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PALMER, ALFRED

ALFRED PALMER, farmer and trout culturist, Sec. 2; P. O. Boscobel; born in Christian County, Ky. When a boy, he came with his parents to Illinois. In 1837, he came to Dubuque, Iowa; in 1839, he came to Grant County and has been a resident of this and Iowa County since. He has been engaged in the merchandising business in Grant and Iowa Counties about thirty years. In 1870, he closed out his business and removed to his present farm; he owns in all about 400 acres; his principal occupation being breeding fish. For the past seventeen years he has been experimenting in trout culture; his is the oldest private fishery in the world; his ponds cover, in the aggregate, about one acre, consisting of nine ponds. He is one of five who were elected members of the County Board during that organization, and has held other minor offices.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Marion) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

PALMER, P. C.

P. C. PALMER, farmer, Sec. 36; P. O. Patch Grove; owns 47 acres of land, valued at $30 per acre. Born in Columbia Co., N. Y., in 1816; came to Wisconsin in 1847, and located on his farm. Married Angeline Brodt, a native of New York, born in 1820; they have four children -- Joseph, Henry, Mary J. and Emmet. Mr. Palmer has been Chairman two years, and a member of the Board for fifteen years, and Justice of the Peace twelve years.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Wyalusing Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

PARKER, D. A.

D. A. PARKER, farmer, Sec. 2; P. O. Mt. Hope; born in 1832 in Shenango Co., N. Y.; was a son of Amasa and Livonia Parker; when 2 years of age, he emigrated to Warren Co., Penn.; lived there twenty years; he then came to Grant Co., Wis.; in 1855, located in Little Grant, where he has lived since, with the exception of one year, which he spent in Nebraska, and two years in Missouri. Married, in 1856, Mary Underwood, a daughter of Willis Underwood; had three children, two living -- Sophronia E., Emma E. Married the second time Elizabeth Tyler, a daughter of Lewis Tyler. He enlisted in 1862 in the 20th W. V. I., Co. I; served three years; was in seven battles; has been Constable two terms; has 40 acres of land, valued at $1,000. Is a member of the Untied Brethren Church. Politics, Republican.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Little Grant Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

PARKER, DWIGHT T.

DWIGHT T. PARKER, deceased; he was born in Malone, N. Y., Dec. 1, 1821; in about 1843, came to Lancaster, Wis.; followed mining and taught school a short time; he then, in company with Mr. Kendall, opened a store, which they carried on several years; in 1857, he removed to Boscobel opened a general store, which is now operated under the firm name of Parker, Hildebrand & Co., and is probably the largest in the county; he died in 1871, aged 49 years; he organized and was President of the First National Bank; he was always successful in all his business engagements, and at his death left property valued at over $200,000, all of this he acquired since coming to this county; he married Miss Mary E. Schrader, December, 1848; she was born in Vandalia, Ill.; have four children three sons and one daughter.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

PARKER, GEORGE W.

GEORGE W. PARKER, firm of Parker, Hildebrand & Co., general merchandise, Boscobel; born in Franklin County, Vt.; came to Lancaster, Wis., in 1856; was employed as clerk in his brother's store, Dwight T. Parker, who had established business there in about 1843; removed his store to Boscobel, in 1857; in 1860, they opened a branch store at Wauzeka, continued it about five years, when they closed out this business; he then bought an interest in the business at Boscobel, since then has been connected with this firm; they are probably doing the largest business of any in the county; their sales amount to about $120,000 per year; has been Chairman of the Town, and Mayor; married in 1872 to Miss Ida Cannon; she was born in Logansport, Ind.; they have one daughter.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

PARKER, ORINGTON

ORINGTON PARKER, Sec. 19; P. O. Patch Grove; owns 200 acres land, valued at $12 per acre; born in New Hampshire in 1848; came to Wisconsin in 1855; settled on this farm in 1877. Married Laura Davis, a native of this county; they have two children -- Hettie May and Carrie.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

PARNELL, J. H.

J. H. PARNELL, Platteville; is a son of William Parnell, of England, who emigrated in 1842, locating in Galena, Ill., where J. H. Parnell was born in 1844; three years later the family came to Grant Co., where the mother died and the father still resides. His son, our subject, married Miss Mary J., daughter of Thomas Chapman, Esq., of Platteville; they have three children -- Jesse Lee, Lillie May and Carrie Edwards, all born in Platteville. From 1862 until 1874, Mr. Parnell was in the mercantile business here; he then began his present business of receiving, feeding and weighing live stock for farmers, drovers, and all who wish such accommodation; he has convenient buildings, yards, etc., and has established a good trade; it was first begun by Chapman & Kirkpatrick. Mr. Parnell is a member of the Platteville Hook and Ladder Co., and of the A. O. U. W.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

PARSONS, P. H.

P. H. PARSONS, Town Collector, is a native of Plattsburg, Clinton Co., N. Y. ; grew up and received his education in that State. In 1852, went to California, and was engaged in mining,, mercantile business and teaching, until 1866, when he came to Grant Co. He had held the office of Deputy County Clerk for some years, also Justice of the Peace, and, for the past two years has held the office of Town Collector. In 1844, Mr. Parsons was united in marriage to Miss Delia J. Phelps, a native of Vermont. They have one son, Fred B., living in Denver, Colo.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

PASCOE, WILLIAM H.

WILLIAM H. PASCOE, dealer in general merchandise, Cuba City; born in this county in 1850; settled in Cuba City in 1876. Married Emily Vincent in 1878; she was born in Galena, Ill.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Smelser Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

PATCH, ELIJAH Jr.,

ELIJAH PATCH, Jr., Sec. 22; P. O. Patch Grove. Owns 260 acres of land, valued at $30 per acre; born in Danbury, Conn., in 1830; came to Wisconsin in 1849; settled on his present farm in 1869. Married Nancy Key, a native of Illinois; they have one child -- Abram. Mr. Patch is Treasurer of this town.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

PATCH, HENRY L.

HENRY L. PATCH, carpenter, Patch Grove; born at St. Anthony Falls, Minn., June 28, 1850, resided there until 1866, he then came to Patch Grove, Wis. Made a trip to Dakota in 1863, with Gen. Sibley, and was at Port Abercombie in 1864; there until 1865; went to Lake Superior in 1872, remained there about one year, then returned to Wisconsin. His wife, Julia C. Lambert, was born in Wisconsin, at Patch Grove, June 27, 1854; they married June 28, 1874; they have had four children -- Harriette C., Marion O. (deceased), Edward (deceased) and an infant son. In politics, Democrat; in religion, liberal believer. Member of I. O. O. F. Lodge and Encampment.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

PATCH, REED

REED PATCH, farmer, Sec. 5; P. O. Patch Grove; was born at Columbus, Ohio, Dec. 28, 1834; came to Wisconsin in 1836 with his parents, who are now deceased, and they were among the earliest of settlers in the valley; the town and village take the name from the father, Henry Patch, who died in 1867. Mr. P. now owns 200 acres of land, and has made the improvements, and what he has, was made by his own industry; has a fine, well-stocked place. His wife, Harriette M. Patch, a daughter of Elijah and Laura Patch, were native of Connecticut. Her mother died in the year 1860; her father now resides in Kansas. Mrs. Reed Patch was born in Connecticut Sept. 18, 1835; came to Wisconsin in the year 1849; they were married March 22, 1854. They have had seven children -- Thomas, born in 1855, died at the age of six months; William, born Feb. 11, 1856, died June, 1857; Emma, born Dec. 19, 1857, died April 10, 1868; Nellie, born April 17, 1860; Laura, born Sept. 1, 1864; Cora, born April 13, 1866; Clarence, born Nov. 29, 1867. Has been Director of Schools, Constable, Chairman of the Town Board; a member of the Good Templars.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

PATERSON, HUGH

HUGH B. PATERSON, one of the pioneers of Grant county, was born in the State of New York, at Whitehall, April 8. 1787, a son of George Paterson. In 1811 our subject was united in marriage to Miss Charlotte Gilmore, a native of Vermont, where she was born Nov. 14, 1790, and after marriage the young couple settled down to domestic life in Chautauqua county, N.Y., where they lived until 1836, at which time they migrated to Jamestown, Grant Co., Wis. Here Mr. Paterson undertook the clearing of a large tract of wild land, and upon it he passed his life until within two years of his demise, when he retired from the farm and removed to the village of Jamestown, where he died in August, 1874.

The first wife of our subject died Nov. 1, 1847, and his second marriage was to Mrs. Catherine Davis, whose death occurred several years prior to that of her husband. By the first marriage he became the father of eight children, only two of whom are living: Jane, Mrs. Sheffield; and George, who is a resident of Albany, Oregon. The deceased were: David B., Mrs. Betsey Ann Bowmer, Mrs. Charlotte Benton, Mrs. Martha Jones. Mrs. Lucy Justis, and Norman, the youngest of the family.

During his long and worthy life our subject was a prominent citizen, for several years was chairman of the board of supervisors, and also for a long term of years was a justice of the peace. In early life he was a Whig, and later became a stanch Republican.

Source: Commemorative Biographical Record of the Counties of Rock, Green, Grant, Iowa, and Lafayette, Wisconsin, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, and of Many of the Early Settled Families; J. H. Beers & Co., Chicago (1901). Transcribed by MCK.

PATTERSON, D. B.

D. B. PATTERSON, retired farmer, Georgetown; born in Chautauqua Co., N. Y., in 1812; came to this county in 1836, and settled in Jamestown in 1840; he removed to this town, where he has since resided. Mr. Patterson has been twice married; first to Cornelia M. Sheffield in 1837; she was born in Ohio in 1815, and died in 1862; she had nine children -- Alvin, Francis M., Ida, Ira, Eugenie, Edward, Hellen, William and Annie. In 1869, he married Mary Fust, a native of Cornwall, England; born in 1832; they have two children -- George and Frederick; are members of the Christian Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Smelser Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

PATTERSON, E. R.

E. R. PATTERSON, dealer in general merchandise, Fairview; born in this town in 1851; engaged in present business in 1877. Married Alice Straw, a native of this county; they have one child -- Laura May. Are members of M. E. Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

PATTERSON, P. P.

P. P. PATTERSON, Sec. 14; P. O. Hazel Green; owns 160 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre; born in St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., in 1812; came to Wisconsin in 1834, and settled near Dodgeville; removed to this county in 1835, and, in 1837, entered his present farm. Married Elizabeth Dobson, a native of England; they have four children -- Enoch R., Charles P., P. P., Cyrus W. Mr. Patterson has been Assessor one term.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

PATTERSON, WILLIAM

WILLIAM PATTERSON, farmer, Sec. 14; P.O. Bloomington; born in 1852, in New York; was a son of Edward and Margaret Patterson; at the early age of 6 months he emigrated with his parents to Shullsburg, La Fayette Co., Wis., where they resided two years, thence to Beetown, where he now lives; stayed with his parents until 23 years of age. Married in 1876, to Ellen Power, a daughter of Patrick and Catharine Power. Is an energetic farmer, and a member of the Catholic Church. Politics, Greenbacker. Has 180 acres of land, valued at $5,000.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

PAUL, ALEX

ALEX PAUL, Postmaster, dealer in dry goods, bats, caps, boots, shoes, clothing and groceries, Patch Grove; was born at Aberdeen, Scotland, Dec. 18, 1819; came to America in the year 1838; settled in Chicago, Ill., where he worked by the day for George Smith until the year 1840, when he went to Galena and worked in the mines; he then went to Ft. Atkinson, Iowa, on the Government works. In the year 1843, he came to Patch Grove, bought 80 acres of land, on which he made the improvements; sold out, moved into the village. His wife, Rebecca Warner, born in Grant Co., Wis., town of Millville, in 1838; married 1858; they have had five children -- Alex, born May 28, 1859; Edward, born May 8, 1861; Jared W., born June 25, 1863; Leroy, born June 15, 1870; Willie, born Nov. 2, 1874, died Aug. 22, 1875. In politics, Republican; in religion, liberal believer. Has held the office of Town Treasurer, also School Clerk; has been Postmaster for twenty years. Returned to Scotland in company with his brother in the year 1875, to visit the parents.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

PAUL, JAMES

JAMES PAUL, Sec 2; P. O. Patch Grove; owns 160 acres land, valued at $56 per acre; born in Scotland in 1823; came to America in 1840 and located in Chicago; two years later, he removed to his present farm. Married Angeline Adams, a native of New York; they have two children -- James and Angeline.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

PEAKE, E. D.

E. D. PEAKE, teacher; Jamestown; was born in Hamden, Delaware Co., N. Y., July 27, 1836, and engaged during the earlier years of his life, up to 1862, in farming, lumbering and school-teaching; circumstances prevented his enlisting at the outbreak of the rebellion, but he soon afterward followed the strong inclination of his mind and entered the Quartermaster's Department, going to Florida as a lumberman, where he remained from August, 1864, to June, 1865; he was at Jacksonville, when many Union soldiers entered that prison-pen, and the Abolition sentiments entertained by him were heightened by the brutality shown at that place; soon after returning North from Florida, Mr. Peake taught school in Anawan, Ill., and in the summer of 1866, came to Jamestown, where he has since resided; has held the office of Justice of the Peace, but is no office-seeker. Was married, June 1, 1871, to Miss Martha E. Judd, of Stafford, Genesee Co., N. Y.; they have no children; is Republican in politics.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Jamestown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

PEEBLES, JOSEPH E.

DR. JOSEPH E. PEEBLES, surgeon and mechanical dentist, Muscoda, was born in Cortland Co., N. Y., in 1846. Graduated at New York College of Dental Surgery, in 1873, and established practice at Marathon, Cortland Co., N. Y., where he remained until he came to this State, in 1875, and located at Spring Green, remaining there until he came to Muscoda. He is a practical engineer, also pattern maker, in fact, a natural-born mechanic. He did the fancy woodwork for the bank in the Smalley House, also made the patterns for the lathes for the new building of the Elgin Watch Factory. Enlisted Sept. 14, 1864, in Co. G 185th N. Y. I., joined the Army of the Potomac and was first engaged in the battle at Hather's Run, and was wounded in the arm; the ball still remains in his arm. Participated with the regiment in nine engagements, and mustered out with them at Syracuse, N. Y., at the close of the war. He is a son of Joseph C. and Diana Campbell Peebles; his father was a native of Vermont, and mother of New York. He was married April 15, 1866, to Elizabeth T. Gray, of Cortland Co., N. Y., by whom he has two sons.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

PENN, JACOB B.

JACOB B. PENN, retired, Platteville, Wis.; born in Patrick Co., Va., in 1818; when only 3 or 4 years of age his father, Abraham Penn, removed to Christian Co., Ky., where young Penn was brought up; in the spring of 1839 he left Kentucky, and spent the summer in Illinois and Missouri, then came to the mines in Grant Co., Wis., the next fall, and to Platteville in the fall of 1840; he was engaged in mining in Grant Co. till 1850, then went to California and followed the same business till 1852, when he returned to Grant Co., and bought a farm two and one-half miles east of Platteville; he followed farming till 1866, then sold out and engaged in the hardware business in Platteville, in company with L. M. Devendorf, firm of Devendorf & Penn, which he continued till April, 1877, since which time he has been out of business; he was married in Platteville in 1849, to Samantha Collins, of Jamestown, Grant Co.; his first wife was a lady of the same name, married in Missouri in 1846; has no children living.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

PEPPER, JOHN

JOHN PEPPER, live stock, Boscobel; born in Mineral Point; when about 2 years old came with his parents to Lancaster. His father soon after was elected Sheriff, and held this office two terms. He also opened a hotel and ran it till his death, which occurred in 1842. At the age of 15 he was employed as clerk for D. T. Parker; held this position five years. In 1854 he went to California; remained a few months, returned to Lancaster and started business with Col. John B. Callis; carried this on about two years. Mr. Parker then opened a store at Boscobel, and retained the services of Mr. Pepper to close out his business in Lancaster. He came to Boscobel in 1859, and bought the Barnett House; ran it about six months. Soon after he and Mr. Hildebrand bought two-thirds interest in this store. The firm became Parker, Hildebrand & Pepper; continued until 1865. He then engaged in live stock and grain a short time; Jan. 1, 1869, was employed at book-keeping for Parker, Hildebrand & Co.; held this position till 1873. He then resumed the grain and live-stock trade, which he continued till April 1, 1879, when he sold out his warehouse to Parker, Hildebrand & Co. Since then he has been engaged in the live stock business.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

PERCIVAL, JAMES GATES

SOME OF GRANT COUNTY'S ILLUSTRIOUS DEAD.

This celebrated poet, whose works have given pleasure to so many of his fellow-creatures was born in Kensington Parish, in the town of Berlin, Conn., as he quaintly gives it, " Tuesday forenoon, September 15, 1795." The poet traced his descent, on his father's side, " to James Percival, who, about 1706, moved from Barnstable, Massachusetts Colony, to East Haddam Conn. He married the daughter of the celebrated Laydan Pastor, John Robinson. In England the family may be directly traced to the Barons of the time of William the Conqueror."

James Percival's boyhood was passed in this quiet eddy out of the busy current of worldly life, where he early became noted for his precociousness as well as for his quiet demeanor, which drew him entirely away from the usual boyish sports. "At this time, he lived," said an intimate friend, " in in a world of his ownan ideal world. He knew and cared very little respecting the real world of mankind. His cast of mind was highly imaginative."

In January, 1807, James suffered a severe loss in the death of his father, and shortly afterward, James and another brother were placed under the charge of their uncle. Rev. Seth Hart, who kept a private boarding school at Hempstead, L. I. Here he remained a year, when he was placed under the tuition of the Rev. Israel B. Woodward, of Wolcott, a town adjacent to Kensington ; from here he again returned to Hempstead, and it was during this second stay that he gave vent to his feelings in poetry. After having spent the usual three years in preparing for college, in the early autumn of 1810, he entered as a member of the Freshman Class at Yale. Upon graduating, young Percival returned to Kensington, and, after some deliberation, determined to commence the study of medicine, being drawn thereto both by the example of his father and, in a secondary way, by an interest in botany. He wavered between this and the law for several years, finally returning to his first choice, and completed his studies with Dr. Ives, at New Haven. "He had already acquired a wide reputation as a prodigy of learning, and for his facility in acquiring knowledge. When it was known that he had applied for a medical degree, there was considerable excitement about his examination. No one of the Medical Board dared to ask him questions out of his own province ; and they examined him for several hours, trying, if possible, to exhaust his knowledge. But he came out triumphantly from the ordeal ; and it was said at the time that no student had ever been proved with such severe tests, and none had ever passed so brilliant an examination."

After taking his degree, Percival was engaged for a time as private tutor, and as a lecturer, in the Medical College, on Anatomy. About this time he became, also, interested in the study of language, and afterward spent some time with the Indians. He then commenced the practice of his profession at Kensington, but the prevalence of an alarming and malignant fever soon after his arrival, the mortality occurring so preyed upon him that he then and there gave up his practice.

In 1821, Percival launched his craft upon the uneasy and uncertain sea of letters. In this year, he published a " small, dingy-looking --?? of 346 pages, containing the first part of his Prometheus ; " and a number of other forms. Its reception was most flattering. The title-page bore the following extract from Southey : " Go, little book ; from this, my solitude, I cast thee upon the watersgo thy ways ; And if, as I believe, thy vein be good, The world may find thee after certain days."

Percival's name had already preceded him, and, in a quiet way, the whole edition was sold in a little over a year from the date of publication. A little later, while engaged as Curator of the Botanical Garden just formed by Dr. Ives, he was seized with the typhoid fever, and, upon his recovery, he accepted an invitation to accompany a botanical lecturer named Whitlow, to Charleston, S. C. Here he soon separated from his companion and remained in the city until March, 1822, when he returned to New York. During this time he published the first number of his " Clio," which was issued by the Babcocks in January, 1822 ; besides this, he employed his pen in versification for the daily press. The new volume was well received and added much to the author's previous reputation.

Of Percival's manners and presence at this time, the following account is given : " He is cold and diffident in his manners, yet steadfast in his feelings, frank and candid in the expression of his opinions, and particularly averse to display and floisy approbation. * * * His passion for study, and the reserve and timidity of manner which characterizes him in mixed company, may naturally lead common observers to suppose he has little aptitude for social intercourse, and little delight in it. But this opinion is incorrect. * * * His range of topics extends to every department in morals, science, politics, history, taste and literature. On points on which he differs from others, he can be approached without the danger of offending even his strong sensibility. Arguments he seems to hear and weigh with much consideration, but his own opinions he maintains with great firmness. He rarely ventures mere assertions, and few, perhaps, are more uniformly in the habit of maintaining their opinions by particular facts and strenuous and elaborate reasonings. One peculiarity may be observed in his manner of conversation, and that is, when he approaches a subject, he enters deeply into it, views it on every side, and pursues it till exhausted, if it be exhaustible."

In August, 1822, the second number of " Clio " was issued from the press of his friend Con-Terse, of New Haven. In November of the same year, the second part of Prometheus was published by A. H. Maltby, of New Haven. Speaking of this poem, the poet Whittier said, in 1830, in the New England Weekly Review : " God pity the man who does not love the poetry of Percival. He is a genius of nature's making. * * * gjg Prometheus is a noble poem. There is no affectedness about itall is grand and darkly majestic."

In February, 1823, Percival assumed the editorship of the Connecticut Herald, a weekly journal, which position he retained but for a short time. Through the earnest efforts of personal friends, Percival received the appointment early in 1824, of Post Surgeon at West Point, but, at his own request, was soon after transferred to Boston. His connection with the Government did not last long, and, until 1835, Percival was engaged in different literary undertakings. In May of the above year, Dr. Percival and Prof. Charles W. Sheppard were appointed by Gov. Edwards, of Connecticut, to make a geological survey of the State. It was during the progress of this survey, that the Doctor was mistaken by the keeper of a country inn for a vagrant, and accosted him sharply as such. "But as the Doctor was leaving his door, a distinguished citizen of a neighboring town drove up and grasped the Doctor's hand with all possible expressions of cordiality and respect. The astonished landlord seeing that he had made a ridiculous blunder, apologized and retired." This work occupied his attention until 1842, his report even in the abridged form in which it was finally published, far surpassing anything that had been attempted in other States.

The last volume of poems published by Percival was in 1843, when " The Dream of a Day " and other poems were issued. This was a --? of 270 pages ; this was his last poetical venture. His last published poem singularly enough was in German, and written for and published in the Wisconsin Staats Zeitung. It was entitled " Der Deutsche Patriot."

Dr. Percival's love of geology had begun as early as 1815, and never abated. The attention which his report on the geological formations of Connecticut attracted, drew the public eye in his erection, and established him as an authority on this subject. " In 1853, he was engaged by the Hon. F. C. Phelps, President of the American Mining Company, to demonstrate the truth of certain theories concerning the lead mines in Illinois and Wisconsin. He succeeded in establishing the very important fact that the mineral extended several hundred feet below the surface of the earth ; and it was thought that his investigations had added at least $1,000,000 to the value of that region. He also advised the use of machinery in the drainage of the mineral lands." in a letter written from Hazel Green in 1853, Dr. Percival gave the following example of the mining dialect of the time.

I was staked on a prospect, and, after prospecting several days, I struck a lead and raised a lot of bully mineral, but it was only a bunch in a chimney without any opening ; so I petered out and a sucker jumped me."

After these explorations had been completed, Dr. Percival returned to the East. During the year 1853, a law had been passed by the Legislature providing for a geological survey of the State. Under this law, Mr. Edward Daniels, then a young man, had been appointed as State Geologist. But those interested in the mining interests of the State, desired that the survey should be conducted by Percival, feeling that the work if carried out by him would result in a much greater benefit to the State. Mr. Daniels also acquiesced in this opinion, and accordingly Gov. Barstow was requested to give the appointment to Percival, which was done.

It is needless to say that the result justified the expectations. Among the miners, Percival was regarded as an authority whose opinions were not only not to be disputed, but were absolutely perfect and unassailable. His commission was received August 12, 1854, and Percival immediately commenced his work. In the introduction to his first report published in 1855, he says of this work: "I have visited during this season all the considerable diggings, from the south line of the State, to a line drawn from east to west north of Cassville, Beetown, Potosi, Platteville, Mineral Point, Yellow Stone and Exeter, and from the Mississippi to the east part of Green County, Some of the least important diggings, within these limits, may have escaped my notice, but I have endeavored to make such an examination of those I have visited, as my limited time would allow."

The report which follows was (??de a letter from Mr. Edward Hunter) written entirely without notes or memoranda, in a little room fitted up for the geologist at the capital, a striking illustration of the marvelous memory possessed by this wonderful man. The next season the Doctor continued his explorations, but, upon his return to his home at Hazel Green in December, he was attacked by an illness which brought his eventful life to a close on the morning of Friday, May 22, 1856.. He was buried according to his wish, at Hazel Green, the Rev. T. N. Benedict, of Galena, conducting the funeral services according to the form of the Episcopal worship.

Those who knew Percival during his residence in Wisconsin became warmly attached to him. Col. E. A. Calkins in an address delivered before the State Historical Society, thus speaks of his appearance at this time : " The most of us that knew Dr. Percival, did not know him till he came to the West. He was then far past his prime. He walked with his head bent, his eyes cast downward, and with slow and uncertain step. Those of our citizens who often saw him will not soon forget his aspect of poverty, almost of squalorhis tattered gray coat, his patched pants (the repairs the work of his own hand) and his weather-beaten, glazed cap with ear pieces of sheepskin, the wooly side in. The frontier inhabitants of the State knew him familiarly as old stone-breaker.' " Among those who knew him, however, and knowing could appreciate his great worth, Percival received every attention. Mr. Edward Hunter, Private Secretary to Gov. Barstow at that time, says : " I became comparatively intimate with him (Percival), and often when I was alone in the office he would enter in his quiet and subdued manner and stand by my desk by the hourI very seldom could induce him to sitand, from the rich stores of his mind, on whatever subject I could get him to speak, hold me a willing captive, perfectly enchanted, until some one would dissolve the spell by entering the room, when the Doctor would drop his head, become instantly silent, and glide away."

Dr. Percival's linguistic attainments were as remarkable as his other marvelous stores of knowledge. Besides reading and teaching most of the modern languages of Europe, he was a delver into Sclavonic lore, having an intimate acquaintance with no less than six of these tongues. In religious belief, the Doctor approached very near to the Unitarian standpoint.

His fondness for children is mentioned by Dr. Jenckes, with whom he resided at Hazel Green, in the following words

His affection for children, especially those he fancied, was frequently shown by his kind attention to their wants, and great solicitude for their welfare. Many a time he took them in his buggy(?) and would ride two or three miles for their diversion, evidently enjoying; himself as much as his little companions. His sincerity and child-like simplicity, caused their attachment to be mutual."

He died as he had lived, simple, unaffected and untouched by the busy, bustling cares of the great world to whose needs and artificial wants he had ever been a stranger. His loss was widely noticed by the press, and many societies of which he was a member, together with the Wisconsin State Historical Society, united in reverent testimonials to his worth. In person, Percival was somewhat below the medium height, and rather slight and frail. His countenance was indicative of his extreme sensitiveness and timidity ; pale and almost bloodless ; the eye blue, with an unusually large iris, which, when kindled with animation, shone with an entrancing brilliancy. The nose rather prominent and finely chiseled, though inclined slightly to Roman in outline ; while the forehead high, broad and swelling out grandly at the temples, marked the noble intellect there enthroned.

Although a linguist of the first rank as a botanist and geologist, standing foremost among those of his time, Percival's name will be borne down to future ages upon the car of the muses. As a poet Percival will always be best remembered.

Source: "History of Grant County Wisconsin", by the Western Historical Company - Sub. by a Friend of Free Genealogy

PERCIVAL, JAMES GATES

Wisconsin Remember With Pride the Poet New England Repudiated

James Gates Percival, First Heralded as 'Another Milton,' Then Starved on His Pedestal, Found Appreciation of His Ability When He Came West as State's Geologist

Without any guidance from the critics, Americans of three generations have admired James Gates Percival's poem on Seneca lake and have kept it in their volumes of favorite selections. The poem, consisting of six stanzas, begins as follows:

On thy fair bosom, silver lake,
The wild swan spreads his snowy sail
And 'round his breast the ripples break
As down he bears before the gale.

On thy fair bosom, waveless stream
The dipping paddle echoes far
And flashes in the moonlight gleam,
And bright reflects the polar star.

To people down east he was known as "Pericival the poet," and to the graduates and faculty of Yale he was more particularly known as "Our Percival" to distinguish him from poets that Harvard produced. But to the people of Wisconsin, his adopted state, he was known as Percival the geologist. He is buried at Hazel Green, in Grant county. On his granite monument, erected by subscription many years after his death, there is chiseled a four-line biography:

Eminent as a Poet
Rarely Accomplished as a Linguist
Learned and Acute in Science
A Man Without Guile

Not far from his grave is the old United States hotel at which U. S Grant used to put up when he came into Wisconsin to sell leather from his father's tannery down at Galena, Ill. Plainly in sight around that little graveyard are lead and zinc mines with their piles of gray ore and mine tailings. It is an appropriate setting, for Percival was Wisconsin's first state geologist.

In this one hundredth anniversary of Wisconsin's rise as a territory, we need to remember that the state's first scenes of rising wealth took place in the southwestern counties in connection with the mining industry. Lead and zinc, as easy of access as they are there, were bound to attract the first settlers and adventurers and warrant the investment of capital. Ammunition and protective paint are always in request. One of Wisconsin's first finished products was a bullet.

Percival's knowledge of geology was applied in most practical ways. He studied the miners' problems, told them things they never knew before, and saved them a great deal of trouble. Mining took a step forward with his arrival. Whatever they might have said about his poetry down east, first of unwarranted and undiscriminating praise, and then of unfair and cruel fault-finding, nothing derogatory to him would have had a long hearing in Wisconsin. They knew that in some sort he was a genius, an erratic and strangely learned man; but he was also a practical scientist wholly devoted to his line of employment in Wisconsin.

