vicksburg, where they joined the army; he served until the close of the war, and was mustered out in the summer of 1865. Nov. 20, 1868, he was married to Miss Louisa Barmonn ; they have one son, Louis H.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

HEWITT, C. M.

DR. C. M. HEWITT, physician and surgeon, Boscobel; is a native of Oneida Co., N. Y.; when a boy, he commenced the study of medicine with his uncle in Batavia, N. Y.; he afterward came to Canada and continued his course of studies with Dr. Merrick about three years; studied with Dr. Nash about two years; he then came to Detroit and continued with his studies under the supervision of Dr. Stephen Henry; graduated in the winter of 1838-39, at the College of Physicians at the New York University; he then returned to Canada and commenced the practice of his profession at Port Rowen and St. Thomas; continued about two years; in 1841, came to Grand Detour, Ill.; thence to Grant Co., Wis.; in 1859, he removed to Boscobel; he practiced in Lancaster, Potosi and other places in this county; he is the oldest practicing physician in Grant Co. He was one of the School Commissioners whose duties were examining school teachers, etc. He was married in 1840 to Miss Lizzie Nash; she was born in Chautauqua Co., N. Y.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HICKLIN, JAMES

JAMES HICKLIN, Sec. 27; P. O. Patch Grove; owns 160 acres land, valued at $20 per acre; born in this county in 1830; located on this farm in 1868. Married Abby Beers, a native of this county; they have three children -- Etheline, Edna and Moses M. Mr. H. has been on the Town Board one year.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HICKLIN, JOHN

JOHN HICKLIN, Sec. 3; P. O. Patch Grove; owns 120 acres land, valued at $50 per acre; born in Missouri in 1827; came to Wisconsin in 1828 with parents and located in Cassville; his father, Moses Hicklin, was one of the earliest settlers of Grant County.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HICKLIN, WALTER

WALTER HICKLIN, Sec. 27; P. O. Patch Grove; born on this farm in 1836. Married Mary Ann Lewis, a native of Iowa; she died 1874; they had two children, one is now living -- John W.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HIER, JOHN

JOHN HIER, farmer, Sec. 13; P. O. Fair Play; has 125 acres of land; probable value, $5,600. His politics is Democratic; he is of the Roman Catholic faith. Has held the offices of Assessor, term of 1862, Chairman of the Board two years (1865), Town Treasurer for four years, and has been Chairman for many years. Was born in the county of Wexford, Ireland, in 1830; immigrated with his father, four brothers and three sisters, in 1852. Married Margaret Williams; they have four children -- Ellen G., Henry P., Mary F., and Celia V. Came to Wisconsin before the days of railroad; marketed all his produce in Galena, Ill.; commenced mining and found a great quantity of lead on the Williams land; owned one-third interest in the mine; put engines on mines, which did not prove a paying investment.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Jamestown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HILDEBRAND, GEORGE F.

GEORGE F. HILDEBRAND, firm of Parker, Hildebrand & Co., general merchandise, Boscobel; is a native of Prussia; in 1856, came to Waukesha, Wis.; in 1858, came to Boscobel; was employed as book-keeper for Dwight T. Parker; held this position five or six years; he was then admitted as a partner into the firm of Parker, Hildebrand & Pepper; this firm continued some years, when George W. Parker bought out Mr. Pepper's interest; since then the firm has been Parker, Hildebrand & Co. This firm carries on the largest business of any house in the county; their sales are over $120,000 a year.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HILL, A. S.

A. S. HILL, Sec. 9; P. O. Patch Grove; owns 160 acres land, valued at $30 per acre; born in New York in 1810; came to Wisconsin in 1855, and located on this farm. Married Eliza Powers, a native of New York; they have three children -- Jerome A., Frank E. and Ellen.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HILL, C. W.

C. W. HILL, Clerk of the Board of Supervisors of Grant Co., is a native of Ulster Co., N. Y. Came West to Wisconsin and located in Grant Co., at Platteville, in February, 1856 ; engaged as clerk in store ; held the office of Justice of the Peace for eight years, and was also Town Clerk for a number of years ; was elected Clerk of the Board of Supervisors of this county in November, 1880. In 1860, Mr. Hill was united in marriage to Miss Julia Shaffer, of Platteville ; they have two children one son, Charles, and one daughter, Flora.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

HINCH, L. B.

L. B. HINCH, farmer; P.O. Beetown; born in 1819; was a son of William Hinch, of Washington Co., Mo.; he lived in Missouri twenty-six years; in 1845, he came to Grant Co., Wis.; has followed farming and mining, but has been the most prosperous in farming. Was married, in 1848, to Miss Mary H. Bushnell, daughter of Henry C. Bushnell; has eight children, three deceased; his son Edwin is a good scholar. Is a Democrat.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

HINN, CHRISTOPHER

CHRISTOPHER HINN, proprietor of Marion Center Mill, Sec. 11; P. O. Boscobel; is a native of Grant Co., and has always resided in this county; until 1879, he was engaged in farming, and took charge of the mill in 1880; his brother Charles is part owner, and, in connection with the mill, they have a well-improved farm of 105 acres. Was elected to the office of Town Clerk in 1880. In 1879, he was married to Miss Nettie Hill, who was born in the town of Liberty; they have one son -- George Albert.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Marion) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HINN, JOSEPH

JOSEPH HINN, farmer, Sec. 22; P. O. Boscobel; born in Baden, Germany; came to Kingston, N. Y., in 1849; worked in stone quarries there about five years; in 1854, came to Grant County, where he has since resided, and followed farming; he owns 200 acres of land, 130 acres of this he has improved, and has made all he is worth since coming to America. Married in 1853 to Katharine Brechler; she was born in Baden; they have ten children -- five sons and five daughters.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Marion) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HINNERS, CARSTEN

CARSTEN HINNERS, retired farmer; born in Weddenwarden, Hanover, Jan. 13, 1825. His early life was spent on a farm; in 1844, he came to America, landing at New Orleans; he came by way of St. Louis and Galena to Grant Co.; his first work here was for D. Harms, of Smelser, and for seven years he worked in that vicinity, he then bought a farm on the school section, town of Belmont, La Fayette Co., and became the first settler on the school section; in the spring of 1863, he sold the farm and came to Platteville where he built a most pleasant home He married Dora Wicters in his and her native village, they have no children. Mr. Hinners is a Democrat, and served three years each on both the town and village boards. Is a member, with his wife, of the German Methodist Church, of which he is steward (verwalter). A brother of Mr. Hinners named Nicholas, died in Germany, leaving two sons -- Henry and Frederic, both of whom are with the family of their uncle, though the former is in a Belmont store; their father spent several years of his life in South Carolina.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HIRSCH, ADAM

ADAM HIRSCH, shoemaker, Stitzer; was born in 1858 in Platteville, Grant Co., Wis., is a son of Leonard and Louisa Hirsch; lived with his parents seventeen years, then became apprenticed to shoemaking trade under Louis Heberline, at Liberty, for two and a half years; from there to Fennimore, where he worked a short time with Mr. Weaver; then to Lancaster for eight months, working in the shop occupied by C. Wentzell; then to Stitzer, where he is the owner of a fine shoe-shop. He was married in 1880, to Louisa Fisher. Politics, Republican; is a member of the Evangelical Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Liberty Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HODGES, ISAAC

PLATTEVILLE

The Hodges were early settlers in Vermont, the grandfather of Isaac Hodges moving thence to Missouri while it was owned by a foreign power. Isaac is the son of Samuel and Keziah Patterson Hodges, and was born in St. Louis County, Missouri, May 14, 1810. He lost his mother when he was quite young. He aided his father on a farm in early youth, receiving such mental discipline as could be had in a country school from teachers illy qualified for their task. He acquired much more knowledge by the fireside, acting as his own teacher, than in the schoolroom. In the spring of 1826 his father moved to Green County, Illinois, and died that year. Left alone in the world, Isaac started northward on the Mississippi river, paying his way by work on a keelboat, and reaching Galena on the 1st of April, 1827, a lad of seventeen, without friends or a dollar in his pocket. He was, however, self-reliant, with a strong will and a strong body, and ready for any kind of decent work. The first month he lived with others in an Indian hut on Smallpox creek, hauling logs used for house building. The following summer he cut cordwood for Dr. Meeker, of Galena, at the mouth of Fever, now called Galena, River. The next year he worked for the same person at smelting.

After he had been living in Galena about two years young Hodges commenced driving cattle from southern Illinois to Wisconsin, with headquarters at Elk Grove, Lafayette County. Two years later he removed to Platteville, and for a while was engaged in the smelting business, without any risk of becoming giddy from prosperity. In 1841 he embarked in the mercantile trade, and followed it until 1861, with fair success. During the rebellion he gave his time almost entirely to securing from the State the pay due war widows.

In 1866 he started a bank with Mr. Lambert McCarn, the firm being Hodges and McCarn. In 1873 Mr. McCarn died, since which time the firm name has been I. Hodges and Co. It is a prosperous institution.

At times Mr. Hodges has dealt more or less in real estate, and now has four or five hundred acres in Grant and Iowa Counties. He is public-spirited, lends a hand in such enterprises as will develop the country, and has been for several years a director of the Dubuque, Platteville and Milwaukee railroad.

He is a strong, out-spoken and unwavering republican, but has no predilections for office holding. He was chairman of the town board of Platteville four or five years, which is all of civil office that he has ever accepted.

He is a Freemason and an Odd Fellow, and is an attendant on Congregational worship, and a man of excellent character.

Mr. Hodges was first married in 1835, to Miss Mary Ann Cory, a native of Vermont. She had one child that lived but a short time, she herself dying in 1836. He was united to his present wife. Miss Lucetta Crist, of Ohio, in 1839. She has had four children, only one of them, the wife of O. F. Griswold, of Platteville, now living.

Mr. Hodges knew in early life what it was to stem the tide of poverty and live on the poorest of fare. In Missouri, a motherless boy, he went bare-footed and bareheaded half the year, and wore buckskin clothes the whole year round. When he reached Galena, a green lad just laying the foundation of a physical and moral constitution, he ate sour bread and rusty pork, and slept in a wigwam with older persons, most of them of a rough class, for his nightly as well as daily associates. The writer once heard Mr. Hodges remark that it was a miracle that he did not become early and thoroughly contaminated, and reduce his life to a cypher. He sees the strong hand of God in leading and preserving the orphan boy amid the temptations of his early years in a frontier settlement. Mr. Hodges has a competency, a pleasant home in one of the loveliest villages in the State, and is surrounded by thoughtful neighbors, who can appreciate the worth of such men in building up a town. He has a pleasant disposition, a jovial turn of mind, and is a rich entertainer in the social circle. A disciple of Democritus, he believes in lessening the shadows in the pathway of life as much as possible.

Source: The US Biological Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Volume (1877) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

HOFFMAN, NICHOLAS

NICHOLAS HOFFMAN, Jamestown; is a native of Germany, born in 1841; immigrated here in 1852; his occupation is farming; he has 21 acres of land; probable value, $1,100. Is a Republican in politics. Married Eliza Trumbull, of Batavia; they have one child -- Clara, aged 14. Served in the army three years; enlisted in Dubuque, Iowa, in the 5th Iowa V. C.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Jamestown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HOFFMAN, PETER

PETER HOFFMAN, farmer, Sec. 4; P.O. Lancaster; was born in Germany in 1815; came to America in 1833, and settle in Pennsylvania. Married Mrs. Bagler in Ohio; came to Wisconsin in 1847; settled in Benton, La Fayette Co., and followed the shoemaker's trade; moved to Grant Co. in 1857, and commenced farming, where he has since lived. Is a member of the M.E. Church; has three children--William, Henry and Louisa. He is a republican in politics.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

HOLLOWAY, JOHN C.

LANCASTER

John Chandler Holloway, a son of John and Lucy Burt Holloway, is a native of Livingston County, New York, he being born in the town of York, July 7, 1826. The Holloways were early settlers in Deerfield, Massachusetts, and the grandfather of John C. was a blacksmith, connected with a cavalry company during the seven years fight for freedom from British rule and taxation. The family immigrated to western New York at the close of the second war with the mother country, there engaging in farming, this being the constant employment of young Holloway until of age, with the exception of a few terms of academical instruction at Geneseo and Lima. At twenty-one he came as far west as Flint, Michigan, where he was engaged in building fanning-mills for two seasons, and removed thence, after a short sojourn at his home in western New York, to Marion, Ohio, where he farmed and dealt in stock for four years.

In the autumn of 1855 Mr. Holloway settled in Lancaster, Wisconsin, purchasing a farm adjoining the village and working it until 1870, engaging meantime in other pursuits. Before the rebellion he was a heavy and prosperous stock-dealer; from 1860 to 1872 was in the mercantile trade, having excellent success, and running a bank during part of this period with George W. Ryland. He has, also, operated a woolen mill from 1872 until the present year (1877). He owns a farm of sixteen hundred acres in Buchanan County, Iowa, of which he has the oversight. He is full of enterprise, and although he has had many different irons in the fire at the same time, he has managed them with care and success.

Mr. Holloway was a member of the lower house of the State legislature in 1871, and of the senate four consecutive years, commencing in 1872. While in the latter body he was chairman of the committee on printing the first year, of the committee on finance the second, president pro tern, the third, and chairman of the committee on claims the fourth, holding a high position among his co-workers in that honorable body.

Mr. Holloway was a whig until the demise of that party, since which time he has acted heartily with the republicans, and is one of their leading men in Grant County.

March 3, 1853, Miss Mary E. Baldwin, daughter of Rev. Johnson Baldwin, of York, New York, became his wife, the fruit of their union being six children, only two of whom are now living. Theodore, a promising son, was drowned, June 7, 1876, at Beloit, while a student in the college; John, the elder of the two living children, has been about half through Beloit College, and should his health, which is delicate, permit, he intends to graduate. Addie is at home; she has spent two or three years at the State University, Madison.

Mr. Holloway has a delightful home in the northern part of the village of Platteville, his elegant house standing in a three-acre lot, embellished by nature and art, and he is living a partially retired and very comfortable life, the health and education of his two children seemingly being his chief concern. His wife, an accomplished woman, is in full sympathy with him in all his tastes and family interests.

Source: The US Biological Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Volume (1877) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

HOLLOWAY, LEWIS

LEWIS HOLLOWAY, farmer; has been a resident of Grant Co. since 1863. A native of Livingston Co.. N. Y., born Sept. 30, 1832, a son of John and Lucy Burt Holloway, both natives of Massachusetts, of English descent. He was married to Miss Cornelia Stone, of Troy, Mich, Oct. 24, 1855, a daughter of William and Harriet Morris Stone. He came West in the spring of 1863, and purchased 1,000 acres of wild prairie land, two miles south of Lancaster, breaking 400 acres the first season, 130 of which he planted to wheat, and received a crop of 3,200 bushels, which he sold for 82.10 per bushel. His farm cost him $13,000, nearly one half of which he paid with his first years' crop. After five years he sold his land for 840 per acre, to George Stewart and Edward McKinney. Mr. Holloway buying out J. Kilbourn, keeps fourteen horses, and does a prosperous business. Mr. Greene is a native of is a cattle dealer, having followed it twenty years. He bought his present home and farm of 340 acres in 1871. He has for several years been Alderman, and is at present.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

HOMNES, GEORGE PAUL

George Paul Homnes, states attorney of Divide county, residing at Crosby, was born in Milwaukee Wisconsin, October 9, 1873, a son of Gunerius and Grethe (Vibe) Homnes, who were natives of Norway. When a young man the father went to sea and for twenty years was a sailor. He was therefore in middle age when he came to America, after which he established his home in Milwaukee and sailed on Lake Michigan. In 1881 he removed to Monfort township, Grant county, Wisconsin, settling near what was the town of Castle Rock, there purchasing one hundred and sixty acres of land, which he developed and improved from 1881 until 1912, when he retired from active life and soon after passed away. In young womanhood Grethe Vibe had come to the United States and they were married in Milwaukee in 1870. She is still living on the old homestead farm in Grant county, Wisconsin.

George P. Homnes began his education in the city schools of Milwaukee but when seven years of age went with his parents to the farm, after which he attended district school and also pursued a business course in Valder's Business College at Decorah, Iowa. Later he returned to the old homestead in Wisconsin and afterward spent six months as a pupil in a private academy at Mount Horeb, that state. Still later he became a student in St, Olaf College at Northfield, Minnesota, spending two years in the preparatory department and four years in the college, winning the degree of Bachelor of Arts upon his graduation with the class of 1903. In that year he removed to Williams county, North Dakota, and filed on a homestead in what is now Divide county. Later in the same year he matriculated in the law department of the University of Minnesota and was graduated therefrom with the class of 1906. During vacation periods he lived upon his homestead and following his graduation, at which time he won the Bachelor of Laws degree, he returned to the homestead, securing the title thereto in the fall of 1907. At the latter date he took an examination at Fargo, North Dakota, and was admitted to the bar on the 7th of December of that year, at which time he located for practice in Crosby, where he has since remained. He is an able lawyer having displayed marked ability in coping with intricate legal problems. He is always very careful and thorough in the preparation of his cases and is devoted to the interests of his clients.

On the 17th of June, 1909, at Northfield, Minnesota, Mr. Homnes wedded Miss Frida Magdalene Bue, who was born at Ostrander, Fillmore county, Minnesota, a daughter of the Rev. Ole A. and Caroline (Hjort) Bue, who were natives of Norway and were there married. Rev. Bue was educated for the ministry in his native country and on coming to America first settled in Fillmore county, Minnesota. He afterward was in charge of the church at Ostrander, Minnesota, for more than thirty years, but at length retired from the ministry and is now living upon a farm near Northfield, and upon that farm his wife passed away October 5, 1912. Mrs. Homnes attended the public schools of Ostrander, was graduated from the high school at Spring Valley, Minnesota, and from St. Olaf College at Northfield, where she won the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1902. She was afterward a teacher of the German, Latin and Norwegian languages in that school for five years. In 1907 she returned home and there remained until her marriage.

The young couple began their domestic life at Crosby, where Mr. Homnes had erected a substantial and pleasant residence. He has sold his old homestead but owns considerable farm land in Divide county, from which he derives a good rental. He is serving as a member of the park board of Crosby and he is interested in everything that pertains to the welfare and upbuilding of the town, taking an active and helpful part in promoting its civic improvement. He was largely instrumental in setting off Divide from Williams county and he became one of the organizers of the Divide County Publishing Company, which publishes the Divide County Journal. He is president of the corporation and he conducts the editorial department, for which the paper is noted. In 1916 he became one of the organizers of the Divide County Fair Association, of which he is the secretary, and he was instrumental in starting the movement to organize the Commercial Club of Crosby, of which he was the president for the first year. Before the division of the counties he was elected to represent the forty-first district, comprising Williams and McKenzie counties, in the state legislature in 1908 and was reelected in 1910, capably serving for two terms, during which he gave earnest consideration to the settlement of many important questions and used his legislative powers for the benefit and upbuilding of the commonwealth. He did much important committee work, being a member of the judiciary committee for both terms and its chairman during the second term, while on other committees he was also active and prominent. He was an earnest supporter of the corrupt practice act and was identified with much other progressive legislation which has had to do with bringing about cleaner and better conditions in the body politic, In 1912 he was elected states attorney for Divide county and was reelected in 1914. He is the present incumbent in the office. His religious faith is that of the Norwegian Lutheran church and its teachings have guided him in all of the relations of life, making him a man whom to know is to respect and honor. There are many opportunities for the citizens of a new district to build along progressive lines, and recognizing this fact, Mr. Homnes has ever labored for the welfare of the city and county in which he makes his home.

Source: North Dakota History and People: Outlines of American History, Volume 2 (Google eBook); By: Clement Augustus Lounsberry; The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1917; Transcribed and Contributed to Genealogy Trails by Jenn Zimmermann

HONER, MORITZ

MORITZ HONER, farmer; P. O. Muscoda; owns 240 acres of land on Sec. 22, also 40 acres timber. He was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, in 1832, where he was educated, and learned the trade of shoemaker, at which he worked eighteen years before coming to this country. His father's name was John, who was born in the same town, and trade that of shoemaker. His mother's maiden name was Mary Schmidt, who was also a native of the same town. Moritz Honer came to America in 1857; he worked at his trade a few months in Milwaukee, then came to Muscoda, and worked at his trade seven months; then went to Avoca, and established business for himself, which he conducted for eight years, when he bought the farm upon which he now lives. He has served the town as Supervisor, School Commissioner and Road Commissioner. He was married October, 1858, to Miss Adeline Paffenrath, who was a native of Germany, and by whom he has nine children -- four boys and five girls -- all living at home. Has always been in active life, and accumulated an estate by his own persevering efforts and industry.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HOOPER, THOMAS J.

THOMAS J. HOOPER, druggist, Platteville; was born Jan. 15, 1839, in Cornwall, England. His father, Thomas Hooper, emigrated to America in the summer of 1845, with his family, and settled in Platteville, where he resided till his death in March, 1861, at the age of 56. Mrs. Hooper was born in 1807, and is still living with her children. Thomas J. was married in Platteville in September, 1866, to Miss Mary Wright, who is a native of Platteville, and daughter of James C. Wright, one of the earliest settlers in La Fayette Co., Wis. Mr. Hooper has been engaged in the drug business ever since his marriage. Has one child -- Hattie.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HOOSER, JACOB Sr.,

JACOB HOOSER, Sr., Platteville; one of the earliest of Grant Co.'s pioneer settlers, was born Oct. 25, 1807, in Lancaster Co., Penn. His father, Jacob F., a blacksmith, soon after took his family to St. Louis. On July 15, 1828, young Hooser arrived in Galena, Ill., then comprising the U. S. warehouse, a store and Jonathan Meeker's furnace. Four days later, Mr. Hooser came to Platteville. Here he met J. H. Rountree, and was by him employed to burn a quantity of charcoal, and to do sundry jobs of blacksmithing. During the summer of 1829, Mr. Hooser opened up a farm on the Pecatonica River. The next year was spent at mining in "Jimtown." In the spring of 1831, he bought out the claim of a miner, which purchase gave him 160 acres, 80 of which he still owns. At the outbreak of the Black Hawk war, he assisted in the building of a stockade on the present farm of Mr. Roseleib, then owned and occupied by E. M. Orrin. Early in the summer of 1832, Mr. Hooser went to Galena, where he earned good wages at shoeing horses during the Indian war. On the surrender of Black Hawk, Mr. H. again sought his Platteville farm, where he has since resided. He married, near Eddysville, Ill., Elizabeth Knotts, who died Feb. 14, 1865, leaving three children -- Justus D., Jacob and Amanda E. The present Mrs. Hooser was Mary Bennett, and by her he has three children -- Marietta, Lester M. and Archie B. The 160 acres before mentioned, was bought of the Government, at the first land sale ever held at Mineral Point.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HOOSER, JUSTUS D.

JUSTUS D. HOOSER, Platteville; eldest son of Jacob Hooser, Sr., was the third white child born in Platteville, March 12, 1832, on the farm where his father now resides. His early life was spent in this town. In 1850, he went to California, where he spent seven years in the gold mines. On his return in 1858, he settled on 76 acres of his present farm, to which he afterward added 100 acres. He married Mrs. Harriet Clark. Her parents were early settlers in Smelser, where her father built his stone house by moonlight, wheeling the material from a distance of half a mile. He was a stone-mason by trade, and was busily employed each and every day in building the houses of his neighbors, so that his own work must be done "after business hours." Mrs. Hooser married in England George E. Clark, who died in Grass Valley, Cal. His only son is James M. Clark. Mr. and Mrs. Hooser have five children -- Joseph, Buther, Elizabeth, Jacob W. and Justus D., all born on the Platteville homestead.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HORNBEEK, CYRUS A.

CYRUS A. HORNBEEK, farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. Dickeyville; son of Isaac and Elizabeth (Mitts) Hornbeek; was born in Carroll Co., Ind., Feb. 28, 1842. His father moved to Paris, Wis., in 1844, and bought a farm of 160 acres on Sec. 21, Town 2, Range 2 west, where he still resides. Cyrus enlisted in Co. I, 25th W. V. I., Aug. 6, 1862; served through the war, and received his discharge June 7, 1865. He was in the Army of the Tennessee. He was married, Feb. 1, 1870, to Miss Mary Shinoe, daughter of Benjamin and Sarah (Preston) Shinoe, of Paris, Wis. They have four children -- Melvin, Albert, Orville and George. His farm contains 210 acres. He also owns the ferry across the Platte River. Mr. H. has held the office of Town Assessor, also that of Constable for several terms.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Paris Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HORNBEEK, MORGAN VANMETER

MORGAN VANMETER HORNBEEK, farmer; P. O. Dickeyville; was born near Delphi, Ind. His father and mother moved to Paris, Wis., in 1844, and are still living on the old homestead. They were married Feb. 14, 1833, and have six children living -- Sarah, now Mrs. Beckett, living in Dickeyville; Morgan V., Cyrus A., Martha J., now Mrs. Smith, living in Dakota; Mary Elizabeth with her parents; Cynthia, now Mrs. Williams, living in Georgetown, Wis. Morgan V. enlisted 6th of August, 1862, in Co. I, 25th W. V. I., in company with his brother, Cyrus A.; served through the war; was discharged June 7, 1865. He was married to Miss Margaret Smith, daughter of Maxime Smith, Oct. 17, 1869. They have three children -- Cass Elmi, Arthur B. and Leone V. His farm of 70 acres is on the northeast quarter of Sec. 21, Town 2, Range 2. He is Clerk of the town of Paris, and a Trustee of the Union Church. He has been Town Supervisor and District Clerk several years.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Paris Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HORSFALL, DAVID F.

DAVID F. HORSFALL, Deputy Postmaster and dealer in general merchandise, Millville; born in Columbiana Co., Ohio, in 1850; came to Wisconsin in 1854 and settled in this town; engaged in business in 1865. Married Lisette Patloff, a native of Germany; they have one child, Lloyd. Mr. H. is Town Clerk.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Millville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HOUGH, ASA EDGERTON

Mr. Hough, who takes rank as one of the oldest pioneers of Grant County, was born at Lebanon, N. H., that old Granite State whose noble sons are to be found in every portion of the Union. He received a fair education, and, at an early age, entered the counting-room of Benjamin Dodd & Co., of Boston, at that day large merchants and extensive ship-owners. At the age of eighteen, young Hough was sent out as supercargo of one of the vessels belonging to the firm. At the age of twenty-four, he was a Master, and, in this capacity, followed the sea for two years, when he went to Washington and engaged in mercantile pursuits, which he followed with success for two years longer, when a fire not only burned up all he had, but left him many thousand dollars in debt. During his residence in Washington, he had succeeded in making friends of many of the leading statesmen of the day, among them, Clay. Webster, Calhoun, Benton, Van Buren and Gen. Jackson. After the fire, he immediately took his family, consisting of his young wife and son, and came to St. Louis. The contracts for supplying the military posts on the Upper Mississippi being then advertised, he put in bids and secured most of them for the posts of Fort Armstrong, Rock Island ; Fort Crawford, Prairie du Chien ; and Fort Snelling, then just being built. Steamboating was then a new business on the Upper Mississippi. Mr. Hough, however, chartered the steamer Rover, a boat of eighty or ninety tons measurement, but considered a first-class boat for that day, and, with a couple of barges, transported the supplies to these forts, taking back lead from Galena. In a few months he found himself out of debt, and with sufficient cash to again start in business, which he did in St. Louis. He remained in that city until the year 1827, when, in company with other gentlemen, he came up the river to Galena in a pirogue, and afterward started a smelting furnace at a place he named Gibralter, on the Platte, and set men at work clearing away the ground preparatory to the erection of a saw-mill, which he built in 1828-29 ; the first mill, probably, ever built by private persons in the present State of Wisconsin. The same year, a post office was established at and known as Gibralter, it being the only one between Galena and Prairie du Chien for many years. In 1832, Mr. Hough took part in the Black Hawk war, and was at the battle of Bad Ax. He continued in the smelting business until 1834, when he closed up this branch of his undertakings, and moved his family to his mill where he resided until 1845, the year before his death, when he removed to Potosi, where he died in 1846. Mr. Hough was a man of more than ordinary intelligence. He had a passion for books, Was a close student, and became a fine scholar. He was a man of medium stature, but of commanding presence, and his opinions were always listened to with respect. In business, he was a straightforward, open man. He had little patience with what are generally known as sharp traders, and abominated a falsehood. Politically, he was a Whig, and, like most Whigs of the day, became almost sick when he heard, through the old-fashioned, slow mail-coach, that Pennsylvania had gone against Mr. Clay, and that James K. Polk was elected to the Presidency.

Mr. Hough was a man of strong opinions, but of generous and charitable impulses ; a man of remarkable polish, and easy, graceful manners, he held fast to his own opinions while treating those of others with respect, and held his friends with hooks of steel. Among the latter was Gov. Duane Doty.

During the years that Mr. Hough resided at his mill, he became an extensive hog and cattle breeder, and much of the fine stock in Southwestern Wisconsin can still be traced to his herds. He also was a careful student of the leading agricultural journals, and sent for seeds, and experimented with them, and thus introduced those most desirable in the country. He was among the first to introduce and successfully cultivate the Bowles' dent corn. At that day corn-raising in Grant County was looked upon as more uncertain than it is at present in Minnesota. When Mr. Hough came West, Dubuque, as a promising town, was unknown ; to-day, his remains rest quietly in the elegant cemetery at that city.