He died in 1856, on May 2, of a cold caught in returning to Hazel Green in bad weather from a trip he had made to Madison. He had gone up to Madison to confer with the governor and submit a report of progress made in his geological survey of Wisconsin. He was advised not to return in the bad spring weather, but he insisted on going because his horse at Hazel Green had taken sick and needed his personal care. Thus he lost his life out of a sense of duty toward the animal that had taken him on so many long trips about the state.

He was a bachelor who lived in one rented room of a small cottage Hazel Green. There at odd times he played his flute and studied and made out his reports. This frame dwelling is still standing. Percival lived in comparative poverty all his life and died in humble circumstances. Yet he had collected a library of 10,000 volumes, which he left behind when he came west and which were sold in Boston in 1860 for $20,000.

Of all American poets, Percival has been the most sarcastically played with and the most unceremoniously knocked about. It became the smart thing to take a whack at him. The high mark of satirical handling was reached by Lowell in his "My Study Windows." Lowell's studied art of satire, of killing ridicule, comes out fully in this critical essay. Lowell had at some time taken observation of a family wash hung out on a windy day. He noted the crazy garments, the billowing skirts, the long armed, feat performing shirts, the high kicking pantaloons, and he made a mental memorandum to be used in some clever criticism. It was Percival who got the brunt of it in the following passage:

With all the stock properties of verse whirling and dancing about his ears puffed out to an empty show of life, the reader of much of this blank verse feels as if a well draperied clothesline were rioting about him in all the unwilling ecstasy of a thunder gust.

That was in 1871, since which time Lowell's own reputation as a writer has sadly shrunk and fallen away.

In 1895, when Prof. Beers brought out a little volume entitled "The Ways of Yale," a contributor named Hudson undertook to kill off what was left of Percival after Lowell's attack. He harked back to the gilt edged gift books, the annuals of the eighteen-forties, such as The Gem, containing highflown contributions from all the solemn and silly poets of the day. And the conclusion was that Percival's work might best be described as "gemmy." The essay was entitled "Our Own Percival" and the point of it was that whereas Lowell, a Harvard man, had taken a fling at him, a Yale man would now do the same.

Of course all this attack was due to the fact that Percival had had considerable eminence in New England. The stodgy critics of the time took his long Miltonic poems quite seriously. They were bound to have a poet of some sort to vie with the great ones of England. As Poe has remarked, colonists have colonial minds. And just as we nowadays talk about the great American novel and keep a lookout for it, they were then looking for the great American poet. In Percival they thought they had found him. The critics, who would not have known a great poet if they had met him, set him on a pedestal, made him believe he was really great and left him there to write poetry and starve to death. They put him in a false position.
***
That he had a certain poetic ability there is no doubt. His "Seneca Lake" and "The Coral Grove" keep alive in their own right. What they may say about his other poetry need have no effect upon what we know about him in Wisconsin. He was several other things besides a poet and it will clarify the situation to take note of some of those abilities that are indicated on his gravestone.

As a mathematician: For some time he was a professor of mathematics at West Point. In view of the fact that he had the ability, his friends at Yale and in Connecticut generally thought that this would be a good position for him. But, of course, as long as he had in mind that he must be a great poet the work at West Point was obnoxious to him and he finally resigned.

As a linguist and philologist: In 1827 he was employed to assist Noah Webster in revising his dictionary. Percival had a knowledge of languages which fitted him, even better than Webster, to be a lexicographer. He did not get along at the work because he was too conscientious and particular about derivations and definitions. Webster, a practical Yankee, wanted to get out a dictionary that was commercially profitable, and this taking time to do things right did not suit him. So he and Percival parted company. Percival was proficient in 10 languages. Lowell, acknowledging the fact, pauses to throw discredit on the ability itself, saying "His faculty of acquiring foreign tongues we do not value as highly as Mr. Ward. We have known many otherwise inferior men who have possessed it. Indeed, the power to express the same nothing in 10 different languages is something to be dreaded instead of admired. It gives a horrible advantage to dulness." Lowell hardly knew where to stop when he was started on a work of clever detraction; and that is one reason his own work has suffered with the passage of time.

As a geologist: In 1835 he was employed to make a geological survey of Connecticut. Percival did this work with a thoroughness that had not been equaled anywhere. He laid the state out in parallel lines east and west, and crossed them with other lines an equal distance apart running north and south. He then started out on his travels and followed each of these lines on the map, east and west and north and south, until he had covered the whole state with the utmost care. Such a thorough geological survey had not been made of any state, and it was because of this fact that Wisconsin invited him to come west and do a like work. In this line he was truly great.

Percival loved Wisconsin. But that is saying only half of it. He loved Wisconsin as he hated New England, with a poet's deep feeling and fervor. Mistaken or not, he felt the injustice of being rated as a major poet and encouraged by all the solemn authorities while at the same time New Englanders did not support him and buy his work.

As we have said, he was called "Our Percival" at Yale in all pride and seriousness. They were fond of his stooping figure wrapped in his "old blue cloak." Then later he was called "Our Own Percival" in critical mockery and gay detraction. To Wisconsin he was a scientist of note, and a most useful one. He loved the state and was happy in his work, and he was buried here at his own request. He did not want to go back to New England. And so, after all is said and done, he is really our Percival.

CHARLES D. STEWART.

Source: The Milwaukee Journal (Milwaukee, WI) 5 Aug 1936; transcribed by Mary Dutcher

PERIN, CHARLES A.

CHARLES A. PERIN, farmer, Sec. 34; P.O. Beetown; born in 1852, in Delaware Co., Iowa; was a son of Daniel Perin, who came to Wisconsin in the same year; located on Rattlesnake Creek; lived there until 22 years of age. He was married at the age of 20, to Elizabeth Wilson, a daughter of William P. Wilson; have three children--Perry E., Josiah and James C. Politics, Republican. Has 120 acres of land, valued at $1,200.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

PERRY, HENRY J.

HENRY J. PERRY, Sec. 3; P. O. Platteville; was born September, 1834, in Carnarvonshire, Wales, where his father, John Perry, died two years later; the mother and eight children came to America in 1846, and located in Oneida Co., N. Y.; H. J. Perry spent several years in New York City; then, going to Princeton, N. J., he married Maggie Blair, and after a residence of ten years there went to Pennsylvania where he spent a year; in 1866, he came to Platteville and bought his present farm; he now owns eighty-five acres in the homestead, and eighty in Lima; has no children; member of the Baptist Church; the mother of Mr. Perry is one of the oldest persons now living in Grant Co.; she is in her 89th year and, though helpless, has a clear mind.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

PERRY, HOMER

HOMER PERRY was born in Hartford, Trumbull Co., Ohio, Feb. 18, 1821; received a good common-school education and grew to manhood on a farm; on the 13th of April, 1849, he reached Platteville, and during the winter of 1849-50 taught school in the Johnson District; up to 1873 he hardly missed teaching a single winter; his work was almost entirely done in the city and town of Platteville; Ex-Gov. Dewey, Geo. S. Hammond and himself constituted the district board when the brick schoolhouse was built; Mr. Perry served twice as town superintendent of schools, and is everywhere well known as the veteran teacher, and a man ever ready to advance the interests of education; he married Dec. 31, 1853, Miss Julia, daughter of Col. Joseph Dickson; they have three children -- George H., Nannie E. and Susie M., all born in Platteville; since the marriage Mr. Perry has resided in the pleasant home he then built on the outskirt of Platteville. Col. Dickson, a settler of 1827 in Grant Co., won his title in the Black Hawk war. He was wounded at the battle of Bad Ax, and was, in consequence, a life pensioner.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

PFLEISTERER, JOHN D.

JOHN D. PFLEISTERER, owner and proprietor St. Charles Hotel, corner Wisconsin and Walnut streets, Muscoda, was born in Wurtemberg in 1831. He is a son of Philip and Catherine Mueller Pflisterer, both natives of Germany. His father was a soldier under Napoleon during the campaign in Russia, with the rank of a non-commissioned officer. John D. was educated and learned the butcher's trade in his native place; he came to America in 1852, and located in Cincinnati, where he remained two years, then came to Champaign Co., Ill., where he worked for Frank Cass, farmer and stock-raiser, for ten years; then he came to Muscoda in 1865, and bought the old Muscoda Brewery, and carried on the business until 1869, when he sold the brewery to John Postel, and bought the hotel he now occupies. In 1857, he married Miss Elizabeth Hus, by whom he had three children, who are all deceased, and his wife died in 1863. The same year he married Miss Anna Meyer, a native of Bohemia, by whom he has one girl. He has always been in active life, and accumulated by his own economy and industry.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

PIPKEN, A. J.

A. J. PIPKEN, banker, successor to First National Bank, Boscobel, is a native of Union Co., Ill.; commenced reading law in 1857, with the Hon. John Dougherty, of Union Co.; graduated in Lexington, Ky., in 1858; came to Watertown, Monroe Co., Ill., in 1860, and opened a law office, which he continued about eighteen months, then went to Chicago in 1865; went to Milwaukee and engaged in the wholesale grocery trade; afterward transacted a merchandise brokerage business; continued till 1876, when he came to Boscobel, and soon after entered his present business, which he has since continued; married in 1875 to Miss Mary L., daughter of Dwight T. Parker, deceased, President of First National Bank, Boscobel. She was born in Lancaster, Wis.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

PORTER, ROBERT

ROBERT PORTER, farmer, Sec. 22; P.O. Beetown; born in Ireland in 1813; when 5 years of age he came to America, and located in Pennsylvania, where he lived for sixteen years, and learned the blacksmith trade, and, after 1834, he spent seven years in traveling; in 1841, he came to Grant Co., Wis., settled at Potosi, and followed his trade, but soon became a prosperous liquor merchant. In 1851, he married Miss Margaret Griggs, a daughter of Alexander Griggs. He has 468 acres of land. Has six children--John Martha, Robert, Mary, Alice, Ulysses G. He has been on the town Board four terms; was Chairman twice; was Assessor three terms. Politics, Republican.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

POSTEL, JOHN J.

JOHN J. POSTEL, brewer, Muscoda, born in Florida in 1842. Came to Wisconsin in 1857 and located in Muscoda, purchased the brewery in 1869, and remodeled the same. Has worked the business up to one of the main industries of the town; employs seven men, and ships beer all over the western portion of the State. Enlisted in 1861 in the 14th W. V. I., Co. K; mustered out as a Captain in 1865, at the close of the war. Married, in 1865, to Miss Mary Smith, a native of Wisconsin, by whom he has six children -- two sons and four daughters. Is a good business man, and has built around him a large property, and justly deserves his increasing business.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

POTTER, CHARLES

CHARLES POTTER, deceased, was a native of Brighton, Beaver Co., Penn.; Feb. 11, 1837, came to Platteville with his parents when 7 years old; he worked with his father, Joel Potter, in his plow-shop, and was in partnership with him under the firm name of J. Potter & Son, till the death of his father in 1874, and the last three years of his life was in partnership with Samuel M. Jones, firm, Potter & Jones. Mr. Potter's death occurred Dec. 18, 1880; he left one son, Charles A., born Sept 14, 1868. He was married Sept. 30, 1863, to Miss Annie E. Foshay, who survives him; she was born in Sing Sing, N. Y., Dec. 31, 1843, daughter of Garrett Foshay, who came to Wisconsin in May, 1854, and still lives at Patch's Grove, Grant Co.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

POTTER, JOEL

JOEL POTTER, deceased; was a native of Plymouth, Litchfield Co., Conn., born in 1807. He was married in 1829, to Miss Mary Payne, who was born in Vernon, Tolland Co., Conn., in 1806. Came to Schuyler Co., Ill., in 1837, and from there to Platteville in November, 1844. Immediately after coming to Platteville, he started a plow-shop in the village, which was the first shop of the kind in Wisconsin west of Madison; he continued that business till his death March 29, 1874. The oldest daughter, Mary, died in August, 1847, aged 17; Seth died in California in 1851, aged 19; Hattie was married to A. Y. Felton, and died Feb. 14, 1874; Charles died Dec. 18, 1880, and Julia in 1846, 3 years old; John now lives in Eagan, Dakota, and Henry is in the mercantile business at Lake Benton, Minn. Mrs. Potter is the only one left of a family of six, four brothers and two sisters, and she is doing her own work and living alone, at 75 years of age.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

POWERS, PATRICK

PATRICK POWERS, Sec. 30; P. O. Cassville; owns 300 acres of land, valued at $31 per acre; was born in Ireland in 1826; came to America in 1850, and, in 1854, located on his present farm. Married Catharine Allen, who was also born in Ireland; they have eight children -- Ellen, Mary, David, Catharine, James, Margaret, Thomas and Julia. They are members of the Roman Catholic Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Glen Haven Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

PRATT, W. W.

W. W. PRATT, farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. Boscobel; is a native of Mulberry, Vt.; when a boy, came with his parents to New York State, where he remained farming till the age of 22 years; in 1857, came to Grant Co. Wis.; since coming here he has been to Utah, Salt Lake and California. Owns 255 acres land; these improvements he has made since coming here; has been six years Clerk of the School District. Married in 1852 to Mrs. Minerva A. Blair, have three children.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Marion) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

PRESTON, LORENZO

LORENZO PRESTON, farmer, Sec. 28; P.O. Beetown; born in 1819, in the town of Oxford, Shenango Co., N.Y.; in 1843, emigrated to Hazel Green, Grant Co., Wis. His abilities as a public officer were made known to the people of his county in the discharge of his duties as Constable, as which he served four terms, and, in 1854, was elected Sheriff of Grant Co.; served two years, then serving two years as Under Sheriff. After retiring from office, he followed mining for twelve years, then went to farming; has 190 acres of land; has been successful. In his boyhood served an apprenticeship as a printer. Was married in 1848, to Miss Sophia Trenary, a daughter of William Trenary, of English descent; had four children, three living--Lucinda J., William A., James H. Has been Assessor for five years; is a Greenbacker; religion, Universalist.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

PRIDEAUX, THOMAS

THOMAS PRIDEAUX, farmer, Sec. 6; P.O. Bloomington; born in 1842 in Grant Co., Wis.; was a son of James Prideaux; has been a farmer all of his life; enlisted in 1864 in the 33d W.V.I.; was in three battles. He was married, in 1872, to Ellen Hudson, a daughter of Benjamin Hudson. He has four children. He is a member of the M.E. Church; has 160 acres of land, valued at $4,000.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

PRITCHETT, GARDNER

GARDNER PRITCHETT, farmer, Sec. 25; P. O. Lancaster; was born in 1851 in Little Grant, Grant Co., Wis.; was a son of Phillip and Margaret Pritchett; lived with parents until 25 years of age, when he married Miss Bettie Oates, a daughter of James and Sarah Oates. Has been Road Overseer one term; School Clerk one term. Owns 160 acres of land, valued at $2,500; has one child -- Viola M. Politics, Republican.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Little Grant Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

PRITCHETT, PHILIP

PHILIP PRITCHETT (deceased); was born in New York State; came to Wisconsin and engaged in anything that he could find to do; he resided in Wisconsin until the time of his death in October, 1870. His wife Margaret Day, born in Louisville, Ky., Nov. 6, 1820; was married in December 1834; they had nine children -- Mary, born Jan. 2, 1837, now Mrs. Singer, at Whitewater, Wis.; Beverly, born Feb. 8, 1838; Joshua, born Nov. 6, 1841; enlisted in 1862 in Co. C, 25th W. V. I.; died at Helena, Ark., Oct. 6, 1863. Allen, born Nov. 13, 1846; now in business at Fennimore. William, born Dec. 20, 1849; now near home on a farm. Garn, born Nov. 1, 1851; Louisa, born Aug. 28, 1853; now at Patch Grove; Sarah E., born May 29, 1859. Mrs. Pritchett has, by industry and economy, bought and owns 80 acres of land in Sec. 6, P. O. Lancaster.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Ellenboro Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

QUICK, WINSLOW

WINSLOW QUICK, Sec. 6; P. O. Patch Grove. Owns 360 acres of land, valued at $20 per acre. Born in Montgomery Co., N. Y., in 1827; came to Wisconsin in 1854; settled on this farm in 1856. Married Ruth Humphrey, a native of New York; they have eight children -- Matilda, Alwilda, Almira, William, Morris, Benjamin, Winslow and Delavan.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

QUINCY, BENJAMIN E.

BENJAMIN E. QUINCY, Sec. 29; P.O. Lancaster; owns 221 acres of land, valued at $23 per acre ; born in Chittenden Co., Vt., in 1820 ; came to Wisconsin in 1844, and located on present farm. Married Mary E. Stone, a native of the same county. They have five children Merton E., Lucia E., Frank S., Fred H. and Charles B. Are members of the M. E. Church.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

RAFTERY, JOHN

JOHN RAFTERY, Sec. 11; P. O. Ellenboro; was born in Castleray, Ireland; is a son of Patrick and Ellen Raftery; emigrated to the United States in 1855; located in Ellenboro, Grant Co., Wis., and, in 1872, returned to his native land and married Miss Feely, a daughter of Jamen and Mary Feely; they have four children -- James, John, Maria, Margaret. Is a member of the Catholic Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Ellenboro Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

RALPH, WILLIAM

WILLIAM RALPH, Sec. 12; P. O. Fairview; owns 412 acres of land, valued at $45 per acre; born in Cornwall, England, March 9, 1819; came to America in 1842; he located on his present farm in 1861. Married Phillippa Richards; she was born in England in 1818; they have three children -- Lizzie, John and George. Are members of the M. E. Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

RAWSON, JONAS

JONAS RAWSON, speculator, Big Patch; born in Yorkshire, England, in 1818; came to America in 1846 and settled in this town; has been twice married, first to Christiana Broadbent, a native of England, who died in 1854; married again to Elizabeth Silson, a native of England. He has five children -- Ann, Jonas C., Richard T., James and Jane.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Smelser Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

REEVE, WILLIAM

WILLIAM REEVE, farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. Boscobel; born in England; came to America in 1855, and located in Huron Co., Ohio, where he remained about two years; in 1857, he came West to Grant Co., Wis., and engaged in farming; he owns 110 acres of land, the improvements upon which were made entirely by himself. He married in 1852 to Miss Ann Fear, who was also born in England. They have six children -- one son and five daughters.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Marion) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

REIFSTECK, L. P.

L. P. REIFSTECK, dealer in live stock, Hazel Green; born in this town in 1854. Married Lena Baker, a native of Illinois; they have one child -- J. Augustas. Mr. Reifsteck has held the office of Town Clerk one term.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

REILLY, PHILLIP

PHILLIP REILLY, a veteran farmer and miner of Platteville, was born in 1804, in County Cavan, Ireland, where his early life was spent on his father's farm. He came in 1841, to America, and worked in the mines and on the canals of New York and Pennsylvania until 1843, when he came to Platteville; worked the first year near this town, and, in the summer of 1844, went to Lancaster and worked in the Pigeon Diggings until 1845, since which time he has resided in the town of Platteville. Settled on his present farm in 1857; built in 1877, a large and elegant house two stories high, the main building being 18x28; wing, 16x18. Since 1860, Mr. Reilly has done but little mining. He married in New York City Mary McGovern, of County Cavan, Ireland; she came to America in 1843, and is the mother of four living children -- Frank, Phillip, Edwin and Kate, all born in Platteville, as were four children now deceased. The family belong to the Roman Catholic Church, Platteville.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

REILLY, THOMAS

THOMAS REILLY, farmer, Sec. 28; P. O. Platteville; was born in 1815, in Ireland, where his early life was spent on a farm. Came to America in 1843, and came from Pennsylvania to Platteville in 1847. Engaged in farming and mining in this town up to 1858, when he purchased 80 acres of his present farm of Mr. Tollman; later he bought out the Richard Bonson farm, one of the first settled here, and has since made additional purchases; he now owns 250 acres. The farm was originally timbered, and the old Bonson log house (which still stands near Mr. Reilly's substantial frame residence) was, when built, one of the best in the town. Mr. Reilly married Mary Reilly, of his and her native county; they have four living children -- James, Jane (Mrs. Connell, of Platteville), John and Mary A.; they also lost a daughter -- Lauretta. The family belong to the Catholic Church of Platteville. The record of Mr. Reilly is one of steady, honorable and rapid progress. He owns the farms of two of the pioneers who preceded him in settlement, yet began with little or nothing, except a strong arm and a resolve to win a home and competence for his family.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

REMY, MICHAEL

MICHAEL REMY, farmer; P. O. Muscoda; born in Luxemburg, April 15, 1817, where he was educated and learned the trade of stone-cutter and mason; is a son of Peter and Anna Remy, both natives of Luxemburg. His father carried on the cooper, grocery and saloon business. Michael came to this State, and located at Mineral Point in 1852, where he worked at his trade of stone-cutting and mason until 1857, when he bought 300 acres of land in Sec. 30, town of Muscoda, which has been his home ever since. Feb. 2, 1862, he enlisted in Co. I, 19th W. V. I., Capt. Rawley, of Oshkosh, commanding the company. They joined the 9th Corps, commanded by Gens. Butler and Gady; served until the close of the war, and mustered out with the regiment. His health became impaired by exposure and hardships. He was married, Aug. 14, 1841, to Katrina Herbert, also a native of Luxemburg, by whom he has had eight children -- one son and five daughters -- two of the girls deceased.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

RESSMEYER, HENRY

HENRY RESSMEYER, harness-maker, Lancaster ; commenced this business in the spring of 1673, commencing in a small way, renting a shop and doing all of his own work ; in the fall of 1878, he bought his present shop, and now carries a stock of about $1,000, employing two men ; he is a native Germany, born April 19, 1849, a son of John Henry and Dorotha (Donnenberg) Ressmeyer, who came to the United States in the fall of 1840 ; his father died in Du Page Co., 111., Sept. 20, 1862, and his mother died in Grant Co., March 2, 1879. Mr. R. was married in Liberty, Grant Co.. Sept. 16, 1877, to Miss Maggie Heiliger, daughter of Joseph and Maggie (Miller) Heiliger. They have two sons William, born Sept. 28, 1878, and Fred, Oct. 3, 1880. Mr. Ressmeyer is an active member of theI.O.O.F.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

REWEY, HENRY

HENRY REWEY, retired farmer, Platteville; was born in Stockbridge, Mass., July 9, 1805. Up to the age of 15, his life was spent on a farm. He then with a brother, interested himself in the wool-carding business, and eventually became the owner of a factory near the line of Tompkins and Tioga Cos., N. Y. He married, Sept. 27, 1832, Mary Wiltse, who was born Nov. 29, 1810, in Saratoga, Saratoga Co., N. Y. They came West in 1844, locating on a new farm in Lima, Grant Co., Wis. The 160 acres cost him $320; half of this farm he cleared and improved. In 1860, he removed his family to a farm in Mifflin, Iowa Co., where they resided four years. Since 1864, he has resided near the city of Platteville, owning three lots of respectively 6, 15 and 20 acres about the place. Mr. and Mrs. Rewey have five stalwart sons to perpetuate the family name. The eldest, Addison, is now farming In Lima; Jefferson W., one of the foremost business men and farmers of Iowa Co., has represented the Southern District of that county several terms in the State Legislature. A station on the new Chicago & Tomah Railroad was named in his honor. Jasper L. now resides in Platteville, and is Deputy Sheriff of Grant Co.; he was born Aug. 18, 1837, in Tioga Co., N. Y., and married Susan Galbreth; he served during the rebellion in the 7th W. V. I., and was wounded. M. Freeman is now in the hotel business at Rewey Station; he is also Overseer of the Iowa Co. Poor Farm. Jay, the youngest son, was born Dec. 3, 1852, in Lima; married Albina Trowbridge, of Darlington, and is with his parents in their Platteville home; he now owns 80 acres of the old Lima farm; the average weight of the five brothers is from 180 to 190 pounds. All are like the father, Republican in politics. Henry Rewey enlisted in Co. C, 7th W. V. I.; was twice wounded, and removing to Nebraska, died there in November, 1874; he left a wife (nee Abbie Moore) and a little daughter, now with her grandparents.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

RICE, F. W.

F. W. RICE, proprietor of Wisconsin House, Patch Grove; was born in Madison Co., N. Y., April 14, 1817; at the age of 17, he emigrated to Pennsylvania with his parents; then from there to Ohio; then to Indiana, and, in 1842, went to Prairie du Chien for about one year; then removed to Grant Co., and worked in a saw-mill for a short time; then was engaged in rafting lumber on the Wisconsin and Mississippi Rivers; then settled at Millville, where he bought 80 acres of land and improved, which he sold; then removed to Patch Grove in the year 1858; took charge of the hotel in 1871, and has been there ever since. His wife, Mirah Bidwell, was born in England, Leeds, July 6, 1825; came to America with her parents, who settled in the Eastern States. They were married Nov. 16, 1845; they have had four children -- Emmet Clarence, born at Millville June 26, 1849, and now residing in Harvey Co., Kan.; Eliza Ann, born at Patch Grove Nov. 13, 1846; Anther, born June 12, 1856; Mary Amanda, born June 26, 1858, died Aug. 8, 1866. In politics, Republican; in religion, liberal believer. Has been Treasurer of Patch Grove. Member of the Union League during the war.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

RICHARDS, DANIEL

DANIEL RICHARDS is one of the real pioneers of the county; born April 15, 1807, in Broome Co., N. Y., he accompanied his parents on their removal to Jacksonville, Ill., in 1823; four years later, he came to Galena, Ill., and began mining. The year 1829 was the date of his settlement in Grant County, it then being an integral part of the Northwest Territory of Michigan. He, with a brother, William T. Richards, made their home one and a half miles southwest of Platteville, and engaged in teaming, hauling "mineral" to the furnaces and lead to Galena. In 1834, Mr. Richards married Mrs. Lucretia (Curtis) Davis and located in Cassville; here he followed farming about 14 years, at the end of which time he removed to Hazel Green; seven years of mining here were followed by his final settlement in his present and pleasant, though secluded and quiet home. Mr. and Mrs. Richards have four living children -- Ruth S., wife of J. D. Babcock; Harriet P., Mrs. W. H. Dobson (both of Lincoln, Nebraska); Emma, Mrs. Daniel Spaugey, of Kansas, and Abigail C., now the widow of the brave Fred T. Bachelor, who perished in the Andersonville Prison pen. He was a volunteer in the 25th W. V. I. George C. Richards, one of the then deceased children of Daniel Richards, also died in the Union army, the others were Daniel and an infant. Mrs. Richards also lost a daughter, Ann E., by her deceased husband.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

RICHARDS, GEORGE E. M. D.

GEORGE E. RICHARDS, M. D.; was born in 1852 in Pittsfield, Mass.; when young, his parents removed to Illinois, resided a short time in Springfield and went from there to Amboy, where they still reside. The doctor was educated at Amboy, Ill., and Pittsfield, Mass., and is a graduate of Hahnemann Medical College of Chicago. He practiced in Ottawa, Ill., till June, 1880, since which time he has practiced in Platteville. He was married in Amboy, Ill., April 25, 1877, to Miss Estelle Badger, daughter of Simon Badger, Esq., a prominent citizen of that place.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

RICHARDS, ORA C

ORA C RICHARDS, Deputy Sheriff, Lancaster ; is a native of the town of Fennimore, began life as a farmer, following that business until 14 years of age ; he then attended school in Boscobel for about four years, and made rapid progress ; at the age of 18 years, he was appointed Deputy Sheriff of Grant Co., and now holds the same position for the fifth year, being appointed in 1877.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

RICKS, J. B.

J. B. RICKS, farmer; P. O. Boscobel; born near the city of New York. In 1852, he came to Platteville, Wis., where he followed farming. In 1853, he came to the town of Marion, and bought 176 acres of land, which he improved. He enlisted in 1861 in Co. K, 12th W. V. I., and served to the end of the war; was in the siege of Vicksburg, Sherman's march to the sea, Peach Tree Creek, Stone Mountain, Jonesboro and others. He came to Boscobel in 1871, and owns his residence property with ten acres of ground, and other property. All of this he has acquired since coming to Grant County. He has been Chairman of the town of Marion four years, and Town Superintendent of Schools of Marion one year; married March 20, 1860, to Miss Myra A. Rice, who is a native of Massachusetts. They have three children -- two sons and one daughter.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

RIEGE, E.

E. RIEGE, merchant, is a native of Hanover, Germany, born in 1837; he came to America in 1856, and was engaged in the mercantile business in New York City for five years; came to Wisconsin in 1861, and commenced business in Platteville in April, 1862, and has followed it ever since. He now owns four stores on Main street, and carries on a general and clothing store himself, the other two being rented; he also owns a brick dwilling, where he resides. He was married in 1863, in Platteville, to Katie Dascher and has had eight children, four of whom are now living.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

RIORDAN, MATHEW

MATHEW RIORDAN, farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. Woodman; born in Ireland; came to Boston, Mass., in 1850, thence to Maine; here he remained about six months, then came to Milwaukee; there he followed teaming about sixteen years, and hauled the first grain there that was hauled by team; in about 1866 he came to this farm; owns 440 acres, with a very comfortable house and other improvements; all this property he has accumulated since coming to Wisconsin, and is a self-made man. Married in 1847 to Mary Lynch; she was born in Ireland; they have eight children -- four sons and four daughters.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Marion) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

RITCHIE, ANDREW

ANDREW RITCHIE, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. Stitzer. The subject of this sketch is a pioneer, and has always sought a private life; he was born in 1812 in Scotland; he was a son of Thomas and Jennette Ritchie; he left his parents at the early age of 11 years, and followed herding for three years; he then came home and went to school for one year, then followed mining for a few years, then went to Glasgow and attended lectures; he finally emigrated to America in 1839; he landed in Quebec, Can., where he lived but a short time, then to Montreal, but while on the voyage passed through a narrow escape by a collision between the two vessels, Lady Elgin and Royal George; he then visited many places in that portion of the country; he arrived at Lewiston, N. Y., following blasting for awhile, when he went to Genesee Valley and worked for three years, then to Canada for nine months; returned to Sandusky, Ohio, where he lived for five years, and, in 1848, he came to Grant Co., Wis., locating in Liberty, where he has lived since. He was married, in 1842, in New York to Anna O'Brien, a daughter of Patrick and Margaret O'Brien; he is the father of nine children -- Thomas, Sarah, Andrew, Samuel S., William (deceased), William W., Perry, John H., Mary W. He has 607 acres of land, valued at $10,000; also 160 acres in Nebraska. He lives chiefly on the interest of his money. Politics, Republican. Has been School Clerk for many years; has been Town Superintendent; was Justice of the Peace for ten years; has been member of the Town Board for many terms, Chairman two terms, and never had a law suit in his life.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Liberty Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ROBBINS, HANMER

HANMER ROBBINS, farmer; was born in the town of Deerfield, Oneida Co., N. Y., Dec. 11, 1815. In addition to a common-school education, he attended Hobert Hall Institute, alternating his attending school falls with working on farm summers and teaching winters, during 1834, 1835 and 1836. In May, 1837, he came to Platteville, Wis., and, in June, was teaching the village school, which school he continued to teach for the following two years; then followed mining for about eight years; then, meanwhile, having bought a farm near the village, he engaged in farming, which occupation he still follows; he went to California in 1850, and returned in 1852. He was married June 1, 1847, to Miss A. L. Goodell, of Clinton, Oneida Co., N. Y. They have had seven children, four of whom are still living -- Fanny, now Mrs. Gray, of Madison; Thomas, Roderick and George. Mr. R. was Town Superintendent of Schools, from 1854 to 1860; was elected to the State Legislature for the years 1857, 1858, 1861, 1864, 1866, 1867 and 1868, and was Chairman of the Committee on Education during four of the seven years. He was Chairman of that Committee in 1858, when the State University of Wisconsin was re-organized and women admitted to the University. He was a member of the State Board of Regents for Normal Schools ten years, and was mainly instrumental in securing the law establishing several Normal schools instead of only one, as well as in securing the location of the first State Normal School at Platteville. He was President of the D., P. & M. R. R., from its first inception until it was bought by the C., M. & St. P. R. R., in 1880; also General Manager during its construction.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ROBERTS, ABEL

ABEL ROBERTS, farmer, Sec. 6; P. O. Lancaster; was born in Indiana in July, 1835; he came to Wisconsin in the year 1840, in company with his parents who were old settlers. He bought 220 acres of land when he was about 23 years of age; on which he has made the improvements; has a fine home; pays some attention to the raising of bees; has made what he has by his own industry. His wife, Emily Curry, a native of Illinois; born Sept. 9, 1840; she came to Wisconsin with her parents, who now reside near Lancaster; she was married Dec. 22, 1859. They had two children -- Alma Allice, Albert Idelbert, both deceased; an adopted son, Charlie. In politics Republican; in religion, Baptist. Has been Clerk of School District No. 5.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Ellenboro Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ROBERTS, R. D.

R. D. ROBERTS, wagon and carriage maker, and dealer in agricultural implements, Hazel Green; business established in 1848; born in Wales in 1822; came to America in 1845, and settled in Dodge Co.; came here in 1848. Married Catherine Jones, a native of Wales, in 1846; have three children -- Margaret, Jane and Kittie. Members of the M. E. Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ROBERTS, WILLIAM

WILLIAM ROBERTS, carriage, sign and house painter, Hazel Green; established in 1850; born in Wales in 1830; came to America in 1850, and settled in this village. Married Jane Bullock, a native of England; they have four children -- Eliza, Ella, Walter and Elmer. Are members of the M. E. Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ROBERTSON, CHARLES

CHARLES ROBERTSON, blacksmith, Patch Grove; was born at Perthshire, Scotland, Aug. 11, 1829; he came to America in 1854; located at Lancaster, Wis.; engaged in business; he then, in 1857, removed to Patch Grove; owns a fine property in the town. His wife, Christina Shallerss, was born in 1827; married in 1852; she died in 1866, leaving seven children -- Charles, now residing in Kansas; Robert, now residing in Kansas; Helen, at Waukesha; George, at Lancaster; William, deceased; Anna and Alexander. Second wife was Rachel Shallerss, a native of England, born in 1847; they married in 1868; they have had six children -- Frank, Arthur, William, Lizzie, Edwin, Christina. In politics, Republican; in religion, Disciple; a Good Templar.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ROBERTSON, JOHN

JOHN ROBERTSON, photographer and proprietor of "Robertson's Art Gallery," is a native of Stirling, Scotland, born in 1824; he came to America in the spring of 1852, stopping in Canada a few months; he came on to Wisconsin and settled in Beloit the next fall. He was there engaged in the jewelry business, which he had learned in Scotland, till September, 1854, then removed to Lancaster, Grant Co., and carried on the same business there till October, 1858, since which time he has been in business in Platteville. He learned photography soon after coming to Platteville, and has been engaged in the business ever since, and also owns a jewelry store, carried on by his two sons, Robert B. and David B. He was married in Scotland to Miss Mary Black, who died in the spring of 1860, leaving four children -- Robert B., Jane W. and Daivd B., who are still living, and an infant who died a few months after its mother. He was married a second time in Platteville, Nov. 20, 1862, to Alice G. Armstrong, by whom he has had six children -- John, Willie, Arthur, Mary (deceased), Allie and Pearl Athol.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ROBINSON, ENOCH

ENOCH ROBINSON, farmer and miner; P. O. Platteville; was born Oct. 7, 1813, in Monroe Co., Ill., where he spent his early life on a farm. His father, a Pennsylvanian, and his mother, a Virginian, were among the earliest settlers of Illinois. The father, David Robinson, went to Galena in 1827. Both father and son were in that then new mining settlement at the time of Stillman's defeat. They afterward engaged in mining at Menomonee; assisted in building the block-house at the Sinsinawa Mounds, and to bury the murdered Boxley and Thompson, who were victims of the Indians. Since the Black Hawk war, Mr. Robinson has worked at mining in Platteville (1840), Fair Play, Menomonee, Beetown, on the site of Warren, Ill., and at Hazel Green, where he remained fourteen years. He was the discoverer of the Robinson Lead at Platteville. On Oct. 13, 1872, he married Mrs. Mary Dickson, widow of Col. Joseph Dickson; she was born Mary 17, 1820, at Prairie du Chien, Wis.; her father was Maj. William D. Adney of the U. S. Regular Army, and her mother's maiden name was Julia Fisher. The latter died in Galena, and Maj. Adney married again, Catharine Hoffman, who still resides at Dunleith, Ill. Maj. Adney was the find of the Adney Lead at Hazel Green, and died Sept. 9, 1832, in the town of Platteville. His daughter, Mary, married Col. Dickson, when she was in her 13th year, and bore him eleven children, eight still survive, namely, Julia A., Samuel T., Susan C., Maggie C., Joseph H., John A., William H. and Josiah P.; those deceased are Sylvester C., George W. and Sarah J. All were born in the town of Platteville, where Col. Dickson settled in August, 1827. He broke about 20 acres of raw prairie on what is now the Roseleib farm, and, in the spring of 1828, planted what is thought to have been the first field of corn in Wisconsin grown by a white farmer. He commanded a spy company during the Black Hawk war, served with distinguished bravery and efficiency, and was severely wounded by the Indians at the battle of Bad Ax. He died Feb. 28, 1871, on his farm, four miles southwest of Platteville. This farm is now the home of Mr. and Mrs. Robinson; here Mr. Robinson continues mining, for which fascinating occupation he has acquired a strong passion during his forty years' experience at it in Wisconsin.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ROBINSON, THOMAS

THOMAS ROBINSON, Sec. 25 and 36; P. O. Platteville; born in April, 1816, in Yorkshire, England. He came to the United States and Grant Co. in 1841; with him were his father, M. W. Robinson, his brother, Joseph and wife, and his brother-in-law, William Hilton, a lad of 14 (see sketch of Joseph Robinson). In place of the log house of forty years ago, Mr. Robinson has a capacious brick farm house, with farm buildings to correspond. The original 40 acres has increased to 255. He married Ann Hilton, a native of Massingham, Lincolnshire, England. They have had nine children -- Sarah, Jane, Mary, Thomas, George H., Charles W., James R., Amelia and John M. All were born on the Platteville farm except the eldest; she married James Huntington, and died at his home in Seymour, La Fayette Co., Wis. Mr. Robinson was with his brother, Joseph, and a few of his neighbors, among the founders of the local P. M. Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ROBINSON, WILLIAM

WILLIAM ROBINSON, retired farmer, Platteville; was born in Yorkshire, England, Sept. 22, 1811. His early and subsequent life was spent as a farmer. In 1834, he came to the United States and located in Ohio. In the summer of 1836, he came via the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to Grant Co., which has since been his home. Three days after his arrival, he bought team and wagon, and for a year or more hauled lead to, and supplies from, Galena. He then rented a farm for a time, and, in 1838, bought of James Vineyard 160 acres of his present farm. He was at this time in partnership with his brother, John Robinson, and the log house in which they kept bachelor's hall stood on the site of William Robinson's substantial brick farmhouse of to-day. Mr. Robinson married Mary S. McBride, whose father was one of the garrison of Fort Crawford when it, Green Bay and Fort Winnebago were the only footholds of white men in Wisconsin; she died in 1867, leaving eight children -- Sarah, Jane, William J., Rosanna, Richard H., Lena and Emma. The present Mrs. Robinson was Miss Jane Blaylock, who was born in Platteville, where her father settled in 1836. By her Mr. Robinson has three children -- Benjamin S., Nora A. and Ida R. Rosanna Robinson died about two years after the death of her mother, at the age of 21. Richard H. is now in the butchering business in Charles City, Iowa. The eldest son is on the splendid 350-acre farm, his father having resided for the past fourteen years in the city of Platteville. Mr. Robinson is a man who has become wealthy through his own exertions, he having earned every dollar and every acre.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ROBINSON; JOSEPH

JOSEPH ROBINSON; P. O Platteville; born Jan. 1, 1821, in Yorkshire, England, where his early life was spent as a farm servant. He married Hannah Bratton, and, in the spring of 1841, left for America. At the end of a tedious three-months' voyage, he found himself on the borders of Grant Co., which has since been his home. Forty acres of his present farm he bought of the U. S. Government, it having been reserved as mineral land. His brother, Thomas Robinson, also bought 40 acres, and both erected log cabins, which stood somewhat nearer the "Branch" than do the substantial brick structures which replaced them. His 40 acres was the site of the block-house built by the settlers during the Black Hawk war, and Mr. R. well remembers plowing over the old rifle-pits. He was one of the leading spirits in the founding of the "Block-House Branch" P. M. Church, of which he for several years officiated as local Elder. Mr. Robinson has buried two wives, and has ten living children; two of his sons, John W. and Joseph S., were among the defenders of the Union who went out from the Badger State. Mr. Robinson has 270 acres on Secs. 25 and 36.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

RODOLF, CHARLES

CHARLES RODOLF, Muscoda; was born at Zurzach, in the canton of Aargan, Switzerland, in the year 1818; his early education was received here; at the age of 11, he attended the high school in his native town, and when 16 years of age, commenced the study of law with his uncle, Henry Rodolf; two years later, young Charles quitted Switzerland, sailing for the new land of promise, America; he landed at New Orleans in December, 1833, and immediately took passage up the river for St. Louis; arriving at that city, he attended school for a short time, when he made a second move, coming to Wisconsin and locating at Wiota, La Fayette Co., where he commenced farming during the year 1834; in 1837, young Rodolf went to Muscoda, then a small settlement of a few houses, and engaged with Col. William S. Hamilton, the then proprietor of the place; he remained here eight months, during which time he devoted his leisure moments to reading law; returning to his farm, he engaged in agricultural pursuits until 1840, when he removed to Mineral Point, taking an interest in a store with his brother, Theodore Rodolf; two years later, Mr. Rodolf opened a store of his own at Centerville, and commenced operations in mining for lead, and the succeeding year ran a smelting furnace at Wingville; about this time, he began to put his legal knowledge to the proof by engaging in mineral cases before the Justices' courts; in 1852, Mr. Rodolf purchased the Eagle Mills and moved to Richland Co.; this same year he was admitted to the bar; up to 1858, he remained a citizen of this county, engaging in various mercantile pursuits; the year succeeding his removal (1853), Mr. Rodolf was elected Chairman of the Board of Supervisors for Richland Co., a most flattering testimonial of the confidence and esteem he had in so short a time inculcated in the minds of his neighbors and constituents; previous to his removal from Iowa Co., he had been elected to the Assembly from the Northern District of Iowa Co.; in 1858, he was again returned to the same body, this time from Richland Co., and, during the years 1859-60, he served at State Senator for the Fifteenth District, comprising the counties of Iowa and Richland; in 1864, Mr. Rodolf was nominated for member of Congress from the Third District on the Democratic ticket, but was not elected; the later fortunes of Mr. Rodolf were cast in Muscoda, at which village he continued the mercantile business until 1876, and where he has since resided; in 1875, he was elected Chairman of the Town Board, which position he held with credit to himself and advantage to the town until 1879; he was re-elected again the present year to the same position.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

RODOLF, CHARLES G.

CHARLES G. RODOLF, Muscoda, is not a native of America, but was born in Switzerland, November 15, 1818. He immigrated to the United States while he was yet fifteen years of age, having received during that time of his life a good academic education, and passed through the regular course of the Swiss High School at Zurzach, Canton of Argovie; coming to the western hemisphere in November, 1833, and landing at New Orleans, he went from there to St. Louis, spending in that city his first year in America. He became an inhabitant of Wisconsin in the year following, locating in August, 1834, in Iowa county. He first engaged in farming on a preemption claim, teaming and breaking prairie, subsequently engaged in the mercantile business and lead mining at Centreville and Highland, Iowa county, previous to entering the legal profession. Mr. Rodolf acquired a moderate knowledge of the English language during his stay at St. Louis, and as soon as circumstances allowed began his study of law, and was admitted to the bar of Wisconsin in the year 1851. He began his practice in 1846 at Highland, but moved, in 1852, to Richland county, and then obtained a few years experience as a lawyer. It was during his stay in this last mentioned county that he erected the saw and grist mills of which he is now the proprietor. He located at his present home, Muscoda, in 1871, and again commenced practice, to which he has ever since devoted his attention.

Mr. Rodolf has been chosen to fill numerous state offices in his adopted country. In 1851 he represented Iowa county in the general assembly; was also a representative in the same body during the year 1858, from Richland county. The counties of Iowa and Richland elected his state senator for the years 1859 and 1860; was chairman of the county board of Richland county in 1853, and was the democratic candidate for congress, in 1863, for the third congressional district; was a member of the board of supervisors of Grant county during five successive years; from 1864 to 1869 he was treasurer of the town of Eagle; and a delegate to the democratic national convention, at Chicago, in 1864, and again, in 1868, in New York.

Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin History and Biography, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Susan Geist

ROGERS, EDWARD

EDWARD ROGERS, Sec. 28; P. O. Hazel Green; born in England in 1810; came to America in 1845, and settled in this county; located on present farm in 1857. Married Mary Ann Treglone in 1848; she was born in Ireland; they have six children -- Mary Ann, Edward, John, Annie, James and Frederick.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ROGGY, JOSEPH

JOSEPH ROGGY, saloon, Front street, Muscoda; was born in Bavaria in 1818; came to America in 1851, and located in Muscoda. He built and run successfully for sixteen years the first brewery in Muscoda; learned the trade of brewer in the old country. He was married the first time to Miss Barbara Renkbarg, in 1846, by whom he had two children -- one son and one daughter -- and for his second wife he married Miss Lena Oswald, a native of Germany, married in Muscoda in 1853. He was in the army in the old country six years. The family are members of the German Lutheran Church; has been on the side board two terms. He is the oldest German settler living in Muscoda.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ROSELIP, CHARLES

CHARLES ROSELIP, P. O. Platteville; is the owner of one of the oldest and best farms of Grant Co.; it is also historic, as it was here that Col. Joseph Dickson, the first owner, planted, in the year 1828, the first crop of corn grown by an Anglo-Saxon farmer in Wisconsin. Col. Dickson disposed of the farm to Judge E. M. Orme, who erected a small house and made other slight improvements. In 1848, John Roselip, a Prussian emigrant, bought the place of the Judge; he was the father of Charles Roselip, who was born Jan. 14, 1840, in Prussia; the son has owned the farm since 1865; beginning fifteen years ago with 140 acres of the original 160, he has added 40 acres, grubbed and broken 70 acres, erected, in 1875, a 30x40 feet basement barn, and, in 1877, built a tasteful frame farmhouse. The old farm, originally prairie with the exception of a few acres, is now in a splendid state of cultivation, and the buildings are in striking contrast to those standing here during the Black Hawk war. Mr. Roselip married Miss Anna, daughter of A. S. Lothman, of Platteville; she was a native of Hanover, and came to this country when she was about 15 years of age; they have six children -- John A. M., Lizzie, Minnie C., Charles H., Ellen C. and William D., all born in Platteville except the eldest. Mr. Roselip spent 1864--65 in the gold region of Montana.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ROUNTREE, JOHN H.

PLATTEVILLE

One of the earliest settlers and most prominent men of southwestern Wisconsin is John Hawkins Rountree, a native of Kentucky. He was born March 24, 1805, his parents being John and Rebecca (Hawkins) Rountree. His great-grandfather, Randall Rountree, came from Ireland before the American revolution, and settled in Virginia. His grand-father, Thomas Rountree, moved from Virginia to Kentucky in 1795, and died there in 1815. His father, born in 1770, died in Missouri in 1853. He was a large farmer, yet held the office of lower-court judge at one time; was a person of considerable distinction in the part of the State where he lived, and was an active man until his death in his eighty-fourth year.

In February 1824, the subject of this brief memoir made a trip on horseback from his home in Kentucky to Montgomery County, Illinois, a distance of three hundred miles; and two years afterward, when only twenty-one years old, he was elected sheriff of that county. Early in 1827, hearing a great deal about the lead mines at and near Galena, he started northward with an ox team, in company with other persons, and arriving at the mines on the 24th of May commenced digging for lead near Galena, into which place he was soon after driven by the Indians, but before the end of the year (1827) made a permanent settlement where Platteville now stands. Here he built a cabin of logs and sods, two hundred yards southeast of his present residence, and had fair success at mining from the start. In 1828 he built a smelting furnace, the first in that part of Michigan Territory now in Grant County, continuing this business several years.

In October 1829, he was appointed by Lewis Cass, then governor of Michigan Territory, justice of the peace for Iowa County, which then embraced Grant, Lafayette, Green, and part of Rock and Dane Counties; but his official burdens were not heavy. On the 10th of March of the same year, the postmaster-general, Hon. VV. T. Barry, appointed him postmaster of Platteville, the town being named for Platte River, a stream three-fourths of a mile northwest of town. At that time there was only an occasional mail from Galena, brought over in a teamster's pocket. Two years later (1831) a weekly mail route was established from Galena to Prairie du Chien, via Platteville. When the Black Hawk War broke out, in 1832, mining operations were entirely suspended for a few months; a mounted cavalry company was organized, with Mr. Rountree as captain, and it composed part of Colonel Dodge's squadron.

In 1834, when the first land sale took place at the United States land office, then located at Mineral Point, Mr. Rountree purchased the site of Platteville, and during the same year he was appointed chief justice of the court of Iowa County. Grant County, so named for Grant River, was not organized until 1837, the year after Wisconsin Territory was set off from Michigan. From 1837 to 1867 Mr. Rountree served much of the time in the Territorial council and the State legislature. He was eight years in the council, four years in the State senate, one year a member of the constitutional convention, and one year in the assembly. No man in the State has spent as many years at Madison among the lawmakers as Mr. Rountree, and no man connected with the legislative history of Wisconsin has a purer record. In all his labors at the State capital he seems to have striven solely for the good of the commonwealth.

He has a farm adjoining the village of Platteville, and of late years has given his attention to it and to his other property.

Mr. Rountree is a Freemason; has passed all the chairs, and has been high priest of the chapter and grand high priest of the grand chapter of the State.

In politics he was originally a whig, and is one of the "constituent members" of the republican party.

He has been connected with the Methodist Episcopal Church since 1836, and is active in religious, benevolent and literary enterprises. He aided in securing the location of one of the State normal schools at Platteville, and during the fifty years that he has been a resident of Wisconsin he has been among the foremost men in pushing forward enterprises which would further the interests of the State.

Mr. Rountree has been twice married. The first time to Miss Mary G. Mitchell, daughter of Rev. Samuel Mitchell, of St. Clair County, Illinois. They were married in August 1828, and had five children; only three now living. She died in October 1837. His present wife was Miss Lydia H. Southworth, of Platteville, their union taking place September 3, 1839. The fruit of this union is ten children, seven of them living. Hiram S., the eldest son, and Philip S, are farmers; John M. is attorney for Cook County, Illinois; George H. is a clerk in the Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company's office at Milwaukee; Harry is a lawyer at Platteville; and Charles S., the youngest son, is not settled in business. One of the daughters is the wife of John N. Jewett, an attorney of Chicago; another is the wife of George P. Smith, a merchant of Chicago; the other two daughters, Lilly T. and Cora S., are single and live at home.

Though in his seventy-third year, Mr. Rountree stands perfectly erect, fully six feet tall, and is an exceedingly well preserved man, having always had good habits, and never forgetting the dignity of manhood. In striking contrast with his humble cabin of fifty years ago, he now owns and occupies an elegant two-story house, standing in a lot of four acres, surrounded by primeval oaks, wild cherries, and other trees of natural growth, transplanted evergreens and numerous other adornments, indices of wealth and taste.

Source: The US Biological Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Volume (1877) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

ROUNTREE, JOHN HAWKINS

HON. JOHN HAWKINS ROUNTREE, Platteville; the ancestral record of this eminent and venerable pioneer settler of Grant Co. is as follows: His great-grandfather, Randall Rountree, emigrated from Ireland in 1720 and settled in Virginia, where he resided until his death; his grandfather, Thomas Rountree, moved from Virginia to the vicinity of the Mammoth Cave, Warren Co., Ky. with is family, in 1795, where he remained until he died; John Rountree, his father, also settled in the same place, which was his place of residence until his decease; in this same locality John H. Rountree was born March 24, 1805; the education received by "the Major" at this period he himself describes as "very common-school," the schoolhouse being one of those primitive affairs so common in earlier times, composed of unhewn logs, with holes cut for windows, while a broad fire-place, with its huge open chimney, furnished the heat for the room in frosty weather; Maj. Rountree moved from Kentucky to Hillsboro, Montgomery Co., Ill., in February, 1824, where he was appointed as Deputy Sheriff, and served as such until he reached his 21st year, when he was elected Sheriff, an office that he held until his resignation upon his return from his trip to Wisconsin in 1827; May 24 of this year, he reached New Diggings (now a portion of La Fayette Co.), and afterward came to Platteville, then just coming into notice; there he has since resided, a period of 54 years. Aug 7, 1828, Maj. Rountree was married to Mary Grace Mitchell, of Galena, Ill., and the next day, with his bride, moved to his log cabin in Wisconsin; Mrs. Rountree died in 1837; Sept. 3, 1839, he was again married, to Miss Lydia H. Southworth, of Platteville; after a long and pleasant companionship, extending over nearly a half century, this lady passed on before, her death occurring June 16, 1881. The numerous positions held by Maj. Rountree are the best evidence of his high standing among his neighbors for the numerous decades hidden beneath the swiftly-revolving wheel of Time; in May, 1826, he was commissioned as Major of Illinois Militia, and the same year elected Sheriff of Montgomery Co., in the same State; in 1829, he was appointed Postmaster at Platteville, and Sheriff of Montgomery Co., in the same State; in 1829, he was appointed Postmaster at Platteville, and was several times re-appointed; also the same year appointed and commissioned Justice of the Peace for Iowa Co., Michigan Ter., of which Wisconsin then formed a part; in 1832, he was elected Captain of a company of mounted volunteers enlisted by him to serve in the Black Hawk war; in 1834, he was appointed Chief Justice of the County Court of Iowa Co., by the Governor of Michigan, which position he held until the Territory of Wisconsin was organized in 1836; in 1837, he was appointed Judge of Probate of Grant Co., which was organized that year; in 1839, he was commissioned as Aid to the Governor, with the rank of Colonel; in 1838, he was elected a member of the Territorial Council for four years, and, in 1842, was re-elected to the same position; in 1847, he was elected a member of the Constitutional Convention, serving in that body on the Committee on General Provisions, which embraced a large number of the most important articles under consideration, as well as upon several select committees; in 1850, Maj. Rountree was elected to the State Senate, and the following year was appointed a Regent of the State University; in 1853, he was appointed Major General of Militia of the Second District of Wisconsin; in 1857, he was appointed Postmaster of Platteville; in 1863, was elected Member of Assembly, and, in 1866, was again elected to the State Senate -- thus having served in the Territorial and State Legislatures longer than any other citizen. This lengthy recital of honors and official positions bears upon its face the highest testimonial that could be furnished of the unbounded esteem and confidence of the communities in which he has lived; in the sterling worth, integrity and ability of this veteran representative of pioneer times. When he first entered the present State, it was divided into two counties, and contained by a few thousand inhabitants, scattered over the vast territory; to-day it numbers its inhabitants by the hundreds of thousands. Maj. Rountree has been the witness of the growth of a new empire; took part in an Indian war; has seen the aboriginal inhabitants pushed back, foot by foot, until they now possess hardly a rood of land which they can call their own; he has seen the commencement, growth and prosperity or obliteration of every city and village, with the exception of two or three military posts, in the State -- all the improvements, indeed, that in fifty years have converted a great and uncivilized wilderness into a series of powerful States; in his own immediate vicinity, the change has been no less great; in place of the rude miner's cabin is seen the stately mansion; the few hundred seekers seeking after mineral have been swallowed up in the many thousands whose cozy farmhouses dot the landscape in every direction. To but a few has such experience been vouchsafed; Gen. Rountree may well be regarded as a landmark between the past and the present -- one who has lived over the whole term of our local history, and served as a prominent factor in making it.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ROWE, J. F.

J. F. ROWE, dealer in dry goods and groceries, Hazel Green; established in 1872; is a son of John Rowe, a native of England, who came to America in 1835, and settled in Illinois; in 1853, he removed to this village.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

RUKA, JOHN J.

JOHN J. RUKA (Rep.) after spending 25 years in the manufacturing business took up farming in which he has been equally successful. Always taking a keen interest in the development and progress of his community, he has devoted a great deal of time in encouraging the farmers of Grant county to improve their methods of farming and in the construction of better roads. During the war he devoted his entire time to the production of more food. Born in Boscobel, May 30, 1862, he has lived in that city all his life. He is vice president of the State Bank of Boscobel and before being elected to the assembly in 1916, had served for years as a member of the school board and of the city council. He was re-elected to the assembly in 1918, receiving 1,723 votes to 701 for John Kelley (Dem.).

Source: The Wisconsin Blue Book (1919) pages 483-484; transcribed by FoFG mz

RUNDELL, ALBERT E.

ALBERT E. RUNDELL, Sec. 35; P. O. Washburn; was born Aug. 28, 1853, at Platteville, Wis; moved to the town of Clifton with his parents on Sec. 36; staid there five years, when he moved to Mifflin, Iowa Co., at which place he remained eight years. Was married to Ellen Fruit, in 1876, by the Rev. Alford Charles, and settled on the place where he now lives. They have three children as follows: Bertha H., Nora J., Elmer Lloyd; has been a member of the School Board five years; is also a member of Good Templars of Washburn Lodge; his wife was born Jan. 28, 1851, in the town of Lima, Grant Co., Wis.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

RUNDELL, JOHNSON P.

JOHNSON P. RUNDELL, Sec. 25; P. O. Washburn; was born in England Oct. 9, 1834; his father, James Rundell, died in England in 1840, and Johnson came with his mother, Betsy to America in 1853; came to Platteville, Grant Co., Wis., and rented a farm then owned by L. L. Goodell, on which he lived four years, and then moved to Mifflin in 1860, and bought 120 acres of land from L. Coats and B. C. Eastman; lived on this farm till 1869, when he moved to the place where he now resides. Was married to Martha Q. Swiers, May 17, 1860, who was born in Iowa, near Dubuque, March 10, 1840; her father, John Swiers, served in the Black Hawk war. They have two children -- Edgar G., born March 10, 1861, and Archie E., Jan. 24, 1863. Johnson has been a member of the School Board in the town of Mifflin and Clifton; was Master of first Grange lodge in Grant Co., organized at Washburn in February, 1873, and was a representative to State Grange two years; is also a member of Masonic order, Mifflin Lodge; owns 500 acres of land, 430 being in Secs. 25 and 36, town of Clifton, and 20 acres timber land on Sec. 16, town of Lima.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

RUNDELL, WILLIAM

WILLIAM RUNDELL, Secs. 12 and 13; P. O. Platteville; was born in Cornwall, England, where he learned the trade of carpenter and joiner. He came to America and Grant Co. in 1848, in company with his brothers Samuel and Thomas; Mr. Rundell assisted in building the Waters Schoolhouse on the Lancaster road and private houses in the vicinity; he rented a farm for one year, and, in 1853, settled on part of his present farm; he now has 201 acres, on which, in 1869, he erected a tasteful and substantial farmhouse, which was planned by himself and family. His first wife, Elizabeth Roberts, of Cornwall, died, leaving a son -- Hercules O., born April 18, 1855, and William R., who died at the age of 29, in Kansas. The present wife, Elizabeth (Hooper) Rundell, was born in Parran, Cornwall; by her he has two children -- Jennie May, born Jan. 31, 1871, and Alden T., born April 29, 1876; all the children were born in Platteville. Mr. Rundell is a member of the P. M. Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

RUNK, JOHN

JOHN RUNK, retired farmer and wagon-maker, Patch Grove; was born in Baltimore Co., Md., Feb. 16, 1809; emigrated to Berkeley Co., Va., with his parents in 1814, from thence to Clinton Co., Ohio, in 1835. His parents died in Ohio in 1836; he then went to Miami Co., Ohio, where he remained until the year 1845, when he came to Wisconsin and located at Jamestown two years; then to Boise Prairie and bought 80 acres of land, this was six miles south of Lancaster; he added to the place until he owned 200 acres, which he sold and removed to Patch Grove. His wife, Rebecca Rankin, was born in Morgan Co., Va., Sept. 18, 1804; they married in 1829, and died Sept. 25, 1876, leaving four children -- Anna E., who died in Ohio; Mary C., now Mrs. Rockwell in Delaware Co., N. Y.; Sarah J., now Mrs. Gee; Alemeda, deceased. In politics, Republican; in religion, Methodist, and has been Steward, also on the Official Board. A man that has made all he has by his own industry and hard work.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

RYAN, JAMES M.