Source: "History of Grant County Wisconsin", by the Western Historical Company - Sub. by a Friend of Free Genealogy

HOWDLE, WILLIAM H.

WILLIAM H. HOWDLE, farmer and buyer, and shipper of stock, Sec. 23; P. O. Livingston; born in Shullsburg, Wis., Sept. 21, 1845; left there with his parents in 1850, and went to Mifflin; moved to Clifton, and commenced farming in 1851, and has been at that ever since on the same farm where he now lives; owns 480 acres of land, all under cultivation, which was bought by his father from the Government; some mining has been done on his place, but never has been proved up; is next to what is known as the Crow Branch mine. He was married to Mary Vipland, April 12, 1869; have six children living -- Cora Ann, Charles William, George Henry, James Albert, Arthur Eli, Hannah.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HOWE, GEORGE

GEORGE HOWE, senior member of the firm of Howe & Baxter, general merchants. a native of Clinton Co., N. Y., and was born at Plattsburg May 24, 1809 ; he grew up and received his education there. After reaching manhood he was united in marriage, December 14, 1831, to Miss Maria Farnsworth, a native of that county; she died June 4, 1847. Two years later, on the 7th of March, 1849, was united in marriage to Miss Martha J. Cole, a native of that State. They came to Wisconsin and located in Grant Co., at Lancaster, May 8, 1855, and Mr. Howe engaged in mercantile business, the firm, being Howe & Barber; after one year the firm became Howe & Burr; after two years Mr. Burr retired, and Mr. Howe successfully continued the business until after the war, when Mr. Baxter became interested in the business with him. Mr. Howe has been successfully engaged in business here over a quarter of a century, and has built up an enviable reputation as a merchant. Has one daughter, Mrs. C. H. Baxter, of this place; had one daughter, Laura, who died in Dundee, Ill., Jan. 10, 1855.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

HOYER, EDWARD

REV. EDWARD HOYER, Pastor of the Evangelical Lutheran St. Paul's Church, of Platteville; was born in Hamburg, Germany, in 1853. When 11 years of age, his parents emigrated to America, and settled in Monroe Co., Wis. His father, Rev. August Hoyer, is now Pastor of the Lutheran Church of Princeton, Wis. Rev. Edward Hoyer is a graduate of the Northwestern University, of Watertown, Wis., Class of 1873. He is also a graduate of Concordia Seminary, of St. Louis, Mo., Class of 1876. He immediately entered the ministry, and was located at Manchester, Green Lake Co., Wis., till October, 1878, since which time he has been in Platteville. He was married in November, 1878, in Spring Valley, Minn., to Miss Mary Kiesel, and has one son -- Arthur.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HUBBELL, T. N.

T. N. HUBBELL, firm of Ritter & Hubbell, hardware, Boscobel. The subject of this sketch is a native of Columbus, Franklin Co., Ohio; when a boy, he came to Bloomington, Ill.; afterward removed to Pana, Ill.; he secured the position as expressman with Valentine's Express, running between Cairo and St. Louis; he continued with this company until they retired from business; he then returned to Bloomington and engaged in the hotel business there and at Pana; in about 1859, came to Lancaster, Wis., and engaged in general merchandise business; he also opened the first store in Woodman, which he carried on for several years; in 1874, he came to Boscobel and entered upon his present business; when in Woodman he was Chairman of the town about four years; also held the office of Town Clerk; since coming to Boscobel he has held various offices; among others was Chief Engineer of the Fire Department four years, and Chairman of the Town Board; he is now Mayor of the city, having been elected in 1879; re-elected in 1880; he was one of the five members who served on the County Board under the old law. Married, October, 1856, to Miss E. A. Ritter; she was born in Salem, Ohio; they have one son, now assisting his father in his business.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HUGHES, HENRY

HENRY HUGHES, Sec. 21; P. O. Bridgeport; owns 140 acres of land; born in England in 1827; came to American in 1857, and located in this town. Married Mary Morris, a native of Canada. Mr. H. has two children by a former wife -- William Henry and Marion.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Wyalusing Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HULFERTZ, HENDERSON

HENDERSON HULFERTZ, farmer. Sec. 11; P.O. Lancaster; is a son of Edward Hulfertz, born in Richland Co., Ohio, in 1848 ; came to Wisconsin with his parents when 8 years of age, locating at Lancaster ; lived with his parents until 25 years old ; since his arrival here he has made Lancaster his home ; he has a beautiful farm of 330 acres ; is still single.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

HUMPHREY

BASHFORD & HUMPHREY, dealers in general merchandise, Glen Haven; business was established in 1871. Mr. Bashford, the senior member, born in New Hampshire in 1814; he came to Wisconsin in 1862, when he removed to Glen Haven and engaged in the mercantile trade until the close of the war; in 1871, he formed a partnership with Mr. Humphrey, and has continued in merchandising since. He married Elizabeth K. Blessing, a native of Western Virginia; they have two children -- Martha and Charles. Mr. Bashford was elected to the Legislature in 1859 and in 1870; in 1864, he was Sergeant-at-Arms to the State Senate. Mr. Alfred Humphrey, the junior member was born in Patch Grove in 1849; he came to Glen Haven in 1871. He married Jennie Calvert, a native of Canada; they have three children -- Harry, George and May.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Glen Haven Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HUMPHREY, JOHN J.

JOHN J. HUMPHREY, dealer in dry goods, boots, shoes, hats, caps and groceries, Patch Grove; was born at Patch Grove, Dec. 18, 1857; engaged in business February, 1879. His wife, Miss Millie Richards, was born at Patch Grove May 11, 1855; they married July 23, 1878; by this marriage there is one child -- Almira, born Aug. 29, 1879. In politics he is Republican; liberal believer in religion. He has one of the finest stock of goods in the village; owns a beautiful residence on the main street.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HUNDEMER, VALENTINE

VALENTINE HUNDEMER, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Potosi; born Feb. 13, 1822, at Achren, near Baden, Germany, son of George and Geneiveve (Munde) Hundemer; came to St. Louis, Mo., in 1846, and in 1847 to this town; owns 240 acres of land. Married in 1846 by Father Staler to Catharine, daughter of John and Justina (Werner) Fallert, of Baden, Germany; had fourteen children, twelve now living -- August, born Aug. 28, 1847, married Mary Dolan; William, born Oct. 28, 1848, married Katie Obrine, at Sioux Falls, Dakota; has two children; John, born March 14, 1850, married Mary Hare, of Dakota; has three children; Josephine, born May 12, 1852, wife of Peter Bowen, of Dakota; has four children -- Charles B., born Dec. 29, 1853, married Caroline Sweeney, of Dakota, two children; Henry, born Sept. 28, 1855, at Leadville, Colo.; mining; A. U., born Feb. 7, 1857, wife of Frank Cramer, of Dakota, two children; George V., born July 10, 1859, at Lancaster; Joseph, born July 21, 1863; Mary Catharine, born June 19, 1865; Frank J., born Aug. 31, 1867; Anna Amelia, born Sept. 20, 1869. John enlisted in 1st W. V. C. at 14 years and seven are of age; 145 pounds weight; helped to capture Jeff Davis, and was paid $300 of the bounty (or reward). Subject of this sketch is a stone-mason by trade, and had $12 to begin his married life. He now owns, with the boys, 1,800 acres of good land.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Potosi Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HUNGERFORD, ULYSSUS M.

ULYSSUS M. HUNGERFORD, farmer; P. O. Blue River; a son of Isaiah and Elizabeth Hutchinson, natives of Connecticut, but located at Livonia, Livingston Co., N. Y., where Ulyssus was born April 12, 1834, where he was educated; learned the carpenter trade with his father; came to Illinois in March, 1854, and located at Kankakee; the following year came to this State, locating on Sauk Prairie, Dane Co.; the following spring he moved to Crawford Co., entering forty acres of land; remained there one and a half years; he then came to this town and engaged as a farm hand until the breaking-out of the war; Dec. 28, 1863, he enlisted in the 6th Wisconsin Light Artillery (Burnett's Battery); he served with the battery until the close of the war, and was mustered out with them at Madison in July, 1865; he had four brothers in the service; Eugene, the oldest, enlisted while attending the University at Madison, in 1861, in the 5th W. V. I., participating in all the battles with the regiment until May 3, 1863, when he was killed while storming the heights at Fredericksburg; Edwin enlisted in August, 1862, and died in the hospital at Corinth Nov. 9, 1862; Thomas J. enlisted in the 6th Wisconsin Artillery Oct. 1, 1861, when the battery was organized, and was in active service until his term of enlistment expired, in October, 1864, when he came home. Addison enlisted in 1864 in the 47th W. V. I., and served until the close of the war. At the close of the war, Ulysses moved upon the farm where he now lives. He married Miss Sarah Carson, who was a native of Indiana, and came to this State with her parents in 1854. He has always been in active life, and accumulated an estate through his personal industry.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Waterstown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HUNSAKER, JACOB

JACOB HUNSAKER (deceased); was born in Union Co., Ill., May 24, 1823; immigrated to Wisconsin in 1847, where he engaged in mining; he operated the mines in the town of Hazel Green known as the "Hunsaker Mines;" afterward he engaged in farming, which he followed until the time of his death, which was caused by a team running away with him, Aug. 21, 1875. He married Matilda Pallett, a native of England; she was born in 1830, and is the mother of six children -- Charles, Phebe, George, Thomas, Nellie and Albert.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Jamestown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HUNTEMER, AUGUSTUS

AUGUSTUS HUNTEMER, manufacturer, cooper and dealer in hoop-poles, barrels, firkins, kegs, etc. Is a native of Wisconsin, and was born in the town of Potosi, Grant Co., Aug. 28, 1847 ; he grew up in this county and learned the trade of cooper in Galena. In 1868, he engaged in business in Potosi, and remained there until 1874 ; came to Lancaster and established his present business in 1875. From a small beginning he has, by industry and good management, built up a large trade, his business the past year amounting to over $20,000 ; he ships his goods to Chicago and other places. He was united in marriage, Aug. 9, 1870, to Miss Mary Dolan, a native of Potosi, Grant Co., Wis.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

HUNTINGTON, GEORGE

GEORGE HUNTINGTON, farmer, Sec. 22; P. O. Platteville; was born Jan. 10, 1811, in Yorkshire, England, where his early life was spent as a farm laborer. He came to America in 1845, with his wife (formerly Ann Cooper) and three sons. Both Mr. and Mrs. Huntington were born near Goole, Yorkshire. He located in Platteville, where he resided until 1852, when he went with his family to California. Since his return, in 1856, he has resided on his present farm, now comprising 240 acres. There are now five children -- James, John, George, Dennis and Thomas; the two youngest were born in Platteville.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HUNTINGTON, JOHN

JOHN HUNTINGTON, Platteville. Born in Goole Yorkshire, England, May 1, 1803. His wife was Mary Hatifield, who was born April 30, 1811, in Laxton, Yorkshire, England; married March 24, 1831, and their bridal tour was to their future home in America. Up to 1837, their home was Pittsburgh, Penn. In the spring of 1837, they came to Platteville, where he bought 160 acres of his present farm; only 17 acres were broken, and on this was a small log cabin in which the young couple began life in Badgerdom. It was replaced in 1859, by the substantial brick farmhouse, now occupied by a son. Mr. Huntington has been a lifelong and most successful farmer. How now owns 680 acres of splendid land under cultivation, besides 120 acres of timber. Since October, 1869, Mr. Huntington has resided in the city of Platteville. Mr. and Mrs. Huntington have had ten children -- William H., Anne, Mary A., Sarah, Elizabeth, Maria, John P., Thomas T., Lydia J. and George R; William H. died Aug. 13, 1861; Anne died July 3, 1835; Sarah died July 9, 1847, and Thomas, Oct. 9, 1855.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HUNTINGTON, RICHARD

RICHARD HUNTINGTON, deceased; was the first of the Huntington brothers to settle in Grant Co. He was born Aug. 1, 1804, in Swinefleet, Yorkshire, England, and came to America in 1830, locating at Pittsburgh, Penn. He remained there until 1835, when he came to Platteville; it was then a small collection of miners' log huts, and had but recently received the name of Platteville. In the spring of 1836, he made what then known as a "squatter's claim" of part of the present estate; this land he bought of the Government on its coming into market. He began here in a primitive log house, which was replaced in 1857, by the present roomy and substantial brick farmhouse. His first wife, nee Mary Myers, died in the fall of 1846, leaving four children -- William M., Robert M., Richard J., and Lydia A. On the 22d of April, 1847, he married Miss Lucy Colburn; she is of the old Puritan stock, and was born in Chittenden Co., Vt., but was reared and educated in and near Burlington, Vt.; 1845, was the date of her settlement in Platteville. Mr. Huntington was a life-long and most successful farmer. He took pride in his beautiful prairie farm, and made such additions as to leave a large estate to his posterity. He was a prominent and honored member of the P. M. Church, and was a man of kindly and benevolent convictions. He died April 28, 1871. Few of the pioneers of Platteville could count more real friends, and none could have left a place more difficult to fill. By his second marriage, he had six children -- Mary E., Frank E., Laura M., Samuel W. and Carrie E. Charles W. died May 11, 1864. Since 1879, his widow and youngest daughter, now Mrs. J. H. Spink, have resided in the city of Platteville. Mrs. Huntington is a member of the M. E. Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HURD, W. T.

DR. W. T. HURD, dentist, Boscobel; was born in Wiota, Wis.; in 1871, he came to Madison, and entered the profession of dental surgery, studying with Drs. Hurd & Chittenden; graduated in 1874 at the State Dental Association of Milwaukee; practiced with Dr. Enos one year in Milwaukee; in 1876, he came to Boscobel and at once established himself in business, and has been a resident here since; he is the only resident dentist in the city.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HURLEY, J. M.

J. M. HURLEY, wagon-maker, in the employ of Charles Bettz, for whom he commenced work in February, 1876 ; he learned the trade with J. C. Herbert and 1). H. Budd, of Lancaster, with whom he worked three and a half years. He commenced business for himself Aug. 15, 1874, and remained in business until December, 1876, under the firm name of J. Dixon & Co. ; they did a prosperous business of about $4,000 per annum. Mr. Hurley is a native of Ireland, born April 26, 1845, a son (if Thomas and Catharine Fanning Hurley ; he came to the United States an infant, in 1846, with his parents. They lived in New York, Pennsylvania and New Jersey, finally settling in Galena, Ill., where his father died in September, 1854, and his mother is now living in Nebraska. He was married Dec.. 24, 1865, to Miss Margaret A. Carroll, a native of Ireland.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

HUSKE, ADAM

ADAM HUSKE, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Hazel Green; owns 130 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre; born in Germany in 1827; came to America in 1851, and settled in Hazel Green. Married Frances Brandt, a native of Germany, who was born in 1826; they have three children -- Katie, Mary, Henry A. Are members of the Catholic Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HUTCHINSON, C.

C. HUTCHINSON, lead ore smelter and farmer, Beetown; born in Swaledale, Yorkshire, Eng., March 30, 1835; received a common school education and a partial academic course at Platteville; came to this country in 1848 with his parents, and settled at Dubuque, Iowa; removed to Shullsburg, Wis., in 1852, and to Beetown in 1868, where he built a smelting furnace; it is at present the main industry of the place; he also owns smelting works and furnace at Potosi; he holds the office of Town Clerk, and has been Chairman for a number of years. Wrote the history of Beetown, which was published in the Herald, and deposited, together with Grant County records, in the centennial box of Grant Co.; is at present on the Wisconsin Fish Commission, and has recently added a fishery to his establishment. Republican in politics; enterprising and wide-awake to the interests of the county.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

HUTTON, A. J.

A. J. HUTTON, conductor of institutes for the State Normal School of Platteville, is a native of Dunfermline, Scotland; born in 1846. When 11 years of age, his parents emigrated to America and settled in Portage Co., Wis., where they still reside. Prof. Hutton was educated at the Platteville Normal School, graduating in 1869, being a member of the first graduating class. In the fall of 1869, he went to Augusta, Eau Claire Co., Wis., and taught in the public school one year; then returned to Platteville, and for one year was Principal of the Academic Department of the State Normal School. He then returned to Eau Claire, and was Principal of the West Side Schools of that place till the fall of 1879, since which time he has been in his present position. He was married in July, 1872, in Platteville, to Miss Kate McGregor, of that place, and sister of President McGregor of the Normal School. Has three children -- Emily, Margaret and James.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HYDE, A. E.

A. E. HYDE, proprietor of the Mansion House, Lancaster, became proprietor of this house in the spring of 1875, but has been identified with it since 1855. When a lad his father, Allen Hyde, bought the property and continued as proprietor of the hotel up to the time of his death, which occurred Jan. 11, 1861 ; his older brother, Jehial Hyde, then became proprietor, and was succeeded by Ira A. Bellows, who ran it for ten years. Mr. Hyde is the fifth son and sixth child of L. A. and Mary Miller Hyde, born in Vermont, July 22, 1848, ; he came to Lancaster at the age of 7, with his parents. He was married in Galesburg, Ill., April 15, 1875, to Miss Kate K. Garvey, daughter of Mrs. E. Dumbrille ; they have one daughter, Mary Elizabeth, and have buried one, Anna Isabella.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

HYDE, GEORGE B.

GEORGE B. HYDE, proprietor of the machine-shop ; commenced business in August, 1875 ; he learned his trade in Indianapolis; he not only served an apprenticeship, but has a natural taste for mechanics; was born in Pottsdam, N. Y., Sept. 19. 1851, a son of H. H. and Martha P. (Elderkin) Hyde; he came West with his parents in 1855. Feb. 24, 1874, he was married to.Miss Alice L. Green. They have three children Martha, Nellie and Augustus.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

HYDE, JEHIEL H.

Although not one of the " old settlers " of Grant County in the stricter sense of the term, Dr. Hyde was so prominently identified with it for some fifteen years as to entitle his name to a place among those who have made their mark upon its society and institutions. He was a son of Luther Hyde, of Highgate, Vt., well known to many of the citizens of Grant County, who were formerly from that vicinity, and was born at Fairfield, in that State, July 29, 1812. His early life was spent upon a farm until he arrived at a proper age to pursue his studies, in preparation for professional life, for which he was always designed. Turning his attention to the profession of medicine, he studied with Dr. Hall, of St. Albans, and attended medical lectures at the Vermont Academy of Medicine at Burlington, and was graduated at the University of Vermont in 1834. He commenced his practice at Hardwick, Vt., but soon afterward removed to Michigan. Here he was one of the pioneers, and endured the hardships and privations incident to the settlement of a new country in those days remote from the appliances of our modern civilization, and subject to the influence of the malarial diseases for which that State at that stage of its settlement was noted. Here he pursued the practice of his profession for a number of years, and in 1839 married Sarah A. Bennett, of Leona, Mich.

Finding that his constitution could not withstand the climatic influences, he returned, in 1840, to his native State and practiced his profession at St. Albans and across Lake Champlain, at Potsdam, N. Y., for some nine years, his health becoming re-established. In 1856, he came to Lancaster on a tour of inspection, and a visit to his brother, already resident in that village. His professional services were at once in demand, even before he decided to settle here, which he did soon after, and speedily established a high professional reputation and a lucrative practice. For many years Dr. Hyde was the leading surgeon of the large territory embraced in the limits of Grant County, and was often called upon to perform difficult operations, or to meet his professional brethren in consultation, in every part of the county. The roads were at that time m a very imperfect condition ; many miles of those he was compelled to travel at all hours of the day and night were mere paths through the woods. With such a practice, under such circumstances, exposure was inevitable, and in time led to the development of the hereditary disease which finally terminated his lifepulmonary consumption. In 1867, his health began to fail and in the following year he removed to Minneapolis, Minn., where he spent a year, in hopes that the change of climate would prove beneficial in arresting the progress of the disease from which he was suffering. Finding that his hopes were not realized, he returned to Lancaster in the spring of 1869 and purchased a residence, which, however, he occupied but a few months before his disease had run its course, and on December 7, 1869, he was called hence. He left no children, his immediate family consisting only of his widow and her niece, who had been adopted as a daughter. A number of his brother's family connections, however, are still resident in Lancaster and other parts of the county.

Dr. Hyde was in the front rank of his profession in Wisconsin, his surgical skill being perhaps unexcelled by that of any physician in the State. During the war he was employed in the Provost Marshal's Department at Prairie du Chien, in which capacity his thorough anatomical knowledge was of much service to the Government. He has appointed by the Commissioner of Pensions to the position of Examining Surgeon, which position he held until physical inability compelled his resignation.

Dr. Hyde was a high Mason, having attained to the Royal Arch degree and perhaps higher, and was well skilled in the mysteries of that fraternity and of high repute as a Master of the craft, having held the position of Master of Lancaster Lodge No. 20 for twelve years. The high estimation in which he was held by his brother Masons was well shown by the Platteville, Potosi, Beetown and Lancaster Lodges, and Grant Chapter of Royal Arch Masons, which, notwithstanding very unfavorable weather, attended his funeral in bodies, as also did many brethren from other parts of the county, and interred his remains with the impressive ceremonies of their order.

Source: "History of Grant County Wisconsin", by the Western Historical Company - Sub. by a Friend of Free Genealogy

HYDE, MARY

MRS. MARY HYDE, widow of Luther A. Hyde, who was a native of Vermont, born February 15, 1810. They were married February 15, 1832, at St. Armand ; they lived in Vermont until December, 1855, when they came to Lancaster. Mr. Hyde ran the Mansion House up to the time of his death, which occurred Jan. 11, 1861 ; he left three children, a daughter and two sons Helen M., now Mrs. Bellows, of Lancaster ; C. J. and A. B., the latter proprietor of the Mansion House at present. Mrs. Hyde has lost four children Margaret Isabella, died in Vermont, April 26, 1851 James Walter, who enlisted in the army, was wounded at the battle of the Wilderness and died in Philadelphia, in 1864; Henry Allen, enlisted in May, 1864, died Sept. 24, 1864 ; George Luther, another who responded to his country's call, and was wounded at the battle of Bull Run, came home and died Oct. 28, 1864.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

IVEY

merchants, Lancaster; this house was established at this location in February 1879 ; they carry a complete stock of dry goods, hats, caps, boots and shoes, clothing, groceries, etc.; stock ranges from $5,000 to $9,000 ; their annual trade reaches $30,000 and is increasing ; this house was established in May, 1866, at British Hollow under the firm name of Wilson & Ivey ; in 1868, Mr. Ivey bought his partner's interest and continued the business alone two years, when he took in William E. Webb ; in February, 1879, they bought their present store which was opened by Mr. Ivey, Mr. Webb remaining at the old store until it could be closed out; in September, 1880, Mr. Webb joined his partner in Lancaster. Alexander Ivey is a native of England, born in County Cornwall March 10, 1837, a son of Joseph and Miriam Endey Ivey, who moved to America in the summer of 1837, and lived in New York City six years, when his father, a miner by trade, was killed by the caving in of a mine, his mother subsequently marrying Josiah T. Tremullen ; they moved to West Virginia, afterward to North Carolina, and in 1846, to Grant Co., Wis.; his mother died in 1849. He followed mining until the war broke out when he volunteered as a private in September, 1861, in Co. D, 7th W. V. 1., Capt. E. F. Giles; he went out as a private and returned a Sergeant, having lost one leg at the battle of Gettysburg. He was married March 4, 1865, to Miss Anna Eustice, of British Hollow, daughter of George Eustice ; they have four sons and a daughter, Miriam P., Joseph E., George Earl, Alexander and W. Leroy ; he was elected Town Clerk at Potosi in 1865, and was County Treasurer for Grant Co. four years from 1875 to 1879, and a member of the City Council in 1879. W. E. Webb, a native of Wisconsin, born in British Hollow, Grant Co., March 9, 1848, a son of John and Dorothy Dunstone Webb, both natives of Cornwall, England, who came to the United States in 1845, and direct to Grant Co. Mr. Webb followed mining from the time he left .school at the age of 14 until he embarked in the mercantile business. He was married to Miss Martha Nicholls, born in Wales, a daughter of William and Ann Wilcox Nicholls ; they have three sons Frank, Walter and William.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

IVEY, JAMES

JAMES IVEY, farmer; P. O. Platteville; was born April 20, 1816, in Camborne, Cornwall, England. His occupation in early life was that of tin dresser. He married, in his and her native parish, Mary Ann Eudey, by whom he has nine children -- James A., Honor A. (Mrs. L. D. Culver), Jennie (Mrs. Alexander Thomas), Elizabeth (Mrs. John Carhart), Edward M., M. Julia, Benjamin F., Rosina and Nellie; the eldest was born in Camborne, and all the others in Grant Co. The parents came to America and located at Lancaster in 1845, Mr. Ivey working in the Pigeon and Rockville diggings; at the latter point he erected one of the very first framed houses, and for a time worked in the furnace of Squire Emery. In 1855, he bought a farm on Sec. 2, town of Harrison, having spent the preceding year in California. In 1872, he came to present location in Platteville; there he has in all 202 acres. At one time, while in Harrison, Mr. Ivey had nine children of "school age," i. e., from 4 to 20 years. His eldest son served under Gen. Thomas in his Tennessee campaign of 1864-65.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

JACCO, J. H.

J. H. JACCO, proprietor of billiard saloon, Patch Grove; was born in Missouri Jan. 16, 1827; emigrated to De Kalb Co., Ill., in 1832; then to Wisconsin in the spring of 1837; settled at Cassville; was in Capt. Knowlton's company in the Mexican war; owns town property. His wife, Amanda J. Parrish, was born in Kentucky March 16, 1827; came to Wisconsin in 1828; married in 1858; they have had two children -- Ned, born Feb. 2, 1859, now of the firm of Jacco & Brown, Bloomington; William P., Jan. 19, 1865. In politics, Democrat; liberal in religion. Has been School Treasurer.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

JACKSON, ABRAHAM

ABRAHAM JACKSON, teamster; P. O. Muscoda; was born Feb. 25, 1833, in Lancashire, England. He is a son of John and Sarah Jackson. His parents came to the United States when he was but 14 years of age, locating at Ft. Winnebago, Columbia Co., Wis., where Mr. Jackson remained fifteen years. He then lived in Vernon Co. for one year, going thence to Castle Rock, Grant Co., where he lived until 1881. He then came to Muscoda, where he lives at present. He was married, in 1864, to Amelia Bowden, daughter of John and Mary Bowden. In politics, Mr. Jackson is a Republican.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

JACKSON, C. M.

C. M. JACKSON, hotel, Potosi; born Jan. 27, 1816, at Muhlenburg (Co.), Ky., son of Jesse and Hannah (nee Rhodes) Jackson; came to Dubuque May 13, 1835, where he remained one year, then came over and engaged in lead mining eight years, then went to his farm of 300 acres of land on Sections 2 and 3. Was married at Lancaster Dec. 22, 1846, by Robert Glenn, Esq., to Martha A. O., daughter of Francis and Nevel Bonham; has nine children living (lost two) -- Ann Eliza, wife of Mr. Spaulding, now on the farm; Lurah, wife of Mr. Hunt, in store at Potosi; Jennette, Mrs. Kinney, of Potosi; Adella, Minnie, Mattie, Mertie, Willie, Jessie. Went to California in 1850, remained two years, mining with fair success. Has kept hotel in Potosi seven years, and is member of firm of Hunt & Jackson, dealers in hardware, dry goods, boots, shoes, leather, clothing, rubber goods, notions, etc.; carry a large and varied stock, and owns the building. Mrs. Jackson died Nov. 6, 1880.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Potosi Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

JACKSON, WILLIAM

REV. WILLIAM JACKSON, farmer and local minister, Sec. 23; P. O. North Andover; was born in 1843 in Lincolnshire, England; son of William and Jane Jackson; resided there eighteen years; then to Billingsbar, where he lived until 1866; then to America, stopping for four months in Clinton Co., Mich.; then to Grant Co., Wis., where he has since lived. He was married in 1868 to Sarah Mason, a daughter of Richard Mason, of England; they have five children -- William M., Herbert, Edwin, Francis and Frederick. He has 100 acres of land, valued at $3,000. Politics, Greenbacker. He has been a local minister in the M. E. Church for sixteen years.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Glen Haven Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

JACKSON, WILLIAM

WILLIAM JACKSON, farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. Hazel Green; farm contains 178 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre; born in England in 1818; came to America in 1846, and settled in La Fayette Co.; removed to his present farm in 1858. Married Susan Ann Treglown, a native of England, in 1842; have eight children -- Sarah Ann, Joseph, Eliza, James, Mary, Francis, Arthur T., Albert. Mrs. Jackson is a member of the M. E. Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

JAMES, JOHN

JOHN JAMES, miner, Lewisburg; born in Cornwall, Eng., in 1838; came to America in 1840 with his parents; located in La Fayette Co. in 1858; settled here. Married Mary Ann Alton, a native of Iowa Co., Wis.; they have three children -- Alice A., Jane A., John M.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

JAMISON, ADAM

ADAM JAMISON, farmer, Secs. 29, 31, 32; P.O. Beetown; born in 1803 in Cabarrus Co., N.C., where he resided until 15 years of age, then to Pike Co., Mo.; lived there until 1845; then to Johnson Co., Ill., and, in 1848, he came to Grant Co., Wis.; located in the village of Beetown. Married, in 1830, to Miss Nancy Sherwood, a daughter of William Sherwood; has been a miner and farmer for many years; has 120 acres of land; has six children--James W., John A., Nancy J., Adam W., William H. and Sarah E. Is a member of the Presbyterian Church. Has been Justice of the Peace two terms; was Constable two terms; was School director two terms. Politics, Democratic.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

JARRATT, W. S.

W. S. JARRATT, Potosi; harness maker; was born in British Hollow, April 13, 1853; son of Joseph and Mary (nee Petty) Jarratt; married Oct. 18, 1877, by Rev. Mr. Young, of Dubuque, to Josephine Ann, daughter of John B. and Elizabeth (Hail) Albrecht, of Grant Co.; has two children -- Arthur and Walter. Owns the shop and stock, and is Republican and Methodist by nature.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Potosi Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

JEARDON, PAUL

PAUL JEARDON, farmer, Sec. 28; P.O. Platteville; was born at Vincennes, Ind., Feb. 7, 1819; emigrated to Platteville, Wis., in 1841; a blacksmith by trade, which he continued to follow; he then removed to Dodgeville in 1847, and remained until 1862, when he entered Co. C, as 31st W.V.I., as private, and elected to First Lieutenant; mustered out in 1865; returned to Platteville, and bought and now owns 140 acres of land; was burned out Nov. 30, 1871, he then built a fine stone house, and has a beautiful home. His wife, Jane Nettle, was born in Liverpool, England, Feb. 9, 1827; came to America with her parents, who settled near Pottsville, Penn., in 1834; started for Mineral Point; her father died at St. Louis, Mo., where the family remained until the next spring, when they came on to the Point, then to Belmont, then to Platteville. They married in 1845; the have had thirteen children--Maggie, born Jan.12, 1846, and now Mrs. Colman; Richard, born Jan. 10, 1848; freight conductor on the Chicago & Alton R.R., in Missouri; Frank Preston, born July 1, 1850; Charles A., born May 21, 1852; Eva J., born June 26, 1854; Louis, born July 10, 1856, in Colorado on the railroad as fireman; Stephen N., born July 24, 1858, in Nebraska; Kate I., born Sept.9, 1860; Jessie J., Feb. 20, 1863; Allen W., born April 1, 1866; Lucy A., born Jan. 4, 1869; Paul H., born Nov. 16, 1871; Helen N., born Dec. 11, 1875. In politics, Republican. In religion, Congregational, is Deacon. Has been Treasurer and Clerk and Director of School; also Good Templar.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

JEFFREY, JAMES

JAMES JEFFREY, dealer in general merchandise, Georgetown; was born in England in 1841; came to America in 1847, and with his parents settled in Benton, La Fayette Co.; removed to this county in 1861. In 1869, he married Alice Oatey, a native of Illinois; they have two children -- William F. and George L.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Smelser Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

JENCKES, J. L.

J. L. JENCKES, physician and surgeon, Hazel Green; born in Rhode Island in 1816; came to Wisconsin in 1848, and settled in Oshkosh, and engaged in the practice of medicine; in 1852, he removed to this village, and has been here since; he received is medical education at Pittsfield, Mass., and Providence, R. I. Married Eleanor J. Smith, a daughter of Rev. Hugh Smith, D. D., of New York City; they have four children -- Hugh Lawrence, Daniel B., Eleanor Lawrence and Jessie. Are members of the Episcopal Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

JENKINS, THOMAS

THOMAS JENKINS, miner; was born in Cornwall, England, June 26, 1832, in the parish of Kenwyn, and received some common-school and academic education in England. His father, Benjamin Jenkins, went to Brazil, South America, with his family in 1837, and was engaged in mining there till 1842, then returned to England. He came to the United States in 1848 and settled in Platteville, where he was engaged in mining until 1851, when he went to California, returning to Wisconsin in 1857; went again to California, overland, in 1861, and from there to Montana in 1866. He returned to Platteville in 1868, and has resided there since. He was married in 1858, in Dodgeville, Wis., to Miss Sheba Martin, daughter of William Martin, of that place, and has four children living -- Bennie, Ida, Nettie and Mary. Mr. Jenkins was a member of the Village Board of Platteville six years in succession from 1870, and was Assessor five years of the time; he represented his district in the Legislature of 1874, and is at present a member of the City Council.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

JENKINS, THOMAS

THOMAS JENKINS, farmer; is a native of Cornwall, England; born in 1833, in the parish of St. Agnes, son of Nicholas Jenkins came to America in 1848, leaving England on the 6th of April, arrived in Mineral Point, Wis., on the 10th of June; he engaged in mining there till April 1, 1849; then came to Platteville April 15, 1852; he started for California and returned June 3, 1857. In 1862, he went again to California and from there to Montana, returning to Platteville in 1868, where he has since resided; he was married in Platteville Dec. 24, 1859, to Miss Elizabeth Enner, who died in April, 1860. His second wife, to whom he was married Jan. 5, 1871, was Mrs. Eliza A. Daney, daughter of William Martin, of Dodgeville, who was also from Cornwall, England; she was the widow of Joseph J. Daney, a native of Mineral Point, Wis., who died in Platteville October, 1869, leaving three children -- Nora A., Joseph E. and Frank S. Mr. Jenkins has three children by the second marriage, Orville M., Clarence P. and Cora A.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

JENNINGS, W. T.

W. T. JENNINGS, teacher, Principal of the Rock Graded School of Platteville; was born in Keweenaw Co., Mich., in 1858. His father, William Jennings, was a native of Cornwall, England, and came to America in 1848. He settled in Hazel Green, Grant Co., Wis., and in September, 1850, he married Miss Elizabeth Collins, also a native of Cornwall, England, who came to America in 1848. Immediately after marriage, he removed to the copper regions of Michigan and was engaged in mining there till his death June 17, 1860, by the falling of earth and rock where he was engaged in blasting. After his death, Mrs. Jennings returned to Hazel Green, whe she resided about four years, then returned to Michigan for about the same length of time. In December, 1868, she married William Trewartha, who died in 1871; since her second marriage she has resided in Grant County, and since August, 1877, in Platteville. William T. Jennings was educated at the High School in Hazel Green and the Normal School at Platteville, graduating from the Normal in June, 1878, since which time he has been teaching, and has been in his present situation since April, 1880; he also taught winters from 1874 to 1878. He has one brother John, and one sister, Mary Ann, now Mrs. Joseph Thomas, of Michigan.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

JERRETT, THOMAS

THOMAS JERRETT, Sec. 8; P.O. Lancaster; owns 160 acres of land, valued at $18 per acre; born in Devonshire, England, in 1823, came to America in 1851, and located in Canada, removed to Wisconsin in 1867. Married Ellen Murphy, a native of Ireland, who died in 1869 ; four children were the result of this union George, Eliza, Mary and Ann.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

JESIDE, JOHN

JOHN JESIDE, merchant tailor, Lancaster ; commenced this business in 1876 with a stock of clothing, and employing but one man ; he now carries a stock ranging from $8,000 to $12,000, and employs three workmen; Mr. Jeside is a native of Germany, born Feb. 6, 1848, a son of John and Elizabeth Jeside. John, Jr., commenced to learn his trade in Germany, and came to Lancaster direct in March, 1867 ; he was then 19 years of age, and engaged as tailor for John Beig, with whom he remained one year, and was one year with H. Cook ; he was afterward for seven years in the employ of Ed Hyde, when he commenced business for himself He was married, Oct. 9, 1871, to Miss A. Beorner, daughter of John A. Beorner; she died May 30, 1872 ; he was again married, Oct. 10, 1874, to Miss Henrietta Henkel, daughter of Henry Henkel, of Ellenboro ; they have one son living, Oscar. Mr. Jeside is a member of the Odd Fellows, Lodge No. 172, and an officer in the same.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

JOHNS, JOSEPH

JOSEPH JOHNS, retired miner, Hazel Green; born in Cornwall, Eng., in 1821; came to America in 1846, and settled in this village and engaged in mining. Married Jane Paul, a native of England; they have five children -- Mary Jane, Emily, Sarah, Alfretta, Lennie May. Are members of the Primitive Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

JOHNSON, ENOCH

ENOCH JOHNSON (deceased); was born in Delaware, August, 1800, and lived there with his parents until he was 23 years old. Was married when he was 24, to Sarah Ann Stigus, at her father's house, who was born June 16, 1811, in Chester Co. Penn.; she settled first on a farm in Lancaster Co., and remained there twenty years, then moved to Western Pennsylvania, and remained there farming for five years, then came West to Wisconsin, and settled in the town of Clifton, and bought a farm from John Booth; lived there five years, then sold it and rented for three years, then bought the place where Mr. Biddick now lives; sold that and went to Illinois, where he stayed two years, and then came back to Wisconsin and bought the present family residence from William Andrew. Enoch died May 29, 1874; was buried in Rock Church Cemetery; there were nine children, of whom seven are living -- Hannah E., Lydia A., Priscilla, William H., Susan J., Narcissa, John H.; the deceased are James and Mary F. Mr. Johnson was a member of the M. E. Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

JOHNSON, FARNAM

FARNAM JOHNSON (deceased); was born in New Jersey Dec. 12, 1802. In 1827, he came to the lead diggings about "Hardscrabble" (Hazel Green), and spent the summer there and at Sinsinawa Mounds, In 1828, he came to Platteville, and began hauling lead for Maj. Roundtree; he was know to have hauled some of the heaviest loads that ever left the place, and was a most expert driver of oxen. During the Black Hawk war, he served with credit, and later went to the Fevre River lead mines. In 1835, he married, at Old Pelmont, Miss Amanda Eastman; she was born May 12, 1812, near Delaware, N.Y.; her early life was spent in Ohio and Indiana. In 1830, her parents, Moses and Elizabeth Eastman, settled at Belmont; they were among those who "forted" at Elk Grove during the summer of 1832. After his marriage, Mr. Johnson spent three years on a farm near Horseshoe Bend, Fevre River. In the summer of 1838, he bought of Elijah Mayfield 240 acres, which is still in the family; during the fall, his wife and himself erected a log house; apertures for windows and doors were sawed out with a crosscut saw. Mr. Johnson standing on the inside and she outside; this house stood on the site of that now occupied by Henry W. Johnson, and was torn down to make room for it when the latter married Maria Quimby, of Etna, Wis. Farnam Johnson and wife resided on this farm from Christmas, 1838, until his death, July 6, 1879. He left five children--Mary (Mrs. John Wallace); Elizabeth (Mrs. George Clemmer); Nancy (now the widow of J. W. Humiston, drowned June 27, 1878, in the Gulf of Mexico); Henry W. and Warren; Henry W. enlisted Aug. 11, 1862, in Co. E. 25th W.V.I.; served in the Sioux war in Minnesota, through the siege of Vicksburg, and fought under Sherman to Atlanta; thence marched with him through Georgia and the Carolinas. He was discharged with the regiment June 21, 1865. Is now on the homestead, containing in all 390 acres; Warren Johnson is also here, as is the widowed mother. The former married Phebe J. Dickinson, of Lima. Mrs. Johnson is the picture of a brave old pioneer lady, and enjoys the comforts of a well-earned home.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

JOHNSON, GEORGE S.

GEORGE S. JOHNSON, merchant, Burton; has 500 acres of land in Sec. 22; was born Dec. 26, 1833, at Lockport, N. Y.; son of Lorenzo and Arminda (Griffin) Johnson, of Rhode Island and New York. He was married April 22, 1855, by Father Schrouenbach, of St. Andrew's, to Ann, daughter of Patrick Brady; they have had eight children -- Arminda, born March 8, 1856; James A., born Aug. 3, 1858, married Nettie Dixon, of Beetown; George E., born July 16, 1866; Eliza Jane, born Sept. 3, 1869; one girl, born March 23, 1873, died at birth; Mary Ann, born July 18, 1860 was crushed to death in a cane-mill, Oct. 3, 1876; she was assisting about the mill and her clothing caught in the machinery, the arm and shoulder being torn off, leaving the heart and lungs visible; other portions of the body were horribly mangled and ground with the clothing, so that it took an hour to gather up and remove the remains from the machine; she was a remarkably active, intelligent girl, and beloved by all. Mr. Johnson started in the mercantile line in 1878; he has a general stock of dry goods, stationery, groceries, hardware, boots and shoes, drugs and medicines, cigars and tobacco, glass, crockery, paints and oils, cutlery, etc.; he is located two miles above Burton on the Grant River, and is rapidly absorbing the trade of the town and the surrounding country; he is a live man, and people know it. He states that the steamer Waterloo, of Waterloo, twenty-five tons burthen, was launched in 1852, Capt. A. S. Cash proprietor, and was afterward taken to New Orleans, and finally to Panama; the scene was witnessed by 1,000 people, who had a dance in the evening, and a fine flag of forty feet was presented by the ladies present.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Waterloo Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

JOHNSON, ISAIAH

ISAIAH JOHNSON, farmer, Sec. 10; P. O. North Andover; born in 1809 in New Jersey; is a son of Isaiah Johnson; lived there until 1821, thence to Clermont Co., Ohio, for forty-four years, and, in 1865, came to Wisconsin, locating where he now resides. He was married in 1853 to Miss Nancy Winter, a daughter of James and Elizabeth Winter; she was born in 1812; they have five living children, seven deceased; those living are Caroline, Augustus S., Laura, Granville and Mortimer. He has been Justice of the Peace eight years, Road Overseer five years, and Clerk of the School Board twenty-one years. Has 160 acres of land, valued at $6,000. Politics, Greenbacker. Member of the M. E. Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Glen Haven Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

JOHNSON, J. A.

J. A. JOHNSON, farmer, Sec. 13; P.O. Beetown; was born in 1858 in Waterloo, Grant Co., Wis.; was a son of G.S. Johnson; lived with his father until 22 years of age. In 1880, he married Nettie Dixon, a daughter of Samuel and Priscilla Dixon; she was born in 1860. Mr. Johnson is one of the promising young men of Grant Co.; his father has been a merchant at Burton for many years. Politics, Republican.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

JOHNSON, JOHN Jr.,

JOHN JOHNSON, Jr., Postmaster, merchant and blacksmith, Castle Rock, is one of the leading citizens of this place; he was born in 1839, in Norway, son of John and Anna Johnson; he came to the United States in 1853, locating in Iowa Co., Wis., near Dodgeville, for two years; thence going to Montfort for two years; then to Castle Rock, where he has since lived. Has kept the post office for a number of years. He was married Oct. 3, 1868, to Huldah E. Richards, a daughter of Solomon and Catherine Richards, and has four children -- Herbert J., Willie R. Roy B., Mabel. He was Chairman of Town Board for two years, and School Clerk for nine years; owns 382 acres of land; in politics, is a Republican.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Castle Rock Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

JONES, J. A.

J. A. JONES, druggist, Lancaster. Established this business in May, 1851, at Hazel Green, in the south part of Grant Co. He commenced with but $200 cash capital, buying out the drug house of Dr. C. A. Mills, and commenced business under the firm name of Jones & Kibbe. At the end of six months Mr. Kibbe retired, and Mr. Jones continued until September, 1857, when he closed out. Having been a conveyancer, he continued in that occupation until elected County Treasurer in the fall of 1858, which office he held four years, and then bought an interest in the dry goods house of George Howe. Continued business under the firm name of Howe & Jones two years, when he again entered the drug business in the fall of 1866, which he has since successfully continued. Mr. Jones was born in Westmoreland Co., Penn., Sept. 1, 1818, a son of John and Elizabeth (George) Jones. He came to Wisconsin in the spring of 1844, and settled in the south part of Grant Co., where he followed mining and school-teaching. He was married Nov. 1, 1849, to Miss Theda B. Culver, daughter of Samuel Culver ; she died in August, 1862. Was again married, March 2, 1864, to Emily J. Wight, of Dubuque.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

JONES, JAMES P.

JAMES P. JONES, dealer in general merchandise, Georgetown; was born in this town in 1851; engaged in his present business Oct. 22, 1878. Married Eliza Watson in 1874; she is also a native of this county; they have three children -- Etta, Mabel and Garfield. Members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Smelser Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

JONES, JESSE S.

JESSE S. JONES, Platteville; was born in 1823, in Orange Co., N. Y.; from there he removed to Ohio, thence, in 1847, to Grant Co., Wis. In early life he learned the trade of leather-dressing, and followed it until he came to Wisconsin; his first enterprise was to open a small store in Wingville, groceries, notions, etc.; he then began mining in Iowa Co., struck some rich diggings and cleared about $1,000; in 1849, he was one of the first to discover the rich "New California Diggings;" here he did a large business, with varied success, but finally met with some serious losses, though he still owns a fine quarter-section of land in that vicinity; while he was a resident of Clifton, he was the first Town Clerk elected, and afterward served a number of terms as Chairman, etc.; in 1865, he came to Platteville and bought his present homestead; here he has erected substantial buildings, and laid out and planted his grounds in a most tasteful manner, making his one of the most elegant suburban homes in the city. His wife was Miss Elizabeth, a daughter of F. C. Kirkpatrick, of the early pioneers of Grant Co.; they have several children. For a number of years after coming to Platteville, Mr. Jones was actively engaged in the milk business, supplying city customers, but has relinquished the work; he has 60 acres, twenty of which are in the corporation, and this land gives him ample facilities to indulge his fancy for fine stock; he has of late devoted much attention to the breeding of fine horses; his pride is the Black Hawk, Reliable, a magnificent type of that famous family of horses; his weight is 1,750 lbs., and, as a writer in the Chicago Field says, is tremendously built, with immense sloping shoulders, strong limbs, round barrel and deep, powerful chest; his owner considers him the best living type of Tyler's old Black Hawk; he shows a three-minute gait, with no training whatever. Another of Mr. Jones' favorites is Tartar, a splendid horse, directly descended from Royal George, and showing many of the best points of that regal line.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

JONES, JOHN

JOHN JONES, carpenter, Patch Grove; was born at Floore, Northamptonshire, England, June 15, 1836; came to America in 1867; settled in the town of Wyalusing, Grant Co., Wis., where he worked at his trade until 1876, when he removed to Patch Grove; owns a fine home with 5 acres of land near the village of Patch Grove. In the year 1854, he was in the East India service, and remained until 1860; was there through the mutiny. His wife, Sarah Dale, a native of Telsworth, Oxfordshire, was born September, 1835; they married July, 1860; they had nine children -- Mary E., Charlotte J., Hannah (deceased); these three were born in England; Edith E., Edwin T., Hannah (deceased); Jessie R., Arthur J., an infant boy, deceased; and Albert Edward. A Republican; Episcopal. Has been Clerk of Schools in Wyalusing; also Justice of the Peace and Notary Public; was Postmaster at Bradville from 1872 to May, 1876. Member of I. O. O. F. Lodge.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

JONES, OBED C.

OBED C. JONES, Sec. 6; P. O. Platteville; was born March 23, 1810, in Trumbull Co., Ohio, where his early life was spent; at 15, he went to Oswego Co., N. Y., but afterward returned to Ohio; in 1837, he went to Hancock Co., Ill., spent a year and then came to Platteville; Obed King was then the only settler at "Whig;" after a short stay he returned to Illinois, and, the next year, brought his family to Harrison for permanent settlement; locating on what is now the Levi Bushnell farm; he followed his trade of carpenter, and worked at millwrighting for many years; during 1839, he put the screening and bolting apparatus into the historic old McKee Mill. Mr. Jones has owned three different farms, and spent 1868 and 1869 in the city of Platteville; in 1870, he settled on his present farm of 160 acres. He married in Hartford, Trumbull Co., Ohio, July 20, 1834, Miss Ursula Miner, who was born Jan. 27, 1818, in Hartand, Conn. Her parents located as early as 1820, in Ohio, where she grew to womanhood. Mr. and Mrs. Jones have six living children -- Pluma A. (born in Vernon, Trumbull Co., Ohio), Albert H., Maria A., Celia J., Julia A. and Mollie E., all born in Harrison. Julius M. Jones enlisted in the 4th W. V. I., and died of typhoid fever on the banks of the Potomac, Dec. 2, 1861. Albert served three years with the 35th W. V. I., and was with Sherman on his march to the sea and through the Carolinas. Besides J. M. this pioneer couple have lost five children -- Ursula J., aged 16; Calvin R., aged 19; Lura L., aged 9; Elluna L. aged 9, and an infant. Mr. Jones is a member of the Christian Church and is a Republican; he served ten years as a Justice of the Peace, and is well and widely known as a well-posted old settler.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

JONES, OBED KING

OBED KING JONES, Sec. 1; P. O. Platteville; born in Trumbull Co., Ohio, Jan. 17, 1833; son of Chauncy and Elizabeth (Brown) Jones; has 240 acres on which or part of which his father settled in 1840. His wife was Miss Susie, daughter of Nathan and Elizabeth Jenney, of Washington Co., Mo.; they have two children -- Nellie and Frank. Mr. Jones has two children -- De Forrest and Lottie, by a former marriage. His is a Republican, and belongs to the M. E. Church. In the spring of 1877, he began the manufacture of cheese, and, in the spring of 1880, built the only cheese factory in his town. Chauncy Jones came from Hancock Co., Ill., to Harrison in the summer of 1837; he was accompanied by a cousin, Obed King, and they built a small log cabin near where O. S. Jones now lives. Mr. Jones was by trade a stone-mason, and was one of the workmen on the old Platteville M. E. Church. Mr. King settled permanently in the town in the fall of 1837, and Mr. Jones in March, 1840; Chauncy Jones, Sr., grandfather of O. S. and O. K., came in 1839, and located on Sec. 12, in Harrison. Mr. King met a tragic death in June, 1840, being killed by the falling of a tub full of rocks while in the bottom of an unfinished well. O. S. Jones was Chairman of Harrison in 1879; was Town Superintendent of Schools many years, and is an old-time teacher in the town.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Harrison Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

JONES, R. C.

R. C. JONES, farmer, Sec. 36; P. O. Fennimore; was born in North Carolina July, 1839; came to Grant Co., Wis., in 1871; was driven from the South for his loyal principles. Enlisted Jan. 1, 1863, in Co. C, 2d W. V. I.; was engaged in all the battles with his command, until, by the explosion of a shell, he was injured; was discharged July 14, 1865. Married Elizabeth Pointer, who was born Oct. 12, 1842, died Sept. 26, 1877; Mr. Jones has two children by his first marriage -- Cora and Elta; was again married Jan. 15, 1879, to Eliza Colburn, who was born Oct. 29, 1853; they have one child, Ethel. Mr. Jones owns a farm of 80 acres, well cultivated and is an active member of the I. O. O. F.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Mount Ida Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

JONES, SAMUEL M.

SAMUEL M. JONES, wagon and plow maker, Platteville; was born in Pembrokeshire, South Wales, Oct. 27, 1840; son of David Jones, who came to America in 1852, and settled in Mifflin, Iowa Co., Wis., where he resided till his death in 1860. Samuel M. learned his trade with Gideon Hawley, of Platteville, and has been in business for himself since 1867; was in company with Edward Davis seven or eight years, and a member of the firm of Potter & Jones about three years. He was married, in May, 1867, to Miss Emma Davis, daughter of Edward Davis, of Platteville, and has six children -- Fannie, Samuel E., Lina, Emma, Nora and Thomas.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

JONES, W. D.

W. D. JONES, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Hazel Green; owns 77 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre; born in Westmoreland Co., Penn., in 1830; came to Wisconsin in 1854, and settled in Hazel Green; located on his present farm in 1877. Married Elizabeth Mayo, a native of Vermont; they have one child by adoption -- Sarah E. Mr. Jones has been a member of the Legislature one term, and Chairman of the Board of Supervisors one term. Are members of the Congregational Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

JUDD, HENRY

HENRY JUDD, farmer. Sec. 27 ; P.O. Lancaster. Owns 120 acres of land, valued at $20 per acre. Born in Genesee Co., N. Y., in 1844. Came to Wisconsin in 1868, and settled in Jamestown, this county ; located on present farm in 1880. Married Ella Patterson, a native of this county. They have three children Burton, LeRoy and Cornelia. Mr. Judd enlisted in Co. I, 6th U. S. C, in 1861, and was discharged in 1864. Was engaged in twenty-eight battles, being all that his regiment participated in.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

KAISER, FRANK

FRANK KAISER, farmer, P. O. Fair Play; from the boundary line between Belgium and France; has 200 acres of land, the probable value of which is $8,000. In politics, Democratic. He served in the army under Louis Phillippe, of France. He married Mary Widerholt, a native of Germany; they have four children -- Joseph, Henry, Frank and Eugenia.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Jamestown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

KALTENBACH, CELESTIN

CELESTIN KALTENBACH, Postmaster, Potosi; born in Germany, 1813; came to this place in 1832, and engaged in lead mining; married at Dubuque, in 1835, to Louisa Kreisen; had five children, three of them now living; his second marriage was to Clara Siedle, in 1854; had ten children; seven of them still living. Post office is in store of his son, Andrew, who is unmarried. His daughter, Mary, was born Dec. 19, 1836, and was the first white child born in this town; she is now wife of H. E. Block, a merchant of St. Louis, Mo.; Mr. K. was Postmaster from 1837 to 1862, and from 1870 to present time; is a Democrat and attends the Catholic Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Potosi Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

KALTENBACH, CELESTINE

A PIONEER'S NOBLE LIFE.

Sketch of Celestine Kaltenbach, the Late Aged Postmaster of Potosi

Potosi, Wis., March 20.--The official life of the late Celestine Kaltenbach, the venerable postmaster of this village, who died last Wednesday, is one of unusual interest, as he was undoubtedly the oldest living postmaster in Wisconsin, if not in the United States, having been in continuous service at this place, with the exception of three years during the civil war, for an unbroken term, of over fifty-four years. His first commission is dated Aug. 8, 1837, and is signed by Amos Kendall, at the head of the post office department during the administration of Andrew Jackson. During all these years Mr. Kaltenbach was the faithful, trusted, diligent servant of the public and the government. It is safe to say that there has been no official in high or low degree, whose services as regards efficiency, probity and punctuality were more appreciated, both by the department and people, than were his. He was ever attentive, faithful, accommodating and kind, even to the little ones who called for their father's mail; pleasantly answering questions of every person who called at his office.

Mr. Kaltenbach was born Feb. 15, 1813, in the Black Forest, Duchy of Baden, Germany, and was 78 years, 1 month old at the time of his death. He was reared in the Catholic faith and from his childhood has remained a consistent, faithful upright member of that church. Though strict in his observance and of adhesion to his own religious views and tenets, he respected the belief and opinions of others and made few comments upon the faults and foibles of his fellow men. In addition to being almost a life-long postmaster, Mar. Kaltenbach was for many years a prosperous and popular merchant of Potosi. He was a member of the town board of supervisors in the first organization of the state in 1848, and subsequently, for a number of terms, held the position of town treasurer. His integrity was unquestioned, and in his early mining days, especially among his own countrymen, his influence and popularity were supreme, his advice or admonition being a law with the people of this section.

It was in the year 1832, almost a beardless and penniless boy, with "an apostolic outfit," accompanied by four companions of his own age, that he left his native Baden and migrated for America--to them a strange and foreign land. In the midsummer of that year, these young men, penniless, unrecommended and unskilled in the ways, customs and language of the country, arrived at St. Louis. For a while they managed to earn a scanty livelihood, spending their days in toil and nights in dreams of home, friend and native land, the woods, the mountains and loved valleys of Baden,

"Where winds the lazy Sheldt,
Or runs the wandering Po."

Three of the young lads soon became disheartened and returned to the fatherland, while two remained--Celestine and his cousin, the late "Deacon" Kaltenbach, of Dubuque. The next year they came north and located in the lead mines, as the country was all called at that time. Galena and Dubuque were the outposts of civilization and the extreme western boundaries of emigration. To the latter place they came and entered into business. It was at the close of the Black Hawk war and at the time of greatest excitement. Capital and labor and all classes and conditions of men were drifting thither, wooed and wafted by fortune's smiles which glowed in the reports of vast mineral deposits. Dubuque was in its infancy, struggling, like some wayward child, for recognition and existence which for a time seemed uncertain, problematical and afar off. Potosi and its rich mineral discoveries on the Wisconsin side, twelve miles above, held out greater inducements for trade and present gains and decided the future homes and location of many of the early settlers, among others that of Mr. Kaltenbach. While stopping at Dubuque he came acquainted with Miss Louisa Caroline Kreizer, a woman of estimable character to whom he was married Sept. 8, 1835. She was a sister of Davis Gillilan, one of the earliest merchants and the first sheriff of Dubuque county. In 1836 Mr. Kaltenbach, with his young wife, came to Wisconsin and commenced trade in that part of the town of Potosi known as Van Buren. He afterwards became landlord of the Wisconsin house in the upper village and entertained such early and eminent guests as Moses Mr. Strong, Gov. Henry Dodge, Joe Jefferson, the tragedian, Jefferson Davis and wife, the daughter of President Zachary Taylor and later, Judge Dunn, Ben C. Eastman, Chief Justice Orsamus Cole and many other noted individuals.