JAMES M. RYAN, farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. Beetown; born in London, England, in 1833. Lived there two and a half years; came to New York in 1836; lived there six months and moved to Grant Co., Wis., the same year; located at Cassville, then moved to Clayton Co., Iowa, near Guttenburg; lived there five years, back to Cassville for two years, then moved to Patch Grove, where he lived until 1852. Became dissatisfied and emigrated to California, and followed mining for five years; saved $2,000, came back to Wisconsin and located at Glen Haven, where he now resides. Married in 1858, to Elizabeth A. Brown, daughter of Jesse S. Brown. Has nine children -- Frank, Effie A., Charles H., John, Lily M., William A., Levi J., Leroy J. and Clyde. Politics, Greenback. Is one of the well-to-do and prosperous farmers of Grant County.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Glen Haven Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

RYAN, JOHN

JOHN RYAN, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. North Andover; one of the most prosperous and leading citizens of Grant County, who has held many prominent positions. Born in 1837, in Cassville, Wis., is a son of John and Deborah Ryan; left Cassville at the age of 5 years, and emigrated to Clayton Co., Iowa; located on Turkey River, and lived there five years, returning to Cassville, where he spent two more years; thence to Patch Grove in 1852, and in 1859 came to Glen Haven, where he has since resided. In 1860, he married Catharine Lewis, a daughter of William Lewis, formerly of Grant County; she was of Scotch descent. He has seven children -- Cora A., William E., James E., John E., Myron L., Reeves A. J. and Lulu. Has been a member of the Town Board five terms, two terms of which he was Chairman; has been Assessor five years, Justice of the Peace eight years, a member of the School Board seventeen years; at present is President of the Farmer's Insurance Co. Has 340 acres of land, valued $15,000. Has been appointed administrator for a large number of valuable estates, among which was the estate of Senator Young, who was murdered not long since. Has been an old war horse in the Republican party until the last few years, when he has marshaled all his forces in the Greenback cause.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Glen Haven Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

RYAN, WILLIAM D.

WILLIAM D. RYAN, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. North Andover. The subject of this sketch is a native of Grant County, his father being one of the old settlers of the State and a tiller of the soil. He is a son of John and Deborah Ryan. Born in 1840, in the village of Cassville, but soon after crossed the beautiful Mississippi River into the fertile regions of Iowa, and located where the village of Guttenburg now stands, where he spent five years; then returned to Grant County, where they have since lived. William is the youngest of three sons, who are the three leading farmers of the county in which they reside. He married, in 1864, Mary Parker, a daughter of Patrick and Mary Parker, by whom he had six children -- Allie, Francis R., Mary D., Julia E., Lo J.; his first wife died in 1875. He married again in 1876, to Mary Power, a daughter of Patrick and Catharine Power, by whom he has three children -- Elgie J., Glendora A., and an infant. Has 170 acres of land, valued at $7,000. Politics, Greenback. Is a member of the Catholic Church; has been School Treasurer one term; has been appointed administrator for for many valuable estates; is one of the many prosperous farmers and stock-raisers of Grant Co., Wis.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Glen Haven Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

RYLAND, GEORGE W.

GEORGE W. RYLAND (Rep.) of Lancaster, Grant county, was born in Selbysport, Allegheny county, Maryland, December 19th, 1827; received a common school education; is a banker; came to Wisconsin in 1853, and settled at Lancaster; was chairman of town board from 1870 to 1877, and of the county-board five years; was postmaster at Lancaster under Lincoln and Johnson; was a delegate to the Republican National Convention held at Philadelphia in 1872; was elected state senator in 1879, receiving 3,129 votes against 1,676 for J. W. Seaton (Democrat), and 623 for S. M. Jones (Greenbacker).

Source: Blue Book of Wisconsin (1880) transcribed by Rhonda Hill

RYLAND, GEORGE W.

GEORGE W. RYLAND (Rep.), of Lancaster, Grant county, was born in Shelbysport, Allegheny county, Maryland, December 19, 1827; received a common school education; is a banker; came to Wisconsin in 1858, and settled at Lancaster; was chairman of the town board for ten years; chairman of county board for eight years; was postmaster under Lincoln and Johnson; delegate to the republican national convention, held at Philadelphia in 1872; elected state senator for 1880 and '81; re-elected for 1882 and '83, receiving 2,668 votes, against 1,370 for George S. Whitchers, democrat, and 133 for S. N. Jones, greenbacker.

(Sixteenth District -- Grant county. Population, 37,852.)

Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1883), page 478; transcribed by Vicki Bryan

Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1882), page 533; transcribed by Mary Saggio



RYLAND, GEORGE W.

GEORGE W. RYLAND, banker, Lancaster; was born in Selbysport, Alleghany Co., Md., Dec. 10, 1827. He received a common-school education. In 1853, he came to Wisconsin, locating at Lancaster ; he was engaged in commercial pursuits, and, during Lincoln's and Johnson's Administrations, he served as Postmaster. He was Chairman of the Town Board from 1870 to 1877, and of the County Board five years. In 1872, he was sent as a delegate to the Republican National Convention, held at Philadelphia-In 1879, he was elected State Senator by a large majority over his two competitors. In 1867, he engaged in the banking and exchange business, and is, to-day, the senior member of the firm of Ryland & Co., bankers.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

SALTZMAN, B. F.

B. F. SALTZMAN, blacksmith and wagon-maker, Georgetown; established business in 1868; born in Posey Co., Ind., in 1826; came to this county in 1835, and settled in Platteville in 1848; he left Platteville and located in Beetown, where he lived three years; he then went to California, came back in 1857, made the second trip to California and returned in 1859. In 1862, he enlisted in Company E, 25th W. V. I., and served until the close of war; he was promoted to Second Lieutenant ten months previous to his discharge. The same year he enlisted he married Elizabeth Haney, a native of Ohio. They have two children -- Lulu and Gertie. Mrs. S. is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Smelser Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SALZGABER, LEONARD

LEONARD SALZGABER, farmer and dairyman, Sec. 35; P. O. Boscobel; was born in Baden, Germany, where he worked in an oil mill for five years. He came to America in 1862, landing at New York May 27; he went from New York to Canada, where he remained until October, when he came to Chicago, thence to Boscobel in 1867, and has since been engaged in farming; he owns 35 acres of good land, which he has been enabled to purchase by industry and perseverance; married in 1868 to Margaretta Rean, who is a native of Hesse-Darmstadt. They have six children -- three boys and three girls.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SALZMANN, GEORGE

GEORGE SALZMANN, farmer, Sec. 25; P. O. Dickeyville; owns 160 acres of land; son of Adam and Anna Salzmann; was born in Gusladen, Prussia, Nov. 18, 1815; he came to the United States in 1849; settled first in Ohio near Cincinnati; lived there about two years; went to Kentucky, near Covington, where he remained about five years; thence to Galena, Ill., three years; thence to Dickeyville, where he lived on a rented farm for four years; then on Sec. 36, town of Paris, three years; then, in 1866, he bought the place where he lived until the 29th of July, 1877, when he died suddenly in the field while at work. He was married Feb. 2, 1843, to Miss Theresa Junemann, daughter of Martin and Theresa (Hartung) Junemann, of his native place; she still resides on the homestead in Paris; they had eight children, six of whom are living -- Anna, now Mrs. Jentz, living in Hazel Green, Wis.; Elizabeth, now Mrs. Ginter, living in Conception, Mo.; Barbara, now Mrs. Weagel, living in Benton, Mo.; Caspar, living at Ishpeming, Mich.; Henry J., at home; Frank, at Corwith, Iowa. Mrs. Salzmann was a member of the Holy Ghost Chapel, German Catholic Church, at Dickeyville.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Paris Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SAMPSON, ARCH

DR. ARCH SAMPSON, Fair Play; born in Fairfax, Vt., May 16, 1818; attended Burlington University, Vermont, graduated at Dartmouth Medical College in 1843; immigrated to Fair Play, Grant Co., Wis., in the fall of 1845, and commenced practicing medicine; his property is in village lots, the probable value of which is $1,000. In politics, a Republican; was formerly a follower of the old Whig party; in religion, is of the Protestant faith; public offices held by him are Justice of the Peace, Town Superintendent, and at present (1881) Postmaster at Fair Play. Married Sophronia Gibbs, a native of Jericho, Vt.; is the father of three children -- Emma, Charles, Florence; one son deceased -- Charles.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Jamestown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SANDERMAN, THOMAS

THOMAS SANDERMAN, Sec. 24; P. O. Livingston; was born in England January, 1817; came to New York in 1843, and from there to Platteville, where he worked at farming and mining on the Laughton farm, where William Waters now lives; from there he removed to the town of Clifton, where he bought 80 acres of land from the Government, on which he settled, and has lived there ever since; has been on School Board several times. T. Sanderman married to Martha Thomson at her father's house; they had ten children, of whom eight are living -- Hannah, Sarah A., John P., Martha E., Maria J., August, Adeline, Ruth; the deceased are Jonathan and Mary E., both buried in Rock Church Cemetery; his wife Martha, died April 1, 1866, after which he married Sarah Manning in 1868, who died July 26, 1880; was buried in Calvary Church Cemetery; he built the first house in that locality; bought the second reaper that was brought on the prairie, and went to Dubuque for it; has three daughters married, Hannah married Robert Watson, Sarah married Richard Hammon, and Elizabeth married William Warne.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SANFORD, ALBERT HART A.M.

Born at Platteville, Grant County, Wisconsin, June 21, 1866. Fitted at the Platteville State normal school, and entered U. W. English course in 1889, graduating in 1891 with the degree of B. L. (English). He was a member of Hesperia, and one of the four winners of the Lewis prize at commencement. Mr. Sanford pursued graduate study at U. W. until the close of 1893, and for the following year at Harvard University, there receiving the degree of A. M. in 1894. Since then he has been an instructor in history and civics at the Stevens Point State normal school, He was married in 1895 to Miss Luella M. Roberts, a student of U. W. in the class of '94, and has one child, a daughter.

Source: The University of Wisconsin: its history and its alumni (1836 -- 1900) Edited by Reuben Gold Thwaites -pages 732-736 (1900) transcribed by FoFG mz

SAWYER, M. A.

M. A. SAWYER, of the firm of Sawyer & Favor, drugs, books and fancy groceries, Boscobel; is a native of Vermont; when a child, he came with his parents to New Hampshire; clerked in a drug store in Meridith and in Concord, N. H., several years; in 1858, he opened a drug store in Bristol, N. H.; continued it till September, 1860, when he sold out and went to New Orleans; remained about six months; at the breaking-out of the war, he returned to New Hampshire, and was appointed Hospital Steward in the 3d N. H. V. I.; in 1863, he came to Milwaukee, where he remained till the following February; he then went to Louisiana and engaged in raising sugar and cotton, having, in company with others, leased a Government plantation, employing about seventy hands; they continued this about two years; in August, 1866, he came to Boscobel and bought an interest with Mr. Mortimer in the drug business; Mr. Mortimer died soon after; the firm then changed to Sawyer & Ames; afterward to Pittman & Sawyer, which continued till May, 1870, when he sold out to Mr. McWilliams; in September, 1870, the firm of Sawyer & Favor was established. He was married July 1, 1865, to Anna M. Prescott; she was born in New Hampshire; they have one daughter.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SCANLAN, MARY

MARY SCANLAN, farming, Sec. 28; P. O. Woodman; a daughter of Denis and Catherine Scanlan, of Ireland; came to America at the age of 12 years, locating in Canada for two years; then in New York for four years; then in Indiana, near Bedford, for five or six years; then in Crawford Co., Wis., for one year; thence going to Grant Co., where he has lived since. Was married in 1846, to John Scanlan, a native of Ireland; has five children -- Ellen, William, Mary, Sarah, John; has 440 acres of land, and is a member of the Catholic Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Woodman Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SCHAEFER, JOHN C. Jr.,

JOHN C. SCHAEFER, Jr., retired farmer, Muscoda; was born in Prussia Dec. 29, 1811. He is a son of John C. and Anna Klin Schaefer. His father's business was raising grapes and making wine. He received his education in his native town, and worked for his father until 25 years old, when he established the same business for himself, which he conducted for ten years. He also served two years in the army in the old country. He came to America in 1847, and located in this county, and engaged in farming until 1875, when he retired and came to Muscoda to live. He was married, Feb. 7, 1837, to Miss Anna Margaret Meyer, a native of Germany. Peter Schaefer, a son of John C., was born in Iowa Co. in 1849. He lived with his parents until he was 12 years old. He then engaged as clerk in a general store for Mr. Daniel Zimas in 1867. He came to Muscoda, and clerked for McKittrick & Sons five years; then engaged in his present business, selling agricultural implements. He was married, Nov. 21, 1872, to Miss Mary Stedle. They have five children. He has been Town Clerk seven terms, and member of the Board two years.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SCHAEMPFLUG, FRED

FRED SCHAEMPFLUG, furniture dealer, Boscobel; born in Prussia; came to Baltimore, Md., in 1854; thence to Cincinnati; in 1856, went to Milwaukee; followed the mason trade there about five years, having learned this trade in Prussia; in 1861, came to Boscobel; has followed this trade more or less since coming here; in 1867, he established his furniture store, which he still continues; carries a stock of about $1,000; his sales amount to about $6,000 per year. Is a member of the Lutheran Church. He was married in 1861 to Lizzie Martin; she was born in Germany; they have three children -- one son and two daughters. He owns his store, also his residence and other property in town.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SCHALLENBERGER, JACOB

JACOB SCHALLENBERGER, Sec. 29; P. O. Cassville; owns 310 acres land, valued at $15 per acre. Born in Switzerland in 1810, came to America in 1818, and located with his parents in Pennsylvania. In 1849, he removed to this county and settled on his present farm. Married Margaret Brookens, a native of Pennsylvania. They have five children -- Jane, Maria, Hester, Rebecca and Joseph; are members of the M. E. Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Glen Haven Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SCHLOESSER, BARBARA

MISS BARBARA SCHLOESSER, milliner, Lancaster; commenced business in the spring of 1868, in partnership with Miss Anna Finney; after one year, Miss Finney retired and Miss Schloesser has since continued alone; she carries a stock of nearly $1,000 during the busy season ; Miss Schloesser is a native of Germany, born near the city of Cologne, a daughter of Henry J. and Catherine (Schaeffer) Schloesser; her parents came to the United States in 1849, and lived in Racine nearly three years, when they settled on a farm near Lancaster where they died, her mother, June 7, 1857, and her father, Feb. 12, 1859, aged respectively 42 and 48. She has four brothers living ; her brother John who enlisted in the 8th W. V. I., died in Andersonville Prison from starvation, after many months' suffering, having been taken a prisoner at the battle of Gettysburg; another brother, Henry, of the 2d W. I. C, of congestive chills after a severe campaign, Aug. 4, 1864.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

SCHMITT, ANDREW

ANDREW SCHMITT, merchant and farmer; P. O. Dickeyville; son of Michael and Margaret Schmitt; was born in the village of Zeuthern, Baden, Germany, Jan. 25, 1832; he came to the United States in September, 1852, landing at New York; thence he went to Newark, N. J., where he worked as a clerk in a store; the next year, he visited a sister in St. Louis; from there went to Menomonee, Dunn Co., and worked for Knapp, Stout & Co., at lumbering and in their store; remained with them until the spring of 1857, when he came to Dunleith and commenced business for himself as a merchant; the same year he started a branch store in Jamestown, and, in 1860, he opened another branch in Dickeyville; soon afterward, he moved to Dickeyville and discontinued his other two stores, and is still engaged in general merchandise; he built the hotel in Dickeyville, and owned it for many years; he is also engaged in farming, and owns about 600 acres; has a fine vineyard; deals in stock, and has a fire insurance agency. He has been Notary Public and Postmaster in Dickeyville since 1861; was elected Justice of the Peace the same year; Chairman of the Board for the town of Paris in 1862-64; Town Treasurer in 1865, and successively ever since to the same office. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, also an Odd Fellow. Is a Republican in politics; in religion, a Catholic. He was married June 11, 1856, in Menomonee, to Miss Christina Scheppele, from Baden, Germany; they had four children -- Louisa, now Mrs. May, of Jamestown, born June 11, 1858; John A., born May 28, 1860; Rosa, born Jan. 8, 1868; Christian F., born Feb. 12, 1870; having lost his wife in 1872, he was married July 13, 1874, to Miss Elizabeth Schmeltz; they have two children -- Barbara, born Sept. 22, 1875, and Joseph George, born Feb. 22, 1880. His mother, at that time a widow, came in 1854 with the rest of her family, and settled in St. Louis, where she died Sept. 11, 1857. His brother, Maximilian, resides in St. Louis, and carries on a manufactory for plows and also a carriage factory; his sister Katharina (Mrs. Gaus), also lives in St. Louis, and owns several large business blocks, also the Iron Mountain Hotel. His sister Josephine (Mrs. Kastner) resides in St. Genevieve, Mo.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Paris Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SCHMITT, ANTON

ANTON SCHMITT, proprietor of the Phelps House ; was torn Nov. 4, 1830, in the village of Dexbach, Grand Duchy of Hesse Darmstadt, Germany. He was married to Miss Elizabeth Briul of the same place, who was born March 15, 1829 ; they emigrated to this country in 1854, and came to Lancaster June 10, the same year. Mr. Schmitt is a farmer and miller by trade ; he bought a farm in Section 2, town of Beetown, on which he lived until April, 1855, when he purchased of J. Allen Barber a gristmill and farm in the town of Lancaster, called Grant Mills, which he operated and tilled the farm until 1869, when owing to poor health he sold the mill and moved to the village of Lancaster ; in 1870, he engaged in the general merchandise trade, which business he carried on in Lancaster and Fennimore until January, 1876 ; in 1870, he bought 28 acres of land in the village of Lancaster on which he built a dwelling house and other improvements, planted a vineyard of 2 acres, orchard and small fruit, which he has cultivated successfully in connection with his other business ; is one of the first and most successful grape and small fruit growers in this part of the county. Has six children Louise, born in Germany, Dec. 20, 1852, now living in Dutch Flat, Gal., married to J. E. Knott ; Caroline, Aug. 18, 1855 ; Carl, April 20, 1857, died Jan. 2, 1870; Adolph, born April 25, 1859 ; Amelia, Jan. 12, 1861 ; Elizabeth, March 20, 1863 ; Veronica, Oct. 8, 1865 ; the four daughters and one son are assisting their parents in their present occupation. Mr. Schmitt has passed all the chairs in the I. 0. O. F., and has been a member of the lodge for twenty years ; always been in active business life, and self-made.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

SCHNITZLER, T.

T. SCHNITZLER, fire and accident insurance agent, Platteville; is a native of De Pere, Wis., born in 1855; came to Platteville in the winter of 1876, and engaged in the confectionery business, which he still continues. He was married in October, 1877, in Platteville, to Miss Anna, daughter of Engle Vanderlire, one of the early settlers of Platteville, who died Jan. 29, 1880; he had been engaged in the insurance business for the last ten years of his life, and, at his death, Mr. Schnitzler succeeded him in that business.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SCHREINER

NATHAN, SCHREINER & CO., dealers in general merchandise and live stock, Lancaster This house was established in 1860, by J. Nathan ; in 1862, the firm became J. Nathan & Son, and, in 1864, Nathan, Schreiner & Co. The same year dry goods, clothing, hats, caps, boots and shoes were added to the line of groceries. In 1865, J. Nathan retiring, he was succeeded by his son, Joseph Nathan. This house is the largest in the city, and does an annual trade of $75,000 ; they built their present store in 1867 ; employ a full force of eight men ; they also handle live stock, cattle, hogs and sheep ; ship to Chicago and Milwaukee, their receipts reaching $200,000 per annum.

SCHRODER, H. P.

H. P. SCHRODER, merchant, Platteville; has been in business in Platteville since March, 1870, in his present location, where he keeps a general store; he is a native of Prussia, born in 1838. In 1846, his parents came to America and settled in La Fayette Co., Wis., in 1847; he left home in 1851, and went to St. Paul, Minn., where he remained till the spring of 1862, then went to California and remained there till 1869; he then returned to Wisconsin, and has been a resident of Platteville since that time. He was married, in Platteville, in the spring of 1870, to Miss Minnie C., daughter of John Kenler, of that place. His father, Peter Schroder, went to California in 1849, and died there in the winter of 1851. Mrs. Schroder is still living in Platteville.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SCHUELTER, HUBERT

HUBERT SCHUELTER, shoemaker; P. O. Burton; was born Jan. 21, 1847, in Prussia; son of Mathias and Gerthrude Schuelter; came here in 1854, and followed farming until his enlistment, in October, 1863, in Co. A, 1st W. V. C.; served two years; assisted in the capture of Jeff Davis, and received $317 of the reward. He was married Dec. 31, 1869, to Florence, daughter of Emerson and Mary (Droullard) Chapman; they have had five children -- Anna, born Nov. 28, 1869, died Dec. 5, 1872; Henry, born Jan. 6, 1871, died at 1 year of age; Lena, born Jan. 26, 1874; Anna B., born Jan. 8, 1877; Henry A., born Aug. 5, 1879. In politics, Republican; in religion, Catholic. He has been Constable four years. Assisted in organizing the Good Templars Lodge.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Waterloo Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SCHULZ, GEORGE J.

GEORGE J. SCHULZ, blacksmith, wagon manufacturer and general repairer of machinery, Muscoda; born in Bavaria on the Rhine in 1849; came to America in 1864, and located at Burlington, Iowa; came to Muscoda in 1869, and established his present business in 1872; learned his trade in the old country with his father, who was a first-class mechanic. His business has gradually increased from the start, and he has taken his brother in as a partner, who has charge of the wagon-making department. The firm name will be Schulz Brothers. George J. was married, in Muscoda, in 1872, to Miss Elizabeth Michael, a native of Pennsylvania, by whom he has three children -- one son and two daughters. He is a first-class mechanic, and has worked himself up from a poor boy, now owning his own place of business.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SCHWAB, FRED

FRED SCHWAB, farmer; Sec. 15; P. O. Boscobel; born in Baden, Germany, in 1831; came to America in 1867, and to Grant Co., Wis., where he has since lived; in 1877, removed to his present farm; owns 140 acres of land. Married in 1859 to Catharine Heller; she was born in Baden; they have two children -- Louis and Lena.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Marion) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SCHWAIGER, PETER

REV. PETER SCHWAIGER, is a native of Bavaiia, Germany, and was born at Schweinkofen April 28, 1838; received his education there and studied five years in Bavaria; emigrated U> America in September, 1858, studied in Westmoreland, Penn., then came to Milwaukee where he completed his studies at St. Francis' Seminary and was ordained in that city in 1863, his first pastorate was in Washington Co.; he has served acceptably as Pastor in the counties of Sheboygan, Dane and Racine, and was appointed Pastor of his present church in 1877.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

SCOTT, J. C.

J. C. SCOTT, County Surveyor, Patch Grove; was born in Grant Co., Wis., Feb. 17, 1847; removed to Galena in 1850, with his parents, where he remained until 1870. Attended the high school and graduated in 1863. He learned the trade of shoemaker with his father. Attended the State University in the year 1865; and, in 1866 and 1867, worked at Bridgeport in the railroad office and grain warehouse. In the spring of 1869, he went to Salt Lake; returned to Patch Grove Feb. 9, 1870, and engaged in general merchandise under the firm name of Scott & Hicklin, sold out to John J. Humphrey Feb. 9, 1879. In 1872, in company with A. Paul and John Hicklin, built the mill at the Grove, the first steam grist-mill in the county; attended the mill until 1877. Elected County Surveyor the fall of 1880; was Town Trustee from 1870 to 1876; Chairman of Town Board in 1876; Assessor in 1877; Town Clerk for 1880; Census Enumerator for 1880; Notary Public for ten years; School Clerk six years; member of I. O. O. F. and A., F. & A. M. Lodges. Republican; in religion, believer. His wife, Angeline Paul, was born at Patch Grove April 5, 1852, daughter of James and Angeline Paul, who came to Wisconsin in 1847; her father came in 1842. They married Dec. 21, 1870; they have four children -- Elsie A., born Jan. 17, 1873; Christina E., born Sept. 5, 1875; John Nagle C, born July 28, 1878; Eulalia, born Nov. 9, 1880.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SCOTT, THEODORE W.

Theodore W. Scott, a younger brother of Thomas B. Scott, was born in Grant county, Wisconsin, on June 2, 1861, and is the son of Frederick and Ann (Wheeler) Scott, more extensive mention of whom will be found in the sketch of their son Thomas B., elsewhere in this work. He grew to the age of fifteen on the Wisconsin homestead and then, in 1876, moved with the family to Harrison county, Iowa. He was educated in the public schools, and remained at home until 1890. At that time he came to Colorado and entered one hundred and sixty acres of land six miles south of Steamboat Springs, Routt county. In addition to this he bought one hundred and sixty acres, and on these two tracts started an industry in the stock business which he conducted successfully and profitably for four years. He then sold his possessions in that section and moved to Grand Valley, locating on the farm which is now his home, six miles northwest of Grand Junction, arriving there in the autumn of 1894. He bought forty acres of wild land without improvements, to which he has added thirty of the same kind by a subsequent purchase. On this he has established himself and built up a prosperous and expanding fruit business, improving his place with a good, modern residence and other necessary buildings, and giving his attention to the cultivation and enlargement of his orchards. He has twenty acres in fruit, which yield large crops of excellent quality, the returns of his labor in 1903 being more than four thousand five hundred boxes of apples and two hundred boxes of pears. By his industry and skill he has redeemed his land from the wilderness and made it productive and smiling with fruits of peaceful husbandry and made a desirable home of what was before a barren waste. On July 11, 1899, he married with Miss Luella Rogers, a native of Harrison county, Iowa, and daughter of John W. and Sarah A. (Riley) Rogers, natives of Ohio, where they grew to maturity, were educated and married. In 1886 they moved to Iowa and settled on a farm in Harrison county, making the trip overland from their Ohio home. John W. Rogers served three years in the Union army during the Civil war. He is now a highly respected citizen of Mesa county. Mr. and Mrs. Scott have three children, Rex R., Glenn G. and Fred R. In politics Mr. Scott is independent, and is always keenly alive to the best interests of the community in which he lives.

Source: Progressive Men of Western Colorado (Publ. 1905) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

SEATON, J.W.

By J. W. Seaton.

It was in the month of July, in the year 1817, that a Northern Lake boat, "bearing Caesar and his fortunes," and a few less distinguished personages, landed in the city of Milwaukee. The shore was reached by a broad plank—uncarpeted— being shoved out into the sand. Down this, one by one, the passengers filed, and through the deep, burning sand, carpet sack in hand (grip-sacks were undeveloped), for half a mile or more, the few passengers made their way to the limits of the city (it was quite a limited city then), and sought the accommodation of a first class hotel. They found one. It consisted of a long, one-and-a-half story frame building with a porch in front, and chairs ranged thereon for the accommodation of guests. The fare was beefsteak, boiled potatoes with the jackets on, coffee, warm biscuits of a saffron hue and an alkaline flavor, all placed on the center of a long table, within reach of the most modest guest, which was " Caesar." They were disposed of with a relish, however, and perhaps went as far to satisfy the inner man as the sumptuous bills of fare which are now served from the sideboards of the Newhall and the Plankinton. Rest for the weary was provided up one flight of stairs, on beds of straw duly separated by board partitions. Dizzy dormitories on sixth and seventh story floors were not reached by elevators on this occasion, and, when morn broke in the east, you did not look out like an angel from mansions in the skies, to take observations of the waking world, and then descend, like a miner down a shaft, to the common level of mortals. None of these conditions existed. But one day and one night of this delectable, primitive city life sufficed for a lifetime and, in a two-horse hack, with a jovial companion of lesser note than the writer considered himself at that time, but who has since managed to " climb the steep where Fame's high temple shines afar"—the Hon. Orsamus Cole, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court—we set out in search of green fields and fresher pastures, over farmless prairies, around the margins of charming lakes, which in their undisturbed repose, and the cool quiet shade of the old oak openings which lined their borders, seemed an epitome of the '' Saint's Rest "—through fenceless valley's and over the brow of treeless hills, we reach at length, on the second day out, the gallant young city of Madison, the capitol of the State. Stat umhra et preterea nihil. An unpretentious hotel situated near the foot of Lake street, wearing the modest title of " Lake House," gave us of its cheer, which was a repetition of the Milwaukee sort, with the addition of broiled prairie chicken and fried fresh fish. It enjoyed also the more exalted honor of being the headquarters of His Excellency, Gov. Henry Dodge, who was then in the zenith of his power. It was here he gave the famous reception to the German Count, displaying a hunting knife and a pair of horse pistols as the insignia of his rank and badge of his office. The city boasted of two other hotels of about the same magnitude and style of architecture as the Lake House ; the one standing near the present site of the Vilas House, kept by Robert Lansing, and the other the notorious " American," which stood on the corner to the north of the park. These, with the old capitol, which looked more like a prison house of the Dark Ages than the capitol of a civilized State in the nineteenth century, and perhaps a hundred or more private residences, environed with hazel-bushes and the primitive oak groves—no house as yet being erected west of the grounds reserved for the public park—comprised all there was of this now beautiful inland city. Even then it was an enchanting spot. Nature, in one of her most wanton moods, seemed to have lavished here her fairest charms and most seductive smiles. Lakes, groves, and undulating hills all conspired to captivate the senses, and lead the adorer to exclaim in his heart,

" These are thy glorious works, Parent of Good !
Almighty! thine this everlasting frame,
Thus wondrous fair !"