By his first wife Mr. Kaltenbach became the father of five children, one one of whom, Mrs. Mary L. Black, wife of Emanuel E. Black, of St. Louis, Mo., now survives him. During the prevalence of the cholera in the summer of 18(??), Mrs. Kaltenbach and her youngest son, Matthew, were stricken with that dread scourge. She died, but the boy recovered and grew to manhood. Four years later, Feb. 7, 1850(?), Mr. Kaltenbach married Miss Clara M. Sudle, an amiable and highly accomplished lady of Erie, Pa., with whom he lived happily for nearly thirty years, when she died Dec. 22, 1883; aged 48 years. The family now consists of three sons and five daughters. George, the oldest son, now married, resides at Patterson, N.J., Mrs. Theresa C?umbs, at Lodgepole, Neb.; Mrs. Mary L. Block, at St. Louis, Mo.; while Andrew, Fannie, Amelia, Anna, and Louis still reside at home. Of the older members of the family Celestine died a few years since at St. Louis, Matthew at Mineral Point and in January last Mrs. Cornelia Dyer passed suddenly away at Fennimore, in Grant county.

Source: The Milwaukee Journal 20 Mar 1891 - Transcribed by Mary Dutcher

KARRMANN, JACOB

JACOB KARRMANN, manufacturer and dealer in boots and shoes, Platteville; was born in Prussia in 1841; he learned his trade in the old country, and came to America in 1866; he lived one year in Pottsville, Penn., and a few months in Galena, Ill., and has been in Platteville since 1867. In 1868, he married Miss Sophia Kabele, and has seven children -- Jacob, Peter, George, Mary Elizabeth, Anna Rena, Magdalena Catharine and Bertha Wilhelmina.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

KAUMP, A. H.

A. H. KAUMP, Sec. 14; P. O. Platteville; was born in the village of Wehrendorf, Hanover, in November, 1815; came to America in the spring of 1835, arriving in the fall of the same year at the Big Patch Diggings; engaged in mining here with his brother, J. W., until the fall of 1876, when they entered the land now constituting their respective farms; the land was heavily timbered, and the entire vicinity a forest. Only John Shipley, Abraham Wavers and perhaps one or two others preceded them as settlers in this town, of which the Kaump Brothers are now the veteran pioneers. A. H. Kaump married Nancy Utt, by whom he has five children -- John W., Henry H., Mary J., Ruth A. and Emma L.; all born on the Harrison homestead. Mr. Kaump is a Methodist and a Republican.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Harrison Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

KAUMP, J. W. Sr.,

J. W. KAUMP, Sr., Sec. 13; P. O. Platteville; born in the village of Wehrendorf, Hanover, in November, 1811; came to America in 1833; landed at New Orleans, and came from there up the Mississippi to Grant Co.; engaged in mining at Big Patch until the fall of 1836, when his brother, A. H., and himself, settled near where he now lives, entering the same land which they have cleared and improved, and now own. Until his marriage, they kept bachelor's hall, and by the division, J. W. came into possession of 240 acres. He married, Sept. 27, 1837, Phoebe Flynn, who was born in February, 1822, in Posey Co., Ind.; she came to Grant Co., in 1835; they have had fourteen children, eight of whom are still living -- William A., Mary E., Catherine F., Elizabeth A., Eliza J., Louis S., Emanuel A. and Alfred S. All were born on the home farm, the eldest in the log cabin of the "bachelor brothers." The Kaump Brothers are now the veteran settlers of Harrison. In 1863 and 1864, J. W. Kaump was one of the County Commissioners. He has also been Chairman of his town many years; also Treasurer and Assessor. Henry Utt and himself named the town of Harrison in honor of the victor of Tippecanoe.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Harrison Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

KEATING, RICHARD

RICHARD KEATING. Among the more prominent farmers of Centre township, Richland county, North Dakota, is the subject of this biography, whose farm is on section 12. He is a self-made man, who by perseverance and industry has succeeded in acquiring a comfortable home and competence. He has also won the respect and esteem of all with whom he has come in contact either in business or social life.

Mr. Keating was born in Queens county, Ireland, November 11, 1830, and emigrated to America in 1849. After a few years residence in Vermont, he removed to Grant county, Wisconsin, where he made his home until coming to Dakota territory in 1873. Locating in Richland county, he took up one hundred and sixty acres of land on section 12, Centre township, where he has since lived and has enlarged and improved his farm until he now has two hundred and forty acres under excellent cultivation and supplied with good buildings.

During his residence in Vermont Mr. Keating married Miss Margaret Cauglain, a native of Kings county, Ireland, who died in Grant county, Wisconsin, April 25, 1872. The children born of this union, were: Mary, now the wife of James F. Shea; Thomas; Celia, wife of William Masterson; Bridget, wife of Donald Wright; Anna, who married John O. Shea and died in Centre township, July 2, 1892; Margaret, wife of James Hickey; Eleanor, who died in childhood; John and Catherine, who married Robert Wright and died in Wahpeton, in November, 1896. The family hold membership in St. John s Catholic church of Wahpeton and are highly respected by all who know them.

Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Kim Mohler

KEATING, WILLIAM M.

WILLIAM M. KEATING. The subject of this notice is certainly entitled to be considered not only one of the enterprising farmers of Richland county, but one of its most respected and honored citizens, and a man of more than ordinary ability. His residence is situated on section 29, Centre township, where he has made his home since 1880. To his original purchase of one hundred and sixty acres he has added until he now has six hundred and forty acres of rich and arable land, which he has placed under a high state of cultivation. Upon the place he erected a good set of farm buildings in 1897, and has made many other improvements which fall to the value and attractive appearance of the farm.

Mr. Keating was born in Queens county, Ireland, December 22, 1846, a son of William and Mary (Brennan) Keating, both of whom died in Centre township, Richland county, North Dakota, the former October 16, 1886, at the age of eighty-seven years, the latter May 7, 1886, at the age of seventy-three. When only a year old our subject was brought by his parents to America and for some years the family made their home in Vermont. From there they removed to Grant county, Wisconsin, where William M. Keating grew to manhood and was married May 17, 1876, to Miss Nora Flynn, who was born in Beloit, Wisconsin, October 27, 1855, and was reared in Grant county, and there taught school for a number of years, and in Richland county, North Dakota, for two years. Her parents William D. and Catherine (Sullivan) Flynn, spent their last days in Grant county, the former dying September 30, 1880, aged seventy-six years, the latter August 1, 1898, aged seventy-six years. Five children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Keating, but William, the eldest, died in Centre township, Richland county, North Dakota, June 24, 1895, at the age of eighteen years and three months. Those living are Peter Leo, Dennis J., John F. and Nora C.

In the spring of 1880 Mr. Keating, with his family, left his old home in Grant county, Wisconsin, and came to Richland county, North Dakota, locating on the farm where he still makes his home. His time and attention have since been devoted to its improvement and cultivation with most gratifying results. He was one of the defenders of the Union during the Civil war, having enlisted in October, 1864, in Company I, Twentieth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. He was in the service one year and at the battle of Spanish Fort was slightly wounded in the left side. He is now an honored member of Sumner Post, No. 7, G.A.R., and he and his family belong to St. John s Catholic church of Wahpeton.

Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Kim Mohler

KEENE, H. S.

HON. H. S. KEENE, farmer. Sec. 30; P.O. Lancaster. Owns 100 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre. Born in Elk Grove, La Fayette Co., Wis. He came to this county with his parents when he was 1 year old, and they settled on the farm, where he now resides. Mr. Keene has been a teacher for many years, but, for the last few years, his attention has been turned to farming. He was married to Minnie Arnold, a native of Indiana. They have four children Walter A., Maud M., Bruce L. and Gertrude A.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy


KEILL, JOHN

JOHN KEILL, saloon and meat market, Glen Haven; born in Germany in 1841; came to America in 1855, and settled in Glen Haven. Married Lena Krapp, a native of Germany; they have six children -- Joseph, Katie, Frank, Martha, Lizzie and Gertrude. Members of the Catholic Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Glen Haven Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

KEMLER, JOHN

JOHN KEMLER, retired merchant, Platteville; has been a resident of Platteville since January, 1844, and was in the mercantile business from that time up to 1871; he was born in Hanover, Germany, in 1818, and came to America in 1837; he spent one summer in New York City, then went to Savannah, Ga., and resided there two years, being one year overseer on a plantation. He came to Galena, Ill., in the spring of 1842, and was there till the fall of 1843; then went to Germany and was married in 1844 to Miss Maggie A. Meyer, of Hanover; then returned to America and settled in Platteville, as before stated. Mr. Kemler has four children, all living in Platteville. His oldest daughter, Minnie, is now the wife of H. P. Schroder; Julia is now Mrs. Geo. Handy; A. W. Kemler married, and in the mercantile business of the firm of Huntington & Kemler, and James C., who is clerking for his brother. Mr. Kemler spent the summer of 1866 in Germany, being accompanied by his wife and daughter Julia; was Village Trustee for several years.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

KEMP, JOHN

JOHN KEMP, farmer; P. O. Jamestown; has 133 acres of land, the probable value of which is $7,000; was born in Cornwall, Eng., in 1830; emigrated to this country in 1843; settled in Hazel Green, Wis. In politics is a Republican. His wife's maiden name was Jane Roberts, born in Cornwall, Eng.; they have six children -- Charles, John, William, Royal, Alfred, Edna. Are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Jamestown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

KENDALL, HON. N. W.

HON. N. W. KENDALL, Wyalusing; owns 800 acres of land; was born in Oneida Co., N. Y., in 1818; in 1832, he removed to Ohio; four years later he came to Wisconsin, and his first location was in Platteville; he removed to Lancaster in about 1846, where he resided for ten years, and then he located in the village of Wyalusing. Although not an office-seeker, Mr. K. has been chosen by the people to quite a number of important offices; he represented the people in the State Legislature in 1868-69, and was also Sheriff two years. He married Elizabeth Smith, a native of England; they have two children -- Albert J. and Ellen.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Wyalusing Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

KENISON, STEPHEN

STEPHEN KENISON, mason, Fennimore; born in 1821 in Canada; was a son of Benjamin and Tina Kenison; he lived with his parents until 11 years of age; he then lived with his uncle Stephen Hays; he then went to Massachusetts for three years and six months; then to Franklin Co., Vt., for thirty-five years and six months, following farming; he then emigrated to Grant Co., Wis., in 1879, locating in Fennimore for two years; then to Liberty, where he has lived since. He was married in 1828, to Elizabeth Lathan, a daughter of Joseph and Angeline Lathan, of Vermont; he has seven children -- Dudley F., Myron S., Mary J., Eunice M., Sarah J., Ella L., Charles F. His politics, Democratic, and is a member of the Catholic Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Liberty Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

KERR, EDWARD

EDWARD KERR, Sec. 5; P. O. Patch Grove; owns 140 acres land, valued at $20 per acre; born in Ireland in 1830; came to America in 1849, and located at Poughkeepsie, N. Y.; in 1858, he removed to this county. Married Mary J. O'Neil, a native of Ireland; they have eight children -- Julia, Mary, Annie, Phillip, Rose, Edward, Ellen and Margaret. Mr. Kerr is Town Assessor.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

KETTLER, HENRY

HENRY KETTLER, Sec. 12; P. O. Platteville; owns 200 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre; born in Hanover, Germany, in 1828; came to America in 1855 and settled on this farm. Married Mary Knipping in 1863; she was also born in Hanover, Germany. They have three children -- Henry, John and Louise. Members of the Lutheran Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Smelser Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

KIDD, EDWARD I

EDWARD I. KIDD (Rep.), of Millville, was born in Millville, May 10, 1845, and has resided there ever since; received a common school and partial academic education; is engaged in milling; he enlisted August 9, 1862, at the age of seventeen, in Company C, Twenty-fifth regiment, Wisconsin infantry, and was in all the battles and marches of the regiment, including the march to the Northwestern frontier against the Indians, the Vicksburg campaign, the Meridean expedition, the Atlanta campaign, "the march to the sea," and through the Carolinas to Washington; he has held various local offices, including chairmanship of the town board, and has been a member of the county board since 1871, with the exception of one year; was elected assemblyman for 1881 ant 1882, and was re-elected for 1883, receiving 1,212 votes against 782 for Henry Gore, democrat.

Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1883) page 492; transcribed by Tammy Clark

KIDD, EDWARD I.

EDWARD I. KIDD (Rep.), of Millville, was born in Millville May 10, 1845, and has resided there ever since; received a common school and partial academic education; is engaged in milling; he enlisted August 9, 1862, at the age of seventeen, in Company C, Twenty-fifth regiment, Wisconsin infantry, and was in all the battles and marches of the regiment, including the march to the Northwestern frontier against the Indians, the Vicksburg campaign, the Meridean expedition, the Atlanta campaign, "the march to the sea," and through the Carolinas to Washington. Mr. Kidd has held various local offices, including chairmanship of the town board, and has been a member of the county board since 1871, with the exception of one year; was elected assemblyman for 1881, and re-elected for 1882, receiving 892 votes against 17 for C. K. Dean, democrat, 60 for Ira Brunson, greenbacker, and 268 for I. G. Dewitt, prohibitionist.

(Grant County -- Third District -- The towns of Blue River, Boscobel, Fennimore, Hickory Grove, Marion, Millville, Mount Hope, Muscoda, Patch Grove, Watterstown, Wingville, Woodman and Wyalusing. Population, 11,836.)

Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1882), page 547; transcribed by Mary Saggio

KIDD, E. I.

HON. E. I. KIDD, proprietor of Kidd's Flouring Mill, Millville, which was built in 1845 by William Kidd, Sr. and William Kidd, Jr.; it has two runs of stone, and has a capacity of twenty-five barrels per day. E. I. Kidd was born in this county in 1845. Married Martha P. Washburn, a native of Pennsylvania. Mr. Kidd has held the offices of Chairman of the Town Board, Town Clerk, and in 1880, was elected to the Legislature from this District. He enlisted in Co. C, 25th W. V. I., in 1862, and was discharged in 1865.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Millville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

KIDD, MARLOW

MARLOW KIDD, Sec. 25; P. O. Glen Haven; owns 68 acres of land, valued at $30 per acre; was born in this town in 1851. Married Annie Baumgartner, a native of Cassville; he is a son of E. A. Kidd, a native of England, who was born in 1809, and came to America in 1819; his wife was Susanna Marlow, also a native of England; they have four children -- Joseph, Richard, Franklin and Marlow.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Glen Haven Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

KILBOURN, BENJAMIN

BENJAMIN KILBOURN, Jamestown; native of Kentucky; came to Galena by steamboat Feb. 25, 1828. Married Lydia Dewey; have three children -- John, Edward and Flora. In early days he followed mining as an occupation, but of later years has followed farming in connection with mining; is the owner of 700 acres of land, the probable value of which is $25,000. In politics a Republican. Is a member of the Presbyterian Church at Jamestown. Mr. Kilbourn has a remarkable memory, and talks of matters which occurred fifty years ago, as though but a few years back; remembers in the fall of 1827 and the spring of 1828 the Government levied a duty on foreign lead. The law didn't go into operation until the following June; in the meantime, there were three cargoes of lead brought to our ports, and the consequence was that it caused a glut in the market, and lead sold that fall in Mineral Point at $5 per thousand.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Jamestown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

KILBOURN, LEROY H.

LEROY H. KILBOURN, farmer, Sec. 7; P. O. Glen Haven; born in 1851 in Grant Co., Wis., in the village of Jamestown; was a son of James A. and Sophia Kilbourn. Was married, in 1879, to Miss Emma C. Shrader, a daughter of Lenhart O. Shrader, of Lancaster; has one child -- Bessie; has 452 3/4 acres of land, valued at $16,000. In politics, a Greenbacker.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Glen Haven Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

KILBOURN, ROBERT A.

ROBERT A. KILBOURN, deceased. A native of Ohio. He came to Grant Co. in the spring of 1837, and was engaged in mining for a number of years, when he commenced farming, which he continued up to the time of his death, which occurred May 12, 1875. He was married March 26, 1836, to Miss Laura Hannum, a native of New York State. They have three children still living James M.. Myra and Anna. He and his wife were members of the Congregational Church. Mrs. Kilbourn still resides in the village of Lancaster.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

KILEY, EDWARD C.

From his early youth Mr. Kiley has been connected with the newspaper business. He has had to rely upon his own efforts from his thirteenth year, and is now the editor and proprietor of the Herald-Review at Grand Rapids, one of the best newspaper plants in Northern Minnesota. He is also judge of probate of Itasca County. He is of Irish parentage, and was born February 28, 1865, at Poughkeepsie, New York, the son of James and Agnes (McNulty) Kiley. When he was but two years of age his parents came West and settled on a farm in Grant County, Wisconsin. The father's death occurred in February, 1878; the mother's a year and a half earlier. The farm property was left encumbered, and after settlement had been made there was nothing left for the support of seven orphans--six daughters and the subject of this sketch. Edward worked for a few months after the death of his father, on the farm of an uncle, and the first money he ever earned was in the employ of Redman Gordan, a farmer, at six dollars a month and board. He then went to Lancaster, Wisconsin, and attended the winter term of school. After having earned a living as best he could until May, 1880 young Kiley went into the office of the Odebolt Observer, at Odebolt, Iowa, and commenced to learn the printing trade. That he was especially adapted to newspaper work is attested by the fact that two years later, when but seventeen years old, he was offered and accepted the position of editor and manager of the McCook County News, at Salem, South Dakota, a Democratic paper having considerable influence. From Salem, Mr. Kiley removed to Northwood, North Dakota, where he purchased the Headlight. He was appointed postmaster of Northwood by President Cleveland, but there being little opportunity to build up a business in that town, he went to Grafton, North Dakota, where he purchased the Grafton Herald. He conducted this paper for a time, when he sold out, and for the next two years traveled extensively throughout the United States, doing reportorial work on various metropolitan papers, and at intervals worked at the printing trade. In 1890 he purchased the Progressive Age, at Duluth, a Democratic paper devoted to the interests of the laboring classes. He spent the following year in the upper peninsula of Michigan, where he was married at Marquette, July 30, 1892, to Mrs. Wilhelmina Desjardins Yates, daughter of Dr. J. A. Desjardins, a prominent physician of that place. In January, 1893 Mr. Kiley located at Grand Rapids, Minnesota, and assumed the management of a local paper. On September 15, 1894, he established the Grand Rapids Herald. The outlook for the success of his new venture did not appear inviting, as two papers already occupied the field. But with careful and painstaking work he endeavored to outrank his competitors by publishing a bright, attractive and aggressive country weekly. In May, 1896, he purchased the Review, and consolidated the two papers. In politics Mr. Kiley has always been a Democrat, and is an ardent advocate of free silver. In 1896 he was unanimously tendered, by the legislative conventions of the Democrats and Populists, a nomination to the house or senate, but declined. Instead, however, he accepted the Democratic and Populist nominations for judge of probate of Itasca County, and was elected, being the only free silver Democrat elected in the county. He is a member of the Democratic state central committee, and chairman of the Itasca county committee. Mr. Kiley has achieved considerable popularity in his home district, though a comparatively young man as yet, but the enterprise and business ability which he has exhibited in the management of his paper promises still greater success for him in the future.

Source: Progressive men of Minnesota. Published by The Minneapolis Journal (1897) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

KINNEY, ADOLPHUS T.

ADOLPHUS T. KINNEY, carpenter, Potosi; born at Potosi, March 17, 1851; son of John and Sarah (Mickey) Kinney; married by Rev. Mr. Eaton, Aug. 22, 1872, to Nettie, daughter of C. M. and Martha Jackson, has two children -- Cora, aged 6 years; Althea, aged 4 years. Is a Republican.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Potosi Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

KINNEY, R. J.

R. J. KINNEY, farmer, Sec. 6; P. O. Lancaster; born in town of Hague, Warren Co., N. Y., Oct. 19, 1809; son of Wm. J. and Mary (McMurphy) Kinney; came to this county in 1855; was lumbering three years at Potosi, and one year at Waterloo, and four years farming at Waterloo, and, in 1865, came to this farm; married Sept. 9, 1834, by Rev. John H. Barker, to Harriet, daughter of Simeon and Lucinda (Cook) Phillips; she was born Feb. 22, 1808, and was widow of Hiram Burt, who died Jan. 30, 1829; by Mr. Burt she had four children -- Lucinda, wife of Elias Larned, of Clay Co., Neb.; Hiram, married Maggie Riggs, of Beetown, now of Osceola Co., Iowa; Edwin, born Nov. 9, 1824, died Jan. 19, 1848; Editha, born Jan. 10, 1826, now in South America; her children by Mr. Kinney are Alfred, born Nov. 18, 1835, married Mary Farrell, of Little Grant, they have three children -- Daniel A., Ada and Gertie; William, born August 23, 1838, married Marilda McNabb, and has three children -- Melissa, Burt and Cora; Simeon, born July 5, 1840, deceased; Valorias, born Jan. 10, 1842, married Eliza Halbert, has three children -- Hallie, Leta and an infant; Martha, born April 30, 1844, died March 18, 1848; Mary J., born April 4, 1847, married Wm. Farrell of Polk Co., Oregon; Vernon H., born Aug. 1, 1852, has an adopted son, 7 years of age -- J. Clarence (Calbert) Kinney; Hiram, Alfred, William and Valorias were in the army, and the latter lost a leg and draws a pension; he is also in charge of the infirmary at Marshalltown, Iowa, and has large practice. Mary taught school ten terms. Mr. Kinney was Chairman of Board, in Waterloo; owns 140 acres of land.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Potosi Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

KIRKPATRICK, F. W.

F. W. KIRKPATRICK (deceased); was born in Madison Co., Ill., Dec. 8, 1808. Went with his brother Jesse to Galena, Ill., 1826, and in 1827, came to Platteville, Wis. Engaged in mining and smelting lead for ten years; then went to Lake Superior and worked in copper mines; from there went to Missouri; then came back to Wisconsin; stayed here two years and then went to Pike's Peak for one year, after which he returned to Wisconsin, and lived here until his death. Was married to Ann R. Hamilton, March 12, 1851, who was born April 14, 1824, at Springfield, Ill; have had four children, whom of only one is living--Mary Alice, who married Maxwell Fawcett, and now lived at Emporia, Kan.; those deceased are Sarah J., twin sister to Mary A., Francis and Lillian; the two latter are buried at Rock Church Cemetery, and Sarah was buried near St. Louis. F.W. Kirkpatrick died April2, 1863, and was buried in Rock Creek Cemetery. His wife lived for fifteen months after her marriage at Wingville, then moved on to the place where she now lived, and has resided there ever since with the exception of four years when she lived in Kansas. She is a member of the M.E. Church. The homestead contained 140 acres of land.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

KIRKPATRICK, J. F.

J. F. KIRKPATRICK, Platteville; is of Scotch descent, his ancestors having been banished to South Carolina and Georgia during the religious troubles in the middle of the last century. His grandfather, with six stalwart brothers, fought under Washington and Marion for freedom and revenge upon the mother country. All returned safely, except the grandsire of Mr. Kirkpatrick, who was foully murdered by Tories. All were over six feet in height, and enlisted from Georgia. The father of Mr. Kirkpatrick, with two brothers, came from Georgia to what is now Madison Co., Ill., in 1800. He was the father of eight sons, of whom John F. was born Sept. 8, 1811. Five of the sons came to the lead regions of Illinois and Wisconsin. J. F. Kirkpatrick came to Belmont Mounds early in 1832 and planted a crop of corn; then came the Indian scare and subsequent war, in which Mr. Kirkpatrick took an active part as one of Capt. Craig's company. Returning to the north of Platteville that fall, he discovered the "Burying Ground Diggings." He married, near Washburn, Mary J. Basey, who died, as did her four children. The present Mrs. Kirkpatrick was Mary Ellen Somers, born in Clarke Co., Ind.; they have five children -- Henrietta (Mrs. George Brunskill), Emma A. (Mrs. Jas. Stevens), Anne, Ella May and Clyde, all born in Platteville. Since 1838, Mr. Kirkpatrick has resided in Platteville. Here he was eight or ten years in mercantile business, and for twenty-two years in the butchering business. Mr. Kirkpatrick has served for many years on both the town and village boards.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

KLINDT, JOHN A.

JOHN A. KLINDT (Rep.), of Cassville, Grant county, was born May 15, 1844, in the village of Prasdorf, near the city of Kiel, Germany; had a common school education; is a merchant; came to Wisconsin in 1864, and settled at Cassville; was elected assemblyman for 1880, receiving 489 votes against 340 for Thomas Davies, democrat; and 272 for F. W. Klinkhammer, green backer.

Second District---The towns of Beetown, Bloomington, Cassville, Glen Haven, Lancaster, Liberty, Little Grant, Potosi and Waterloo. Population, 13,387.

Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1880) transcribed by RuthAnne Wilke

KNAPP, A. V.

A. V. KNAPP, farmer, Sec. 31; P.O. Platteville; was born in Senaca Co., N.Y., June 27, 1832' came to Wisconsin in 1854; engaged in farming east of Lancaster in 1865; removed to his present place; now owns 260 acres of land; enlisted October, 1861, in the 10th W.V.I., Co. F, as private; mustered out December, 1863, as 2d Lieutenant; member of Good Templars' Lodge. His wife, Laura C. Woldorf, was born in Harrison, Grant Co., Jan. 27, 1844' married Oct. 4, 1864; they have eight children--Fred W., born July 2, 1865; Frank S., Feb. 16, 1867; Sidney D. B., July 23, 1869; Clara L., Oct. 16, 1870; Charles D., Feb. 16, 1873; Jessie E., July 2, 1875; Horace H., Feb. 26, 1877; Arthur V., June 2, 1880, died Dec. 19, 1880.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

KNAPP, ANTON

ANTON KNAPP, farmer, Sec. 5; P.O. Bloomington; born in 1841 in Germany; came to America in 1847; located in Grant Co., Wis., near British Hollow; after living in Grant Co. for thirteen years he moved to California; resided there two years, then returned to Grant Co., where he has since lived. Enlisted in 1862, in the 25th W. V.I., Co. H; served three years; he was with Sherman on his first raid on the Meridian. He was married in 1865 to Miss E. Roberts; has four children--Alice L., Perry H., Nettie M., Clay W. Is a Republican. Has 162 acres of land.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

KOHL, JOHN

JOHN KOHL, Town Treasurer, Hazel Green; born in Germany in 1829; came to America in 1848, and settled in this village. Married Mary Ann Matters; she was born in England. Mr. Kohl has been Town Treasurer two years. Members of the Episcopal Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

KRAMER, VALENTINE

VALENTINE KRAMER, Sec. 4; P.O. Platteville; was born Feb. 8, 1820. in Prussia; came to America in 1841, landed at New Orleans; spent a winter in the mines at French Village, Ill., and in March, 1842, reached Platteville; engaged in mining at Big Patch, Dodgeville and Beetown; in 1847, he bought 80 acres of his present farm; it was timbered openings, with only log buildings upon it; has cleared some, and added 160 acres, part of which was improved before his purchase. He married Catharine Wonn, of Prussia, in August, 1847; they have eight children--Maggie, Mary, Henry, Valentine, Fannie, Minnie, John and William; all were born in Lima as was Louisa, who died when 24 years of age. The family belong to the Lutheran Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

KRATOCHWILL, V. J.

V. J. KRATOCHWILL, boots and shoes, Boscobel; was born in Austria; in 1856, came to Muscoda, Wis.; there he commenced to learn this trade in 1857 with C. J. Molle; he came to Boscobel July 30, 1860, with Mr. Molle, and finished learning his trade; he worked for Mr. Molle fourteen years; this gentleman died in 1872, when Mr. K. bought out the business; he was clerk in the sutler's department during the war in 1863-4. He is a member of the Odd Fellows and Temple of Honor. Married in 1866 to Elizabeth Weibel, who was born in Switzerland; they have six children, five sons and one daughter.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

KUENSTER, JACOB

JACOB KUENSTER, Sec. 25; P. O. Glen Haven; owns 960 acres of land; born in Prussia in 1832; he came to America, and his first location was in this town; he has been twice married, first to Doratha Miller, a native of Germany; she died in 1870; they had five children -- Alexander, Charles, Henry, Altena, Laura. Married again to Matilda Vogt, a native of Germany; have four children -- Amelia, Albert, Louisa and Jacob.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Glen Haven Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

LAMBERT, J. J.

J. J. LAMBERT, Sec. 25; P. O. Mount Hope; owns 400 acres land, valued at $20 per acre; born in Germany in 1825; came to America in 1833, and settled with his parents in Ohio in 1853; he located on this farm. Married Catharine Beitler, a native of Pennsylvania; they have nine children -- George, Julia, Sarah, Emeline, Ella, John, Lottie, Fred and Walter.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

LAMEY, THOMAS

THOMAS LAMEY, farmer; P.O. Bloomington; born in 1829 in Ireland; in 1849, he came to America, and settled in Washington Co., N.Y.; lived there until 1852, then came to Wisconsin and located in La Fayette County, near Shullsburg, and came to Grant County in 1857. He married Miss Margaret Foley, of Illinois; lived in Illinois for thirteen years; returned to Grant County in 1870, where he has since lived. Has twelve children. Politics, Republican. Member of the Catholic Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

LAMSON, G.

G. LAMSON, farmer, Sec. 21, 22, 27 and 32; P.O. Beetown; born in 1817 in Berkshire Co., Mass. At the age of 21, he went to New York City, where he lived five years, and followed the mercantile business; then to Grant Co. in 1844, and clerked for a firm for Warren & Shinn, dry goods, Platteville; then to Galena, as clerk for Dr. Warren. In the fall of 1845, he came to Beetown; engaged in selling dry goods and groceries until 1875; then moved to the farm, where he now resided. He was married, in 1849, to Miss Jane Francis, a daughter of James Francis (deceased), in 1853. He was married the second time, in 1854, to Miss Lucy J. Rodgers, a daughter of Amos Rodgers; has raised eleven children--Herbert G., Carrie H., Fred W., Franklin M., Harley B., Inez M., William B., Earnest O., D.C., Mary M., Otis F. In politics, a Greenbacker. He has been Town Treasurer for ten years; has held the position of Postmaster of Beetown for eighteen years; made an unseccussful run for member of the Assembly of Second District on the Greenbacker ticket. He has been a prominent politician for many years; had the misfortune to lose his dwelling by fire at a loss of $2,000.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

LANDON, WILLIAM

WILLIAM LANDON, farmer, Sec. 5; P. O. Lancaster; born in Pennsylvania Jan. 11, 1817; he emigrated to New York with his parents, where he remained until he was 12 years of age, when he then went to Ohio. In the year 1849 he came to Wisconsin; settled in Ellenboro, Grant Co., bought 80 acres; now owns 240 acres of nicely improved land. His first wife Anna Richmond; born in Virginia; married in Ohio in the year 1840; died in Ellenboro in 1849. They had five children -- Catherine, who died in Nebraska in the year 1864; Henry J., George R., Anther S., Ozias W., all in Dakota. His second wife, Rachel Bacon, born in Trumbull Co., Ohio, May 25, 1832; she came to Wisconsin at the age of 11 years, with her parents; her father built the first frame building in the city of Platteville, for Squire Bennett Atwood, and used as a boarding-house. He removed to Nebraska, where he died in July, at the ripe old age of 81. Her mother also died in Nebraska in 1871. The second marriage was in the year 1850; they have nine children -- Endrick U., deceased; Ada Anna, Mrs. Reymer, in Dakota; Mary E., now Mrs. Burr, in Iowa; Sarah J., deceased; Jane R., Charles W., Byron M., Gay D. and Catherine S. In politics, he is Republican; in religion, liberal believer; School Director in the years 1853-54. After the second marriage, they returned to Ohio, and remained until the year 1856, when he returned to Wisconsin. While in Ohio he was Superintendent of the Cleveland & Mahoning Railroad. After returning to Wisconsin, and while plowing in the field, he was taken with inflammation in the head. The next morning he had entirely lost his eyesight, and has not been able to see since; but by his good management, thrift and industry, he has a well-kept farm. Mrs. Landon's brother Samuel was born blind, and was educated at Columbus, Ohio. Instrumental in the building the cottage for the blind at Jacksonville, Ill., also at Nebraska City; at one time Principal at Iowa City; the first Principal at Nebraska City. On July 4, 1850, Mr. Landon, in company with his wife, went over to his wife's father's, where, in company with Mr. Bacon, started for the fourth at Black Leg Hollow (now Pleasant Grove), to the log schoolhouse. There they found Uncle Obed Jones, with a cheese and loaf of bread, and Dr. Bradley (now in Colorado), who made the lemonade with essence of lemon, sugar, water and soda. The others there were Joshua Culver, Edmond Allen, Port Allen, Blakley and a few others having a shooting match; this was the celebration of July 4, 1850, without a woman.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Ellenboro Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

LANE, GEORGE

GEORGE LANE, Sec. 19; P. O. Patch Grove; owns 480 acres land, valued at $10 per acre; born in Herefordshire, England, in 1818; came to America in 1840, and settled in Grant County. Married Elizabeth Barnett, a native of Pennsylvania; they have six children -- John, Eliza, Esther, James, Richard and Thomas.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

LANE, HENRY C.

HENRY C. LANE, retired, Platteville; was born Sept. 19, 1819, in Hartford, Trumbull Co., Ohio. In early life, he learned the trade of blacksmith, which trade he began soon after his arrival in Platteville in the spring of 1840. A log shop, on the present site of Hendershott's store, was the scene of his first labors here. He worked for and boarded with Samuel Moore for a time. In 1842, he built a frame house -- part of which is still standing in the rear of Hendershott's store -- and the same year bought the log shop of Mr. Moore. In August, 1843, he married, in Ohio, Miss Alvira Holcomb, who was born in Broome Co., N. Y., but reared in Ohio. She has vivid and amusing memories of their "wedding tour," notably the journey through the then new and primitive Southern Wisconsin. Milwaukee was a hamlet with two small hotels, so crowded that the landlord was obliged to dislodge certain guests, in order to accommodate them. He said the routed sleepers had "gone to bed early, any way." The young couple began in the before-mentioned frame house, which was their home until 1847, when Mr. Lane bought out Judge Inman. Thus they lived in what is now a part of the Wright House until 1856 or 1857, when they took possession of the large and pleasantly located residence previously built, and now occupied by them. Mr. Lane has taken much pride in laying out and planting his grounds, and has a beautiful place. He carried on blacksmithing and the hardware business until 1867, building for a shop the present store of Mrs. Block. It was then the best blacksmith-shop in Wisconsin. L. N. Devendorf and himself built their store, and Mr. Lane has built and remodeled other structures in this city. Mr. and Mrs. Lane have four children -- Maria, Etta, Gulana and Jessie, all born in Platteville and all married and settled in homes of their own.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

LANE, JOHN F.

JOHN F. LANE, Sheriff of Grant Co. Is a native of Lower Canada, and was born Dec. 27, 1832. He came to Wisconsin before reaching manhood, and settled in Grant Co. When the war broke out, he enlisted May 20, 1861, in Co. I, 3d W. V. I., and was transferred to Co. G, 1st United States Engineers, and served until the battle of Chancellorsville, when he returned to his old regiment, and was severely wounded in that battle. He afterward entered the secret service under Col. Baker, and served in Capt. Pott's division until the close of the war. In the fall of 1880, he was elected Sheriff of this county. In the tall of 1874, Mr. Lane married Miss Florence Sheffield, a native of Grant Co. They have two children Effie and Ernest ; they have lost one son, Harry.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

LANGSTAFF, JOHN J.

John J. Langstaff, of Rifle, Garfield county, an extensive and prosperous stock man, was born on February 14, 1855, in Grant county, Wisconsin, and was reared and educated there, attending the district schools during the winter months for a few years. At the age of twelve he took up the burden of life for himself and from that time until the present he has made his own way in the world successfully. Being obliged to work hard for a livelihood and depend wholly on himself in the effort, he learned self-reliance and acquired a good knowledge of his own capacities and the characteristics and temperaments of men in general. He began by working nine years in the lead and coal mines of his native state, then in 1876 went to Illinois and later to Cleveland, Ohio. For two years he followed coal mining in those states, and in 1878 turned his attention to farming, moving soon afterward to Minnesota, where he farmed for wages. He determined to return to the mining industry, and until 1880 was engaged in that pursuit in Utah and Montana. In the year last named the gold excitement at Leadville in this state led him thither, and during the next two years he mined both for wages and on an independent basis in different parts of Colorado, meeting with good success most of the time. In 1882 he pre-empted a claim of one hundred and sixty acres in Grand river valley, to which he added other tracts until he owned six hundred acres, and on this land he ranched and raised stock until 1903. He then sold the land but retained the cattle which he has since kept and tended on the open range. When he located in Grand valley the country was wild and wholly unsettled and the Indians were numerous and hostile. They killed stock owned by other persons in the neighborhood in 1885, but did not molest his. Mr. Langstaff was one of the earliest settlers in that portion of the valley, and, with the help of William L. Smith and H.G. Brown, buried the first white man who died there. His name was William Gay and he died in 1883. A coffin was made of wagon-bed timber by James Moss and in this the body was buried. Mr. Langstaff was the first county commissioner elected in Garfield county, and he also had charge of the bridge and road building in the county at its organization. There were then one hundred and twenty miles of roads and four bridges, and the sum of twenty-seven thousand dollars was appropriated for their maintenance and extension. In political faith and allegiance he has always been an active working Republican, and in fraternal life has for many years belonged to the order of Odd Fellows. His parents were William and Laura Langstaff, the former a native of Yorkshire, England, and the latter of Michigan. They located in Wisconsin at an early period and the father built the first smelter in that state. He was a successful business man and died in 1871, his wife also passing away. Both belonged to the Methodist church. Six of their nine children are living: William, at Cripple Creek; Mary A. (Mrs. James Wilson), at Beloit, Wisconsin; John J., at Rifle; Jennie, at Boulder; Margaret (Mrs. Edward Crane), at Beloit, Wisconsin; and Bartholomew, at Parachute, this state.

Source: Progressive Men of Western Colorado (Publ 1905) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

LANGSTAFF, WILLIAM

WILLIAM LANGSTAFF, farmer and dealer in agricultural implements; P. O. Potosi. Born Jan. 8, 1851, in county of Durham, England, son of Jonathan and Elizabeth (Barnes) Langstaff; came here in June, 1853. Married Oct. 15, 1879, by B. F. Mayne, of Platteville, to Maggie, daughter of Patrick and Catharine McLoughlin, born May 1, 1851; has one child, Mary E., born Feb. 6, 1880. Mr. L. is Republican-Protestant, and his wife a Catholic. Established his business in 1877, and has now bought the business of G. Hawley & Son, of Platteville, with Mr. B. Pratt, of Mineral Point, as senior member of the firm. Mr. L. owns 40 acres of mineral land.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Potosi Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

LARIMER, JOHN

JOHN LARIMER, farmer; P. O. Boscobel; he is a son of Hugh and Sarah McMinn, who were natives of Ireland; they came to America in 1819, and located in Herkimer Co., N. Y., where they engaged in farming, and where his father died in 1852. John was born in Tompkins Co., N. Y., in 1825, where he was educated and lived until 1829, when he went to Allegany Co. and engaged in lumbering for some years; then went to Michigan and engaged in the same business for nearly two years, when he came to Hickory Grove and was engaged in a saw-mill; in 1859, he bought the farm where he now lives. Enlisted in the 44th W. V. I. in 1865, and served with his regiment until the war was ended, and was honorably discharged. He was married in Allegany Co., N. Y., July 13, 1851, to Miss Jane Henry, by whom he has one boy living; after her death, he married Miss Matilda Henry; they have seven children living -- Hugh, was born Sept. 6, 1856; John Ethan, was born Nov. 12, 1862; William James, was born Nov. 13, 1864; Frank Ellsworth, was born Nov. 10, 1866; Ella May, was born June 6, 1869; Norman, was born Aug. 30, 1873; Mattie Bell, was born Nov. 5, 1875. Mr. Larimer is much respected, and has held the offices of Assessor and member of the Board several times, and also District Clerk.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hickory Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

LATHAM, JEMIMA

MRS. JEMIMA LATHAM, farming, Sec. 31; P. O. Annaton; widow of Edward Latham; she was born in 1810, in Hadley, Mass.; she was a daughter of Timothy and Jemima Clark; she lived there until 6 years of age, then in company with her parents, emigrated to Ashtabula Co., Ohio, where she lived until married to Edward Latham, the son of Christopher and Sabra Latham; he was born in 1806, in London Co., Conn.; was bound out at age of 14 years, to Mr. Bailie, of Ashtabula Co., Ohio, with whom he lived until he married; then moved to Trumbull Co. for a short period; he then emigrated to the fertile regions of Grant Co., Wis., in 1849, locating at Clifton. Mrs. Latham has 47 acres of land; has six living children; three deceased; of the living -- Francis W., Amison E., Timothy, Pattie J., Wilber E., Matilda L.; of the deceased -- Loretta L., Maryette and Lorenzo, whose life was lost in the army, belonging to Co. C, 25th W. V. I. Mr. Latham was a Constable for many years; in politics, strictly Republican, and a member of Disciples' Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

LAUGHTON, GEORGE R.

GEORGE R. LAUGHTON, retired, Platteville; has been a citizen of Platteville since Dec. 25, 1842. He was born in London, England, in 1820; came to America with his parents in 1835; lived in New York City and Monroe Co., N. Y., till 1842, when he came to Wisconsin, and located in Platteville. He was engaged in merchandising in Brockport, N. Y., three years, and two years in Clarkson, same county, previous to his coming to Wisconsin. He followed the same business in Platteville till 1846, then engaged in farming two miles out of the village till 1873, when he retired from active business, and came to Platteville to reside. He is at present a member of the City Council, and was one year Supervisor while living in the town. He was married in Platteville in 1844, to Miss Mildred M. Durley of that place, and has had seven children, five of whom are still living, four of them sons, whose average weight is 250 pounds, none of them weighing less than 200, and all in good health. Mr. Laughton was the originator and promotor of the erection of the Grant County Solders' Monument at Lancaster, which was the first of the kind erected in the United States.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

LAWRENCE, MATHIAS

MATHIAS LAWRENCE is a prosperous farmer of Dwight township, Richland county, North Dakota, wherein he settled on section 33 during the first days of the history of that region. He is a foreign-born citizen, but his labors since coming to America have been for the welfare of his adopted land. He is the owner of a fine estate, and is respected wherever he is known.

Our subject was born in Bohemia, February 10, 1844, and came to America in 1866, locating in Grant county, Wisconsin, where he engaged in farming until 1871, when he took up his residence in Dakota. He was one of the very first settlers of Richland county. His farm comprises a half-section of land in Dwight township, and he is also owner of a half-section of land in Wilkin county, Minnesota. Upon his home farm in North Dakota he has erected a complete set of fine farm buildings, and added such improvements to the place as entitle it to rank among the fine farms of that region.

Our subject was married in North Dakota, in April, 1873, to Anna Dworak, a native of Bohemia. Mrs. Lawrence died in 1886, leaving the following children: Lizzie, Frank, Charles, Anna and Christiana. Mr. Lawrence was a second time married, in 1887, to Anna Benech. Of this union there are two children, named as follows: Mathias J. and Agnes. One child, Joseph, died when about ten years of age. Mr. Lawrence takes an active interest in public affairs, and has served in various positions of local importance. He is public-spirited and progressive, and his labors for the welfare of his community are given freely and with a oneness of purpose which commends him to the esteem of his entire acquaintance.

Source: History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Sally Masteller

LESLER, LOU P.

LOU P. LESLER, County Treasurer. Is a native of Grant Co., and was born Nov. 8, 1844-He grew up and attended school here, and, in 1859, entered a store in Boscobel as clerk. Upon the breaking out of the war, he enlisted when only 17 years old, in the 2d W. V. I , but was rejected, and again entered a store in Boscobel. In May, 1864, he enlisted in the 41st regiment, hundred-day troops. Has held the office of Town Treasurer several terms. Was elected Treasurer of Grant Co., in November, 1878, and was again re-elected to the same position in the fall of 1880, by the largest majority of any one on the ticket. In 1875, was married to Miss Ida A. Meyer from Boscobel ; they have one son, Leo Paul.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

LEWIS, JOHN

JOHN LEWIS, Sec. 11; P. O. Patch Grove; owns 240 acres land, valued at $40 per acre; born in Delaware Co., N. Y., in 1823; came to Wisconsin in 1848, and located on his present farm. Married Frances Loughran, a native of the same county; they have eight children -- Margaret, James; Charles, Nancy, Frances, John, Moses and William.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

LEWIS, TIMOTHY J.

REV. TIMOTHY J. LEWIS, Jamestown; born in New York in 1825; moved to Wisconsin in 1850, and settled in Rock Co.; is a minister of the Gospel; has been a member of the West Wisconsin Conference twelve years; stationed at Jamestown, Grant Co., Wis., in 1880; prior to his ministry he followed the business of carpenter and joiner. Politics, Republican. Served in the navy one year; shipped in the navy as a common sailor, and a year in the Mississippi squadron; was aboard the iron-clad Choctaw. Married Ellen Himebaugh, a native of Pennsylvania; have six children -- Francis E., Henry B., Fred F., Mina B., Timothy G., Hattie May.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Jamestown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

LIEBFRIED, GEORGE

GEORGE LIEBFRIED, farmer; P. O. Potosi. Born in Bavaria in 1808, son of Frank and Ann Mary (Ackerman) Liebfried; came to Baltimore, Md., in 1837; after two years, went to Cumberland, and, after six years' residence there, came to present location; worked at farming and tailor's trade. Married Feb. 6, 1846, at Cumberland, by Father Maer, to Mary Theresa, daughter of Frederick and Mary (Ulrich) Leporine, who was born in Bavaria in May, 1818. Had ten children, six now living -- Frank M., born Feb. 8, 1847, widower, and Treasurer in Carroll Co., Iowa; Joseph A., born May 12, 1849, married Catharine Schuster, and has two children -- May and George; Barbara Mary, born May 2, 1852; wife of Henry Wallenhurst (a miner at St. Andrew's) and has three children -- John, George and Frank; Bernhard, born July 10, 1853; married Anna Stelpflug, and has one child, Caroline; Joseph Henry, born March 30, 1855, married Mary Maurer, and has one son, George; Nicholas, born Aug. 30, 1858, teaching school in Carroll Co., Iowa. Mr. L. owns 100 acres of land.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Potosi Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

LIGHTCAP, L. L.

L. L. LIGHTCAP, Potosi; born at Hazel Green, Grant Co., Wis., Sept. 29, 1853; son of Solomon and Sarah (nee Tobey) Lightcap. Married, Sept. 29, 1879, by Rev. Mr. Cramb, of Galena, Ill., to Clara, daughter of Peter and Grace Skinner. Mr. L. is a courteous, well-educated, self-made gentleman, who by a four years' course of teaching fully qualified himself to occupy the position he now so creditably fills, he being Principal of the graded school of Potosi, with 150 pupils, he being ably assisted by his wife and Miss Eva Farrall.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Potosi Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

LIGHTCAP, S.

S. LIGHTCAP, proprietor of Hazel Green Mills; born in Pennsylvania in 1813; came to Wisconsin in 1847, and erected a mill, and has been engaged in the same business since. Married Sarah Low, a native of Vermont; they have seven children -- William, Mary, Franklin, Emeline, Caroline, Leonard and Albert. Mr. L. has been Chairman of the Board two terms.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

LIKENS, JAMES

JAMES LIKENS, Sec. 17; P. O. Rockville; born Jan. 10, 1812, in Washington Co., Va.; his parents, John and Margaret (Davis) Likens, removed to Wythe Co., Va.; here he was reared as a farmer. During three years of his young manhood, he followed flat-boating on the Western rivers. From Vincennes, Ind., he went to Isle No. 100 on the Mississippi; thence to Galena, Ill., where he spent the winter of 1831-32; his next location was Dodgeville, Wis., where he followed mining six years. In 1840, he located near Rockville, and, in 1846, settled on his present farm. He married Artilla Crockers in 1839; she was born near the Kanhawa Salt Works, Virginia, and came to Wisconsin in 1835; they had ten children -- William W., George W., Sarah J., John, James, Benjamin F., Samuel, Artilla, Josephine and Emma; all were born in Grant Co.; the three eldest sons were in the Union service during the rebellion, the eldest, William W., serving as Captain of Co. H, 43d W. V. I.; George W. was a Sergeant in the same company, he died Nov. 20, 1864, at Johnsonville, Tenn. John Likens, after the war, graduated at the University of Wisconsin, only to be cut down by the merciless sickle of death in December, 1873. James Likens is one of the genuine old settlers of Harrison and the State. He is in politics a Republican, and has held various town offices. His eldest son is now an attorney at law in Harvard, Neb.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Harrison Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

LILLIE, ABRAM

ABRAM LILLIE, farmer, Sec. 25; P. O. Platteville; was born at Litchfield, Conn., May 2, 1807; emigrated with his parents to Trumbull Co., Ohio, in 1810; his parents died in Ohio; he then removed to Wisconsin in the year 1854; bought 80 acres; now owns 160 acres of land improved, with a fine house 16x28, with wing 16x26, one story and a half; a barn 24x34, with basement, stable, wagon shed 28x56. His wife, Polly Spears, was born in Ohio; they married in 1834; she died Jan. 7, 1852, leaving three children -- Amelia, now Mrs. Culver, residing in Crawford Co., Wis.; Homer, who enlisted in Co. C, 6th W. V. I.; drowned at Fredericksburg, Va., June 20, 1862; Dudley, who enlisted in Co. B, 43d W. V. I.; died Dec. 7, 1864, at Nashville, Tenn. His second wife, Cordelia Alling, a native of Connecticut, was born Aug. 31, 1816; they married Oct. 27, 1854; she died March 3, 1875. By this marriage there was one child -- David H., who was born August 4 also Assessor and member of the Town Board.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Ellenboro Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

LIND, JOHN

JOHN LIND, hotel, Stitzer; was born in 1848 in Berks Co., Penn.; was a son of Henry and Jeanette Lind; lived with his parents until 14 years of age, then came to Liberty, Grant Co., Wis., in company with his parents, but soon after arriving, went to Lancaster and learned the carpenter trade with Henry Messie and William Alcorn, with whom he worked for six years. He married Annie Schoenberger, a daughter of John and Annie Schoenberger; then to Liberty for two years; then to Allamakee Co., Iowa, for two years; then returning to Liberty, where he has since lived. He has three children -- Jennie M., Mary J., Emma L; is the proprietor of the City Hotel at Stitzer; also the owner of a saloon in the same place. Politics, Republican, and is a member of the Evangelical Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Liberty Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

LINTON, WILLIAM R.

WILLIAM R. LINTON, farmer and blacksmith, Sec. 3; P. O. Mt. Hope; was born in 1848 in Franklin Co., Ohio; was a son of Dutton and Elizabeth Linton; he was raised on farm and lived with his father until 20 years of age; when 7 years of age, his father moved to Wisconsin and located at Mt. Hope, in Grant Co., where he lived until he was of age; he then moved to Little Grant, where he has since lived. He was married in 1875 to Sarah J. Hinton, a daughter of Christopher and Sarah Hinton; is farming in company with his brother; they are the owners of 120 acres of land and a good blacksmith shop.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Little Grant Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

LONG, WILLIAM

WILLIAM LONG, farmer; P. O. Platteville; a very early settler of Platteville; was born Jan. 30, 1815, in Grayson Co., Va. His father was a Virginian, and his mother a native of Tennessee. To the latter State they removed soon after his birth. Grown to manhood here, he mounted his horse in 1834, and rode across the country to Platteville; engaged in mining until 1853, when he settled where he now is. Has 40 acres, originally timbered. His wife was Susan Gregory, born in Tennessee, and reared in Marion Co., Mo. They have eleven living children.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

LONGBOTHAM, THOMAS

THOMAS LONGBOTHAM, farmer; P. O. Dickeyville; son of Elijah and Rebecca Longbotham; was born in the Parish of Ripon, West Riding, Yorkshire, England, May 13, 1807. Was married in 1840, to Miss Hannah Wreakes; she was born at Petworth, near London; they came to the United States in 1841, and settled in Rigsby Hollow, Potosi; here he followed smelting about two years; then moved to the Menomonee Diggings and mined for about three years; then, in October, 1846, entered three forties and commenced farming, where he still resides. He now owns about 770 acres in the town of Paris; the homestead is on Sec. 22, Town 2, Range 2 west. Mrs. L. died July 27, 1880, leaving six children living -- William, now living in Thomasville, Neb.; Elijah and Thomas, now living in Rockford, Iowa; Rebecca A., John and George, at home. Mr. Longbotham has been Clerk of the Town of Paris about twenty-three years in succession, and member of the School Board many years.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Paris Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

LONGBOTHAM, WILLIAM

WILLIAM LONGBOTHAM, deceased; was born in Yorkshire, England, in 1816, son of John and Jane (Emerson) Longbotham; came here in 1840; engaged in farming, mining and smelting, etc. Married Aug. 23, 1840, in Ripon church, England, to Hanna, daughter of William and Mary (Grange) Palliser. Had six children -- Mary Jane, now Mrs. Cyrel Marcue; John P., born Oct. 9, 1849, died March 8, 1863, of diphtheria; William J., born Aug. 9, 1851, died Jan. 23, 1863, of diphtheria; Thomas B., born Aug. 29, 1854; Joseph B., born July 31, 1858, died Jan. 5, 1863, of diphtheria; Joshua G., born Aug. 4, 1861; died in December 1861. The subject of this sketch died Feb. 2, 1863, of the same disease as the rest. He owned 47 acres of land, and one-half of a smelting furnace; and the mother of Mrs. Longbotham died at the age of 103 years; she had at one time weighed 290 pounds.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Potosi Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

LOOMIS, B. L.

B. L. LOOMIS, farmer, Sec. 8; P. O. Mt. Hope. The subject of this sketch is one of the pioneers of the region where he lives; he was born in 1825, in Erie Co., N. Y.; was a son of John and Mehitable Loomis; at the age of 10 years, he moved with his parents to Lorain Co., Ohio, where he lived until 1845; then to Dane Co., Wis., where he began doing for himself; then to Grant Co., locating in Mt. Hope, where he has lived since, and the section where he lives has long gone by the name of Loomis' Ridge. He was married in Dane Co. in 1848, to Harriet Mayhew, a daughter of William and Lucy Mayhew; they have had three children -- two living -- Ora M., Carrie, and Lelia (deceased). He has 94 acres of land. Politics, Republican; is a member of the Catholic Church. Has been Justice of the Peace twenty years, Town Treasurer nine years, Road Overseer ten years and School Clerk twelve years. Enlisted in 1864, and served ten months.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Mount Hope Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

LOONEY, J. J.

J. J. LOONEY, blacksmith and wagon-maker, Hazel Green; born on the Isle of Man in 1847 came to America in 1868; in 1873, he settled in this town, and engaged in present business. Married Margaret Roberts, a native of this county; they have two children -- Mary and Jane. He has been a member of the Town Board one term.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

LORD, ISAAC

ISAAC LORD (deceased); was born in Parsonsfield, Me., in 1803. He was engaged in the boot and shoe business in Maine, and came from there to Platteville in 1839. He was married, in 1843, in Elizabeth, Ill., to Miss Emaline Morton, daughter of Chester Morton, a native of Massachusetts. Soon after his marriage, Mr. Lord purchased land in Platteville and vicinity, and also in La Fayette Co., and in the spring of 1854, he went on a farm at what is called the West Plat Mound, and was engaged in farming there till the fall of 1870; then removed to the village of Platteville, where he resided till his death, Aug. 16, 1877. He left two children -- Isabel, now Mrs. Minard Mills, of Plymouth Co., Iowa, and Purl, who is reading law with S. W. Bell.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

LYNESS, ELIZABETH

ELIZABETH LYNESS, farming, Sec. 6; P. O. Little Grant; is a widow of Barney Lyness (deceased); she was born in in 1849 in Germany; was a daughter of Sebastian and Barbara Kistner; she emigrated to the United States in company with her parents at the age of 9 years, locating at Strawberry Point, Iowa; lived there until 17 years of age, then came to Grant Co., Wis. In 1866, she was married to Barney Lyness, and has lived in Little Grant since; has five children -- John C., Annie B., Rosa E., Mary M. and Elizabeth. In the early part of her husband's life, he followed the occupation of steamboating, but in his latter days was a farmer; his politics were Democratic, and he was a member of the Catholic Church. She is the owner of 40 acres of land, valued at $1,000. Her husband was 45 years of age when he died.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Little Grant Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

LYSTER, FRANKLIN

FRANKLIN LYSTER, cabinet-maker and undertaker, Jamestown; was born in Illinois Nov. 5, 1828; he has 10 25/100 acres of land; probable value, $1,500. Public offices held by him: Justice of the Peace for fifteen years; Assessor seven years; was census enumerator in 1880; County Supervisor, and at present (1881) is County Coroner. Married Hannah Nehimire, who was born in Germany; they have eight children -- Henry L., Frank M., Albert N., Mary C., Ellie H., Fannie F., John C., Maggie E. Settled in Jamestown, Wis., in March, 1856. In politics, a Republican.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Jamestown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MACKE, HENRY

HENRY MACKE, brewer and farmer; P. O. British Hollow; owns 290 acres of land and brewery; born June 18, 1842, in Hanover; son of Christian and Dorotha (Vesperman) Macke; came to Rockville in 1857, and followed butchering four years; then on his farm, on Sec. 3, eleven years, and then bought the brewery of Samuel Stephens and William Mohrenburg for $12,000. Married, and has four children -- Albert, Henry, Willie, Reca.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Potosi Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MANLOVE, OLIVER P.