Here were landscapes and pictures of loveliness, unapproachable in their design, perfect in their execution, painted by the hand which had long since designed the blue canons of the skies, and painted the starry galleries of the heavens. Leaving this paradise of places, where reason and the charms of nature invited us to stay and make our fame and fortune (if such a thing were possible), we resumed once more our journey westward, and soon were approaching the lofty summits of the Blue Mound. Arriving at the old home of Ebenezer Brigham, which started short distance from the public highway, in all its original simplicity—a double log cabin of the Southern type—we partook of a choice meal of venison and pastry, supplemented by other rare dainties of a well-spread Western table, which we have ever since held in grateful remembrance. Here for the first time, I met the hero of Pecatonica. Gov. Henry Dodge, who, in company with Judge and Frank Dunn, was on his way to Madison, the latter to attend a session of the Supreme Court, of which the Judge, in Territorial days, was Chief Justice. The stockade near the Mound, called "Mound Fort," was still standing about a mile and a half south of Brigham's house, and could be seen from it, excited the most lively emotions in my young and enthusiastic mind. Here was one of the strongholds of the early settlers, where they had brought their wives and children, to protect them against the wily assaults of the renowned chief of the Sacs and Foxes and his followers—Black Hawk and his 'warriors. In this neighborhood the blood-thirsty savages had murdered a member of Brigham's family. It was in the sight of this Fort two of its inmates, who were out reconnoitering, had been surrounded by the lurking enemy, killed and horribly mutilated, in the presence of their companions, and which deed of atrocity had led to the relentless punishment which Gen. Dodge and his command soon after gave them at the famous battle of the Pecatonica where, out of a band of seventeen warriors, not a red-skin was left to tell the tale. Ail were killed. It was to this fort the young Hall girls, after a month's wandering and captivity, were brought in a most destitute and forlorn condition, and where they were so kindly received and treated by the ladies of the Fort. The scene of these cruelties and war-like exploits made a deep and lasting impression upon my mind at the time, as well as the wide, romantic view of the surrounding country, which these lofty summits enables the eye of the traveler to obtain. From here onward we came in contact with the old-time mode of transportation of lead across the State to the lake ports—three and four yoke of cattle attached to a heavy wagon the " prairie schooners " of early times—which made their regular monthly voyages to and from the lakes and mines—taking out their cargo of pig lead, and returning with merchandise and family stores. It was a slow but sure and profitable business. In driving these teams many a Yankee boy learned forcible expressions and expletives which he never dreamed before were in the English language. Passing through the already important and wealthy mining villages of Dodgeville, Mineral Point and of Platteville, all then flourishing places and deserving of mention, we reach, at last, the brow of the hill where the road descends into this ancient burg Potosi. What a view is here again presented ! Before you, to the southward and westward, is. a prospect the most beautiful which can be imagined. It is not in your immediate presence, in superlative languages, sublime, illimitable, immense ; it is rather quiet, impressive, peculiar. To the right and left are gentle, undulating slopes, clothed in emerald green of waving oaks, mark the northern limits of the long, deep and sinuous ravine you are about to enter. Its trailing course, as it presented itself to the early settler, winding in dark and dismal folds to the river, begot the name of " Snake Hollow," by which sobriquet it was long known among the miners. On either hand burst forth two large and never-failing springs of limpid water, which form the source of the beautiful stream called by the harsh, ill-sounding pseudonym of " Snake Hollow Branch." All the diminutive streams in the mining region which branch came from and supply the larger water-courses are known by this peculiar, and I may say, appropriate applicative. Hence we have " Rigsby Branch," "Dry Hollow Branch," "Long Branch," " Eayres' Branch," and many other branches, all tributary to the Grant and Platte Rivers, which course through the town in nearly every direction, furnishing pure and living water to almost every farm. None of them are sluggish in their movement, but go rippling and bounding down to mingle with the great Father of Waters ; and to their purifying influence more than any other causes, may we justly attribute the continued exemption of this town from malarial and other diseases, so destructive to human life and happiness in many Western towns.

The moisture with which they continually supplied the earth and air were also productive of a heavy growth of forest trees which are still numerous, and which, fifty years ago, shaded nearly every rod of ground within the borders of the town with their dark, dense foliage. And it is to these huge trees, many of them the slow growth of centuries, more than the products of the mines, rich and valuable as they have been, Potosi has derived a preponderant share of its wealth and prosperity. Chopping and boating cord-wood and timber to the Dubuque market has for years been a lucrative business, and many of our prominent citizens have derived therefrom a respectable independence, a fact which can be said of but very few who have delved and wasted their lives in the lead mines.

But to return to the brow of the hill, where like De Soto, I gazed for the first time upon the broad, matchless and almost boundless valley of the Mississippi, where sweeps its mighty waters to the ocean. It was standing upon this elevation, looking over and beyond the little valley in my immediate presence into the vast and almost measureless valley beyond, that I became impressed with the greatness and grandeur of the country I had reached. There, almost at my very feet, flowed the world's most magnificent river. There, within reach of my vision, clearly defined by the shores of this mighty stream, were the eastern boundaries of an, empire yet to be. The Great West, with its vast prairies, its arid plains, its streams and mountains, its wooded hills and valleys, its " boundless contiguity of shade," yet uninhabited and unexplored by the foot of civilized man, stretching onward and onward to the far limits of a continent, presented itself to my mind, and I shrunk into nothingness, and was ready to exclaim in the language of the Psalmist " What is man that thou art mindful of him or the Son of Man that thou visited him." Surely, thought I, here is a region so far-reaching in its limits, so wild and weird in its aspect, so much beyond the necessities of the present civilization that centuries must elapse before the broad acres of its prairies will be needed to supply the wants of man, and generations must expire before the solitude of its woods and streams shall be broken up or re-echo to the sound of the woodman's ax.

At this date, 1847, Potosi was second to no other town in the county. Her miners were prosperous, her mechanics were profitably employed, her merchants were doing an increasing and extensive business both in the wholesale and retail trade. Lancaster, Wingville, Beetown, the Hurricane and all surrounding points came here to purchase their supplies. Steamboats left the landing weekly, freighted with lead and brought back in return the necessaries and luxuries of life, as whisky, bacon, flour, staple groceries and dry goods. A printing office whence issued the Potosi Republican whereof your humble servant was proprietor and editor, and weekly expounded good, sound. Democratic doctrine) was here sustained and shed its benign influence over the darker portions of the county ; four lawyers. Cole & Biddlecorae, the former now Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, and the latter one of the brightest intellects and most promising young men the State could boast, who since pursued his profession in St. Louis and died in Florida ; Judge Cyrus K. Lord and Hon. William Hull, both residents at the present time of La Crosse, where they still pursue their honorable profession. Judge Lord was Receiver of the Land Office at that point, holding his appointment from President Franklin Pierce, and William Hull distinguished himself in the Legislature during the term of Gov. Bashford's administration as the popular Speaker of the House ; closing his political career, he located at La Crosse and became the attorney of Commodore Davidson's Northern Line of Boats, which position he still holds. The medical profession was eminently represented by such skilled practitioners as Dr. Carlos M. Hewitt, now a respected citizen of Boscobel, but whose failing health has prohibited him for several years from active practice. Drs. Bannett Armstrong, George W. Bicknell and John Creighton, all of whom are now dead, and a few years later, Dr. Taylor L. Graham, who still resides and pursues his profession among us.

Among the principal merchants at that period, who were engaged in active business, were Solon M. Langworthy, now of the city of Dubuque, a son of old Dr. Langworthy, an early pioneer of the mines. Donald A. McKinzie, a Scotchman by birth, boasting Highland blood, who came from St. Louis about the year 1840, entered into the lead and mercantile business and established a character for honesty and fair dealing which became proverbial. He subsequently entered into partnership with Julius Augustine and James Garmick, doing business under the firm name of McKenzie, Augustine & Co. The firm was dissolved in the spring of 1855, Mr. McKenzie removing to Dubuque and Mr. Garmick to Dunleith, where, for a few years, they were connected with the Dubuque & Dunleith Ferry Company, Mr. McKenzie for many years being the trusted and efficient clerk of the company. The members of this firm are now all dead, Mr. Garmick having become an invalid and cripple several years before his death from a railroad accident, suffering the loss of his right arm. He was a good citizen, and an intelligent, worthy man.

Samuel Wilson, a native of County Down, Ireland, was another leading merchant. He came to Potosi about the year 1840, from the city of Galena, where he had previously been in business, and engaged at first as a clerk in the store of D. A. McKenzie. Subsequently purchasing the stock of Lawther & Dyer, who removed to Dubuque, he commenced business for himself, and continued it until the summer of 1857, when his active and busy career was brought to an untimely end, and he passed from the busy walks of life to the cold and silent grave. Mr. Wilson was a fine man, correct and expert in all his business transactions, and the soul of honor. His memory is yet cherished by all who knew him, and none pass his morale monument in our village cemetery without mentioning his manly virtues, and paying a tribute to his genial qualities and kindly heart. While residing in Galena, he became acquainted with and married Elizabeth Carpenter, an estimable lady, and a step-daughter of Gov. Briggs, late of Andrew, Iowa. Mrs. Wilson remained in widowhood for a number of years after the death of her husband, and then was re-married to a Col. Cobb, a gentleman who resided a short time during the war in Potosi. They soon afterward disposed of their pleasant home here, and went to reside at Farmington, Mo., the place whence the Colonel had migrated during the troublesome times. Both have since passed to their long repose. Dr. George M. Wilson, an only son, survives them, and is practicing medicine in Missouri.

Another merchant of note was the late Simon E. Lewis, who passed from the scenes of life in July, 1874. He was probably the shrewdest, most energetic and successful of all who were here engaged in business at an early day, securing by his industry, tact and enterprise an ample fortune, which his children now enjoy. Mr. L. was born in Austria, on the Upper Danube; leaving his native country while yet a young man, to seek and carve out for himself a name and fortune in a strange land, which the limited opportunities and over-crowded state of affairs denied to him and others like him in his own land. Landing in the New World alone and almost penniless, he makes his way westward to the then almost frontier of civilization, and takes up his residence at Bowling Green, Mo., where the natural avocation of his people leads him to engage in the mercantile business. From the beginning, he is a prosperous and rising man. Learning of the fortunes being so readily made in the Upper Lead Mines, he closes his small establishment in Bowling Green, and the spring of 1840 finds him domiciled in Potosi, selling large quantities of supplies to the miners and neighboring farmers, who were then struggling in the swaddling clothes worn by all settlers in a new country—scarcely able, to live and gain a foothold on the soil. Of course they needed credit, and Mr. Lewis soon became abundantly able and freely gave them all the credit their circumstances required. He thus secured a large and profitable trade, and became well and widely known to all the leading men of the county. About the year 1847, Mr. Lewis was joined by a younger brother, Mr. John P. Lewis, and for several years thereafter the business was conducted in the firm name of John P. Lewis & Co. Other partners succeeded, and branches of their growing business were established at Wingville, Lancaster and British Hollow. He purchased the interest of Julius Augustine in the steam saw-mill located at the mouth of the Hollow, erected by Messrs. Kinney & Augustine, in the year 1853, which for many years did a large and profitable business, and was a partner in the saw-mill and mercantile business, the firm being known as Kinney & Co., until a few months before his death. In the year 1857, he was elected to and held the responsible office of County Treasurer, discharging its duties in a creditable and efficient manner. Mr. Lewis was long known in this community, and exerted a large influence in the business circles as well as over the political and social interests of the town. His second son, George H. Lewis, succeeded him in the mercantile business. His amiable widow remains upon the homestead, while the other members of his family are Dr. John S. Lewis, of Dubuque, Iowa; Josephine McKee, the wife of John McKee, a well-known citizen of Leavenworth, Kan.; Eugene H. Lewis, a promising a young lawyer of New York City—a junior partner in the law firm of Chamberlin, Carter & Hornblower—the first-named individual being the late notorious carpet-bag Governor of Georgia, and T. G. Lewis, a student of Beloit College, Wis. Cyrena, his eldest daughter, and wife of Dr. Taylor L. Graham, died a few years since, and sleeps beside the affectionate father whom she loved so well in life, in the old Van Buren Cemetery, on the ridge west of the village.

Celestine Kaltenbach was then, as now. Postmaster, which position he has held for the past forty-three years almost continuously, being the oldest Postmaster in the State. He received his first appointment from Amos Kendall, August 28, 1838, under the administration of President Van Buren, and has discharged its onerous duties so faithfully and well, that no administration has seen fit to remove him. He is a worthy man and good citizen, besides being a prominent merchant of forty years' standing ; has held several offices of trust and responsibility in school, church and town. In former years, no man exercised a wider or more salutary influence. over the community, and especially his own countrymen, than did Celestine Kaltenbach. He is still spared in the vigor of health, and in the enjoyment of happiness, surrounded by his estimable wife and children, a worthy and well-preserved monument of early life in the mines.

There were many others doing business here worthy of extended notice, but space forbids other than a brief reference to their names—all of whom, or nearly all, are now out of active business, have removed from the place or been gathered in by the Great Reaper. To close the list I will simply mention the names of those most familiar to my memory : Haines & Hollub, I. Gr. Ury, Langworthy & Williams, Block & Kaltenbach—the senior member of the firm being Elias Block, now a wealthy banker in San Francisco, who was succeeded in business by his brother, Hyman E. Block, who married the eldest daughter of his partner and became an active and influential citizen of the town (now a prominent commission merchant of St Louis), Mr. A. B. Southworth (a relative of the celebrated novelist, Emma D. E. N. Southworth), tinsmith and dealer in stoves. He closed business here about the year 1850. Mr. S. afterward located in San Francisco, where he accumulated a large fortune in the lumber trade. Bicknell & Armstrong kept a drug store ; and there were the usual number of shops, saloons and other places of resort which constituted a well-regulated mining town. Samuel Vance and his brother James conducted a thriving business in general merchandise at British Hollow, where was also the old brewery and several saloons in full blast, furnishing potations to the thirsty and thrifty English miners of that village. A small store was kept by Edward Lafont at Rockville, and another by Harrison Pauley. At the German settlement. Peter Zeng and Peter Ort, brothers-in-law, supplied their freshly-arrived Teutonic brethren with their native beverage, and, in generous mugs, made them forget their exile and "Fatherland." Old Peter Zeng, who has now reached his fourscore years, is yet hale and hearty, and walks as sprightly as of yore. He was the first German who located in the settlement—now fifty years ago—and began the building of a town by the erection of a small log house. Others soon followed, and the settlement bids fair to become as famous as "fair Bingen on the Rhine." The mines were flourishing, buildings sprang up on every side, a church soon followed, and the sweet tones of its vesper bells soon greeted the ear and told the listening world a Christian people here had come to dwell. The old church building is now converted into a Sisters' school, while a new and more stately edifice, one of the finest in the State, supplants the old, and rears its lofty spire amid the sunny clouds. And' Peter has lived to see this wonderful change; and now, with his "ault frau," contented and happy, blessed with plenty and surrounded by his children and grandchildren in untold numbers, awaits the coming of that time, when, together they shall " wrap the drapery of the couch about them and lie down to pleasant dreams."

In those days, dancing parties were of frequent occurrence in the settlement and were greatly enjoyed by young and old of all classes, creeds and countries. The " sound of revelry by night" and the sweet tones of the violin, with clarinet accompaniment, as executed by John Gruion, Von Bernard Marcus and his brother musicians, and as it comes gently floating down on the stream of time, is still ringing in my ears ! Oh, those delicious sounds !

"'Twas music in the sinner's ear— 'Twas life and health and peace."

Nor were these gay waltzing parties without their little episodes. Rude barbarians from the surrounding neighborhood often crept in to, disturb those who had met to smile upon the pretty German girls and enjoy the fleeting moments as they passed. And when there was too much malt m the brew, as sometimes happened, black eyes and broken noses were the consequence.

On one memorable occasion, a fracas of this kind happened at a gathering of this kind, when a tenderfoot, unused to border scenes and Western customs would have imagined the innocents were all about to be slaughtered.

Sam and Henry Redman were wild boys living in the vicinity, and when under the influence of liquor, had no respect for the civilities of life. They were present, as they had often been before—dressed after a peculiar fashion of their own, wearing red flannel shirts, open at the collar, and without coat or vest. Around their loins was girt a miner's belt in which each carried a large hunting knife, ready to flay a deer or scalp a man as the occasion might present. The girls "swung to their partners" and whirled in the giddy evolutions of the waltz; while the strong, but gentle arms which encompassed their lovely forms, were ever ready to fell with ponderous blows him who dared to supplant them in the smiles of these angelic objects of their adoration.

" Love framed with mirth a gay, fantastic round:"

they smiled, perspired, and told the measure of their love with laughing eye and gentle pressure of the hand, when all at once the scene was changed. Big, loud, unmentionable oaths flew thick and fast and the place became suddenly blue with the profanity of the intruders. The girls, panting, trembling, and in utter dismay, fled from the room and were as quickly followed by their more courageous but not less discomfited companions. The candles were extinguished and for the nonce darkness brooded over the scene. The Redmans had sprung a coup d'etat and were the sole possessors of the place. They whooped, hallowed, danced, and sung their ribald songs and on the light being restored, revealed them brandishing their gleaming knives in the air ; while, at intervals, with fiendish grin and lurid oaths, they would drive their glittering points into the rough logs as if pinioning to the walls the victims of their hate. After a. time—when fear of sudden danger had subsided—some of the bolder of the German boys ventured to return and remonstrate with the outlaws—the outrage was condoned—a truce agreed upon—the Redmans were invited out to partake of a fresh glass of lager—the dance went on and once more "peace reigned in Warsaw."

A brawl or a personal encounter with the roughs who frequented the dancing parties which constitutes one of the chief amusements in the early settlement of the town, was no uncommon occurrence and often ended with serious results to some of the parties engaged.

But I pass to other and more important matters. Among the smelters of that day I remember William T. Ennor, Joseph Pettey and Albert W. Emery, of British Hollow, and William Lightfoot and Thomas Pallier, of Potosi, only two of whom, Joseph Pettey and A. W. Emery are still living. The mining interest greatly declined after the discovery of gold in California, and the five years succeeding 1849 saw the lead mines of Wisconsin almost depleted of its mining population. Some returned in after years to explore their abandoned diggings, but mining as a source of wealth and employment has never regained its former importance.

James Alderson, during the fifties, made the first improvement upon the old mode of mining with windlass and tub, by the appliance of steam power and machinery and going beneath the water for the shining ore. He mined at " Adney Patch " near British Hollow, and succeeded in raising large quantities of mineral. This gave a new impetus to the business and attracted capitalists, in search of profitable investments, to the mines. A company organized in Pittsburgh, attracted thither through their agents, purchased the Alderson diggings ; ran them for a few years with moderate success, when, tiring of their bonanza they re-sold to James Alderson & Co., who, after expending many thousand dollars in machinery and sinking shafts here and at other points, abandoned their works as unprofitable. Another company called the Graham Mining Company, organized in Milwaukee, and of which Hon. J. C. Hathaway, now of Beetown, was agent, purchased from Gov. Dewey, in the sixties, a tract of mining land supposed to be rich in lead ore, known as Preston Point, and commenced mining operations and continued with varied success down to the year 1879, when they, too, suspended operations and sold their lands for a mere nominal sum, having sunk not less than f50,000 in the enterprise. Practical miners were always of the opinion this company did not mine with that judgment which is the result of long acquaintance with mining operations, and hence their failure. Drifts, or tunnels, were run into the hill, for many hundreds of yards ; the workmen tediously and expensively cutting their way through solid rock at a cost of |3 to $5 per lineal foot, to drain the main crevices of water and thus be enabled to reach and unearth the large mineral deposits there contained. They succeeded partially in removing the surface water, but never came upon any remunerative beds of ore. Their failure was a disappointment not only to themselves, but the community at large, who still believe untold wealth lies embedded in our bluffs and hills ; and that at no very distant day, its sources will be reached, their treasures revealed, and the glittering ore in untold million pounds reward the skill of man.

About the year 1850, or perhaps earlier, the great railroad projects leading out from the lake shore westward to the Mississippi, were being much discussed both through the public press and in business circles. The Galena & Chicago Union Railroad was the first to start the grand race for the banks of the Mississippi, which, after crossing Rock River in the year 1851, reaching Galena, where it remained a short time, in the year 1853, and was continued sometime during the year 1855. Dubuque was made the western terminus of the road mainly through the efforts of Hon. George W. Jones, then the accomplished Senator from Iowa. Milwaukee, fully awake to the importance of railroad communication with the growing West, was making strenuous efforts to anticipate her more fortunate rival, Chicago, and reach first, with the iron horse what was regarded then as the ultama thule of trade—the banks of the Mississippi River.

The unparalleled immigration to and rapid settlement of Minnesota at this time gave the Upper Mississippi an importance unequaled in the history of the world. Everything and everybody seemed to be moving toward St. Paul and intermediate points ; during the summers from 1850 down to as late as 1858, the splendid steamers of the packet companies were thronged with passengers and loaded to the guards with freight all bound northward to this new country, whose salubrious climate and prolific soil have not disappointed their then most glowing anticipations. Milwaukee, young, moneyless, and sinewless as she was, bent all the energies of an indomitable will to this great task and commenced grading and laying the iron track toward the setting sun.

Potosi, alive to the importance of securing the western terminus of this road, commenced a railroad project with the view of meeting the eastern road half way and escorting the iron horse to the river. Meetings were held, speeches were made, articles written and published in the columns of the Potosi Republican, Lancaster Herald and other local papers, all lauding the enterprise and expatiating upon the benefits to be derived therefrom. By the united efforts of William R. Biddlecome and Robert M. Briggs, the members of the Legislature from the Potosi and Beetown districts, a charter was secured and the Potosi & Dodgeville Railroad Company became one of the most important institutions of the land. Briggs secured his election by promising his constituents it should be built by the way of Beetown with a double track "like two rows of brass buttons on a double-breasted vest." The books were opened and many shares of stock subscribed, but it is needless to add, the project was beaten by our more enterprising neighbors in the north part of the county, who mortgaged their farms for stock, and thus secured the location of the road in the Wisconsin Valley.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Publ. 1881); transcribed by a Friend of Free Genealogy

SHAW, WILLIAM W.

WILLIAM W. SHAW, farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. Ellenboro; was born in Dubuque Co., Iowa, in 1843. He remained with his parents until their death; his father died in 1861, his mother in 1862. Enlisted in 1861, in Co. C, 9th Iowa V. I.; he served three years and three months; was in twenty-four battles; came home in 1864, lived in Dubuque County for one year, then went to Glen Haven, Grant Co., Wis., where he lived for twelve years and followed farming; then went to Ellenboro, where he has since lived. He was married the first time in 1865, to Sintha Smith, a daughter of Edward and Catharine Smith; had four children, Charles E., Mary L, Molisa J., Anna M.; his first wife died in 1875, and in the latter part of the same year he married Marilda Shaw, of Fennimore, a daughter of James and Margaret Shaw; had two children, William N., deceased, and Dora M. Has forty-one and a half acres of land, also a fine house and lot in Glen Haven.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Ellenboro Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SHEPHERD, THOMAS

THOMAS SHEPHERD, deceased; was born in Yorkshire, England, 1806; married Agnes Hoe, a native of Westmoreland, England; they came in 1850, to America, with ten children, and located on a farm owned by Maj. Rountree. The Shepherd homestead originally of 160 acres was then purchased; Mr. Shepherd did good work here clearing and improving; in 1857, he built the substantial stone house, now making a good home for his family; he subsequently sold all except 84 acres; at his death, June 31, 1862, he left his widow and the ten children namely: Allen, Mary, Anthony, Agnes, Thomas, Betsy, Isabella, Hannah, William and Joseph; Mary is in Otisville, Iowa, and William in Oakdale, Neb.; all the others are now in the city and town of Platteville; the family are members of the P. M. Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SHERMAN, FANNY

MRS. FANNY SHERMAN, Lancaster ; widow of Cyrus Sherman, both natives of Franklin Co., Vt. Mrs. Sherman was born April 29, 1822, a daughter of Hon. Jed Barber, a native of Connecticut, and for many years Judge of the Circuit and Probate Court, he came to Lancaster in 1856, and died there at the age of 87. Her mother also died in Lancaster, at 80 years of age. Mrs. Sherman was married, June 18, 1849, they moved to Lancaster in 1854, and he died Dec.. 29, 1860, leaving three sons and a daughter.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

SHILLIAM, PHILLIP

PHILLIP SHILLIAM, retired; P. O. Fair View; born in England in 1815; came to America in 1839, and settled in Chicago; came here in 1842, and settled in this village, and engaged in shipping stock to Eastern markets. Married Jane Cook in 1839; she was born in London in 1815; they have three children -- Samuel, Elizabeth and Jane.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SHIMMIN, PHILIP

PHILIP SHIMMIN, farmer, Sec. 1; P. O. Annaton; born on the Isle of Man in 1839; he was a son of Thomas and Ann Shimmin, and at the age of 5 years he came to America in company with his parents, locating in Jo Daviess Co., Ill., for twenty-two years, and at the age of 21 he married the widow of William Robinson, whose life was lost in the falling of a factory in Massachusetts, leaving one son -- John, who was brought up by the latter husband; she was a daughter of James and Sarah Brown. Mrs. Shimmin was also married at the age of 16, but they were soon separated; Mr. Shimmin came to Grant Co., Wis., in 1867; located in Liberty, where he has since lived; he has 247 acres of land, valued at $3,000; has seven children -- Thomas R., William E., Philip G., Sarah J., Ellen M., George R., Charles L. Has been Road Overseer three terms, and School Clerk two terms. Politics, Republican. Member of the M. E. Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Liberty Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SHINGLEDECKER, WILLIAM

WILLIAM SHINGLEDECKER, farmer, Sec. 2; P. O. Platteville; was born in Mercer Co., Penn., July 14, 1825; came to Wisconsin in 1855; bought and owns 80 acres. His wife, Sarah Davis, born in Pennsylvania in 1818. Married in 1846; they have six children -- George, Martha, now Mrs. Speise, in Platteville; Mary, Josiah, William H., Ester. In politics, Republican; his wife is a Methodist; has been Clerk of District No. 8. His wife had three children by former marriage -- Emeine, now Mrs. Will Hake, in Colorado; Josephine, now in Pennsylvania.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Ellenboro Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SHINN, JAMES

The Late James Shinn.

A name which has an enduring place in the horticultural history of California is that of James Shinn, who died on his farm near Niles, Alameda county, Thursday, October 29, in his ninetieth year. Mr. Shinn was so widely known among the older readers of the Rural Press, and was so highly esteemed for his horticultural work and for the worth and graces of his character, that we are sure a sketch of his life will be welcomed in Rural circles.

James Shinn was born September 29, 1807, in Salem, Ohio. He was of Quaker stock and his father and grandmother were among those of the Quaker faith who went out from Mt. Holly, N.J., in 1802 to establish a colony in the forests of southeastern Ohio. The Shinns were of old English Quaker stock, and the first of the name to come to America was one of the forty who obtained the grant of the New Jersey colony from the English crown. The family was among the early followers of William Penn, and there are more of the name now in Pennsylvania and New Jersey than in all the rest of the United States.

James Shinn was first married in 1828 to Mary Sebrel, who died in 1845, leaving him several children, of whom one survives. Mrs. Livingstone Mays, of Round Rock, Texas. He was married again in 1846 in Platteville, Wisconsin, to Lucy Ellen Clark, who survives him, as also do three of their children: Charles H., Joseph C., and Millicent W. Shinn.

In his youth James Shinn attended such schools as were to be found in the second decade of the century in southern Ohio. At the age of twelve he was left an orphan and during the following years supported himself in various outdoor occupations, until, at the age of twenty years, he began to teach school. From 1837 to 1856 he lived in various places in Ohio, Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa, Tennessee and Texas, alternately occupied in farming, merchandising and school teaching, but always preferring the farmer's life and returning to it whenever feasible. In this wandering life he had opportunities for wide observation and study, which gave him that breadth of view and possession of information which prepared him for his successful and creditable career in California.

Mr. Shinn came to California in 1856, where members of his wife's family had preceded him, and located near Niles the farm upon which he lived continuously the remaining forty years of his life. He was always prominent in social and political affairs, and was respected in all these relations. The phase of his life which was best known to Californians generally was his horticultural interest and work. He had always been a strong lover of plants, and, recognizing the favoring conditions in his new California home, he entered at once upon fruit and plant lines, and won immediate recognition. He introduced standard sorts and novelties from all sources, and early in the sixties had probably the largest collection of fruits in bearing than in California, and he won innumerable awards at the fairs of those days. In his nursery work he introduced many new varieties, but modestly refused to place his name upon any. He spent much time and care upon his nursery catalogues, which were models of accuracy, and were in their time the equal of any published in the country.

Mr. Shinn was one of the organizers of the State Horticultural Society in 1878, and prominent in its affairs almost up to the close of his life. He was a vigorous and able writer upon horticultural and public affairs, and in the early days of our fruit growing his carefully written statements were of wide value.

Source: Pacific Rural Press, 14 Nov 1896; transcribed by MD

SHIPLEY, GEORGE

GEORGE SHIPLEY, Sec. 11; P. O. Martinville; born in Ohio Oct. 9, 1829; left Ohio October, 1851, and arrived at Martinville the last of November in the same year, and located on what is now known as Bunker farm; then went back to Ohio in 1853; stayed two years; then returned to Martinville and stayed three months; went back again to Ohio; stayed two years, and the third time returned to Martinville, and has been on the farm where he now resides ever since. He has 95 acres of land, which he bought from his brother, who bought it from Isaac David, who was the original settler of the land. George Shipley was married to Priscilla Johnson in 1856. She was born in Lancaster Co., Penn., in 1834. They have five children -- Sarah Jane, George Johnson, William Francis, Susan Ann and Mary Frances. He has been a member of the M. E. Church since 1848; his wife also member of the same since 1853. He is a member of the Good Templar's Society at Martinville, and has been a member of School Board for nine years. He is now Steward of the M. E. Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SHRAKE, JACOB

JACOB SHRAKE, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Hazelton; owns 160 acres of land. Born in Coshocton Co., Ohio, in 1842; came to Wisconsin with his parents in 1844, and located in Green Co.; in 1868, he removed to this county. Married Lucinda Trine, a native of this county; they have three children -- Walter, Ada and Maud. In 1862, he enlisted in Co. A, 31st W. V. I., and was discharged in 1865. He has been Justice of the Peace, Assessor, etc.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Wyalusing Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SICKLE, S.