OLIVER P. MANLOVE, farmer and stock-raiser, Sec. 22; P. O. Muscoda; was born in Russell, Ill., Sept. 12, 1831, and was one of the first children born in that village; he is a son of Moses and Elizabeth (Huff) Manlove, who died at the age of 28, in the year 1841. His father is now living and is 76 years of age. He is a native of North Carolina, and located in Illinois in 1824 and engaged in farming and milling. He moved his family to this town, and entered the land upon which he now lives with his son Oliver, and where Oliver has always lived, with the exception of about six years. In 1854, he went overland to California, being five months on the road; during his sojourn there he was engaged in mining. He returned in 1857, and came by water, taking passage in the Central America, which was wrecked during the passage, off Cape Hatteras, having on board some five hundred passengers, only forty-nine of whom were saved, and they were fortunately picked up by the Norwegian bark Hellm, loaded with logwood, and bound for Falmouth, England; Mr. Manlove was one of the forty-nine that was saved. The Central America was commanded by Lieut. Herndon, who refused to leave his ship and sank with her, and has been greatly commended for his bravery. Mr. Manlove entered the army in December, 1863, and was assigned to Co. H, 37th W. V. I., participating in the battles of the regiment until the close of the war; was taken prisoner at the blowing up of the rebel fort in front of Petersburg, July 30, 1864. He has engaged somewhat in literary pursuits, and has contributed to several journals, among which are the Waverly Magazine and New York Weekly. He was married, Nov. 3, 1867, to Miss Carrie Carell, by whom he has two boys -- Norman C., the oldest, aged 11, and Howard P., aged 4. Has served the town as Assessor two years.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MANNING, W. S.

HON. W. S. MANNING, County Judge, vice-president of the State Bank, at Ladysmith, and a prominent dealer in real estate, is one of the leading citizens of this section of Wisconsin.

Judge Manning was born Aug. 26, 1855, in Sheboygan County, Wis., a son of E. D. and Elizabeth (Shaugen) Manning, the former of whom was born at Saratoga, N. Y., the latter at Morristown, New Jersey.

His father dying is his youth, E. D. Manning accompanies his mother, then Mrs. Jacob Ling, to this State, and settled in Sheboygan County, in 1848. In this county he married and lived until 1856, when he and his wife removed to Baraboo, a year later going to Richland county, where they settled permanently. The father died in 1898, aged seventy years, and the mother is still surviving and residing on the old homestead there. Mr. Manning was a man of affairs and held numerous offices.

Judge Manning is the oldest of his parents' five children. He was reared on his father's farm and remained at home until maturity, obtaining his education in attendance at the common and high schools of Richland county. At the age of seventeen he began teaching in the public schools, and followed this profession for some sixty months. During this time he employed spare moments in the study of the law, and finally entered the office of Clark & Jackson, as a student. They were prominent attorneys at Plymouth, Wis., and were his office preceptors one year. He was admitted to the Bar in October. 1880, and immediately opened a law office at Muscoda, Wis., for the succeeding nine years closely applying himself to the demands of his profession.

In 1889 Judge Manning became associated with E. I. Kidd, formerly State Bank examiner, Atley Peterson, State Railroad commissioner, J. O. Davidson, now lieutenant-governor of Wisconsin, W. H. Bennett, B. F. Washburn, Ole O. Dahl and A. C. V. Elston, in the organization of the Kickapoo Valley and Northern Railway, now the Wisconsin Western and a part of the Milwaukee system. Mr. Manning was the active manager of this company, and they completed thirty-four of the fifty-one miles between Soldiers' Grove and Wauzeka, finishing their contract in 1891. In 1895 he went to Kentucky, where he had a contract for the construction of twenty-five miles of road, which is now operated by the Louisville & Nashville Company. After the completion of this second contract, Mr. Manning returned to Wisconsin, and became cashier of a bank at Soldiers' Grove; he served in that capacity until 1900, when he came to Ladysmith as the representative of the J. L. Gates Land Co., of Milwaukee. This place was then a hamlet, with seventy-four residents by actual count, and was known as the village of Warner. Here Judge Manning was confronted with a business opportunity, which he was not slow to take advantage of. Prior to this there had been much agitation concerning a division from Chippewa County, and the question had been before the Legislature. It needed but the enterprise of an energetic and forceful man, like Judge Manning, to take the matter in hand. He saw its expediency and became the champion of the bill, and went before the Legislature of 1900 as the representative of those interested. He labored during the whole session and it was largely through his efforts that the bill was finally passed authorizing the division which wa accomplished in May, 1901.

About this time Gov. LaFollette named Mr. Manning for the position of County Judge, his present term to extend until 1906. He has dealt extensively in the Gates Company's lands and continues to be one of the company's representatives, having also large personal holdings. He has been very active in encouraging emigration and has been the direct means of locating many desirable settlers in this county.

In politics Judge Manning is a Democrat, and for many years has been one of the acknowledged party workers. He has served as delegate for his party to State and other conventions, and was twice a candidate for district attorney. Fraternally he is a Mason, one of the organizers and charter members of the Mystic Tie Lodge, No. 280, of which he was the first master; is a Knight Templar, De Molai Commandery, of Boscobel, Wis., and belongs to the order of Odd Fellows, being connected with the Ladysmith Lodge of that organization.

In 1880 Judge Manning was united in marriage with Miss Ida M. Elston, and their two children died in infancy. An adopted daughter, Frances C., is given parental care and a good home. In 1900 Judge Manning built a handsome modern house, on a beautiful point overlooking the Flambeau river.

Source: Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Lake Region (1905) Transcribed by: Glenda Stevens

MARCUE, CYREL

CYREL MARCUE, farmer, miner and smelter, Potosi; born April 29, 1833, in Canada; son of Joseph and Josephine (Buvia) Marcue; came to Grant Co. thirty years ago. Married, by Rev. R. H. Doegens, to Mary Jane, daughter of William and Hannah (Palliser) Longbotham, of Yorkshire, Eng., who was born May 6, 1845; had eight children, four of them living -- Hannah Josephine, born July 31, 1864; Joseph Louis, May 14, 1871; Lizzie Jane, Oct. 31, 1875; Minnie R., July 4, 1878. Is Republican and Methodist.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Potosi Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MARING, FREDERICK

FREDERICK MARING, farmer, Sec. 21; P. O. Dickeyville; son of Caspar Ortes and Margaret Maring, was born in Burch, Ewrach, Bavaria, Aug. 10, 1807; he came to the United States in 1841, and lived in Pennsylvania one year; then to Galena, Ill., where they remained a year; then to Hazel Green, where they lived thirteen years, and followed mining three years; then engaged in farming, etc.; in 1856, settled in Paris on Sec. 21, where he now resides and owns 163 acres. He was married in Pennsylvania in the spring of 1842; has ten children living -- the eldest, Festus, is at home; he enlisted in Co. I, 25th W. V. I., Aug. 6, 1862; served through the war and was discharged June 7, 1865; he is a member of the Town Board, and a member of the fraternity of Odd Fellows; Louisa, now Mrs. Waekershauser, in Paris, Wis.; Catharine, now Mrs. Montag, residing in Iowa; Magdalena, now Mrs. Hoffmeister, in Potosoi, Wis.; William, Dickeyville; Mary, now Mrs. Schneider, in Wausau, Wis.; Mitchell and Frederick, at home; Barbara, now Mrs. Schmeltz, in Dubuque, Iowa; Leone, at home.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Paris Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MARKS, GEORGE

GEORGE MARKS, brick-mason, Lancaster. A native of Vermont, born Nov. 11, 1837-He came West in November, 1869. In, the spring of 1870, he came to Lancaster. Mr. Marks was married March 25, 1862, in Colchester, Vt., to Miss Sophrana N. Spear. They have three sons Walter, George M. and Arthur.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

MARKT, FRANTZ X.

FRANTZ X. MARKT, farmer and stock-raiser, Secs. 31 and 36; P. O. Muscoda; was born in Wurtemberg March 11, 1819; he is a son of Joseph and Cresinsia (Blessing) Markt; his father's occupation was that of cooper and brewer, and for six years was brewer for King Willhelm First. Mr. Markt lived with his parents until he was 14 years old, when he was apprenticed to learn the trade of clock-maker; after he had learned the trade, he commenced business for himself, and traveled through Austria, Italy and Switzerland, selling his goods; the first clock he sold, he made himself, it was in twelve pieces, and he traveled some 200 miles before he made the sale, and finally sold it near the Austrian line for $1.20; his clocks were called the Schwaslwald clocks; that was his first start in business; he made his own goods and peddled them himself, conveying them upon his back and selling them for $1.26 each; he came to America in 1840, locating first in Jersey, remaining a short time he went to Pennsylvania; not finding employment at his trade, he engaged to work on the Baltimore & Ohio Canal, which as then being built; he afterward moved to Center Co., Penn., where he was employed for four years as a hostler. In 1845, he was married to Miss Katie Fletcher, whose ancestors were among the early settlers of Pennsylvania, and participated in the Revolutionary war; in the fall of 1846, they came to this State, and located at Mineral Point, where during the winter, he engaged in watch and clock repairing; during the year 1847, he located on the land upon which he now lives; he has held the office of Justice of the Peace, and also been a member of the Town Board; they have had ten children, seven of whom are living, and five married, the two youngest; Charles and Amanda, live at home. Mr. Markt has been a very persevering, energetic, industrious man, and accumulated an estate through his own personal efforts.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MARLOW, GEORGE W.

GEORGE W. MARLOW, farmer. Sec. 31 ; P. O. Hurricane Grove. Owns 87 acres of land, valued at $30 per acre. Born on this farm in 1842. Married Angeline Druen, a native of this county. They have five children George C, Clara B., Louson, Vernon and John. In 1861, Mr. M. enlisted in Co. C, 2d W. V. I., and discharged in 1862.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

MARTIN, FREDRICK

FREDRICK MARTIN, farmer, P. O. Annaton; born in 1828 in Germany; was the son of Andres Martin, of Germany; lived with his parents until 14 years of age, then wandered for eight years, then returned and lived with his parents until their death, which occurred in 1852; he then came to America in 1856, and located at Pittsburgh, Penn., where he resided for three years, then to Liberty, Grant Co., Wis., where he has since lived. He was married, in 1851, to Sophia Duncler, a daughter of Gottfried and Crisinia Duncler, late of Grant Co.; has six children living and four deceased -- Louise, Antonia, Catherine, William, Edward, Frederick; deceased are Nathalia, Mary, Emma and Mary. Has been Assessor for two years; School Clerk one term; Treasurer one term. Politics, Republican. He has 120 acres of land, valued at $2,000. Is a member of the Evangelical Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Liberty Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MARTIN, GEORGE

GEORGE MARTIN, farmer, Sec. 7; P.O. Platteville; was born in Grant Co., Wis.; has always been on the farm; now owns 80 acres of land. His wife, Sarah Chilson, was born in Adams Co., Ill.; her parents were old settlers in Wisconsin; her father died in 1869; her mother is now living in Liberty, Grant Co., Wis. Married, Christmas, 1876. In politics, Republican; in religion, believer.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

MASSEY, HENRY L.

HENRY L. MASSEY (deceased); was born in Watertown, N. Y., Aug. 6, 1809; came here about 1830. Married, by Rev. Mr. Mayne, to widow of William T. Ennor; had no children by last marriage. Mrs. Massey had six children by her first husband, W. T. Ennor, four of them now living -- Lizzie (now wife of G. T. Foster, of Lancaster, at present Principal of high school of New Lisbon), Mary, Thomas, Willie (being in Hancock Co., Iowa). Mr. Massey was an old settler, and for a long time engaged in merchandising, and died April 11, 1872.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Potosi Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MASSMANN BROTHERS

MASSMANN BROTHERS, engaged in blacksmithing, wagon and carriage manufacturing, Muscoda; Henry, the oldest, was born in Pomerania, Prussia, June 16, 1842; is a son of Ernst and Lina (Wedon) Massman, both natives of Prussia, where his father engaged in farming; Henry learned his trade in the old country, and came to America in 1869, and stopped first in Muscoda, established their present business in connection with his brother and Mr. Schumaker. He married in 1875, Miss Caroline Schumaker, a native of Germany, by whom he has five children -- four girls and one boy. Ernst Massmann was born in Pomerania, Dec. 25, 1844, where he also learned the trade; he was three years in the army, from 1865 to 1868; came to America with his brother. Was married in 1873, to Louisa Rux, by whom he has one boy; his wife died Dec. 5, 1874. On Nov. 30, 1876, he married Marie Mueller, by whom he has three girls.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MATHUSHEK, JOSEPH

JOSEPH MATHUSHEK, farmer, Sec. 12; P. O. Muscoda; was born in 1852, in Bohemia; son of Frank and Josephine Mathushek. His parents came to America when he was very young; he resided with them until he was 22 years of age. He was married, in 1874, to Sylvia Shafer, daughter of Mathies and Anna Shafer, of Castle Rock; they have three children, Edward H., Clarie E., Ida M. In politics he is a Republican. He is also member of the Lutheran Church. He owns 120 acres of land.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hickory Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

McCALLISTER, NELSON A.

NELSON A. McCALLISTER, general hardware store and dealer in agricultural implements, Muscoda; born in Putman Co., Ohio, and came to Wisconsin with his parents in 1850. They located on a farm in the town of Pulaski, Iowa Co., where his parents now live. He came to Muscoda in 1869, and established his present business. He enlisted Aug. 14, 1862, in Co. A, 33d W. V. I.; served with the regiment during its terms of service, and mustered out with them at Vicksburg Aug. 9, 1865.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

McCARN, ALFRED J.

ALFRED J. McCARN & CO., bankers, established 1874. Alfred J. McCarn was born in Wayne Co., N. Y., March 27, 1838; is a son of James and Margaret Failing, both natives of New York State, and whose ancestors settled in the State near New York City, before the Revolutionary war commenced, and fought for the cause of American independence. In 1856, the family moved to Davenport, Iowa, where Alfred remained until the autumn of 1857, when he came to Platteville and engaged as clerk in the Bank of Grant Co. (which was one of the old State banks), which position he held until 1860, when he bought a small book store, and engaged in the book and stationery business. He enlisted April 21, 1861, in three months' service; the company not being accepted unless for three years, he returned again to business, and again enlisted Aug. 14, 1862, in Co. A, 33d W. V. I., and was appointed Quartermaster Sergeant, in which capacity he served until February, 1865, when he was promoted to Quartermaster of the regiment. He was mustered out with the regiment at Vicksburg, Aug. 9, 1865. He was married in January, 1868, to Olive McGonigal, a native of this county, by whom he has two children -- one boy and one girl. His father was born in February, 1801, and died near Animosa, Iowa, October, 1880.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

McCARTNEY, ORRIS

By Orris McCartney.

I was born in Harford, Washington Co., N. Y., May 9, 1794; started West in 1817 got as far as Bristol, Ontario County, and went to New Connecticut in 1818; then bought a farm at $400, raised a crop, land title bad, lost my money and land ; then went to Delaware, Delaware Co., Ohio, got the ague, and left in 1819 ; drove a two-horse team for a man to Illinois 600 miles; stopped at Milton, Madison County, January 8, 1820; was in Illinois drifting about several years; was twice elected Sheriff of Schuyler County, Ill., and served about three years; then resigned and came to the lead mines ; fell in with Maj. Rountree, and we came together in 1827; was married to Eliza Barber, near Jacksonville, November 12, 1826 ; in 1828, settled at Beetown, bought part of the Bee Lead for $500, from which Beetown took its name. This lead was found by Cyrus Alexander, Tom Crocker, Jim Meredith and Curtis Cadwell, while out looking for bees. Finding a large, hollow, upturned maple-tree, they looked under the roots, and saw a chunk of mineral which weighed 425 pounds. About the same time, Tom Cegar and Ben Stout found another lead on Bushnell's land. The Indian troubles began soon after. Id June, 1828, sold out, and removed in August to farm near Cassville, where I have stayed ever since, except during the Indian difficulties ; traded lead for a six horse team, hauled 100,000 mineral to Cassville; Judge Lawyer built the first furnace, and Tom G. Hawley built the first house in Cassville. Arthur L. Johnson came in 1828, and built a log furnace, and put up a store in Beetown, but the mineral soon gave out, and the miners went to Mineral Point and Dodgeville. Moved temporarily to Belmont in 1829, stayed four months; hauled rails to fence seventy-five acres; returned to Cassville farm in fall, having raised a crop of corn. Hodges and Shanley built a log warehouse at Cassville in the year 1828. Christmas of 1830, my house was burned and all with it ; the first ball at Cassville same time.

The Indian alarms began in 1831, and in 1832 came the Black Hawk war. We all went into fort at Cassville; sent my family to Illinois July 4, 1832, to be safe from Indians. The Indian war then lasted four months.

In 1828, Tom Cegar, Nahem Dudley and Ben Stout settled at Lancaster. William Morrison settled on the Morrison place that year, and H. C. Bushnell settled on what is now the Gulick place ; Hodges and Shanley built on the prairie near Lancaster in 1831.

Guy Hackett had a furnace near the double log cabin at Muscalonge, in 1828 ; he broke, and returned to Illinois and died. De Tantabar settled at Paris in 1826 or 1827. [1828—Ed.] St. John found mineral and the den of snakes, which gave to Potosi its first name of Snake Hollow, in 1831." [Other authorities place this discovery in 1833.-ED]

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Publ. 1881); transcribed by a Friend of Free Genealogy

McCARTNEY, ROBERT

ROBERT McCARTNEY, farmer; P.O. Lancaster; born in Washington Co., Penn., in 1824; is a son of Daniel McCartney. He loved in Pennsylvania for eighteen years, then went to Ohio, where he was married in 1844, to Anna McCartney. He resided there until 1869, then moved to Grant Co., Wis., and settled near Lancaster. He served three years and one month in the army, in the 11th Ohio, Co. C. Was Road Master one term and Constable on term. Have ten children--Mary A., Maria E., Sarah A., John W., Nancy J., George S., Katie V., Elma J., William W., Charles F. Is a Republican.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

McCLURG, WILLIAM

WILLIAM McCLURG, Sec. 19; P.O. Platteville; born Aug. 6, 1812, in Mercer Co., Penn. Married Miss Ann Manson, who was born march 7, 1817, in Venango Co., Penn. Engaged in farming until he came to Wisconsin, which was in 1843; they came via the Ohio and Mississippi to Galena, thence to "Whig," where they wintered; the next spring he took up land on Buckwheat Ridge, and was there five years; afterward rented farms for a time, and, in 1843, settled on his present farm of 43 acres; the log house and surrounding forest have given place to cultivated fields and a pleasant frame house. Mr. and Mrs. McClurg have three children--Mary Jane, now Mrs. Samuel Frazier; James A. and Henry; the two eldest were born in Ellenboro, and the youngest in Lima. Mr. and Mrs. McClurg belong to the Christian Church of Platteville.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

McCLURG. JOHN

JOHN McCLURG. Sec. 19; P.O. Platteville; born in Salem, Mercer Co., Penn., Nov. 16, 1803. Married Miss Jane Manson, of Verango Co., Penn., and came in 1844, to Wisconsin; in May of that year, they began in a log cabin in a log cabin in the timber that then covered his farm of 60 acres. Mrs. McClurg died Oct. 27, 1856, leaving seven children--Henry, James, Louisa, Martin, Margaret, Albert and John; the two youngest were born in Lima, and the others in Pennsylvania; Louisa is now in Missouri; Henry in Washington Territory, while John is in Highland, Iowa Co.; Albert McClurg died in the Union service, and James, pressed into the rebel army, was killed by his own men. The second wife, formerly Hannah Klingensmith, died Aug. 11, 1879. Mr. McClurg now leases his farm, and will probably spend the remainder of his days here. He is a member of the Baptist Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

McCORD, WILLIAM L.

WILLIAM L. McCORD, farmer, Sec. 12 ; P.O. Lancaster. Was born in town of Ellenboro. Grant Co., Wis., Feb. 8, 1847. He went to the oil regions where he remained twelve years, then returned to Wisconsin ; rented land for about four years ; then bought 160 acres of land with fine house, 16x32, with wing, 18x40, main part two stories; barn 30x40, 16-foot corners, basement, stable ; a well improved place. His wife, M. Emma Crabtree, born in Harrison, Grant Co., Wis., Feb. 23, 1855 ; they married Feb. 21, 1877 ; they have two children Eula E., born Nov. 6, 1877 ; Laura E., born April 1, 1879. In politics. Democrat. Religion, Episcopal. Member ofI.O.O.F., Lodge No. . What he has he has made by his own industry. Mrs. McCord was a daughter of John Crabtree, deceased, who was born in England May 31, 1818. Came to America in 1840 ; located in Fair Play, engaged in smelting and mining; died Nov. 8, 1868. Her mother was Alice Mills, a native of England, born May 30, 1819, and married in the old country in the year 1837. They had a family of eleven children, eight are now living. Mrs. Crabtree resides with her daughter, Mrs. McCord.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

McCORMICK, BARNARD

BARNARD McCORMICK, farmer, Sec. 28; P. O. Lancaster; is one of the many respected citizens of Grant Co., Wis.; he was born in 1809 in Ireland; he was a son of Martin and Bridget McCormick, of Ireland, with whom he lived until 21 years of age, and, in 1832, came to America, locating at Toronto, Can., for a short time, thence to New York for two years; he then wended his way westward to the city of Chicago, where he lived for one year; thence to Galena, Ill., for fifteen years, and followed mining; he then came to Liberty, Grant Co., where he has lived since. He was married, in 1839, to Alice Nailas, a daughter of Feral and Alice Nailas; they have eleven children -- Martin, Bridget, John, Frank, James, Catharine, Mary Ann, Alice, Barnard, Margaret, William; he is the owner of 480 acres of land, valued at $9,600. Has been Road Overseer four terms; School Clerk three terms. Politics, Democratic, and a member of the Catholic Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Liberty Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

McCORMICK, JOHN

JOHN McCORMICK, farmer and dealer in stock and agricultural machinery, Lancaster. A native of Grant Co. He was married Nov. 29, 1876, to Miss Kittie Scott; she was born in Waukegan, Ill. They have two children Margaret A. and Mary E.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

McCOY, J. B.

J. B. McCOY, dealer in live stock; P. O. Platteville; was born in Peoria, Ill., in 1839; came to Platteville in 1860, and attended the Platteville Academy till 1862. In August, 1862, he enlisted in Co. E, 25th W. V. I., and served as a private about sixteen months, when he received a First Lieutenant's commission, and served in that capacity till the close of the war. In 1874, he was elected Sheriff of Grant Co. on the Republican ticket, and served one term. In May, 1866, he married Miss Flora S., daughter of Milton Graham, of Platteville, and has had four children. His two oldest -- Charles Graham, aged 12, and James Lester, aged 8, died of diphtheria in the fall of 1878; has two living -- George F. and Milton Clay.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MCCOY, WILLIAM J.

WILLIAM J. McCOY (Dem.), of Lancaster was born in Argyle, New York, September 30, 1834; received an academic education; is by occupation a famer and live stock dealer; came to Wisconsin in 1852, and settled at Beetown, where he resided until 1880, when he removed to Lancaster; was a member of assembly in 1876 and in 1878; was elected assemblyman in 1883, receiving 1,335 votes, against 795 votes for D. B. Stevens, republican, and 50 votes for D. Lamson, greenbacker.

Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1883) page 491; transcribed by Tammy Clark

McDONALD, S. C.

S. C. McDONALD, of the firm of Swingle & McDonald, dealers in hoop-poles, shaved hoops and box-straps, Muscoda; was born in New York in 1831; came to Wisconsin in 1855, and located in Grant Co.; built fifteen miles of the railroad west of Muscoda in 1856 and 1857. Has held office of Chairman of the town for three terms; Justice of the Peace at present, and Town Clerk one year; had charge of railroad, buying wood and ties, up to the time it changed hands. He was married in 1854, to Miss Elizabeth Hopkinson, a native of New York, by whom he has two sons, one in the St. Paul railroad office at St. Paul, Minn., and the other is attending school at Madison. He is a prominent member of the A., F. & A. M., and active business man, and has always been identified with matters pertaining to the welfare of the place. The firm ship five million hoops and poles per year, mostly to the Minneapolis mills. It is one of the main industries of the place.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

McGIRK, JOSEPH

JOSEPH McGIRK, farmer; P. O. Potosi; born in Ireland in 1826, and came over in 1848; was in Pennsylvania one year, then went to Clinton a short time, and to this place in 1853. Owns 154 acres of land; son of Barnard and Ann (McGirk) McGirk. In 1855, married Ann L., daughter of Daniel and Mary (Ryan) Winslow; have four children living -- James A., Catharine E., Joseph L., Mary Ann.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Potosi Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

McGONIGAL, JUDGE WILLIAM

JUDGE WILLIAM McGONIGAL, Lancaster. Is a native of Tennessee, and was born in Hawkins Co., March 14, 1814. He came to Wisconsin Territory in June, 1836, and located in La Fayette Co., at White Oak Springs, and engaged in mining. Was one of the early settlers in the State. Continued mining through the different sections of the lead mining region fourteen years. Came to Lancaster Jan. 1, 1853, and since then has resided here. In 1849, he was elected Representative to the State Legislature. In 1852, was elected Sheriff of the county, and, in 1854, was elected Register of Deeds. In 1857, he was elected County Judge, and, since then for a period of twenty-four years, he has continuously held that position. In 1846, was married to Miss Ros. Ann Logsdon, a native of Kentucky. They have four children Olive, William F., James M., Mattie C.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

McGRANAHAN, JAMES N.

JAMES N. McGRANAHAN was born in Salem, Mercer Co., Penn., Dec. 15, 1841. Ten years later, his parents, A. J. and R. J. McGranahan, came to Iowa Co., Wis.; lived three years on a farm near Mineral Point, and a year in the Wyoming Valley. Owing to ill health, the father returned with his family to Pennsylvania, and stayed there three years. The family then returned, and lived for a time near Gratiot and Red Rock; then went to Fennimore, and four years later, settled on the farm in Lancaster, where the old couple now reside. In January, 1865, J. N. McGranahan enlisted in Co. K, 47th W. V. I.; served nine months, and was honorably discharged with his regiment. He then spent two years with his parents, and, in 1867, married Mary Orton. She was born on the Strand, in London, and was the daughter of a business man of that metropolis, who made a voyage to Australia, and around the globe, taking his family with him. After a somewhat brief experience on rented farms, Mr. McGranahan came to Platteville, and, after a winter at mining, he entered the employ of the Laflin & Rand Powder Co. Mr. McGranahan seems to bear a charmed life as a brief recital of his many close and almost miraculous escapes will show. In his younger life, while in La Fayette Co., Wis., he was nearly crushed to death by a runaway steer, the brute so managing his stampede as to drag the boy after him, and finally fell upon him. His second accident overtook him while he was crossing some slippery timbers in constructing a dam. He was a powerful young fellow, and was carrying a very heavy beam, the end of which struck him full in the face as he went down and, of course, drove him to the bottom of the deep stream. During his six years' service with the powder company, he was thrice in imminent danger. At the first explosion, Feb. 16, 1877, he sprang from one of the buildings just as the roof was blown from the "corning" works, yet escaped the hail of falling missiles. In September of the next year, the packing works exploded. He, at the time, was washing himself in a building prepared for the use of the employers. He was entirely nude, and when found was under a mass of debris with his shoulders and lower limbs literally stuck full of bits of glass. He now bears the scars of innumerable wounds and cuts. The roof of the wash-house and the broken windows did the business for him. When the press works exploded, in November, 1877, he jumped into the creek, and thus extinguished his blazing and most inflammable garments, which had caught from the explosion. Few men would have had the presence of mind he displayed in closing eyes and mouth, and making the plunge as he did. The surface of the water was strewn with broken timbers, etc., yet he was not hit, and, in spite of his many adventures and "close calls," he is to-day a sound man. In the spring of 1880, he was elected Town Treasurer, and, in the fall following, was appointed Janitor of the Normal School building. Mr. and Mrs. McGranahan have a son Ralph, born in Platteville. Mr. McGranahan has a house and lot in the city, though living in the school building, in order that his duties may be fulfilled.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

McGREGOR, DUNCAN

DUNCAN McGREGOR, President of the State Normal School at Platteville, is a native of Perthshire, Scotland; born in 1836; was educated at Perth Academy, University and King's College, Aberdeen, Scotland, and Lawrence University, at Appleton, Wis., graduating from the latter place in 1862. He came to America in 1857, taught school in Waupaca Co., Wis., three winters -- 1858, 1859 and 1860 -- and was Principal of the High School at Waupaca from 1860 to 1864. In August of that year he raised a company in Waupaca, and was mustered into the service as Captain of Co. A, 42d W. V. I., and served till the close of the war; was one year Principal of the Waupaca High School after the war. In 1867, he was elected to the Professorship of Mathematics, in the State Normal School at Platteville, which position he occupied for six years, and was then Professor of Theory and Practice of Teaching, and conductor of institutes for six years longer. In January, 1879, he was elected to his present position, which he has occupied since. He was married in 1865 to Miss Annie Bowman, of Waupaca, and has four children -- Alice, Grace, Libbie and Jessie.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

McINTYRE, PETER B.

PETER B. McINTYRE, stock-dealer, Muscoda; born in Bucks Co., Penn., July 8, 1819; when 4 years of age, he moved with his parents to Ithaca, N. Y., where they remained until 1832, when his father died; the family then moved to Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio. In 1844, he came to Platteville, Grant Co., where he engaged in blacksmithing, having learned the trade at Warren, Ohio, remained there two years, and returned to Warren, Ohio, and married Miss Martha A. Elston, the 4th of June, 1846; returning the same year to Platteville, established the blacksmithing business in company with George Hawley, engaged in the business five years; then came to Muscoda and started a livery stable, which he conducted three years, and sold the business to William Johnson; during that time he had established a blacksmith and wagon shop, which, in connection with his brother, John B., he conducted three years, and retired from the business and engaged in farming, in which he continued until 1867, when he opened a general store at Muscoda, the old town by the river, which he conducted in connection with his farm. In 1867, he took his nephew, A. C. V. Elston, into partnership in the store, which they continued until 1877, when he gave his interest to his son and only child, Robert B., and the firm name was changed from McIntyre & Elston to Elston & McIntyre. Mr. McIntyre then retired and turned his attention to dealing in stock, his present occupation. He has held nearly all of the town offices, and has been a respected and successful business man in the community in which he lives.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

McKENZIE, J. J.

J. J. McKENZIE, farmer, Sec. 30 ; P.O. Lancaster. Owns 500 acres. Was born in Morgan Co., Ky. In the fall of 1839, he left his native place and went to Edgar Co., 111., where he remained during the winter, and the next year, in July, 1840, came to Grant Co., where he has since lived. In the spring of 1850, he made a trip across the plains to California, where he was engaged in the mines three years. He was married in 1856, to Miss Susanna J. Halferty, a native of Richland Co., Ohio. They have three sons and two daughters Frank, William, Ben, Kate and Fanny.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

McKERNAN, JAMES

JAMES McKERNAN, saloon-keeper; has been a resident of Platteville since May 10, 1841. He went to California in 1851, and returned the same year; went again in 1862, and returned in 1863. He was born in Canada, and when about a year old his father, Bernard McKernan, removed to Rochester, N. Y., where he resided about six years, then returned to Canada, and lived six years only about six miles from Detroit, Mich. He went from there to Freeport, Ill., and thence to Platteville in 1841, and died there in 1871. James was married in 1839, in Joliet, Ill., to Mary Ann McCauley, and has five children -- James, Laura Ann (now Mrs. Thomas Leahy), Charles, Lillie and Mary Ann.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

McKINNEY, JOSEPH

JOSEPH McKINNEY, retired farmer, Lancaster. Born in 1802, a native of Rockingham Co., N. C. Came to Wisconsin in 1835, and located in Lancaster, Grant Co., where he has remained with the exception of four years, when he went to Texas. Always been engaged in farming. Married in 1825 to Miss Susan Overby, a native of North Carolina, by whom he had thirteen children, nine of whom are living. Married a second time in 1852, to Mrs. Anna Bobbins ; by her, he has four children, three of whom are living. Are members of M. E. Church, of which church Mr. McKinney has been Deacon for forty years; one of the oldest living settlers in Grant Co., and was considered one of the best farmers in the county. Is an honorable and exemplary man. Democratic in politics.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

McKITTRICK, WILLIAM W.

WILLIAM W. McKITTRICK & SON, general store, dry goods, groceries, hats and caps, etc., Muscoda; was born in Morgan Co., Ohio, May 10, 1828; is a son of William and Alice Funda; his father a native of Pennsylvania, a farmer; William was educated and lived on the farm until 1855, when he came to this State and located at Springville, Vernon Co., where for two years he worked in the flouring-mill of Graham & Sons, and then moved to Crawford Co., and bought a farm, where he lived until the spring of 1865, when he sold the farm and moved with his family to Missouri. In the spring of 1866, owing to ill health of his family, he sold out and came to Muscoda and established his present business, and erected the building which he now occupies. In 1868, he built a warehouse, and, in 1871, an elevator; since that time, has engaged in grain and live-stock trade. In 1850, he married Miss Mary A. Crider, a native of Ohio; they have three sons and a daughter living. His sons assist in the business; has always been in active life, and accumulated his property by his persevering industry. In addition to his business he owns two farms, one (of 160 acres) in Castle Rock, Grant Co., and one (of 136 acres) in Eagle, Richland Co., both of which are worked under his personal supervision.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

McKNIGHT, JAMES

JAMES McKNIGHT, farmer, Sec. 10; P. O. Lancaster, was born at Benton, La Fayette Co., Wis., Nov. 27, 1846; went to Kansas in 1872; remained there until 1874, engaged in farming; then returned to Iowa, and rented land; then returned to Wisconsin; bought and owns 80 acres of land (a part of the old homestead of his father). He enlisted, in the year 1862, in Co. A, 33d W. V. I.; mustered out in August, 1865, at Vicksburg, Miss. His wife, Linda Bronell, who was born in La Fayette Co., July 23, 1853; a daughters of Clinton and Cynthia Bronell; natives of New York. They married in 1872; they have three children -- Everett D., born in Kansas April 24, 1874; Wilbur A., born in Iowa Sept. 24, 1876; Melvin J., born in Wisconsin Sept. 21, 1878.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Ellenboro Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

McKOWN, THOMAS

THOMAS McKOWN, blacksmith, Washburn; was born in Pittsburgh, Penn., Feb. 1, 1847; learned the trade of blacksmith at Wheeling, Va., then removed to Keokuk, Iowa, was engaged by the United States on the Government works; came to Wisconsin March 22, 1876, and worked for Mr. Harris; enlisted in the 129th Ohio V.I. His wife Sarah Harsha, was born in Mifflin, Iowa Co., in 1856; married in 1872; they have three children--Elmer, Delia F., Herbert. In politics, Republican; a liberal believer.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

McMAHON, THOMAS & JOHN

THOMAS & JOHN McMAHON: P. O. Platteville; are sons of Thomas and Margaret (Blakly) McMahon; the father was born Mary 17, 1787, in County Fermanagh, Ireland; he came with his family to America in 1847, and at once located in Harrison; at his death, Aug. 3, 1875, he left seven children -- John, William, Jane (Mrs. William Horlocker), Eliza (Mrs. Thomas Moffitt), Thomas, Margaret (Mrs. John Marston), and Mary (Mrs. H. W. Long). John McMahon has a family and a farm of 205 acres; is a Republican, and served four years on the Town Board of Supervisors. Thomas McMahon is with his mother on the homestead farm of 130 acres. Her served, as did his brother William, in the 25th W. V. I., during three years of the civil war, participating in the battles and movements made by his regiment. He is now Chairman of the Town Board, of which he was a side member in 1879; he has also served seven years at Justice of the Peace, and two years as Assessor. In 1880, he was the U. S. Census Enumerator.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Harrison Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

McNELLY, H. F.

H. F. McNELLY, attorney at law and Notary Public, Front street, rear of printing office, Muscoda; was born in Richland Co. in 1854; is a son of Henry McNelly, M. D., of Muscoda; received his education at Madison, and established himself in present business in September, 1877; practices in the whole district, which includes five counties, and also in Supreme Court; the youngest attorney in Grant Co.; is a member of the I. O. O. F., has passed all the chairs, at present Past Grand; has always been in active life, and is a self-made man.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MCNELLY, HENRY FREELAND

HENRY FREELAND MCNELLY, Muscoda, was born at Orin, Richland county, Wisconsin, in 1854, and is the son of Dr. H. Mc Nelly, who is one of the earliest settlers of the state. He commenced the study of law with Judge M. M. Cothren, at Mineral Point, in 1875; was admitted to the bar June 26, 1877, at a term of the Circuit Court at Darlington, and commenced practice at Muscoda, September 9, 1877, and has been in practice at that village till the present time.

Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin History and Biography, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Susan Geist

McREYNOLDS, JOSEPH O.

JOSEPH O. McREYNOLDS, Sec. 13; P.O. Washburn; was born March 14, 1826, in Bond Co., Ill.; left there with his parents in 1836, and came to Wisconsin and settled on the farm known as the Conklin farm; took poultry and produce to Old Belmont, where the first Legislature was then in session; bought the farm he now lives from the Government; owns 140 acres of land; held office on Town Board in 1879, and has been on School Board thirteen years. Was married to Sarah Glenn, July 18, 1858; have seven children living and two deceased--the former named Walter E., William S., Jessie G., May C., Arthur V., Bertie L., Ethel M.; the latter named Clara E., Joseph L., both buried in the family cemetery on the place. The stone house which they occupy was built on the site where the old log cabin stood which his parents lived in, and has always been a landmark for travelers. He is a member of the Masonic order at Mifflin Lodge, and also belongs to Lodge No. 28, I.O.O.F. When Mr. McR. First came to Platteville, there was only one store kept by Maj. Roundtree, and a blacksmith shop.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

McWILLIAMS, C.

C. McWILLIAMS, firm of Pittman & McWilliams, drugs and groceries, Boscobel; is a native of Ireland; came to Eagle, Wis., in 1859; clerked in a drug and hardware store about two years; in the spring of 1866 he came to Boscobel and commenced this business; they carry a stock of about $8,000, doing a trade of about $30,000 per year. Married in 1865, to Miss Maggie E. Haslehurst; she was born in New York; they had three children, two living; lost George in 1870, aged 3 years.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MEDLEY, ELIAS

ELIAS MEDLEY, Sec. 17; P.O. Platteville; was born in 1810, in Trumbull Co., Ohio. Married Margaret A. Espy, who was born in 1810, in Cumberland Co., Penn.; in 1846, the came via the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to Grant Co.; they began in a log house on 80 acres of the present 200 acre farm. They have seven children--Philo H., a twenty years resident of California; Cornelia, now Mrs. J. Carson, of Kansas; Robert E. and Alfred, now of Lima; Thos. Jefferson, now in Texas, Jane E., wife of Peter Klingensmith, of Lima, and Mary A., now Mrs. H.C. Haskell, of Lima. Mr. Medley has been a life-long farmer, and is now in broken health, partially caused by the labors and hardships incurred by all early settlers in timbered regions.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

MELSTER, HERMANN

HERMANN MELSTER, editor and proprietor of the Platteville Correspondent, is of German parentage, and was born in 1857 in Milwaukee, Wis. Here he received a good education in both German and English, and, in 1871, entered the office of the Herold. Beginning newspaper life thus early, he has since followed it, filling various positions on the Seebote, the Freidenker and the Banner und Volksfreund, of Milwaukee. He has also been employed on the German papers of Indianapolis, and was, for a time, foreman in the job office of the St. Paul, Minn., Volkszeitung. Returning to his native city, he remained until the fall of 1879, then came to Platteville. In company with Ferd. Reinshagen, he established the Correspondent, the first issue bearing date Oct. 9, 1879. On the 18th of December, 1880, Mr. Melster bought out the interest of his partner, and has since managed this, the only German newspaper in Southwest Wisconsin, alone. It is a four-page eight-column weekly, independent in politics, and devoted to the best interests of this part of the State; circulation at this time 550, and constantly increasing.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MERRICK, SAMUEL

SAMUEL MERRICK, Jamestown, was born in Jefferson county, New York, July 15, 1815. His father was a native of Massachusetts, and his mother of Rhode Island. He was educated in the public schools and at an academy situated in Lowville, New York. His main occupation, after the completion of his studies, was that of teacher in the common schools. At the breaking out of the Mexican war he enlisted as a soldier in the American army, and had a good deal of experience of military service. He commenced his study of law with John Palmer, of Watertown, New York, an eminent lawyer of that time. He removed to Wisconsin in the spring of 1850, and seven years afterward was admitted to practice at the bar of Grant county, which vocation he is now following.

Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin History and Biography, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Susan Geist

MEYER, EDWARD

EDWARD MEYER, firm of Meyer Bros., general merchandise, Boscobel; is a native of Westphalia, Germany; came to Waukesha Co., Wis., in 1848, with his parents; followed farming till 1859, when he came to Boscobel; was employed as clerk with Fleete, Meyer & Co., who had opened their store in 1858, and was one of the first stores started here; this business was succeeded to by Meyer, Hildebrand & Co., in 1862; they continued this business till 1866, when it was changed to Meyer Bros.; they carry a stock of about $20,000; their sales amount to about $75,000 per year; has been chairman of the town; married in 1867 to Miss Josephine Horn; she was born in New York; they have four children, three sons and one daughter.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MEYER, RICHARD

RICHARD MEYER, banker, Lancaster ; was born in Westphalia, a province of Germany, in 1817. His earlier education was conducted at a private school in Hamburg. Upon its completion, young Meyer was transferred to a desk in a large banking and shipping house at Libya, Russia, where he remained twelve years. At the expiration of this time, he was promoted to the charge of the office of Harrison, Winans & Eastwick, the great American railway contractors, then located at St. Petersburg. Upon the close of their contracts, and return to America, in 1850, Mr. Meyer accompanied them, and established himself in Philadelphia. Ill health soon after demanded a change of residence, and, heeding the warnings, Mr. Meyer started for the West, coming at once to Grant Go., and making his headquarters at Lancaster in 1857. This afterward became his permanent home. Mr. Meyer has been connected with his present business since 1867.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

MEYER, WILLIAM Sr.

WILLIAM MEYER, Sr., Platteville, was born Sept. 22, 1828, in Sulz, Wurtemberg. In early life he learned harness-making, and during the revolution of 1848-50, he served as a soldier in the Fourth Wurtemberg Regiment. In 1852, he came to America; landed at New Orleans, and then came up the Father of Waters to Galena, thence to Platteville, where he entered the employ of Mr. Lambert, a harness-maker. During the civil war, he formed a partnership with Miner Burwell in the harness business. At the death of Mr. B., a year later, Mr. Meyer bought out the heirs, and conducted the business alone, until he in turn sold out to his son and son-in-law, Dec. 15, 1877. He owns 9 acres in the city and farms in a small way; is also one of the Board of Alderman, elected in the spring of 1880, and a member of the German Presbyterian Church, of which he has been an Elder for three years past. His first wife was Frederika Kohler, born in his native village. She died in November, 1870, leaving five children -- William, Rosa, John, Samuel and Martha. By the present wife, nee Pauline Geyer, he has a son -- George. The eldest son is in partnership with Peter Pitts, Jr., they having bought out the father in the harness business. The second son is in the shop with them, while the three youngest children are with the father, whose name heads this sketch.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MICHELL, THOMAS

THOMAS MICHELL, blacksmith and repairing shop, Cuba City; born in England in 1851; came to America in 1872, and settled in Pennsylvania in 1875; he removed to this village and engaged in his present business. Married Mary Jane Penhale, a native of Cornwall, England; they have three children -- Edgar, William Henry and Earnest.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Smelser Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MICKA, JOHN

JOHN MICKA, farmer; P. O. Platteville; was born Nov. 12, 1809, in Rhenish Prussia, where he spent his early life as a stone cutter. Here he married Catherine Boscha, who was born Aug. 5, 1814. They were wedded Feb. 24, 1834, and came to America and Grant Co. in 1841. During the first seven years, Mr. Micha was a lead miner, and then began on his 120-acre farm, half a mile north of the city of Platteville. Mr. and Mrs. Micka have had twelve children -- Catherine, Mary, John, Margaret (deceased), Henry, Augustus, Sylvester, Joseph, Frank, Herman, George and Abbie. The four eldest were born in Germany, and the others in Platteville. This family are and have been active and influential members of St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church, Platteville, Mr. Micka donating liberally toward the erection of the church. Himself, wife and children are lovers of music and good singers. He and his sons Herman, George and Frank, have been members of the choir, of which Miss Abbie is now leader and organist.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MILLER, JOSEPH

JOSEPH MILLER, P. O. Homer; was born in Erie Co., N. Y., in 1822, where he lived until he came West; he came to this town in 1855; his occupation has been that of farmer. He married, in November, 1860, Miss Arvilla A. Bartow, a native of Huron Co., Ohio.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hickory Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MILLER, MONTGOMERY

MONTGOMERY MILLER, farmer; P.O. Bloomington; born in 1842, in Lancaster, Grant Co., Wis. Was a son of Harvey Miller. He was married in 1864, to Monerdy White; has but one son, William L. He is the owner of 280 acres of good land, valued at $6,000. Is a Republican. He was a volunteer in the 7th W.V.I., Co. K, where he lost his eyesight.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

MILLER, N. B.

N. B. MILLER, restaurant and saloon, Boscobel; born in Livingston Co., N. Y.; followed farming till 1858, when he came to Ohio and worked at the daguerrean business about eight months; in the fall of 1858 came to Lancaster; worked at the same business there till the spring of 1861; then started a grocery; firm of Barnett & Miller; they continued about six months when Mr. Miller bought out the business; he owns this and other property in town, all of which he has acquired since coming to Grant County; married in 1864 to Helen M. Petty; she was born in Ohio; they have one son -- Nathan G.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MILLER, CHARLES C.

REV. CHARLES C. MILLER, Pastor of the German M. E. Church of Platteville, was born in Quincy, Ill. His father, Michael Miller, was a native of Alsace, Germany, and came to America in 1830 or 1831. He lived in New York City till 1835, then went to Quincy, Ill., and now lives in Lincoln, Neb. Charles C. Miller was educated in Quincy, Ill.; was in the mercantile business in Bushnell, Ill., six years, and five years in Freeport, and entered the ministry in 1878. He was married in Freeport, Ill., in 1873, to Miss Lizzie Wenzel, and has five children -- Arthur Wenzel, Edward Funk, Ida May, Clarence Wesley and Benjamin Philip. His first charge was Lena, Ill., and he came from there to Platteville in October, 1880. In February, 1864, he enlisted in the 151st Ill. V. I., Co. C, as a private, and served till the close of the war.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MILLER, W. G.

REV. W. G. MILLER, Rector of St. Mary's Church of Platteville, was born in Racine, Wis., and educated at St. Francis Seminary, near Milwaukee, and ordained in 1872. He spent a few months in Milwaukee after his ordination; then was two years in Sun Prairie, and in July, 1874, assumed charge of the Church of St. Mary's of the Lake, in Westport, Dane Co., Wis., and also St. John's Church of Waunakee. He was transferred to his present charge in September, 1880.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MILLIN, EDWARD

EDWARD MILLIN, Sec. 36; P. O. Patch Grove; owns 80 acres of land, valued at $1,600; born in England in 1817; came to America in 1852, and settled in Ohio; in 1856, he removed to Wisconsin, and settled in Grant Co.; located on his farm in 1864; he has been twice married; his last marriage was to Angeline Brodt, a native of New York; he has four children by his former wife -- William, Eli, Mary and Charlotte.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Wyalusing Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MILLS, GEORGE K.

GEORGE K. MILLS, dealer in fancy groceries, confectioneries, toys, tobacco, cigars, drugs and medicines, Hazel Green; established in 1875; born in Cornwall, England, in 1853; came to America in 1863, and located in New York with parents; in 1865, came to Wisconsin. Married Amanda Morcom, a native of this county. Mr. Mills was elected Town Clerk in 1880.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MILLS, JOSEPH T.

JOSEPH T. MILLS, Lancaster, was born in Crane Ridge, Bourbon county, Kentucky, December 18, 1812. He acquired an academic education, studied law, was admitted to the bar, came to the west, and located in Bond county, Illinois, in 1831, moved to Wisconsin and permanently settled at Lancaster in 1843, when he entered into the practice of the law; was elected circuit judge for the fifth circuit, and served from 1865 to 1877, and was a member of the assembly in 1856, 1857, 1862 and 1879.

Judge Mills has ever been prominent in the public and judicial affairs of the state; no man stands higher in Wisconsin for profoundness in legal lore, and for general information; his wit and humor is not surpassed, if equaled, by any of his contemporaries, and the course of his long life has been one of the unalloyed purity. Although now nearly three score years and ten his mental vigor remains unimpaired.

Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed Publisher (1882) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

MILLS, M.

M. MILLS, farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. Hazel Green; owns 187 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre; born in Cornwall, England, in 1832; came to America in 1854, and settled in this county in 1864 and to his present farm in 1878. Married Susanna Jeffery, a native of England; they have five children -- Mannington, Susanna, William, Katie and Libbie.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MONTAG, MICHAEL

MICHAEL MONTAG, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Dickeyville; owns 185 acres; son of Henry and Martha Elizabeth Montag; was born in Katharinenberg, Saxony, Prussia, April 10, 1846; his father was born in the same place, and his mother at Eisstrut, Saxony; she died in August, 1870, aged 46 years; his father moved to the United States and settled on Sec. 27, Town 2, Range 2 west, where Michael now lives. He was married Jan. 9, 1871, to Miss Catharine Brant, daughter of Andrew and Victoria Brant, of Jamestown; they have five children -- Henry, Justin, Charles, Dorothea and Andrew. He is a School Director, a Republican and a Catholic. His father was Burgomaster of his native village in Germany, and, after he moved to Wisconsin, he was elected, in 1867, Justice of the Peace; he is still living in Dickeyville; he was the second German who settled in the town of Paris; a zealous Catholic, he helped to build the St. Mary's German Catholic Church at Jamestown, and afterward the "Holy Ghost" Chapel, German Catholic Church, at Dickeyville.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Paris Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MOODY, SYLVESTER F.

SYLVESTER F. MOODY, clerk; P. O. Annaton; was born in 1846, in the town of Oakland, Coles Co., Ill.; was a son of Isaiah and Usilla Moody, who emigrated to Grant Co. in 1846, locating in the town of Smelser, and in 1848 his mother died; in 1850, his father emigrated to California, where he has lived since, leaving his two sons Sylvester and George entirely under the control and protection of their grandparents, Delial and Asenath Kies, both of Smesler, Grant Co., Wis., whose occupation was farming; he lived with his grandparents until 17 years of age, and then enlisted in the 25th W. V. C., Co. I, under Capt. Smalley; served three years; was wounded the 22d day of July, 1864, at the battle of Atlanta; he was in five different battles; he then returned to his native home in Grant Co., stopping for a short period in the town of Smesler; then to Boscobel, where he clerked in a store for six months; thence to Fennimore for one year, working on a farm owned by Isaac McDonald; thence to Castle Rock for two years; followed farming when he returned to his birthplace in Illinois, where he resided for two years, and there clerked in a store; he again returned to Grant Co., locating at Fennimore for four years, and, in 1876, came to the town of Clifton, in the village of Annaton, where he has since lived, mining the biggest portion of the time; is President of the Northeastern Level Company, and is now clerking in the post office and store, which is owned by John Woodward, at Annaton; was Constable one term. Politics, Republican.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MOORE, AARON

AARON MOORE, farmer, P.O. Lancaster; born in 1831 in Lancaster Co., Penn.; is a son of Gaines Moore. He resided in Pennsylvania until 20 years of age; he lived in Illinois for three years. Then went to Wisconsin and located in Clark County; followed the lumber business for seven years; thence to Grant County, where he has since lived; he settled near Beetown. In 1852, he married Mary A. Blackburn. He was in the army two years and eleven months. Has 63 acres of land, valued at $1,000; he is a Quaker; his politics, Republican; has eight children--Alice P., George G., Mary C., Walter C., Henry, Lucy A., J.E. and Willard.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

MOORE, J. B.

GEN. J. B. MOORE, Muscoda. Gen. Moore was born in Posey Co., Ind., March 14, 1825. His early years were passed in the place of his birth. In 1837, his parents removed to what was then the Territory of Wisconsin, settling near Muscoda. During his youth, he received a common-school education, completing his studies at the Platteville Academy during the years 1843-44. In 1853, Mr. Moore opened a store at Muscoda, and continued in mercantile pursuits for some time. He served in the Legislature of 1860 as member of the Assembly for his district, and, the succeeding year, was elected Sheriff of Grant Co., making one of the most popular officials that had held that office. During this interval, the great war of the rebellion had broken out. Recruiting had been actively going on from the first throughout the county; and, at one time, it was to form a Grant County Regiment, to be composed, rank, file and field officers, of the inhabitants of this county. Prominent among those whose names were mentioned for appointments in the proposed regiment was Sheriff Moore. Circumstances prevented the consummation of the project; but, upon the formation of the 33d W. V. I., the colonelcy was tendered to Mr. Moore, and accepted by him, the commission bearing the date of Aug. 30, 1862. On the 8th of September, he was commissioned Post Commandant at Camp Utley, Racine, at which place the companies composing the Forty-third were ordered to report. Col. Moore took command of the post on the 29th of September, and commenced at once preparing his regiment for the field. The regiment soon after left for the South, and, upon arriving at Memphis, Tenn., Col. Moore was detached from his regiment, and assigned to the command of the Third Brigade. Upon the transfer of the Thirty-third to the Fourth Division, at the request of Gen. Lawman, Col. Moore once more assumed command of his regiment. In March, 1864, Col. Moore was ordered to assume command of the First Brigade of Gen. Kilby Smith's Division of the Seventeenth Army Corps. With his brigade, Col. Moore took part of the ill-fated Red River expedition of that year. Upon the organization of the detachment of the Army of the Tennessee in December, 1864, Col. Moore was assigned to the command of the Third Division. In the January following, he was relieved from the command upon the return of Gen. Kilby Smith. In the order announcing the change, the Commanding General took occasion to say: "In relieving Col. Moore, the Major General Commanding desires to express his high appreciation of the able, thorough and soldierly manner with which he has executed the trust confided to him in this command." He was, however, soon after returned to the command of his old division. On the 17th of August, Col. Moore was relieved by Gen. Carr, the former being assigned to the command of the First Brigade. While in command of his brigade, he took part in the attack on Mobile and Spanish Fort, leading the charge against the latter in person. A little later, he was ordered to Vicksburg, where he was mustered out Aug. 9, 1865. During his term of service, Col. Moore participated in three sieges, nine battles and eleven skirmishes. He was twice commissioned Brevet Brigadier General. The first commission bearing date April 7, 1865, for gallantry at the battle of Nashville, where he commanded the Third Division Detachment of the Army of the Tennessee. The second commission bore date April 9, 1866, being issued "for faithful and meritorious service during the campaign against the city of Mobile and its defenses." Upon his return from the South, Gen. Moore located at Muscoda, where he soon after erected the bridge across the Wisconsin River at that point, an undertaking which marked the turning-point in Muscoda's commercial history. Gen. Moore is at present the owner of a large amount of real estate, in and about Muscoda, which, with operating of his bridge occupies the greater portion of his time. In the political questions of the day, the General takes a deep interest, being a thorough and consistent Republican. Endowed with a kindly, generous nature, affable and public spirited, Gen. Moore is a noticeable figure among the many prominent men of Grant Co.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MOORE, JAMES

JAMES MOORE, farmer, Sec. 29; P. O. Mt. Ida; was born in Mercer Co., Penn., Dec. 27, 1818; removed to Grant Co., Wis., in 1864. Was married Dec. 18, 1841, to Sarah Dilley, daughter of Mathias Dilley, of Mercer Co., Penn.; she was born Feb. 11, 1821; they had three children -- two deceased; one son living -- John S. -- born May 27, 1843. Mr. Moore is a Democrat politically; has filled various town offices, and is at present a member of the Board of Supervisors of his town, and is a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity; owns a farm of 139 acres, with valuable improvements.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Mount Ida Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MOORE, SAMUEL

SAMUEL MOORE, Platteville. Mr. Moore was born near Mt. Vernon, Ind., Nov. 19, 1814; he came from Kentucky stock, his parents having removed from that State to Indiana some time previous to his birth. He remained at Mt. Vernon until he had attained his 20th year, obtaining a good common-school education, and afterward learning the trade of gunsmith, besides attaining a proficiency in iron-working, which stood him in good stead when, later, he came to the then Territory of Michigan; this move was made in the spring of the year 1834. Young Moore came at once to what is now known as Grant Co., and located at Platteville, and, during the several decades which have blazed forth and burned for their brief space then faded away only to be forgotten, Mr. Moore has remained a resident of this, the first place of his selection. Young Moore at once started in business, opening a blacksmith-shop, which trade he practiced for the seven years following; ill health caused an abandonment of this trade, and, in 1843, he engaged in the mercantile business; from this time until 1860, Mr. Moore's store was one of the prominent institutions of the kind in the town; Mr. Moore's attention had been early attracted toward manufacturing, and previous to that date, namely, in 1854, he had started a linseed oil mill with fiber works in connection, near the site of his present hotel; in order to devote more attention to this business, he closed out his stock of goods and devoted his whole time to his manufacturing interests; in 1862, after closing out these interests, Mr. Moore was elected County Treasurer, which position he held two terms, giving most general satisfaction, and retiring with honor at the expiration of his second term. Hardly had he shaken off the cares of office before, in connection with Mr. Hamner Robbins, he entered upon the work that resulted in bringing the present "broad gauge" road into Platteville, and giving that village for the first time, after the failure of many schemes, railroad communication with the outside world. To Mr. Moore and his co-worker belongs the honor of having accomplished a seeming impossibility. The first moneys needed in the early beginnings of this line were furnished by these two gentlemen. For the six years following, Mr. Moore was closely connected with the line, but, at the close of that time, injuries which he had received necessitated his withdrawal from active business. Upon the recovery of Mr. Moore from his injuries, some years later, he devoted his time to the supervision of his own private matters until October, 1880, when he took possession of the Gates House, which hotel is owned by him, and is at present engaged in the congenial task of landlord.