S. SICKLE, cigar manufacturer, Platteville; was born in Treves, Germany, Oct. 18, 1818; came to America in 1852 and lived two years in Buffalo, N. Y., and eighteen years in Detroit, Mich, most of the time in the mercantile and tobacco business; came to Platteville in 1873, and has been in his present business since that time; he is also in the wholesale and retail tobacco trade in company with his son Max, firm S. Sickle & Son. Mr. Sickle was married, in Detroit, Mich., in 1854, to Mrs. Frederica Murcus, daughter of M. Rosenbaum; she was a native of Sternberg, Germany. Max Sickle was born in Detroit, MIch., in 1860, and has been in partnership with his father in the tobacco business since May, 1880; he has been Secretary of the Fire Department of Platteville since April 26, 1880, and was Secretary of the engine company about four years.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SIEMERS, HERRMANN

HERRMANN SIEMERS, of the firm of Siemers & Thiele, saloon-keepers, Platteville; was born in Pupsen, Germany; came to America in 1865; lived nine months in New York City, then went to Cincinnati, Ohio, and came from there to Platteville in 1868; worked three and a half months on a farm and has been in his present business since. In November, 1872, he was married, in Lyons, Iowa, to Lena Kuhl, and has three children -- Mary, Julia and Frederick.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SIMS, WILLIAM

WILLIAM SIMS, retired farmer; P. O. Fairview; born in Cornwall, England, in 1807; came to America in 1841; in 1842, he settled in this town. Has been twice married, first to Apply Pascoe, a native of England, they had three children -- William, Mary Ann and Elizabeth. Married again to Mary Ann Rorr, a native of England; they have one child -- Mary Annie. Are members of the M. E. Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SLOCUM, WILLIAM B.

WILLIAM B. SLOCUM, farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. Lancaster; was born Sept. 2, 1822, in Saratoga Co., N. Y.; son of Job and Lydia (Bolt) Slocum, of Vermont; came to Grant Co. in 1843; after a short residence at Cassville, came to Waterloo and ran a cabinet-shop three years; from there to a farm in Bloomington; thence to Rice Co., Minn., and returned to Bloomington, and to his present location in 1868; his father died in 1860, aged 74, and his mother in February, 1880, 90 years of age. He was married Nov. 28, 1849, by Elder Chapin (Baptist), to Sarah Jane, daughter of Abner and Emma (Green) Beardsley; they have six children -- Charles H., born Sept. 12, 1850, who married Sarah Harper, of Orient, Iowa; they have two children -- Walter and Jennie; Alice E., born July 26, 1852, wife of E. N. Fancher, lumber dealer of Iowa; they have two children -- Mabel and an infant; Grace L., born March 13, 1854, teaching school in District 2, Potosi; Clara L., born July 26, 1856; Wilfried J., born July 3, 1858; Mary E., born Dec. 8, 1865. Mr. S. is a Republican and a Congregationalist. He has been several years Town Clerk, Chairman and Justice of the Peace. Owns 170 acres of land.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Waterloo Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SMALLEY, JOHN

JOHN SMALLEY, proprietor of the Smalley House, Muscoda; born in England in 1828; came with his parents to America in 1838, and settled in Pennsylvania; came to Wisconsin in December, 1855, and located at Muscoda, where he has since resided. In 1856, he opened the "Smalley House;" in 1874, he built the present hotel, the largest brick hotel west of Madison, on the Prairie Du Chen Division, and also one of the best managed hotels on the line, and a general resort for traveling men. In 1855, he was married to Miss Mary Carroll, a native of Pennsylvania, by whom he has one son, now in the employ of the railroad at Milwaukee. Mr. Smalley has held the office of Town Treasurer, and also Chairman of the Town Board. He is a man that can be depended upon in every sense of the word.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SMEARBAUGH, C.

C. SMEARBAUGH, Sec. 27; P. O. Hazel Green; owns 125 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre; born in Germany in 1847, came to America in 1852, and settled in this town; he is a son of Anthony Smearbaugh.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SMELSER, OBED

OBED SMELSER, farmer; P. O. Georgetown; owns 166 acres land, valued at $50 per acre; born in this town in 1845; he is the son of J. M. Smelser, a native of Bourbon Co., Ky. In 1866, he married Rachel Shrigley, a native of Ohio; they have four children -- Mildred, Hiram J., Frank E. and Elizabeth Maud. Mr. S. has held office on the Town Board and other minor offices.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Smelser Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SMITH, E. B.

E. B. SMITH, farmer; Sec. 30; P. O. Boscobel; born in Erie Co., Penn.; at the age of 12 he came with his parents to Grant Co., where he has since resided, coming here in 1846; they are among the oldest settlers in the county. Enlisted in 1862 in Co. C, 20th W. V. I.; served till the end of the war; participated in the battles of Prairie Grove, Ark., Vicksburg, Brownsville, Texas, Yazoo City, Mobile, Ala., and others; has been to California, and has traveled over most of the Western country; he own 280 acres of land. Married in 1866 to Miss Mary Clinger; they have five children -- one son and four daughters.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Marion) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SMITH, GEORGE Jr.,

GEORGE SMITH, Jr., livery, Boscobel; was born in Prairie du Chien, Wis. When a child, he came to Dane Co., Wis., and at the age of 10 years, came to Boscobel, where he worked for his father in the livery business until 1875, when he commenced business for himself. He first bought a watch for $3; this he traded for a cutter; he then traded the cutter for a harness; then bought a buggy, and so continued until he has accumulated considerable livery stock. He now owns nine horses and seven buggies and wagons, and is considered the leading livery-man of the town.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SMITH, WILLIAM

WILLIAM SMITH (deceased), was born in England in 1828. Came to Grant Co. in 1852, and located four miles west of Lancaster ; purchased and moved on the homestead, where his widow and family now live, in 1865. He died in 1868. He always followed farming, and built around him a large property, which he made by hard work and economy ; was an exemplary and honest man, and his loss was not only felt by the family, but the community at large. The farm consists of 240 acres, beautifully located one and one-half miles from Lancaster, with the best of improvements. The family consists of four sons and two daughters. Charles and James remain at home working the farm and raising and fattening stock in partnership. They are good business men, both unmarried. William Smith was a prominent member of the A., F. & A. M.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

SMITHERUM, JOSEPH

JOSEPH SMITHERUM, miner; P. O. Lewisburg; born in La Fayette Co., Wis., in 1852. Married Alice A. James, a native of this village, in 1881. Mr. Smitherum has been in Colorado for the past six years.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SMITHYMAN, WILLIAM E.

WILLIAM E. SMITHYMAN, miller, Castle Rock; was born near Raughton, Eng., in 1828; son of Edwin and Jane Smithyman; when 19 years of age he went to Wolverhampton and followed milling; came to America in 1858; located at Mauston, Juneau Co., for two years; spent one year in the southern part of the United States; lived at Castle Rock, Grant Co., for twenty months; at Avoca, Iowa Co., seven months; and at Dodgeville for two years; he then enlisted in the 42d W. V. I., and served eleven months. He was married in 1864 to Ellen Hughes, daughter of Peter and Elizabeth Hughes, by whom he had two children -- Emily and Ellen. Was married the second time, in 1867, to Elizabeth Pendleton, daughter of Thomas and Selina Pendleton, by whom he had six children -- Lincoln, Mary A., Rollin E., John P., Jessie R. and Jonathan C. (deceased.)

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Castle Rock Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SMYTH, JOHN

JOHN SMYTH, Sec. 8; P. O. Patch Grove; born in Ireland in 1852; came to America in 1870 and settled with his parents in Brooklyn, N. Y.; removed to Wisconsin in 1875 and settled on this farm; he is a son of Patrick Smyth, a native of Ireland. John S. is a member of the Roman Catholic Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Millville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SNOW, WILLIAM C.

WILLIAM C. SNOW, manager Fair Flouring Mills, Sec. 2; P. O. Boscobel; born in the town of Wingville, Grant Co., Wis.; lived there till 1867, then moved to the town of Boscobel, and attended school, receiving a good business education; then moved to the town of Marion and engaged in the milling business, under his father's instruction, for seven years. For the past year, he has been renting the mill of his father, and managing the business himself. The mill was built in 1863, has one run of stone, and cost $6,000. In 1880, he was married to Miss Maggie Lull, who was born in Grant Co., Wis.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Marion) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SPEAR, JOHN

JOHN SPEAR, retired farmer, Platteville; was born Sept. 25, 1806, in Little Petherick, Cornwall, England; in early life he served an apprenticeship as a carpenter and joiner; going to London, he worked fourteen years at his trade. In this metropolis of the world, he also married Anne Roberts, who was of Probus Parish, Cornwall; both their children, John R. and Annie R. were born in London. The family came to America and to Platteville in 1851; the journey from New York was a long and tedious one, via the Hudson River and great lakes to Milwaukee; they first located on the present farm of William Rundell; remained two years, then came to Platteville and spent a couple of years; then for six years they were on a farm in British Hollow, town of Potosi; afterward they resided and farmed in the towns of Lancaster and Benton; in March, 1876, the ill health of young Spear cause the final removal and settlement of the family in Platteville; they still own a considerable amount of land in this county. Mr. Spear, Sr., made a most enjoyable visit to his native land in the fall of 1880, and takes pleasure in describing the progress and power of Merry England, as well as the changes made in thirty years.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SPENSLEY, MASON

MASON SPENSLEY, Platteville; was born Jan. 14, 1815, in Yorkshire, England; came to America in 1841, and located in the Catfish Mining Settlement near Dubuque, Iowa; here he was employed both as a miner and smelter; in 1850, he formed a partnership with Richard Straw, Ralph Spensley and Thomas Staley; the firm rented the old furnace of Bell & Co., on the Big Platte River; in 1852, Ralph Spensley withdrew; the remaining partners removing to Platteville; here in 1855 or 1856, Mr. Staley met an accidental death. Messrs. Spensley and Straw have since continued the business; their blast furnace was purchased of L. Coates; from 700,000 to 1,100,000 pounds of lead are annually produced. Mr. Spensley married Frances A. Taylor, a native of Knox Co., Ind., where her parents both died in her infancy; an aunt brought her to Dubuque when she was 9 years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Spensley have nine children -- James T., Rosa, Frances A., John T., Maggie, Richard, Mary, Allie and Cora.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SPIEGELBERG, E. O.

E. O. SPIEGELBERG, firm of Spiegelberg Brothers & Co., general merchandise, Boscobel. Is a native of Saxony; came to Portage, Wis., in the fall of 1869. Since the age of 12, he has followed this line of business. In 1877, the firm came to Boscobel; they opened with a stock of about $7,000; now are carrying about double this amount; their sales amount to about $40,000 a year. Married in 1877 to Miss M. Schumacher; she was born in Germany. They have one son. Charles Werner, a member of this firm, was born in Saxon Weimer, Germany, came to Portage, Wis. In 1868; he has followed the brewing business about twelve years; he also came to Boscobel in 1877. Married in 1871 to Bertha Schirchswitz; she was born in Prussia. They have three children, one son and two daughters.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SPINK, JOHN

JOHN SPINK, farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. Big Patch; owns 700 acres land, valued at $40 per acre; born in Hanover, Germany, in 1818; came to America in 1836 and settled in Wisconsin in 1841, and settled on his present farm. In 1845, he married Rebecca Reed, a native of the same place; they have six children -- Henry, Julia, August, Matilda, George and Lydia; are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Smelser Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

SPRAGUE, HARLEY S.

HARLEY S. SPRAGUE, farmer, Sec. 18 and 19; P.O. Beetown; born in 1849 in Grant Co., Wis.; was a son of Frederick A. Sprague, a large farmer. Mr. Sprague went into the army at the age of 21; enlisted in Co. C, 6th W.V.I.; was a First Lieutenant; served four years; was engaged in twenty-four battles. He was married, in the fall of 1865, to Miss Grace Johnson, a daughter of Harvey Johnson, of New York. He has three children--Blanche, Cora and Albert; has been Assessor one term and Town Treasurer one term. His politics are Republican. He lost two brothers in the war--Egbert and Albert. His father died Oct. 3, 1844; his mother died March 9, 1848.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

STARCK, C.

REV. C. STARCK, Pastor of the First Evangelical Lutheran Church of Platteville; is a native of Erfurt, Germany, born in 1824; he was educated and entered the ministry in Germany, and came to America in 1851; came to Platteville in 1857, and remained till 1862; in 1871, he went to Louisville, Ky., and was professor in a high school there two years, then accepted a pastorate at Springfield, Ill., and remained there till the spring of 1880, when he was recalled to Platteville; he was for many years one of the Directors of Carthage Lutheran College of Illinois and is at present, President of the Wartburg Synod of the E. L. Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

STARR, WILLIAM

WILLIAM STARR, wagon-maker, Lancaster. Has been a resident of Lancaster since May, 1866, coming here at the age of 17 from Clinton Co., N. Y., where he was born Dec. 25, 1838, a son of Lewis and Mary A. (Curry) Starr. His father is still living in Clinton Co. Mr. Starr worked for D. H. Budd nearly seventeen years, commencing when a boy. He was one of the firm of J. Hough & Co., which was established in August, 1874, and continued until January, 1880. He was married, May 5, 1860, to Miss Mary Maines. They have a daughter and three sons Fanny L., Daniel H., J. L. and Walter E.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

STEEL, A. M.

A. M. STEEL, farmer, Sec. 22; P.O. Platteville; was born March 8, 1830; came to Wisconsin in 1850, now owns 120 acres of land on which he has made the improvements; his wife was Miss Burney, afterward Mrs. Evans, a native of Wayne Co., Ohio; they married in 1862. In politics a Republican; in religion, Methodist. Has been Clerk and Director of Schools, also Assessor and Pathmaster.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

STEINBRENNER, GOTTLIEB

GOTTLIEB STEINBRENNER, farmer, Sec. 14; P. O. Stitzer; was born in 1814, in Germany. He was a son of Michael and Elizabeth Steinbrenner, of Germany. He came to America in 1853, locating in Pennsylvania for one year and seven months; then to Galena, Ill., for eighteen months; then to the town of Harrison, in Grant Co., Wis., where he resided for nearly nine years; then to Blake's Prairie, in the same county, for two years, when he moved to Liberty, where he has lived since. He was married, in 1857, to Miss Girock. She was a daughter of Conrad and Christina Girock, of Germany. They have five children -- John G. and John, Mary, Louisa, Christina. He has 200 acres of land, valued at $3,500. In politics, he is a Republican, and a member of the Evangelical Church. He has been School Director for one term, and has lived where he now resides for sixteen years.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Liberty Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

STEPHENS, J. J.

J. J. STEPHENS, Secs. 2 and 3; P. O. Platteville; was born in Peyrdinzabuloe, Cornwall, England, Feb. 3, 1825. His father, James Stephens, came to America and settled in Grant Co., in 1840, bringing with him his sons Thomas and J. J. The mother and the remainder of the children came with the "Stephens Colony" in 1842. The brothers, Thomas and J. J., dug several wells, and helped build the dame for Virgin's mill, as their first work. The father and sons continued mining and farming here up to the removal of the brothers to California in 1852. J. J. returned in 1853, and located on a farm east of Platteville, where he remained eleven years. He then bought the Ed Thomas estate of 195 acres, which is now his home. He married, Jan. 25, 1845, Miss Jane, daughter of Michael Stephens. They have eight children -- James H., Selinda, Charles A., Almon M., Sidney A., Olive N., Harlen K. and Fannie L., all born in Platteville. They lost two infant sons. Mr. Stephens is independent in politics, and the family attend the P. M. Church. Besides the Thomas farm, he owns 146 2/3 acres of timber and pasture in Lima, and also a house and lot in Platteville.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

STEPHENS, JOHN

JOHN STEPHENS, farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. Ellenboro; was born in Cornwall, England, Sept. 24, 1820; came to America in 1849; settled in Ohio; was only there a short time when he came to Wisconsin; now engaged in mining and farming on 40 acres; now owns 80 acres of land. His wife, Elizabeth Daddow, was born in Cornwall, England, March 1, 1822; came to America in 1848, and settled in Benton, La Fayette Co., Wis.; they were married in 1850; they have had five children -- John D., born Aug. 18, 1851, died Dec. , 1880; Mary E., born March 20, 1855; Lucy A., born Jan. 1, 1858; Amrilla, born July 4, 1869; Joseph B., born Jan. 25, 1863. In politics, Republican; in religion, a liberal believer.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Ellenboro Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

STEPHENS, JOHN

JOHN STEPHENS, farmer; was born in the Parish of Peyrdinzabuloe, Cornwall, England, Nov. 11, 1797. He came to Platteville, Wis., in 1841, and took up a farm near town, how within the city limits. His twin brother, Michael, came over the next year with all the other brothers but one, and his brothers-in-law and their families, fifty-two persons in all, and all settled in the vicinity of Platteville. All the Stephens brothers were married in the same parish church in England, and now, all the sisters and sisters-in-law are buried side-by-side in the cemetery in Platteville. John Stephens was married Jan. 22, 1826, to Miss Catharine Repper; she died at Platteville; they have had seven children -- Ann, now Mrs. William Laughton; Catharine, who died in 1864; Elizabeth, now Mrs. H. H. Jacobs; Thomas, living in Placerville, Cal.; Jane, now Mrs. Walsh, also in California; John R., living at Yankton, Dak.; Mary L., now Mrs. Hockett. Mr. Stephens had a stroke of paralysis in 1879, since which, he has not been able to attend actively to business, and his daughter, Mrs. Jacobs, has moved back to the old homestead, where he lives with her. Mr. Stephens has been a member of the Town Board of Platteville several terms, and has held other town offices.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

STEPHENS, JOHN

JOHN STEPHENS, station agent and dealer in grain, Cuba City; born in England in 1843; came to America in 1848 and located with the parents in this town. Married Elizabeth J. Reed, a native of Missouri, in 1863. They have three children -- Samuel, Frank H. and John Charles. In 1862, Mr. S. enlisted in 2d W. V. C. two years; are members of the Primitive Methodist Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Smelser Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

STEPHENS, T. G.

T. G. STEPHENS, dealer in general merchandise, Jefferson; business was established in 1856; born in England in 1818; came to America in 1841, and settled here. Married Edith Withers, a native of Cornwall, England; has three children by a former wife -- Thomas, Phillippi and Mary. Mrs. S. has one child by a former husband -- John Withers. Mr. Stephens was elected to the Legislature in 1872; he has also been a member of the Town Board about ten years.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

STEPHENS, W. C.

W. C. STEPHENS, Platteville, is a son of Michael and Mary (Conlin) Stephens. He is one of ten children, and was born Oct. 22, 1820, in Peyrdinzabuloe Parish, Cornwall, England. His father was born same place Nov. 11, 1797. In June 1842, no less than forty-nine members of this historic family arrived in Platteville, and it was the settled home of the different branches of the family until the outbreak of the California gold fever in 1850-51. In 1852, Michael Stephens and his sons went to California, remaining until 1853. W. C. Stephens built, in 1844, a frame house near his present residence, and a family is now sheltered under the same shingles he laid thirty-six years ago. The pleasant home which his family now enjoy is the result of his own handiwork, he having accustomed himself to the use of carpenter's tools from boyhood. Mr. Stephens has a 146-acre farm on Sec. 1 and 12 in Platteville, which was his home for twenty years. He married, March 28, 1842, in England, Miss Ann Mitchell, of his native Parish. They have four children -- Mary A., Allie, George and Amo, all born in Platteville. Mr. Stephens is a Republican, and is with his wife a member of the P. M. Church. His aged father is a twin brother of John Stephens, and both are wonderfully well-preserved specimens of the hardy and stalwart men who have so proudly and successfully carried old England's flag around the globe.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

STEVENS, DANIEL BARTLETT

DANIEL BARTLETT STEVENS, (Rep.), of Cassville, was born in Paris, Oxford county, Maine, January 25, 1837; received an academic education; is by occupation a manufacturer and dealer in lumber; came to Wisconsin in May, 1856, settling in Grant county where he has since resided; has been town clerk of Beetown; was elected member of assembly for 1882, receiving 807 votes against 575 votes for Patrick Bartley, democrat, and 30 for Anton Vogt, greenbacker.

(Grant County -- Second District -- The towns of Beetown, Bloomington, Cassville, Glen Haven, Lancaster, Liberty, Little Grant, Potosi and Waterloo. Population, 12,909.)

Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1882), page 547; transcribed by Mary Saggio

STEVENS, WILLARD T.

WILLARD T. STEVENS (Rep.) president pro tempore of the senate in the 1919 session, was born Sept. 6, 1865, in Beetown, Grant county, going with his parents to Cassville when one year old. He attended the common school in Cassville and business college in Dubuque, Ia., moving to Rhinelander in 1889. He is president of the Stevens Lumber company; was sheriff of Oneida county two terms; member of the Republican state central committee 1904-06. He was elected state senator in April 1912 for the unexpired term of James A. Wright, (deceased) and was re-elected in the fall of 1912 and in 1916.

Source: The Wisconsin Blue Book (1919) page 471; transcribed by FoFG mz

STEVENSON, MRS. WM. H.

MRS. WM. H. STEVENSON, Mary Janette Miller was born in Delaware county, New York, June 10, 1838, and died at Manchester, Iowa, December 3, 1918. At the age of eight years she came with her parents to Grant county, Wisconsin, living there for ten years, and then coming to Hopkinton, Iowa. She was united in marriage to William H. Stevenson. June 9, 1860, and moved to a farm near Sand Spring, Iowa, which continued to be their home until the death of her husband, January 23rd, 1895. Since then she lived with her children. Her family consisted of seven children, one son dying in infancy, and a daughter, Laura May Bowen, died February 20, 1912, at Orchard, Nebraska, The surviving children are William J. Stevenson of Clay, Louisiana; Fred J. Stevenson of Manchester, Iowa; Arthur M. and Anna C. Stevenson of Clinton, Missouri; and Donald W. Stevenson of Lamont, Iowa. She is also survived by three sisters, Anna G. Miller and Mrs. Lillian Ballentine, of Valley Center, Kansas; and Mrs. Christine Kirkwood of Whitewater, Kansas; and thirteen grandchildren. Her two brothers, John and David Miller, have preceded her to the great beyond. The funeral services were held in the home of her son, Fred J. Stevenson, of this city, on Friday afternoon, and were in charge of Rev. S. R. Beatty, pastor of the Methodist church. The remains were taken to Hopkinton for interment.

Source: Manchester Democrat (Manchester, Iowa), December 11, 1918; transcribed by Anonymous

STEWART, GEORGE

GEORGE STEWART, farmer ; P.O. Lancaster. A native of Perthshire in the highlands of Scotland; born Jan. 1, 1820, a son of Thomas and Anna (Melrose) Stewart. He left his native land at the age of 14, and came to Canada West, where he lived eight years engaged in farming. In 1847, he was married in Rochester, N. Y., to Miss Eliza Morrow, a daughter of John and Jane Higgins Morrow, natives of Ireland; she was born April 18, 1826, in Dublin. Mr. Stewart came West to Lancaster and worked several years for J. Holloway. In the spring of 1862, he bought 80 acres three, miles south of Lancaster, on which he remained seven years, and then, in 1868, sold the 80 and purchased 400 acres from Lewis Holloway. He has been a successful farmer, and now owns one of the best farms in the county 320 acres prairie land and 80 acres of timber, valued at $20,000. They have a son and five daughters Jane, Robert, Ellen, Catharine, Mary and Lucy.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

STEWART, THOMAS

THOMAS STEWART, farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. Fennimore; was born in Champaign Co., Ohio, Oct. 13, 1814; removed when 7 years of age, with his parents to Indiana; again, in 1834, to Elgin, Ill.; came to Grant Co., Wis., in 1856. Was married Oct. 13, 1854, to Mrs. Mary A. Swits, widow of Tunis Swits, and a daughter of John and Caroline Wheeler; Mrs. Stewart has a daughter by her first marriage -- Susan C., born Nov. 6, 1845; they have no other children. Are both consistent members of the United Brethren Church. He is a Democrat of the old Jackson stamp. Owns a farm of 120 acres, one of the handsomest farms in his locality, and highly educated.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Mount Ida Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

STICKEL, E. C.

REV. E. C. STICKEL, Pastor Congregational Church, Boscobel; is a native of York Co., Penn.; received a regular college course at Amherst, Mass.; graduated in 1874 at the Andover Theological Seminary; intervening this time taught school, and was appointed Superintendent of Public Schools in Selma, Ala.; served two years; then Professor of Latin in Tallmadge College one year; was Pastor of the First Congregational Church, Montgomery, Ala., about three years; in 1878, came to Mazomanie, Wis.; supplied the pulpit in the absence of the regular Pastor two years; February, 1880, came to Boscobel, and became Pastor of the Congregational Church. Married in 1874, to Miss Luretta R. Chamberlin; she was born in Michigan. They have one daughter. Mrs. Stickel is a music teacher and portrait painter.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

STINGLE, F.

F. STINGLE, merchant tailor and dealer in ready-made clothing, gents' furnishing goods, hats, caps, boots, shoes, etc., is a native of Bohemia, Austria; born in 1841; came to America in September, 1865; lived in Milwaukee nearly one year, then went to Monroe, Green Co., Wis.; was in business there till September, 1875, since which time he has been in business in Platteville; was married in Monroe to Miss Augusta Roth, and has three sons -- Benjamin, Leopold and Emanuel.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

STRAW, BENJAMIN

BENJAMIN STRAW, Sec. 23; P. O. Hazel Green; owns 240 acres of land valued at $50 per acre; born in Derbyshire, England, in 1820; came to America in 1828, and settled in Pennsylvania; removed to Wisconsin in 1834; located in Hazel Green in 1840. Married Mary Sparks, a native of England; they have three children -- Henry B., Mary W. and Ida. Mr. Straw has been a member of the Town Board, and has assessed the town several times.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

STRAW, RICHARD

RICHARD STRAW, of R. Straw & Co., smelters, was born Feb. 15, 1817, in Derbyshire, England. He came to America in 1828, with his father, residing in New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania until 1834 when he came to Dubuque, Iowa. Here he engaged in mining and teaming. In 1840, he came to Hazel Green, Wis., and engaged in mining; ten years later he formed a partnership with Messrs. Mason and Ralph Spensley and Thomas Staley, and began the smelting business, which he has since followed (see sketch of Mason Spensley). Mr. Straw married Mary Place, of Yorkshire, England, by whom he has six children -- Hannah, Mary A., Anne, Margaret, Carrie and Richard. Anne and Margaret were born in Montford, Grant Co., and the others in Platteville. Mr. Straw is a Republican, and a member with his family of the M. E. Church. He has served many years on both the town and village boards.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

STREET BROS.

STREET BROS., MARSHALL & CO., proprietors of the Lancaster Woolen Mills. This firm was established in May, 1880, succeeding the Lancaster Woolen Mill Co., by whom the mill had been built in 1869. The present firm was organized with ample means. The members are R. R. Street, J. A. Street, E. Street and H. L. Marshall. This is a two-set mill with eight broad looms of the Crompton pattern, three of which are of new design, run by steam-power. The factory is a four-story and attic frame-and-stone structure, 60x40, with office, dye-house, boiler-room and other necessary additions. It has been thoroughly refitted and furnished with the latest improved machinery by this firm. They employ a force of thirty men. The capacity of engine is 25-horse power, and the water-power used in the mill is from the never-failing fountain at which most of the early settlers used to resort for their water spring of historic note. H. L. Marshall, salesman for the house, has his headquarters at No. 184 Washington street, Chicago. They make a specialty of fine black-worsted finish cassimere, and extra-fine twilled flannels, one brand of which is rarely ever made of equal weight in the Northwest.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

STREETER, GAY D.

GAY D. STREETER, livery sale stable; is a native of Ontario Co., N. Y., and was born June 22, 1833; came West in 1851, and came to Grant Co. in 1866; engaged in hotel business and auctioneering. In 1878, was elected Sheriff of Grant Co., and held that office two years, being the only Democrat ever elected since the county was organized. In 1857, he was united in marriage to Miss Maria E. Adams, a native of Saratoga Co., N. Y. They have seven children Clara, Kate, Edward, Cora, Harry, Nora and Bertha.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

STURMER, JOHN

JOHN STURMER, farmer, Sec. 17; P.O. Beetown; born in 1820 in Prussia, Germany. At the age of 26, he emigrated to America; was a son of Peter Sturmer. His father, being a shoemaker, attempted to teach his the trade; but, not liking that occupation, led him to seek other pursuits to gain a livelihood, and he chose that of farmer; settled in New York in 1847. Two years later, he moved to Grant Co., Wis.; stopping at Potosi; thence to Beetown, where he now lives. He was married, in 1853, to Miss Barbary Barton, a daughter of John Barton. He has ten children--John, Mary, Joseph, Albert B., Jacob L., Elizabeth S., Clara, Ellen, William, Minnie M. (deceased) and Adaline. He is a member of the Catholic Church. Politics, Democrat.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

SYLVESTER, DANIEL R.