But few men now living in Grant Co. can show a longer continuous residence in the county, and, as one of the "old residenters," Mr. Moore takes a deep pride and interest in everything bearing on the county's welfare. In addition to his service as County Treasurer, he was twice elected President of the village of Platteville, and twice Chairman of the Town Board of Supervisors. In 1837, Mr. Moore was united in marriage to Miss Ann Snowden, of England; three children were the fruit of this union, one son and two daughters, of whom but one daughter (Mr. McCarn) is still living.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MORRISON, J. W.

J. W. MORRISON, Sec. 17; P.O. Platteville; was born in New Windsor, Orange Co., N.Y., in 1839; he resided as a farmer in his native county until 1855, then came to Wisconsin, and located on a farm in Iowa Co., in 1858, he came from there to Lima; in August, 1864, he enlisted in Co. B. 43d W.V.I., and served ten months, or until the rebellion succumbed; in the spring of 1866, he settled on his present farm of 73 acres. He married Miss Caroline, daughter of Luke Moses; she was born in Trumbull Co., Ohio, from whence her people came to Lima in 1855. Mr. and Mrs. Morrison have three children--Wm. E., Carrie W. and J. Percy, all born in Lima, where the parents were married. Mr. Morrison has for the past six years been Town Treasurer of Lima.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

MORROW, JOHN

JOHN MORROW, farmer, Sec. 5; P. O. Little Grant; was born in 1822 in County Down, Ireland; is a son of John and Sarah Morrow; lived with his parents fourteen years; is a stone-mason by trade; he lived a short period in Scotland; in 1849, he came to the United States and settled in Livingston Co., N. Y.; lived there until 1857, then moved to Lancaster, Grant Co., Wis., for one year. In 1862, he enlisted in Co. D, 33d W. V. I., and served three years; was in fifteen battles. Was married in 1844 to Martha Addams, a daughter of James Addams, of Scotland; they had seven children -- Sarah, John, Annie, Jane, Adam, Willis N. and Richard; he was married a second time to Helen Leighton, a widow of John Leighton; she was a daughter of Peter N. Thornton, of Bloomington, by whom he had four children, three living -- Margaret, Agnes, Franklin and McBunless. Politics, Republican. Is a member of the United Brethren Church. Has 390 acres of land, valued at $6,000.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Little Grant Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MORSE, B.S.

B.S. MORSE, Postmaster and dealer in drugs, medicines, paints, oils, stationery, groceries, etc.; P.O. Beetown; born in Maine in 1835; came to Grant County in 1855, and located in Beetown. Educated in Massachusetts, is an old Grant County school-teacher, having taught fifteen years in the county in an early day, has held the office of Town Clerk for a number of years; appointed Postmaster in 1874; all these positions he has filled creditably. Enlisted first in 1862, in the 20th W.V.I., and served one year; enlisted again in the summer of 1864, in the 43rd W.V.I.; was with his regiment all through the war. Was married in 1859, to Miss Nancy Tindell, by whom he has six children, three sons and three daughters. Has always been in active business, and is a self-made man.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

MOSES, LUKE

LUKE MOSES, deceased; was born in the year 1805, in Canaan, Conn.; when a young man, he removed to Ohio, and married in Hartland, Trumbull Co., Olive Dickenson; she was born Dec. 1, 1810, in Cornwall, Conn., and was 6 months of age when her parents removed to Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Moses came to Lima in 1855, and settled on the farm where he died May 2, 1861; he left two children--Martin and Caroline. Mr. Moses was an upright Christian citizen, who lived enjoying the confidence of his fellows, and who died enjoying faith in the final reward of his Maker. His aged widow, still in full possession of her faculties, now resides with her only son, who inherited the homestead.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

MUELLER, CHARLES

CHARLES MUELLER, farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. Boscobel; is a native of town of Marion; was born in 1860; his father is one of the old settlers of this county, having come here in about 1850, and settled in this locality; they own 200 acres of land. Charles lives on and manages the farm, where he was born.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Marion) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MUESSE, GEORGE

GEORGE MUESSE, contractor and builder, dealer in lumber, Lancaster. Is a native of Germany ; emigrated to America in 1848, with his brother, and learned the trade of carpenter and joiner in Philadelphia. He came to Grant Co. in 1859, and remained one year, then returned to Pennsylvania. In 1870, he came to Lancaster, and since then has been engaged in building. In 1879, he also engaged in the lumber business, and is building up a good trade. He holds the office of City Weighmaster. In July, 1863, Mr. Muesse married Mrs. Elizabeth Hamrichhouse, a native of Germany. They have seven children Annie E., George H., Lizzie, Carrie M., Fred W., Edward C., Charlie L.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

MUESSE, HEBERT

HEBERT MUESSE, contractor and builder and dealer in lumber, Lancaster. Is a native of Germany ; was born in in Prussia June 22, 1836. Emigrated to America in 1848. Learned the trade of carpenter and joiner in Philadelphia. Came to Wisconsin in 1855, and settled in Lancaster, and began working at his trade; and since then, for the past twenty-six years, he has been successfully engaged in contracting and building, and has done a large business. In 1875, established the lumber business, and has a good trade. He has served as Police Justice and member of the Town Board. Was united in marriage to Miss Eliza Reynolds, a native of London, England, Oct. 15, 1860. They have six children Olive, John, Hattie, Harry, Frank, Susie.

MUNNS, PERRY PERRY MUNNS, farmer, Sec. 1; P. O. Fennimore; was born in Fennimore, Grant Co., Wis., March 1, 1849, and has always been a resident of this county. Mr. Munns was married to May Jones Sept. 3, 1874, who was born Aug. 5, 1858, in Grant Co., Wis.; is a daughter of T. J. Jones, of Grant Co.; they have three children -- Maud, George and Leon. Owns a farm of 130 acres. He is an active and working Republican. Mr. Henry Munns, brother of Perry Munns, was a member of Co. C, 12th W. V. I.; was killed at Atlanta, Ga., July 21, 1864.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Mount Ida Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MURPHY, JAMES W.

JAMES W. MURPHY, Platteville, is a native of the town in which he is now practicing his profession, and was born in the year 1858. He was educated at the State Normal School at Platteville, and studied law in the same town, in the office of A. W. Bell, afterward attending the law department of the University of Michigan. He was admitted to the Wisconsin bar in 1879, and has as yet been associated with no law partner.

Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin History and Biography, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Susan Geist

MURRAY, KIREN

KIREN MURRAY (deceased); born in Kings Co., Ireland, in 1799; emigrated here in 1825, and was engaged at New Orleans; came to Galena, Ill., March 17, 1828, and engaged in mining; then settled on his farm in 1833; he has 240 acres; the probable value is $12,000; he died in January, 1874, and was buried at Sinsinawa Mound; he was the oldest settler in this part of the country. In politics he was Democratic; in religion, a Catholic. He married Bridget Carroll, a native of Kilkenny Co., Ireland; born Sept. 29, 1813; they have nine children -- Martha, Lawrence, Nicholas, Samuel, Thomas (died in December, 1874), Kiren, Mary, Catharine, Michael (graduated and received a diploma from the St. Clara Academy at Sinsinawa Mound).

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Jamestown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MURRAY, PATRICK

PATRICK MURRAY (deceased); born in Kings Co., Ireland, in 1809; died July 8, 1877; in politics, a Democrat; in religion, a Catholic. When he first settled here he followed mining with some success; afterward engaged in farming, which has been continued by the family since his decease; they have 240 acres of land, the probable value of which is $12,000. Mr. Murray married Mary Sheridan, a native of County Cavan, Ireland; they have had eight children -- William (dead), Michael, James, Catharine (dead), Sarah, Joseph, Theresa, Agnes.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Jamestown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

MYERS, JOHN

JOHN MYERS, farmer, Sec. 23; P.O. Beetown; born in 1826, in Canada; was a son of Michael and Ann Myers; he became an active young man at the age of 22, and came to Wisconsin and worked in the pinery; then to Taylor Co., Iowa, for two years; came back to Wisconsin and lived one year; he then went to California, where he lived for one year and a half; moved then to Grant Co., Wis., near Beetown; began farming in 1867. He married Miss Mary J. Immel, a daughter of A. Immel; he went in debt for a large farm, but was prosperous and paid for it; he raised five children--William M., Philip H., Bertha R., Mary E., Ettie B.; has 240 acres of land. Politics, Republican.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

MYERS, JOHN

JOHN MYERS, was born July 22, 1807, in Westmoreland, England, where he served an apprenticeship as a carpenter. He came to America and located in Buffalo, N. Y., in 1832. Here he married Annie Smith. Up to 1837 he worked at his trade, on both the American and Canadian sides of the Niagara River, building vessels for the lake trade. The year 1837 found him in Platteville, and late in that year he helped build the old M. E. Church, the first erected in Grant County. Part of the old edifice is now in use by Maj. J. H. Rountree, as an office. It was built by subscription, and was the second M. E. Church built in Southwestern Wisconsin, that erected in 1834, at Mineral Point, only preceding it. Mr. Myers also worked at the old Platteville Academy. In 1849, he located where he now is, and, in company with George R. Laughton, built a carding mill, which he operated about ten years. His wife died Feb. 3, 1859, and in 1864 he married Hannah Beckett, who was born in Canton, St. Lawrence Co., N. Y. She came from the Western Reserve, Ohio, to Wisconsin in 1853. Mr. Myers has followed his trade faithfully, and still takes pride in his work.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

NAGLE, T.

T. NAGLE, Sec. 34; P. O. Patch Grove; owns 120 acres land, valued at $30 per acre; born in Ireland in 1806; came to America in 1830, and located in Canada. In 1837, he removed to Cassville, this county; two years later, he settled on this farm. Married Elizabeth Brown, a native of Scotland; they have five children -- Tamer, Jane, John, Thomas D. and Eliza.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

NAPP, CONRAD

CONRAD NAPP, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Lancaster; born in 1855 in Lancaster, Grant Co., Wis.; is a son of Conrad and Elizabeth Napp; he lived with his parents until 21 years of age; they were of German descent. He owns 80 acres of land, valued at $1,800; his parents moved into the town of Beetown when he was but 3 years of age, where they lived for eight years, then returned to Lancaster, where they resided for seven years; thence to Fennimore for nine years, and then to Liberty, where he has lived for two years. He was married, in 1875, to Emily Roth, a daughter of Jacob and Margaret Roth, of Liberty; have two children -- Jacob C. and Edith. Politics, Greenbacker.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Liberty Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

NATHAN

NATHAN & WOOLISTENHOLME, dealers in general merchandise, Lancaster, commenced business in the fall of 1869, with a $2,000 stock and small capital of about $1,500, doing a trade the first year of about $2,500 ; their business has since increased threefold. Joseph Woolstenholme, of this firm, is a native of Lancaster, Grant Co., born Nov. 1, 1860, son of John W. and Annetta Nathan Woolstenholme ; his father was bore in Philadelphia, of English parentage, and his mother was born in Germany. He has always been engaged in this business. A graduate of Lancaster High School.

NATHAN, ADOLPH

ADOLPH NATHAN, of this firm, is a native of Prussia, born May 8, 1844, a son of Jacob and Helen (Sheuer) Nathan, who moved to St. Louis in the winter of 1849, where they lived about six months ;. in the spring of 1850, they moved to Lancaster. Adolph went to Chicago to Commercial College, and, ;n 1863, volunteered in the 41st W. V. I., one hundred days. United States service; he was detailed as a Special Order Clerk, under Gen. Washburn. October 18, 1865, he was married in New York to Miss Rosa Schreiber, daughter of Louis Schreiber ; they have one son and one daughter, Louis, aged 12, and Jeannett, an infant. Mr. Nathan was Financial Agent of the Chicago & Tomah Railway from 1878 to 1880 ; was General Freight Agent, Auditor and Treasurer. John Schreiner is a native of Germany, born Jan. 27, 1835 ; he came to the United States, and direct to Grant Co., in 1853. He was married Oct. 25, 1855, in Lancaster, to Miss Sophia Nathan ; they have seven children living, four sons and three daughters Ellen K., Elizabeth Anna, Adolph J., Emma, Frank, Edmund A. and Herbert E.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

NATHAN, JACOB

JACOB NATHAN, Lancaster, a native of Prussia, born June 12, 1810, a son of Isaac and Susan (Leopold) Nathan. Was married July 25, 1835; he came to the United States in 1849, and settled in Lancaster, where he followed butchering and peddling his meats ; was also engaged in mining during the first four years. They have five children living Joseph, Sophia (now Mrs. John Schriener), Henrietta (widow of John Woolstenholme), Amelia (now Mrs. John G- Oswald), and Adolph. Mr. Nathan is a member of I. 0. 0. P.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

NATHAN, J.

NATHAN, SCHREINER & CO., dealers in general merchandise and live stock, Lancaster This house was established in 1860, by J. Nathan ; in 1862, the firm became J. Nathan & Son, and, in 1864, Nathan, Schreiner & Co. The same year dry goods, clothing, hats, caps, boots and shoes were added to the line of groceries. In 1865, J. Nathan retiring, he was succeeded by his son, Joseph Nathan. This house is the largest in the city, and does an annual trade of $75,000 ; they built their present store in 1867 ; employ a full force of eight men ; they also handle live stock, cattle, hogs and sheep ; ship to Chicago and Milwaukee, their receipts reaching $200,000 per annum.

NEBEL, PETER

PETER NEBEL, farmer, Sec. 18; P. O. Platteville; was born in 1826, at Wurtemberg, Germany; lived with his parents until 16 years of age, going to school the greater portion of the time; he then followed laboring for eleven years; came to the United States in 1853, locating in Allegheny Co., Penn., for nine months, arriving in Stephenson Co., Ill., in 1854, where he followed renting and tilling the soil for twelve years, when he returned to Allegheny Co., Penn., and remained there for two years; then moved to Wisconsin, locating in La Fayette Co., near the Platte Mound, for four years; then to Ellenboro, Grant Co., where he has lived for nine years. Was married, in 1854, to Friederika Bare, a daughter of Godlip and Mary Bare; had three children, since deceased, Lewis F., John G., both living with their parents. Is a member of the Evangelical Methodist Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Ellenboro Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

NEELY, ROBERT

ROBERT NEELY, Platteville; was born July 11, 1815, in Westmoreland Co., Penn.; in 1821, his parents, David and Jane (Fether) Neely, removed and settled in Mercer Co., Penn.; grown to manhood here, Robert went to Ohio and resided there between three and four years; he then taught a term of school near his old home and decided to come to the lead regions; in May, 1839, he reached Burlington, Iowa; and soon after made a claim forty miles to the west of that town. Owing to the fact that the land came into market almost immediately after, he was compelled to relinquish his claim and come to Wisconsin. His friend, Horace Earle, had accompanied him from the East, and the two came to Platteville together. They soon secured a wood-cutting contract on what is now Mr. Neely's farm, it then being a smelting survey reserved by the government. They boarded in a cabin with several other bachelors, said hut then standing a short distance from where Mr. N. has since built his barn. Finally, Mr. Neely made a "claim" here, erected a better habitation and caused the coming of his aged parents, though he then looked upon this as only a temporary stopping-place. Yet as he plowed and sowed, built and planted, his affections centered around the lowly house where his parents were so contentedly dwelling. He married Miss Helen M., daughter of B. F. and Mary F. (Robinson) Chase; she is a descendant on her mother's side of one of Vermont's first Governors, and was born in Middleport, N. J. B. F. Chase afterward removed his family to Ohio, where she engaged in teaching prior to her marriage. Since that event, which occurred in August, 1849, in Salem, Penn., Mr. and Mrs. Neely have resided on this picturesque farm, Mr. N. having purchased it at the U. S. land sale held in 1848 at Mineral Point. His father, who had in his younger days served with Mad Anthony Wayne, died here in his 85th year. The aged mother also passed her last days here. Mr. and Mrs. Neely are members of the Platteville Congregational Church, of which he has been a Deacon for the past twenty years. They have seven children -- Henry, Mary F., Kate M., Helen S., Fannie L., Robert S. and Benjamin P. All were born and educated in Platteville.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

NEWMAN, CHARLES F.

CHARLES F. NEWMAN, farmer, Sec. 1; P. O. Lancaster; owns 80 acres of land; born in Auburn, N. Y., in 1849; son of Richard L. and Rachel (Haskell) Newman; came to Grant Co. twenty-four years ago; has owned and run two threshers. Was married Feb. 22, 1880, by Andrew Walker, to Adaline, daughter of Widow Keen; she was born Feb. 1, 1844, and has five children by her first husband, Horace Albee, of Great Bend, Penn., who died in 1878 -- Roby, Nellie, John A., Laura and Amy. Mr. Newman was Constable two years.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Waterloo Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

NEWMAN, NELSON

NELSON NEWMAN, Sec. 1; P.O. Washburn; miller; was born in Madison Co., Ill., March 15, 1830; left there with his parents in 1837, and came in Lima, Wis., where they built the first grist-mill in the town in 1840, and built the second mill in the village of Washburn in 1846; run this til spring on 1868, when he removed to the site he is now on and built the mill which is now run by the firm of Newman & Wagner. Nelson was married to Louisa Melvin, Dec. 23, 1858; she was born in town of Smelser, Wis., November, 1841. They have six children living--Alice, Jessie, Jefferson, Inez, Frank r., Louisa G. and one deceased, Wilber, who died in 1864 and was buried in Washburn Cemetery Mr. Newman has been on School Board fifteen years, and on Town Board one year; is also a Mason, of Melody Lodge, Platteville, and is a member of I.O.O.F., Washburn Lodge, No. 128. He is now extensively engaged in raising stock.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

NEWTON, E. F.

E. F. NEWTON, superintendent of Laflin & Rand's Powder Works, Platteville; is a son of Edward and Mary Newton, who came in an early day to Dubuque, Iowa, from Maryland. E. F. Newton was born in Dubuque June 11, 1840. Two years later his father died, and the wife followed him when E. F. was about 15 years of age. Thus thrown upon his own resources, he returned to Maryland, and clerked in a Baltimore hardware store until he was 21; in 1862, he entered the employ of the powder manufacturing company, and served both as clerk and traveling salesman for nine years. He was appointed to his present position in 1871. Married Miss Susan Shafer, of Illinois, by whom he has a son -- Charles Newton, born in Platteville.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

NICHOLS, JAMES

JAMES NICHOLS, was born June 2, 1815, in Reen, Paranzatatoe, Cornwall, Eng.; he learned the trade of wagon-maker in his youth; in 1842, he counted as one of the "Stephens colony" that emigrated from Merry England and located in Platteville; Mr. Nichols' first work here was building the law office of Eastman & Lakin during 1842; he also worked on the old M. E. parsonage and the Rountree bridge, across the Platte, besides the Campbell Hotel and the M. E. Church; for about four years he had a shop and made wagons here; in 1844, he married Mary A. Stephens, a first cousin; she died in October, 1853, leaving two children -- John A., who died when he was about 23 years years of age, and A. J., who died Dec. 29 1859; Mr. Nichols left for California in April, 1852, and was four months crossing the plains with an ox team; he employed himself at gold mining and in working at his trade until May, 1854, when he again arrived in Platteville; his two motherless boys were with their grandparents. Feb. 5, 1855, he married Mary J. Rundell, who was born in Little Pethick, Cornwall, Nov. 14, 1831; she came to America in 1853; after the marriage, Mr. N. spent about ten years on a farm in Platteville, and two years on a farm in Mifflin, Iowa Co.; in 1867, he came to the then village of Platteville and bought a lot of Maj. J. H. Rountree, building and planning his own house, which makes a most pleasant home for his wife and himself. Both are members of the P. M. Church. He still enjoys an occasional day's work with his tools and is the picture of the healthy and stalwart sons of old England; his parents, James and Jane (Stephens) Nichols, came to Platteville from England in 1848, and both died here.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

NORTHEY; WILLIAM

WILLIAM NORTHEY; P. O. Muscoda; farmer of 360 acres in Sec. 14; he was born in Cornwall, England, Feb. 19, 1836; he is a son of Robert and Martha Edwards, both natives of Cornwall; he came to America with his parents in 1840; they located at Greenville, Mercer Co., Penn., where his father engaged in farming and copper mining. They remained there until 1854, when they came to this State. William, preceding them two years, had entered some land in the town of Millville, upon which they located. His father died in 1856, and his mother in 1859. William engaged in the butchering business at Platteville until 1859, when he went to Lancaster and kept the old United States Hotel; also carried on the butcher and provision business there until 1863, when he went to Woodman in the employ of the old Milwaukee & Mississippi Railroad; he remained there one year and went to Boscobel, where he was employed by the Milwaukee & Prairie du Chien Railroad as telegraph operator; was also express agent; remained there until 1869, when he came to Blue River, where he was station agent and operator until Dec. 7, 1879, when he resigned and took charge of the farm where he now lives. He was married Feb. 2, 1851, to Miss Martha J. Simpkins, a native of Pennsylvania, by whom he has six children; she died May 20, 1868. On Oct. 6, 1869, he married Miss Cornelia Simpkins, by whom he has six children, in all eight boys and four girls; one son and one daughter are married. His oldest son, Louis Henry, is in the employ of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad, as clerk and operator at Minneapolis. Thomas C. is in Nebraska, engaged in farming. While living in Waterstown, was twice Chairman of the Town Board.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

NORTHRUP, W. S.

W. S. NORTHRUP, banker and member of the firm of Northrup & Co., Platteville; was born in Rutland Co., Vt., in 1850; came to Platteville in 1874, and, from that time until 1878, was in the bank of S. Hodges & Co.; he was then in business for himself in Belmont about one and a half years, and formed the present partnership in April, 1880. He was married, Oct. 10, 1878, to Mary G., daughter of Dr. G. W. Eastman, of Platteville. Mr. Northrup is the present City Treasurer.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

NYE, CHARLES H.

CHARLES H. NYE, Director of the Model School of the State Normal School, of Platteville, was born in 1835, in Somerset Co., Me.; was educated at the Waterville Classical Institute, and commenced teaching in his native State in 1855; came from there to Grant Co., Wis., in the fall of 1857; he first settled in Hazel Green and taught school there about six years; in August, 1864, he enlisted in the 43d W. V. I., and went out as Quartermaster Sergeant, and was in the service till the close of the war. There were nine boys in his father's family and seven of them were in the army at the same time, four from Maine and three from Wisconsin; two of them never came back. Newell D. Nye was in a Maine regiment, and was killed at the battle of Port Hudson, and George W. Nye, also in a Maine regiment, was killed at the battle of Chantilly, Va. In the fall of 1865, Mr. Nye came to Platteville, and was Principal of the "Rock Graded School" from that time until 1873, when he accepted the position of Principal of the Grammar Department of the State Normal School, and, in the fall of 1873, was transferred to his present position. He was married, in Platteville, in 1860, to Miss Flora A. Tyler, and has five children, three sons and two daughters.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

NYE, J. L.

J. L. NYE, photographic artist, Platteville; is a native of Maine, born in Fairfield, Somerset Co., in 1842; he enlisted, Aug. 5, 1861, in the 7th Me. V. I., Co. E, and served as a private two years in that regiment, when he was given a Second Lieutenant's commission in Co. E, 9th U. S. Vols., and served one year in that capacity; he was in ten engagements while in the 7th Me. Regiment, and was at the siege of Port Hudson with the 9th. After he left the army he returned to Maine, and from there came to Platteville, in November, 1865, where he has been engaged in his present business ever since. He married Miss Kate Tyler, of Platteville, in 1867, and has two children -- George N. and Mabel.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

O'CONNOR, PATRICK

PATRICK O'CONNOR, farmer, Sec. 7; P. O. Bloomington; was born in 1829 in Sligo Co., Ireland; is a son of John and Catherine O'Connor, with whom he lived until he was 21 years of age, when he emigrated to England, where he resided for ten years, when he went to Scotland, where he lived for one year, then to England for a short period, then emigrated to America in 1863; he located in Ohio for one year, thence to New York, but soon wended his way to Boston, Mass., where he lived for two years, where he was also married, in 1865, to Catherine Nangle, a daughter of Thomas Nangle; then he removed to Grant Co.; in 1866, settled in Patch Grove for a short period, then to Little Grant, where he has since lived. Has eight children, all of whom are living -- Mary, Catherine, John, Elizabeth, Mathethis, Thomas, Annie, Peter. He has 194 acres of land. Politics, Greenbacker, and is a member of the Catholic Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Little Grant Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

O'NEILL

FAHERTY & O'NEILL, dealers in general merchandise, Hazel Green; business was established in 1854. The senior member of the firm, Mr. John Faherty, was born in Baltimore in 1803; came to Wisconsin in 1845, and settled in this town. Married Catherine Delton, a native of Kentucky; have two children -- Thomas and Lizzie. In 1866, Edward O'Neill became a member of the firm; he was born in Illinois in 1840. He married Elizabeth Faherty in 1866; she was born in Illinois; have two children -- Charles and Estella. In 1862, Mr. O'Neill enlisted in Co. B, 90th Ill. V. I., and served three years.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

O'SHAUGHNESSY, THOMAS

THOMAS O'SHAUGHNESSY, farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. Mt. Hope; born in 1837 in Adair Co., Ireland; son of Patrick and Margaret O'Shaughnessy; his father died when Thomas was six months old; his mother died but six months later; he then lived with his grandparents and uncle until 18 years of age, when he came to America, locating at Fair Haven, Vt.; from there he removed to Mt. Hope, Grant Co., where he has lived since. He was married in 1856 to Bridget Morrison, daughter of John and Honora Morrison; they have eight children -- Mary, Patrick, Joseph, John, Thomas, James, Bridget and Michael. He has 143 acres of land. Has been Road Overseer one term. Politics, Democratic; is a member of the Catholic Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Mount Hope Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

OAKS, ALONZO

ALONZO OAKS, wagon-maker, Burton; was born at Rockdale, Dubuque Co., Iowa, July 24, 1849; son of William and Mary (Head) Oaks; came to this county and started a wagon-shop in 1879. He was married Sept. 3, 1876, by Hiram Gilmore, to Jane K., daughter of Joseph K. and Isabel (Clark) Quick; they have had three children -- Harvey Ray, born Aug. 23, 1877, died Sept. 8, 1877; Bertha, born Dec. 5, 1878; Amos Jerome, born Dec. 21, 1880. Mr. Oaks has been Town Clerk four years.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Waterloo Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

OATES, EDWIN

EDWIN OATES, farmer, Sec. 25; P. O. Lancaster; is a native of England; was born there in 1841; is a son of James and Sarah Oates, with whom he resided until 21 years of age, and followed farming. He enlisted in 1862 in the 33d W. V. I.,Co. G; served three years; was in nineteen battles; wounded in camp with a bayonet by scuffling, for which he draws a pension. Was married, in 1866, to Mary A. Edwards, daughter of Joseph and Jane Edwards; has six children -- James, Elsie C., Nelson L., Joseph W., Ernest E. and John H. Has 263 acres of land, valued at $4,000. Has been Road Overseer three terms; School Clerk, three terms; Director, five terms; Assessor, five terms; member of the Board, one term. Politics, Republican.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Little Grant Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

OATES, THORNTON

THORNTON OATES, farmer, Sec. 36; P. O. Lancaster; was born in 1848 in Hazel Green, Grant Co., Wis.; was a son of James and Sarah Oates; lived with his parents until 21 years of age. He was married, in 1873, to Elizabeth J. Edwards, daughter of Joseph and Jane Edwards; he has three children living. Has 160 acres of land, valued at $2,000; has been Road Overseer. Politics, Greenbacker, and is a member of the M. E. Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Little Grant Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

OETTIKER, JAMES

JAMES OETTIKER, physician and surgeon, Georgetown; was born in La Fayette Co., Wis., in 1853; was married in 1878 to Jennie Stewart; they have one child -- Lenice E. Mr. O. is a graduate of the Platteville Normal School, also of the Medical University, Philadelphia, Penn.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Smelser Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ORTON, THOMAS

THOMAS ORTON, Lancaster, grain buyer, in the employ of F. W. Strong, has been with this firm since March, 1879. He is a native of London, England, born July 20, 1854 ; came to America with his parents in February, 1863, and settled in Lancaster; his father was a publisher and bookbinder, and died two weeks after his arrival ; his mother died April 17, 1880. Dec. 9, 1878, he was married to Miss Lizzie Adams, of British Hollow.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

OSBORNE, FRED S.

OSBORNE, Fred S., banker, and broker; born, Bloomington, Wis., (Grant Co) May 13, 1867; son of Aaron S. and Virtue E. (Sealy) Osborne; educated in public schools of Bloomington. Began active career,1884, in Detroit office of George K. Sistares & Sons, bankers and brothers, New York, and lager became manager of the office junior partner Cameron, Currie & Co., bankers, 1892-02; has been in business on his own account as Fred S. Osborne & Col, since 1904. Secretary treasurer Esperanza Cobalt Mines Co. Member Chicago Board of Trade, Chicago Mining Stock Exchange, Detroit Board of Commerce. Republican. Member Masonic order (32), Shrine. Clubs: Detroit, Fellowcraft. Office: Penobscot Bldg. Residence: 709 Brush St.

Source: "The Book of Detroiters". Edited by Albert Nelson Marquis, 1908 - Submitted by Christine Walters