HON. DANIEL R. SYLVESTER, miller and farmer, Sec. 30; P. O. Castle Rock. The subject of this sketch, better known as Capt. Sylvester, is one of the leading citizens of the community in which he lives, and has held the trust of many prominent positions. He was born Dec. 22, 1825, at Avon, franklin Co., Me.; son of Charles and Mary Sylvester; lived with his parents until 20 years of age, then moved to Westport, Mass., where he taught school for six months, then to Iowa Co., Wis., locating near Wingville in 1846, where he resided for three years; in 1849, he went to California, where he followed mining and merchandising for a year and a half, then returning to Philips, Me., in 1852, where he married Clara Winship, by whom he has had nine children -- Velina, Ace B., Myrta, Fred W., Arine, Harriette E., Gracie, B. J., Walter T. Came to Grant Co., Wis., in the latter part of the year 1852, locating in the village of Castle Rock, where he built a large mill and also engaged in merchandising for a few years; he and his brother own a large mill near Boscobel, known as the Boscobel Mills. He enlisted in 1861 in the 12th W. V. I. as Captain of Co. K; served from September, 1861, until November, 1864; participated in the sieges of Vicksburg in 1863, and Atlanta in 1864, and various battles intervening; after returning to his home at Castle Rock, where he has since lived, he was elected Chairman of the Town Board for two years; was Assessor for a number of years; was also elected to the Assembly of 1877. In politics he is Republican.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Castle Rock Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

TAYLOR, HAWKINS

Hearing of the discoveries made at Snake Hollow in 1832, I, with others, started for that point; we stayed one night at Gilmore, a few miles from Sinsinawa Mound. The next day all got to the mines and went into camp, and I found everybody my friend, and there never was a happier set than we miners were. We had little shanties made of logs, generally split and covered with the bark, and we had bunks two stories high. Our bed and covering was a thick Mexican blanket, but what good, sound sleep did we have ! Not a trouble on our minds ; not one of us who was not confident of striking a lead very soon. Each had a tin cup, and we had a common coffee pot; our meat was mess pork and we made our own bread. The fare, without variations, was coffee, bread and meat. In one hut there were four of us, which was the rule generally. These huts were scattered for a mile along this branch. All told, there were about sixty miners in the camp, and of the whole lot there was but a single quarrelsome man, by the name of Malony, an Irishman, and his spite was against Free Williams, but Free didn't scare. In the midst of our happiness, news came to us about 6 o'clock one evening, that the Indians had defeated Stillman on Rock River, and were then making their way toward the Mississippi, and would, most likely, pass down the Platte and rob the stores of DeTantibar at his town, and Loring Wheeler, at Gibraltar, and also take in our camp. Cox, then Sheriff of the county (Iowa), had sent a messenger from Mineral Point to give us the warning. Within ten minutes of the time the news came to our camp, more than forty miners were at Maj. Anderson's camp. The Major had been an old Indian fighter, and with one accord, we went to him to be our commander and adviser. There were some fifteen or twenty Irish in the camp that had come from Galena in skiffs and a pirogue; they had brought their provisions and tools this way, and when the alarm was given they naturally went for the vessels, that were in a branch of the river about a mile from camp. Malony, the bully, got behind, and the last of the party had got out into the stream before he got to the river, but he jumped in and was barely saved from drowning. Free Williams joined Stephenson's company of dragoons and made a brave soldier. By morning our party had dwindled down to thirteen ; we then went to the Platte, to DeTantibar's, and a man by the name of Cornwall, a Virginian, and I went down to Wheeler's (now, if alive, living in De Witt) Wheeler had a horse and joined the dragoons." Finding that the Indians were in no hurry to come our way, we went back to the diggings. I have no record of the names, and forty-odd years is a long time to recollect, but we had with us then Maj. Anderson, a man by the name of Hillis, Ham and his nephew Thieskill, Tennesseeans ; a man by the name of Cook from Mississippi; Cornwall and Nehemiah Dudley from Vermont. Nehemiah was the ugliest man I think I ever saw, but, notwithstanding the antipathy that was then universal in the Mississippi Valley against Yankees, we all liked Dudley. I have never heard of him since I left the Mississippi, but I have often thought of him. These are all I can recollect, but I think there were eleven or thirteen of us. We built a block-house of large hewn logs, and kept a supply of provisions on hand in case of an attack by the Indians. We mined through the day and slept in our block-house at night. The block-house was on the high ground north of the ranch, and I understood some years ago that there was a Catholic Church near by, and that the old shanty that I had lived in was standing near the church. In 1828, the miners had crossed over the river, and back of Dubuque; had been very successful in finding lead, so much so that they built a smelting furnace on the island ; but the Indians complained to the Government and troops were sent who drove off the miners, and an officer and a few men were stationed across the river on the Illinois side, under the bluff, to keep the miners from trespassing on the Indians. These troops were withdrawn when the Indian war commenced, and as there were several fine leads that had been opened in 1828, we concluded to make a raid on them while the Indians were absent, and to that end Ham, Cook, Dudley, as I recollect, made one party, and Cornwall and myself another, and we went down the river in skiffs, taking our provisions and tools. We all stopped with the old man Jordon, who had the ferry across the river. At that time, his ferry facilities were a flat-boat that would take one wagon and team of two horses, and half a dozen Indian canoes. Jordon's house or tavern was a double-log house with a passage in the middle, and a supply of outhouses, and was on the. side bank a few hundred yards from the river. The scenes of my after career were laid wholly in Iowa.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Publ. 1881); transcribed by a Friend of Free Genealogy

TAYLOR, MILES D.

MILES D. TAYLOR, Mt. Hope; blacksmith, wagon and carriage maker; machine and plow work a specialty; was born in Wyoming Co., Penn., in 1847; came to Wisconsin in 1849, and located in Bloomington, where he lived with his parents until he came here. Married Euphene Whiteside, a native of this town.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Mount Hope Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

TAYLOR, WILLIAM A.

WILLIAM A. TAYLOR, minister, Sec. 20; P. O. Mt. Hope; was born in 1852, in the town of Potosi, Grant Co.; a son of Caleb and Nancy Taylor; he lived with his parents until 18 years of age and then spent a few years in laboring in Grant Co. Was married in 1872 to Katie Baker, daughter of Jacob and Caroline Baker, of Beetown; has had three children, two of whom are living -- William C., Allie M., and Eddie J. (deceased). He began ministerial work in 1873, in the Free-Will Baptist Church, preaching in different parts of the county. In 1875, he associated with the United Presbyterian Church, and moved to Mt. Hope in 1880, where he has lived since, and is preaching on the Woodman Circuit. In politics, he is Republican.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Mount Hope Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

TEASDALE, W. H.

W. H. TEASDALE, miller; P. O. Hazel Green; born in St. Joseph Co., Mich., in 1836; came to Wisconsin in 1842, and settled in White Oak Springs, La Fayette Co.; came to this county in 1848, and settled here. Married Eliza Stephens, a native of England; they have five children -- H. E., C. H., Earnest, Annie and William.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

TENNANT, JOHN

JOHN TENNANT, farmer, sec. 28; P. O. Mt. Ida; was born in Yorkshire, England, Dec. 21, 1847; emigrated with his parents to the United States in 1852, and settled in Grant Co., Wis., in 1857. Married Emily Walters July 4, 1869; she was a daughter of John and Hannah Walters; was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., Jan. 27, 1851; they have four children -- John W., born Oct. 4, 1875; Clara V., born Feb. 13, 1873; Elsie L. and Walter E. Mr. Tennart has always been identified with the Republican party, and is identified with the Primitive Church. He owns a farm of 218 acres of valuable land.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Mount Ida Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

THIELE, HENRY

HENRY THIELE, member of the firm of Siemers & Thiele, saloon-keepers, was born in Hanover, Germany, in 1840; came to America in 1866, lived in Cincinnati, Ohio, nine months, and came to Platteville in August, 1867; has been in his present business since 1868; he was married in Platteville in 1868, to Dora Pranga, and has two children living -- Harry and Mary; lost one, August, who died when 3 years old in 1874.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

THOMAS, E. W.

E. W. THOMAS, retired, was born in Salem, Mass., in 1802; removed to Ohio in 1844; lived in Ashland Co., till 1851, and came from there to Grant Co., Wis., where he has since resided; he followed farming two miles north of the village till 1865, and since then has lived in the city; he in company with his son, Hudson, built what is known as Thomas' Block, in which Thomas Hall is located, completing it in 1871; he was married in Madison Co., N. Y., in 1825 to Polly Bacon, daughter of James Bacon, and has six children -- Mary, Hudson, Huron, Homer, Martha and Hadley; Hudson enlisted in 1863, in the 33d W. V. I., and served as Second Lieutenant of Co. A till the close of the war; he is now living in Lyon Co., Minn. Huron was in the 25th W. V. I., Co. E, enlisted in 1862, and was Sergeant of his company; went with Sherman to the sea, and was discharged on account of sickness at Savannah, Ga.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

THOMAS, JAMES

JAMES THOMAS, farmer; P. O. Beetown; born in 1821 in Cornwall, England; was a son of Hannibal and Elizabeth Thomas; lived there for twenty-five years, and, in 1846, he emigrated to the beautiful and fertile regions of America; located at Hazel Green, Grant Co., Wis., for one year; thence to Racine Co. for four years; thence to Beetown, where he lives at the present time. He married in 1866, Miss Susan Richman, a daughter of Seth Richman, of Ohio; had one child, deceased -- James N. He has 1,650 acres of land. Has been Pathmaster one term, School Director one term. Is a member of the M. E. Church. Politics, Democrat. Has been a prosperous farmer, and one of the luckiest miners of the age.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Glen Haven Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

THOMAS, JOSIAH

JOSIAH THOMAS, dealer in general merchandise and Postmaster, Hazel Green; business was established in 1865; born in Cornwall, England, in 1835; came to America in 1842, and settled with parents in the town of Benton, La Fayette Co. Married Jane Hocking, a native of Cornwall, England; they have five children -- John Henry, Laura A., Minnie, Eva L. and Lillie J. Mr. Thomas has been Justice of the Peace two terms; is the present Justice.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

THOMAS, WILLIAM

WILLIAM THOMAS, retired merchant, Hazel Green; born near Elston, Cornwall, England, in 1828; came to America in 1848, and settled in Lewisburg, and engaged in mining in 1856; he removed to Fairview and engaged in the mercantile business. In 1863, he married Mary E. Harvey, a native of Cornwall, England; they have two children -- William H. and Clinton W. Mr. Thomas has been a member of the Town Board, and is at present, and was Postmaster about fifteen years at Fairview.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

THOMPSON, FRANCES

MRS. FRANCES THOMPSON, Sec. 24; P. O. Livingston; was born in Lancashire, England, July 7, 1826. She left England in 1845, and came to America. The first night in Wisconsin, she stayed at Milwaukee, and went out to North Prairie the next day, and slept in a barn that night. She stayed at that place one year and then went to Mifflin, which was then called Black Jack. Worked there in a hotel about six months, after which came to the town of Clifton, and settled on the farm where she now lives. She was married to William Thompson, by Squire Hollman, of Platteville, in a log cabin on Sec. 23, Dec. 24, 1846. He died April 15, 1869, and was buried in the Rock Church Cemetery. He located the joint district school on his farm; was a member of Crow Branch School Board four years, and bought the first reaper used on the prairie, for which he went to Milwaukee. Mrs. Thompson has had eight children, of which five are living -- William, Susan, John, Caroline and Frances. The deceased are Hannah, Mary Ann and Timothy, all buried in Rock Church Cemetery. Mrs. Thompson is a member of the Episcopal Church, and was confirmed in England.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

THOMPSON, FRANK G.

FRANK G. THOMPSON, auctioneer, Hazel Green; born in England in 1844; in 1852, he came with his parents to America and settled in Hazel Green. Married Katie McBrien, a native of this town; they have one child -- George Francis.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

THOMPSON, MATHIAS & EDWARD

MATHIAS & EDWARD THOMPSON, dealers in furniture, hardware, undertakers and cabinet-makers, Hazel Green; established business in 1854. The senior member, Mathias, was born in Yorkshire, England, in 1816; came to America in 1853, and settled in this town. Married Margaret Langton, a native of England, in 1839; they have six children -- Eden, Frank G., Lizzie, Margaret, Mary Ann and Doratha Newton. Edward, the junior member, was born in England in 1823; came to America in 1853, and settled in this village. Married Ann Brougham, a native of England; they have six children -- Ann E., Mary Jane, Margaretta, Brougham, Emma, Samuel. Are all members of the M. E. Church. Mr. Mathias Thompson has been Chairman of the Board of Supervisors two years.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

THOMPSON, ROBERT E.

ROBERT E. THOMPSON, farmer, Sec. 36; P. O. Annaton; was born in 1851 in Grant Co., Wis., and is a son of William Thompson, a native of Scotland. He lived with his parents till he was 18 years old. His father died in 1878, leaving the son to look after the welfare of his aged mother. He has 200 acres of land, valued at $3,000. He was married in 1877, to Elizabeth Day, daughter of James and Sarah Day, of Little Grant. They have one child -- Charles. In politics, he is a Democrat.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Liberty Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

THURBER, LAUREN L.

LAUREN L. THURBER, station agent for C., M. & St. P. R. R., Muscoda; has been employed fourteen years in the same capacity by the same road; he was born in Door Village, Ind., Jan. 17, 1841, where he was educated and learned the trade of mason; he is a son of Nathaniel and Sarah Leland Thurber, who were natives of Vermont; they came to this State in 1857 and settled upon a farm in the town of Pulaski, Iowa Co. The subject of this sketch came two years later, and joined his parents on the farm. In August, 1861, he enlisted in Co. C, 20th W. V. I.; was with the regiment during its term of service, participating in all the engagements, and mustered out with them at Madison in August, 1863. May 6, 1866, he married Miss Anna Soper, by whom he has three children, all boys.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

TILLOTSON, M. D.

M. D. TILLOTSON, Cashier Exchange Bank of Boscobel; is a native of Genesee Co., N. Y. When a child, he came to Michigan, where he received his education, and in 1867, he came to Chicago, and engaged in the banking business until 1875, when he removed to Boscobel, and was appointed Cashier of the First National Bank. This position he held until 1878, when the bank dissolved. Then the Exchange Bank of Boscobel was organized, and he was appointed Cashier, which position he now holds. Married in September, 1868, to Miss Mary Burchard; she was born in Michigan. They have two children, one son and one daughter.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

TIMM, HENRY

HENRY TIMM, farmer, Sec. 19; P. O. Hurricane Grove; owns 119 acres of land, valued at $15 per acre ; born in Prussia in 1838; came to America in 1863, and located in New York. Three years later, he removed to Wisconsin. He married Caroline Brinkman, a native of Germany. They have one child Johnny. They are members of the Presbyterian Church.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

TRABER, H. J.

H. J. TRABER, Mayor of Platteville, was born in Albany Co., N. Y., Nov. 9, 1833; when 17 years of age he left home and went on a whaling voyage in the ship Montezuma, Capt. Williams, of New London, Conn.; they sailed on the 15th of July, 1850, and returned on the 15th of May, 1853, crossed the equator seven times on the voyage, and visited during the time, the Azore Islands, St. Paul's Island, New Zealand, East Cape, in Russian America, Sandwich Islands, King Mills Group, La Drone Islands, Tihita, and thence around Cape Horn, home; he soon after made a voyage to Liverpool, Eng., then returned to America, and visited Bath, Me., Boston, Mass., and then went to Chesapeake Bay, Portsmouth, N. H., and back to Albany; in the spring of 1855 he sailed to Buffalo, N. Y., and followed the lakes till July of that year, when he landed at Chicago on the 9th and came to Platteville July16, and has been a resident of the city since that time; Aug. 14, 1862, he enlisted in Co. A, 33d W. V. I. as a private and was in the service three years; in September, 1864, he was transferred to Co. H of the same regiment as Second Lieutenant, and had command of his company from that time till the close of the war; he was in twenty-one engagements during his term of service and was never wounded and was never a day off duty; he is the present Mayor of Platteville, elected in April, 1880; he was married in 1859, in Lancaster, Wis., to Miss Sarah Kines, and has had four children, three of whom are living.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

TREGANOWAN, AMBROSE

AMBROSE TREGANOWAN, farmer, Sec. 6; P. O. Platteville; was born March, 1810 in Fryock, Cornwall, England, where his early life was spent in the mines. In 1840, he came to America and began work in the Virginia coal mines. This came near being his last work in this world, as he was nearly crushed to death by being drawn from the shaft against some timbers overhead by a thirty horse power engine. For months, it was thought he could not live, and it was years before he was able to work. However, he came to America again in 1846, and lived in Platteville until 1850, when he went to California. Nine months later, he returned, and settled on his present farm in 1853. He has 80 acres. His first wife, Peggy Mitchell, died in England. He then married in Platteville Ellen Stephens, who died thirteen months later. The present Mrs. Treganowan was Catharine Pothour, born in Trumbull Co., Ohio. He has no children, but in spite of his many misfortunes preserves a warm heart and generous nature.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

TRELOAR, JAMES

JAMES TRELOAR, farmer. Sec. 29; P.O. Lancaster; owns 200 acres of land, valued at $30 per acre ; born in England in 1820 ; came to America in 1847, and settled on this farm. Mr. Treloar has been twice married, first to Mary Cock, a native of England. They had eight children, six of whom are living James, Mary, William, Grace, Margaret and John (who died in April, 1860). Mr. Treloar's second marriage was to Frances Ellis, a native of Kentucky. They have three children Lora, Thomas and Minnie.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

TRENARY, JOHN

JOHN TRENARY, farmer, Secs. 12 and 13; P. O. Platteville; born July 10, 1809, in Redruth, Cornwall, England. His early life was spent in the interest of his father's large mercantile and other business. He came to America in 1840, kept the old Blue Run tavern for a time, and, in 1843, came to Platteville, where he engaged in mining and auctioneering. His first wife, formerly Eliza Pollard, of Redruth, died in 1847, leaving four children -- Eliza, now in Kewaunee, Ill.; John, a Methodist Episcopal preacher; Ellen, now residing at Big Patch, and an infant that died three months after the mother. In 1848, taking his three surviving children, he returned to England, where he remained eighteen months. Marrying Clarissa Lory, of Elstone, Cornwall, he brought her and the children to Platteville, and settled on a farm adjoining the one he now owns. Mr. Trenary now has 175 acres in the home farm, and 40 in timber in Lima. He was one of the founders of the Primitive Methodist Church of Platteville. For more than twenty years, he has been Class-Leader and Sabbath School Superintendent. Mrs. Trenary has been a member for twenty-five years. They have ten children -- Charles, Edwin, Carlin, Nelson, Eldred, Sarah, Lucy, Rosina, Albert and Eli.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

TUFFLEY, GEORGE

GEORGE TUFFLEY, farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. Boscobel; born in Warwickshire, England; while in the old world worked at the gun-maker's trade for about eighteen years. He was apprenticed to the trade at the age of 14 years; worked for the East India Co. and in the Tower of London, making muskets and small arms generally for the use of the army. In 1850, he came to America and located at Platteville, Grant Co., Wis., and there followed his trade. He came down from Portage to Galena on the first boat that ever came down the Missouri River. Remained at Platteville five years; from there he came to the town of Marion, June 1, 1855, and located on the farm where he now lives. He owns 340 acres of land, 175 acres of which is improved; all improvements have been made by him personally. Has held office of Chairman of Town Board, Clerk, State Enumerator, and, in 1880, United States Enumerator of Census; has been Justice of the Peace several years, and member of the School Board and Director. Was married June 27, 1842, to Miss Mary Darby, who was born in the same county; has five children -- three sons and two daughters. Enlisted in 1861 in Co. K, 12th W. V. I.; served through his enlistment, which was three years; after receiving his discharge, he went to Indianapolis and was employed at the arsenal repairing guns, etc. Participated in the sieges of Vicksburg, Atlanta, battle of Peach Orchard and innumerable skirmishes.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Marion) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

TURNER, THOMAS

THOMAS TURNER, farmer. Sec. 11 ; P.O. Lancaster; was born in Canada April 16, 1837. He came to the State of New York in 1850 ; worked on a farm by the month ; then removed to Burlington, Vt., where he remained one year; then to Wisconsin in 1856; worked by the month until 1864; then rented land for three years of J. A. Barber, when he then bought 80 acres with a fine large two story house 32x42 feet, a nice place. His wife, Catharine Frawley, a native of Grant Co , Wis., was born in 1844. Her parents came to this county in an early day, and are old settlers in Potosi. She was married March 29, 18 4. They have three children Frank, born Dec. 29, 1865 ; Mary, born Aug. 16, 1867 ; Annie, born Sept. 22, 1873. He also owns 40 acres of land in Ellenboro, Sec. 17. What he has is by his own industry and labor.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

ULUE, OLE O.

OLE O. ULUE, farmer, Sec. 1; P. O. Boscobel; born in Norway; came to Manitowoc Co., Wis. in 1866, where he lived one year; then came to Dane Co., and remained two years; in 1869, came to Grant Co., where he has since lived, and followed farming; he owns 80 acres of land -- this he has acquired since coming to Wisconsin. Married, in 1873, to Mary Halverson; she is a native of Norway; they have five children -- four sons and one daughter.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Marion) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

UNDERWOOD, PARKER C.

PARKER C. UNDERWOOD, Muscoda; was born in Delaware Co., N. Y., Feb. 3, 1803; he is a son of Dr. Oliver Underwood and Jemima Parker; Parker C. lived in the State of New York until September, 1834, when he came West and located at Buffalo Grove, Ill.; the following year, he came to Mineral Point, Iowa Co., Wis., and his home has been in Iowa Co. since that time; he engaged in mining lead ore what they called Upper Mines; he sold his ore to Col. W. S. Hamilton, who had smelting works at Wiota, in what is now La Fayette Co.; his first sale of ore was 50,000 lbs. at $20 per 1,000 lbs.; it was the first ore sold; he then sold out his interest in the mines, and went to what is now called Centerville, and discovered what is now called the Drybone and Black Jack Vein, which yields zinc ore; the place was then known as the Underwood & Billings Diggings, he having given Mr. Billings an interest in the mine; he remained in the mines about three years, then engaged some in farming. He was elected Constable, also Under Sheriff of Iowa Co., which then embraced what is now Grant, Richland and La Fayette Cos. He was married March 11, 1824, to Miss Anna Parker, a native of New York State; she died in 1848; they had four sons; the two oldest, Joseph and Oliver P., are living on the old homestead, in Iowa Co.; Madison, the third son, died Dec. 8, 1880; Irving, the youngest, entered the army, and was wounded at the battle of Pittsburg Landing, and killed at the battle of Corinth.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

VEDDER, A.W.

A.W. VEDDER, farmer, Sec. 26; P.O. Hurricane Grove; born in 1809, in Truxton, Cortland Co., N.Y.; was a son of John N. Vedder; resided there until 21 years of age, then moved to Chautauqua Co., Wis., lived there ten years. Married Eliza J. Dagget; his first wife died; he then married Susan Hogle in 1839, a daughter of Andrew and Hannah Hogle; has six children, two by his first wife, and four by his present wife; has been on the Town Board two terms, and member of School Board four terms; has 160 acres of land, valued at $5,000. Politics, Republican.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

VIKTORA, MATHIAS

MATHIAS VIKTORA, saloon, Muscoda; was born in Austria in 1850; in 1855, came to America with his parents and located with them in the town of Blue River, Grant Co., where they engaged in farming until 1876, when they moved to Muscoda and established the present business. He is a son of Wenzel and Rosa Knutz, both natives of Austria, where his father engaged in farming; his mother died in 1867. He was married in February, 1877, to Miss Caroline Bettinger.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

VIPAND, SARAH

SARAH VIPAND, Sec. 36; P. O. Washburn; was born May 28, 1819, in Durham County, England; she came to America with her husband in May, 1845, and settled at New Diggings, Wis., where her husband worked at farming and mining lead; moved to Washburn in 1855, to the farm where she now lives, which contains 240 acres of land. The first building on the place was a brick and frame house that was first used as a schoolhouse, the school taught by Amelia Hull. Her husband went to England on a visit in 1861; he was taken ill on board ship, while returning to America; died at Buffalo, N. Y., of dyspepsia; was buried at Chicago in July, 1861, and, in the spring of 1862, was removed home and buried in the Ebenezer Cemetery, and was the first one buried in that yard. Mrs. Vipand built the house where she now lives in 1875. She has had nine children, of whom eight are living -- John W., born in England, Catherine, George, Mary, Thomas, Sarah J., Elizabeth A., James A.; one son, Thomas, died at New Diggings. Mrs. Vipand is a Primitive Methodist. Three of her daughters are married, Catharine to Michael Rowe; Mary to William H. Howdle, and Sarah to James Andrew.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

VIRGIN, NOAH H.

HON. NOAH H. VIRGIN, Platteville, one of the pioneers of Grant Co.; was born in Fayette Co., Penn., Dec. 6, 1812, son of Eli and Nacka (Hyatte) Virgin. When 6 years of age, his father died, and a few years after his mother married Col. Heaton, of Fayette Co., who owned a flouring mill and a woolen factory, in which young Virgin worked for some time, then learned the millwright's trade of his brother-in-law, Isaac Hill, of Greene Co., Penn. He came to Wisconsin in 1835, and worked at his trade in places until April, 1836, when he came to Platteville, where he has resided since that time. He, in company with John H. Rountree and Neely Gray, built the Platteville flouring mill, which was completed in 1840, and was the first flouring mill built in Platteville. He afterward bought out his partners, and has owned and run the mill himself up to the present time. Since 1870, he has been engaged in grain dealing in company with his son, Col. Horatio Virgin, in addition to his other business. Mr. Virgin was a member of the Assembly in the last Territorial Legislature in 1847, and also the first State Legislature in 1848, and again in 1855. He also served two consecutive terms in the State Senate, ending in 1861. He commenced political life as a Whig; was a Republican from 1854 till 1864, and since that time has acted with the Democrats. In 1866, Mr. Virgin was a candidate for Congress from this district, against Amasa Cobb, who was elected. On the 15th of January, 1839, he was united in marriage with Mrs. Pamelia E. Adams, daughter of Rev. Bartholomew Weed, of Platteville, and has had eight children, four of whom are still living -- Horatio H., living in Platteville, Emma, now Mrs. George H. Laughton, of Chicago; Mary, now Mrs. William Laughton, of Platteville, and Eugene, the youngest, living in Platteville. His eldest son, Col. H. H. Virgin, was born in the village of Platteville April 9, 1840, and grew up to manhood in his native village. In April, 1861, he enlisted under the three months' call, and was assigned to the 7th Regiment, but did not go out of the State. The next October, he was appointed Aid on the Governor's staff with the rank of Colonel, and, on the 18th of December following was appointed Battalion Adjutant of the 2d Wisconsin Cavalry (1st Battalion), and assigned to duty under Gen. Schofield in Missouri, in the spring of 1862. On the 30th of August, 1862, he was commissioned Major of the 33d W. V. I., and, after March 1, 1864, had command of the regiment till the close of the war, being in command in every engagement except three, while he was with the regiment. He was temporarily in command of a brigade in the battle of Yellow Bayou, on the Red River expedition. After the battle of Nashville, he held a Lieutenant Colonel's commission till the close of the war, and was then brevetted Colonel. During his term of service, he was in forty-two engagements, and never received a scratch, though he had three horses shot under him, and on one occasion a ball passed through the top of his boot, and on another he had a lock of hair shot off just above his ear, cutting a hole though the rim of his hat. After the close of the war, he was three years in the corn business in St. Louis, and two years in the grain business in Booneville, Mo. In 1870, he returned to Platteville, Wis.; built a warehouse, and since that time has been engaged in buying grain, in company with his father, under the firm name of N. H. Virgin & Son. Jan. 1, 1874, he was married to Miss Annie E. Kane, of Dodgeville, Wis.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

VIRGIN, NOAH H.

PLATTEVILLE

The great-grandfather of Noah Hyatt Virgin came from Wales, and settled in Maryland, and one of his sons, the grandfather of Noah, moved to Virginia, and was prominent in driving the Indians out of western Pennsylvania and West Virginia. The parents of Noah, Eli and Nacka Hyatt Virgin were living in Fayette County, Pennsylvania, when he was born December 6, 1812. He lost his father when the son was only six years old. A few years later his mother married Colonel Henry Heaton, of Fayette County, and Noah worked in his stepfather's flouring mill and woolen mill, receiving meanwhile such education as a winter school afforded. Subsequently he lived with his brother-in-law, Isaac Hill, of Green County, learning the millwright trade. He worked at that business in the East until 1835, when he found his way to Platteville, there continuing that occupation four or five years. He built the Platteville flouring mill, completing it in 1840 (the first mill of the kind in the place), having in partnership with him John H. Rountree and Neely Gray. These gentlemen he afterward bought out, and he has run the mill alone to this time. In company with another man, in 1856, he built the Genesee mill, two miles from Platteville, on the Lancaster Road, disposing of it four or five years later.

In 1874 Mr. Virgin added grain dealing to his business, with his eldest son, Colonel Horatio Hyatt Virgin, as a partner.

He was commissioner of Grant County at an early day; has repeatedly held the highest official positions in the village of Platteville; was a member of the last Territorial legislature, held in 1847; was a member of the State assembly in the following year, and again in 1855, and served two consecutive terms in the senate, ending in 1861. During the last term he was chairman of the committee on claims, and held an influential position in the upper house.

Mr. Virgin began political life as a whig; was a republican from 1854 until the second election of Mr. Lincoln in 1864, and has since acted with the democrats. In 1866 he was nominated by the democrats and reformers for congress, in a strong republican district, and ran ahead of his ticket.

On the 15th of January 1839, Mrs. Pamelia E. Adams, daughter of Rev. Bartholomew Weed, of Platteville, became his wife, and she has borne him eight children, only four of whom are living. Besides the son already mentioned there are two daughters, both married, and a son, Eugene W., unmarried. Emma is the wife of George H. Laughton, and Mary, of William R. Laughton, a brother of George, both living in Platteville.

Colonel Horatio H. Virgin, his eldest child and partner in business, was born in Platteville, August 18, 1840; was educated in the Platteville Academy and a commercial college at Madison, Wisconsin, where he graduated in December 1859.

He was married January 1, 1874, to Miss Annie E. Kane, of Dodgeville, Wisconsin, she being a relative of Governor Henry Dodge. They have two children.

Colonel Virgin has a brilliant military record. In October 1861, Governor Randall appointed him on his staff as aid-de-camp and colonel; in December 1861, he became battalion adjutant of the 2nd Wisconsin Cavalry, Colonel C. C. Washburn, commander; August 31, 1862, he was appointed major of the 33rd Infantry; was promoted to lieutenant colonel in January 1865, and returned to Wisconsin at the close of the war in command of the regiment, being brevetted colonel just before the regiment was mustered out. He was in forty-two engagements, including skirmishes; had three horses wounded twice each; had his own hair singed, his hat-rim hit, and two or three balls strike his saddle, but received not even a flesh-wound. While major he took command of the regiment in the Meridian expedition, and held the command until mustered out. On the Red River expedition, at the battle of Yellow Bayou, he had command of a brigade. At that time his regiment was in a detachment from the army of the Tennessee, under General A. J. Smith, and they had become so rugged as to be called "Smith's Guerillas." At the battle of Coldwater, Mississippi, April 19, 1863, Colonel Virgin was reported among the killed, and his obituary appeared in more than one Wisconsin newspaper, but he is as "live" a man as Platteville can exhibit, the pet of his father, and, because of his dash and bravery, the pride of the State.

Source: The US Biological Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Volume (1877) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

VOGT, ANTON

ANTON VOGT, Sec. 18; P. O. Glen Haven; owns 80 acres land, valued at $40 per acre; born in Baden, Germany, in 1848; came to America in 1852; located with his parents in Butler Co., Ohio; in this county in 1869. Married Caroline Winney, a native of this county. They have one child -- George. Mr. Vogt has been Town Treasurer three terms.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Glen Haven Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WADSWORTH, T. D.

T. D. WADSWORTH, agent Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul R. R., Boscobel; is a native of Hartford Co., Conn.; at about the age of 19, commenced studying medicine; graduated from the Twenty-third Street Homoeopathic College, New York City, in 1866; went to St. Louis in 1868, commenced practicing his profession; went to Chicago in 1871, and continued practicing till 1877, when he secured a position with the St. Paul R. R. Co., July, 1879, came to Boscobel and assumed his present position. He was appointed Superintendent of Ventilation of the State House at Springfield, Ill., and delivered lectures on Pathology in the Missouri Homoeopathic Medical College; he also started and conducted a free dispensary at St. Louis, Mo. Married, in 1866, to Miss Carrie A. Peck, of Warren, Trumbell Co., Ohio; they have four children -- three daughters and one son.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WAGNER, ELISHA

ELISHA WAGNER, of the Washburn Mills. The subject of this sketch was born in Ohio, Oct. 9, 1819; emigrated to Wisconsin in 1852; bought 160 acres of land in Clifton; sold and bought a half interest in the mill; also owns 100 acres of land. The mill is one of the best in the county. His wife, Sarah Taylor, was born in Lancashire, England, Aug. 15, 1814; emigrated to America in 1817, with her parents, who located in Ohio, and died there; they were married Feb. 19, 1844; she died April 10, 1878, and left five children--Charles Wesley, born in Ohio Dec. 11, 1846; miller by trade, and employed in the Washburn Mills; William Thomas, born in Ohio Aug. 22, 1848, and now is Kansas; Margaret Elizabeth, Sarah Ann, Mary E. In politics, Republican; religion, Methodist for forty-one years, and held the the offices of Steward, Class Leader and Trustee. Has been Pathmaster, District Treasurer; was Assessor in Ohio. They have a granddaughter, Tillie Draper, who resides with them.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

WALKER, THOMAS

THOMAS WALKER, dealer in furniture, and cabinet-maker, Patch Grove; was born in County Fermanagh, Ireland, Dec. 22, 1822; he came to America in 1850, and resided at Potosi; then to Lancaster in 1878, went to Patch Grove; he keeps a fine stock of goods, and has a good trade. His first wife, Mrs. Jenet Brewer, was a native of Indiana; they were married in 1846; she died in 1847, by this marriage there was one child -- Franklin, who went into the army from Illinois, and was never heard from afterward, supposed to have been killed. His second wife, Eliza J. Patterson, was born in Canada in 1825; they were married in 1850, and have two children -- Hattie E. (now Mrs. Parrish), and Robert. In politics, Republican; in religion a believer; a member of the Good Templars. Owns village property.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WALKER, WILLIAM

WILLIAM WALKER, farmer on Sees. 15. 16 and 25; owns 700 acres of land. He was born in Ireland, and, in his 16th year, left his native land for America. In May, 1840, he landed in Grant Co., Wis., without means. He has since resided there, and by industry has accumulated a comfortable property. "He was married in 1852, to Miss Emma Rawden, a native of England. They have five sons and two daughters.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

WALL, TILMON

TILMON WALL, farmer; P. O. Boscobel; owns 100 acres of land; also owns 240 acres in Waterstown; was born in North Carolina in 1816; at the age of 24, he went to Missouri and engaged in farming for six years, then returned to Jo Daviess Co., Ill., where he engaged in farming two years; in 1849, he came to this county and located on Blue River, in the town of Castle Rock; two years later, he moved to his present location, where he has lived ever since. Was married in 1840, to Miss Anna Brown, a native of Kentucky; they had five children; but one son and one daughter are now living.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hickory Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WARD, DEXTER

DEXTER WARD, carpenter and builder, Lancaster; was born in Chittenden, Vt. He came to Walworth Co., Wis., in 1842, and Feb. 8, 1843, came to Grant Co. He was married, Feb. 8, 1845, to Miss Cecilia Ward, a native of Georgia, Vt. They have had five children-William W., Henry A., Eleanor M., Adeline S. (deceased) and Mary M. He was elected Constable in 1857, and re-elected, and served five years. He was Deputy Sheriff four years under Mathew Woods ; !also Deputy Sheriff under George R. Stuntz for two years, and in 1855-56, was Under Sheriff under Lorenzo Preston. In 1857-58, he was elected Sheriff of the county, and in 1861-62, was again Under Sheriff under Goodnough.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

WARD, EDWARD

EDWARD WARD, Jamestown; was born in Cornwall, England in 1826; follows farming as an occupation; has 145 acres of land, probable value, $7,500. In politics, a Republican. Married Mary Symons, a native of Cornwall, England; have two children -- Elizabeth A. and James; are of the Protestant faith, but are not members of any particular denomination.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Jamestown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WARD, REUBEN

REUBEN WARD, farmer; P.O. Lancaster; born in 1840 in Vermont; was a son of Solomon Ward; came to Grant Co., Wis., in 1855. He married in New York in 1865; located in Beetown, and has lived there since; was in the war three years, and was wounded in the face; owns a large farm; is a Republican.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Beetown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

WASHBURN, F. A.

F. A. WASHBURN, Sec. 11, P. O. Martinville; born Aug. 25, 1844, in Lake Co., Ill. He lived with his parents until 1857, and came with them to Wisconsin, and settled on the farm where he still lives, and owns 325 acres of good land. He was married, in 1869, to Serena Taylor, at his mother's house in Port Andrew, Richland Co., by Squire Corner. She was born in Grant Co., Wis., Jan. 4, 1852. They have two children living -- Albert E. and Ida Delia. Lily May died March 8, 1872; was buried in Rock Church Cemetery, town of Clifton. F. A. enlisted in Co. F, 2d W. V. C., under Capt. Palmer, and served four years in the late rebellion.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WATSON, CHARLES

CHARLES WATSON (Rep), of Washburn, Grant county, was born September 1st, 1835, in county Wicklow, Ireland; had a common school education; came to the United States in 1852, and to Wisconsin in 1853, and settled at Clifton, Grant county, removing thence to Lima, Grant county, in 1876; is a farmer; had held various local offices; was elected assemblyman for 1880, receiving 1,135 votes against 605 for John Hier, democrat, and 138 for E. Witherbee, green backer.

GRANT COUNTY. First District---The town of Clifton, Ellenboro, Harrison, Hazen Green, Jamestown, Lima, Paris, Platteville and Smeiser. Population, 13,522.

Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1880) transcribed by RuthAnne Wilke

WATSON, MRS. JOHN

MRS. JOHN WATSON, Sec. 24, P. O. Livingston; was born in Lancashire, England, Sept. 18, 1827. She was married to John Watson in the Church of England, and came to America in 1848; stopped in New Orleans six months on account of sickness in the family, and lost two children there with ship fever -- Thomas and another child unnamed. They then came to St. Louis, where her husband worked in the coal mines one year, and then came to the town of Clifton, in which place he resided till his death. He followed mining until he bought the farm where his wife now lives; owned 170 acres of land. He died May 23, 1876, of congestion of the brain, aged 52 years, and was buried at Rock Church Cemetery, according to the Masonic Order, by Mifflin Lodge. The procession reached nearly a mile. It was estimated that there were over 1,000 persons in attendance. Mrs. Watson has seven children living -- Winfield S., Catharine, Sarah, Elizabeth M., John W., Charles and James. Three deceased -- Ann, Lincoln, and one infant, not named, all buried in Rock Church Cemetery. Winfield married Ellen Stephens. Catharine, G. W. Hilbry, and Sarah, James Mundon, all living in the town of Clifton and farming, except Winfield, who keeps hotel at Livingston. Mrs. Watson has been a member of the M. E. Church for twenty years.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WATTERHOUSE, GEORGE W.

GEORGE W. WATTERHOUSE, farmer, Sec. 22; P.O. North Andover; born in 1858, in Grant Co., Wis.' Is a son of Charles and Elizabeth Watterhouse; his mother's surname was Elizabeth Hutchcroft; he lived with his father until 21 years of age. Married in 1880 to Erla Briggs, daughter of Edwin Briggs; is a promising farmer; politics, Greenbacker.
WAY, OTIS M.

OTIS M. WAY, farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. Glen Haven; owns 90 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre; born in Trumbull Co., Ohio, in 1831; came to Wisconsin in 1841, and settled with his parents in Lima, this county; removed to this farm in June, 1851. Married Louisa Mayer, a native of Milwaukee. They have two children -- Melinda and Edmund.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Glen Haven Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WEBB

IVEY & WEBB, merchants, Lancaster; this house was established at this location in February 1879 ; they carry a complete stock of dry goods, hats, caps, boots and shoes, clothing, groceries, etc.; stock ranges from $5,000 to $9,000 ; their annual trade reaches $30,000 and is increasing ; this house was established in May, 1866, at British Hollow under the firm name of Wilson & Ivey ; in 1868, Mr. Ivey bought his partner's interest and continued the business alone two years, when he took in William E. Webb ; in February, 1879, they bought their present store which was opened by Mr. Ivey, Mr. Webb remaining at the old store until it could be closed out; in September, 1880, Mr. Webb joined his partner in Lancaster. Alexander Ivey is a native of England, born in County Cornwall March 10, 1837, a son of Joseph and Miriam Endey Ivey, who moved to America in the summer of 1837, and lived in New York City six years, when his father, a miner by trade, was killed by the caving in of a mine, his mother subsequently marrying Josiah T. Tremullen ; they moved to West Virginia, afterward to North Carolina, and in 1846, to Grant Co., Wis.; his mother died in 1849. He followed mining until the war broke out when he volunteered as a private in September, 1861, in Co. D, 7th W. V. 1., Capt. E. F. Giles; he went out as a private and returned a Sergeant, having lost one leg at the battle of Gettysburg. He was married March 4, 1865, to Miss Anna Eustice, of British Hollow, daughter of George Eustice ; they have four sons and a daughter, Miriam P., Joseph E., George Earl, Alexander and W. Leroy ; he was elected Town Clerk at Potosi in 1865, and was County Treasurer for Grant Co. four years from 1875 to 1879, and a member of the City Council in 1879. W. E. Webb, a native of Wisconsin, born in British Hollow, Grant Co., March 9, 1848, a son of John and Dorothy Dunstone Webb, both natives of Cornwall, England, who came to the United States in 1845, and direct to Grant Co. Mr. Webb followed mining from the time he left .school at the age of 14 until he embarked in the mercantile business. He was married to Miss Martha Nicholls, born in Wales, a daughter of William and Ann Wilcox Nicholls ; they have three sons Frank, Walter and William.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

WEBER, JOSEPH

JOSEPH WEBER, Jamestown; born in Prussia May 6, 1819; emigrated here in 1846; settled in Galena for six years, and then removed to Jamestown, where he settled permanently; he engaged in mining, and afterward began farming; probable value of farm, $5,000. Politics, Democratic; is a Catholic. Married Catharine Kulle, who was born in Prussia April 2, 1821; was married in Prussia in 1843; they have eight children -- Martha, born Sept. 29, 1843; Anton, July 13, 1845; Joseph, Sept. 20, 1847; Henry, Jan. 14, 1850; Fuldine, March 17, 1851; Joecheim, Nov. 12, 1854; Ceewille, Feb. 14, 1859; Catharine, May 16, 1861.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Jamestown Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WEDHASE, F.

F. WEDHASE, harness-maker and carriage-trimmer ; is a native of Germany, and was born in Prussia Feb. 5, 1823; grew up and learned the trade of carriage-trimmer; after the revolution, he emigrated to America in 1849, and the following year came west to Dubuque and entered the employ of L. D. Randall & Co., and was engaged in carriage trimming for that firm for fifteen years ; he made the first top buggy ever made in Dubuque. He came to Lancaster and established his present business in 1869, and is the oldest harness-maker in Lancaster. In 1852, he married Augusta Koch, from St. Louis ; they have eight children Frank, in Dakota; Lizzie, in Boscobel ; Fanny, in Dakota; John, Clara, Ida, Delia and Fred.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

WEFEL, JOHN F.

JOHN F. WEFEL, merchant, Stitzer; was born in 1855 in Germany; is a son of Adam and Mary Wefel; lived with his parents until 24 years of age; came to America when but 3 years old, locating in Liberty, Grant Co., Wis. He followed farming until 21 years of age; then went into the mercantile business at Stitzer; is one of a family of five children, all of Grant Co.; two brothers deceased, both died in the same night. In politics, he is a Republican. His father is an enterprising and prosperous farmer. He is a member of the Evangelical Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Liberty Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WEHRLE, GOTTLIEB

GOTTLIEB WEHRLE, farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. Fennimore; born in Baden, Germany, in March, 1822; he came to the United States in September, 1855, and settled on his present farm; he left Germany in 1843 and went to Leeds, Yorkshire, England, and engaged in the clock business, he being a clock maker by trade; he came to this country from England; he is one of the most prominent and successful farmers of Grant Co.; he is now engaged principally in the dairy business and io the raising of hogs. He served in the Legislature of 1874. He was married to Mary Dorer, who was born in Baden.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Mount Ida Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WEINHART, REV. F. X.

REV. F. X. WEINHART, Muscoda; born in Austria in 1828, a son of Anthony Weinhart, who is still living in the old country. Father Weinhart received his education in Austria, and came to America as a theologian in 1852; was ordained as a Catholic Priest in 1855, and has had great success in establishing and organizing congregations. In 1856, he started and built his first church in Greenfield, Milwaukee Co., viz., "Holy Sacrament." The second one at Franklin, Milwaukee Co., in 1857, viz., "Sacred Heart of Jesus and Mary;" he also established the "St. Aloisius" Church at Sauk City; at Avoca, "St. Joseph's;" at Highland, the German Roman Catholic Church, which was dedicated in 1864, and the church at Muscoda in 1859; at present he has charge of two congregations, the one at Avoca, and the church at Muscoda; he moved to Muscoda permanently in 1880. He was permanently located at Mineral Point for the term of eight years, and also at Highland for the same length of time; he has been in the ministry continually from the time he was ordained, with the exception of the trip he took to Europe, to see his aged father. He established two churches in Richland County, one of which was named "St. Anthony," after his father, and the other "St. Mary." He is the only one living of the three Priests that started the seminary in 1854 and 1855 at Milwaukee. His present congregation at Muscoda only numbered sixteen families in the start, and he said mass in the schoolhouse at first, and then in a wagon-shop, using the workbench as an altar; it is now in flourishing condition, numbering ninety-four families. He has wonderful executive abilities, and is thought highly of by the whole community.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WEIR, W. J.

W. J. WEIR, farmer Sec. 19; P. O. Liberty Ridge. He was born in Grant Co. His father, Thomas Weir, came to the county in 1840, and located in the town of Potosi. In 1856, he bought the farm, which is now worked by the son, and where he lived until his death, which occurred Feb. 9, 1879. W. J. Weir was elected Justice of the Peace, in April, 1879. He was married, April 1, 1880, and has one daughter -- Mamie. He is a member of the I. O. O. F.; and, in politics, is a Republican.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Liberty Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WEITTENHILLER, CHARLES

CHARLES WEITTENHILLER, manufacturer of cooperage; was born in 1844 in Bavaria, Germany; came to America in 1853 with his parents and settled in Platteville, where they still reside. Learned his trade of his father, Sebastian Weittenheiller, who carried on the same business in Platteville till 1864. Charles Weittenhiller enlisted in February, 1864, in the 25th W. V. I., Company E., and was in the service till the close of the war. On the 22d of July, 1864, he was taken prisoner at Decatur, Ga., and was two months in Andersonville Prison, before he was discharged. He has been in business since 1867. He was married in 1867, in Platteville, to Miss Jennie Marshall, daughter of E. H. Marshall, and has four children -- Cora, Addie, Marenus and Charles; has been Justice of the Peace for the last four years, and was on the Village Board one year.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WEITTENHILLER, SEBASTIAN

SEBASTIAN WEITTENHILLER, Sections 5, 7 and 8; P. O. Platteville; was born April 7, 1824, in Eichseichstadt, Bavaria. Here in his and her native village, he married Annie Schiell, born Jan. 16, 1822. He came to America in 1849, spent eighteen months in New York, then came to Galena, and, after visiting Iowa, came in May, 1853, to Platteville. His wife came from Germany in November of the same year. Mr. W. had learned the cooper's trade in Rochester, N. Y., and for eleven years followed it in Platteville; in 1864, he bought his present 164 acre farm, and has since lived upon it. Mr. and Mrs. Weitenhiller have nine living children -- Charles, Mary, Annie, Conrad, Emil, Phillip, Lena, Jennie and Etta. They also have lost five children, one of whom met an accidental death by the falling of a horse. The family are Presbyterians.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WELLNER, PAUL

PAUL WELLNER, farmer; Sec. 29; P. O. Boscobel; born in Wurtemberg, Germany. Came to America in 1849; worked in various parts of the country in stone quarries, railroads and canals about five years; came to Crawford Co. in 1854; in 1864 to his present farm; owns 320 acres land; all improvements have been made by himself and son. Married in 1862 to Margaretta Henkel. They have five children -- three sons and two daughters.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Marion) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WELLS, LYBORN

LYBORN WELLS; P.O. Washburn; was born March 12, 1825, in Burlington Co., N.J. His father and mother died when he was 15 years old, and he was left alone to look out for himself; went to Harper's Ferry, on the Potomac River, and worked on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad for two years, then came to Chicago, and from there to Joliet and worked at the carpenter's trade for the winter, and after that came to Mifflin, Wis., and engaged in mining till the spring of 1859, then went to California and returned in 1852, but went back and stayed one year more; then came back to Mifflin and bought 310 acres of land from the Morehead estate, and farmed it one year, sold it and bought the Morehead Saw-mill, on Little Platte River, in town of Lima, and run it four years, after which, bought 160 acres of land from Gov. Dewey; remained there two years, then removed to Washburn, and had lived there since, except two years that he kept a Grange store in Platteville. Was married in 1854 to Emma Pullen, who was born in New Jersey Oct. 3, 1836; have five children--Lorenda, Allen V., Leslie K., May C., Charles. Mr. Wells was Justice of the Peace for three years, also Assessor three years; he kept a store in Washburn at the same time he was farming, and his son Allan was postmaster.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

WENTZ, PETER

PETER WENTZ, southwest quarter Sec. 3; P. O. Platteville; born July, 1814, in Scheresfeldt, Bavaria, where he married Sarah Miller; his early life was spent at farming and coal mining. In 1854, he brought his family to the United States, spent eighteen months in Pennsylvania, then came to Platteville, where he first bought 10 acres which he sold. Next he bought 40 acres on Sec. 3, which he sold in 1877, and that year bought his present 160-acre farm of I. Penberthy. Mr. and Mrs. Wentz have four children -- Barbara, Sarah, Charlotta and Christian, all four in Bavaria; the only son, born March 23, 1852, married Mary Linden, who was born in Potosi, Grant County, Wis.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WENZEL

HENKEL & WENZEL, proprietors of saloon and restaurant. This business was established in December, 1874, in their own building, which was constructed the same year.
WENZEL, JAMES

JAMES WENZEL, painter, Lancaster; commenced this business in Lancaster, in 1871, beginning with Pravis & Bushnell ; in February, 1875, he opened a shop, buying out his employer; he does sign and house painting, and employs two men. Mr. Wenzel was born in Delaware, Feb. 27, 1852, a son of Conrad and Margaret (Weeth) Wenzel, both natives of Germany, who came to the United States in 1847 ; they moved to Liberty, Grant Co., in 1857, and to Lancaster in 1870. Mr. Wenzel was married in July, 1875, to Miss Alice Orton, daughter of Charles and Mary (Willard) Orton.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

WENZEL, JOHN J.

JOHN J. WENZEL, of this firm, is a native of Germany,born March 3, 1841, a son of Conrad and Margaret (Werth) Wenzel, who came to the United States in the summer of 1848, settling in Delaware, where they lived eight years. In the spring of 1857, they moved to Grant Co., settling on a farm four miles from Lancaster. John J., the subject of this sketch, spent the earlier years of his life on the farm, which he left in 1871, and came to Lancaster, where he and his father opened a saloon. In February, 1 862, he was married to Miss Christina Trump, daughter of Henry High street, of Pennsylvania, a native of Switzerland. Mr. Wenzel was elected Constable in Liberty, and is a member of theI.O.O.F. The family are members of the Evangelical Church.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

WETMORE, CHARLES E.

CHARLES E. WETMORE, farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. Bloomington; was born in 1822 in Trumbull Co., Ohio; he is a son of Josiah and Elizabeth Wetmore, with whom he lived until 1843; he then came to Grant Co., Wis.; located near Millville, where he lived up to 1852, when he went to California and resided for three years; then to Grant Co., near Millville, for five years when he moved to Little Giant, where he has lived since, and followed farming. He was married, in 1851, to Abigail Dubel, a daughter of Michael and Abigail Dubel; they have two children -- Charles E. and Emily E. He has been School Director for one term. Politics, Republican. Has 85 acres of land, valued at $2,500. Has been very prosperous as a farmer.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Little Grant Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WHALER, EDWARD

EDWARD WHALER, farmer, Sec. 1; P. O. Platteville; born in 1860 in England; was a son of William and Susan Whaler; came to America in 1868; located in Little Grant, Grant Co., Wis., for one year; then to Lima for one year; thence to Ellenboro for eleven years, where he has since lived; he has lived with his parents all his life. Politics, Republican.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Ellenboro Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WHITCHER, GEORGE S.

GEORGE S. WHITCHER, farmer and dairyman, of Lima; P.O. Platteville; was born in Bath, Grafton Co., N.H., May 4, 1830; four years later, his parents removed to Michigan, then went to Ohio, then to Wisconsin in 1845. They located on a timbered farm in Ellenboro. Grown to manhood here, G.S. Whitcher, in 1850, went to California, and was there about six years. During this time, his parents had settled where he now lives in Lima. In 1859, he married Rhoda Cooley, a native of Johnson, Trumbull Co., Ohio. His father died in 1871 on the farm, and the widowed mother in 1875, in Platteville. Mr. and Mrs. Whitcher have five children--John F., Fannie L., Lee, Nora A. and George S., all born in what is now the cheese-factory, then the home of their parents. Mr. Whitcher has a fine farm of 393 acres, originally timbered land, that is fast proving itself equal to the best grass, producing lands of Central New York. He has a herd of twenty or more milch cows, with much other stock and very large and well arranged barns. In the spring of 1880, he fitted up a cheese-factory, the only on in his town. It has proven a successful venture, and it is his intention to use the milk of 300 cows during the season on 1881; 125 cows furnished the milk for the 23,000 pounds of cheese made here in 1880. Mr. Whitcher has added a new boiler, pump, etc., and evidently means to do a good business.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

WHITT, JOHN WESLEY

JOHN WESLEY WHITT, farmer, Secs. 25 and 26; P. O. Blue River; he is a son of Meredith and Sarah Atkins, natives of Virginia; they left their native State and located in Kentucky; in 1842, they came to this State and located in this county. John W. was born in Kentucky in 1834; he came to this State with his parents, since which time he has been engaged in farming and lumbering. He married, Nov. 25, 1857, Miss Sarah B. Lea, a native of Ohio; they have three children.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hickory Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WILDMAN, JAMES

JAMES WILDMAN, farmer, Sec. 8; P. O. Glen Haven; owns 160 acres of land, valued at $45 per acre. Was born in Ireland Aug. 15, 1810; came to America in 1835, and located in Ulster Co., N. Y.; in 1856, he removed to Wisconsin, and settled on his present farm. Married Margaret McIver, also of Ireland; they have six children -- Henry, William, Letitia, Annie Margaret, Samuel and Louis. Are members of the Congregational Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Glen Haven Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WILDMAN, WILLIAM

WILLIAM WILDMAN, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. North Andover; owns 160 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre; born in Ireland in 1841; came to America with his parents in 1843, and located in New York; removed to Wisconsin in 1856, and, in 1867, he settled on his farm. Married Jane Duncan, a native of Canada; they have four children -- Charles, Clara, Lottie and William. Mr. W. is a member of the Town Board.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Glen Haven Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WILKINSON, D. B.

D. B. WILKINSON, retired farmer; P. O. Platteville; was born Oct. 7, 1823, in Owersby, Lincolnshire, England; he spent his early life as a farmer. Married Elizabeth Marshall, who was born March 24, 1823, in Storton-by-Stow, Lincolnshire. They came to America and located in Cayuga Co., N. Y., in 1846. Later, Mr. Wilkinson purchased a farm in Oswego Co., N. Y. In 1850, they came to Wisconsin and located on a new wild farm in the Whig Settlement, Grant Co. Beginning with 40 acres and a log house. Mr. Wilkinson made steady progress toward better things, and more of them, increasing both his farm and home in size. The homestead of 200 acres is now in charge of his only son, Robert W. He was less than two years old when the parents came to the United States. His wife, nee Frances McRundell, of Fennimore, Grant Co., Wis., is the mother of three children -- Lillie E., Flora B. and Lulu M. Since 1868, D. B. Wilkinson and wife have resided in the city of Platteville. He was, in former years, a most successful miner, he having discovered some of the rich "diggings" in Whig, one of these yielded him $1,000 net profit.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WILKINSON, DAVID

DAVID WILKINSON, dealer in general merchandise and proprietor of Big Patch Mills; born in England in 1832; came to America in 1844 and located in this town. In 1856, he married Isabella Harker, a native of England; born in 1834, and died in April, 1880; has two children -- Elizabeth Ann and Ellen. Is a member of the Primitive Methodist Church. Mr. W. has held different town offices; has been Chairman one term.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Smelser Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WILKINSON, JOHN

JOHN WILKINSON, farmer, P. O. Stitzer; was born in 1821 in Yorkshire, England; is a son of the Hon. Charles Wilkinson of England. He lived with his parents until 16 years of age; was a cloth-dresser by trade; but, at the early age of 16 years, began as an apprentice in a blacksmith's-shop. He came to America in 1842; located in Paterson, N. J., where he resided for nine months; then to Pittsburgh, Penn., for nine months; then taking a westward course to Davenport, Iowa, for one and a half years; then to Galena, Ill.; thence to Mineral Point, where he resided for seven years. During all this time, he followed the occupation of blacksmith; and, in 1850, he wended his way to the golden regions of California, where he wandered around for eighteen months; then returned to Mineral Point for the period of two years; then to Liberty, Grant Co., Wis., in 1854, where he lived for ten years; then to Dallas Co., Iowa; then returned to his old home in Liberty, where he has since lived. He was married, in 1850, at Mineral Point, to Miss Grace Pace, a daughter of Richard and Mary Pace, who were from Cornwall, England. He had nine children -- Joseph H., Christopher, Charles A., Charlotte, Lillie, Helen, Rosalie, Richard (deceased) and John. He has 215 acres of land, valued at $4,000; has been Pathmaster five terms, and School Director one term. In politics, a Greenbacker.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Liberty Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WILKINSON, JOHN T.

JOHN T. WILKINSON, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Ellenboro; born in Indiana July 15, 1835; came to Wisconsin in 1850, with his parents. He enlisted in Co. C, 25th W. V. I., in 1862; discharged April 13, 1865, on account of wounds received at Atlanta, Ga., Aug. 15, 1864; he then returned to Wisconsin, and now owns 160 acres of land; made the improvements, and owns what he has by his own industry. His wife, Miss A. A. Bradley, was born in Ohio Nov. 16, 1836; came to Wisconsin with her parents in 1846; they died in Grant Co.; his father died in July, 1846; his mother died in March, 1876, They were married in 1860, and have one child -- Eva, born Dec. 18, 1861. In politics, Greenbacker; liberal in religion. Has been Assessor, member of the Town Board, Justice of the Peace, Director and Treasurer of Schools. Is a member of the P. of H. and Good Templars.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Ellenboro Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WILKINSON, JOSEPH

JOSEPH WILKINSON, Sec. 6; P. O. Jamestown; owns 220 acres of land, valued at $45 per acre; born in Durham, England, in 1814; came to America in 1850, and settled in Pittsburgh, Penn.; removed from there to Ohio; thence to St. Louis, and, in 1852, he removed to this county. Married Ann Redfren; she was born in Durham, England; they have six children -- Thomas, John, George, William, Samuel and Robert.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WILLEY, JOHN

JOHN WILLEY, Sec. 26; P. O. Cuba City; owns 320 acres land, valued at $50 per acre; born in Cornwall, England, Oct. 15, 1828; came to America in 1853 and settled in the town of Hazel Green; in 1869, he located on his present farm. Married Martha Bodinnar, a native of Cornwall, England, who was born Nov. 14, 1831; they have nine children -- Mary Jane, John, Alfred, Martha Ann, Samuel, Thomas, Grace, Emily, Henry, Walter, Nellie. Mr. Willey is a son of Samuel Willey, who came to America in 1853.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Smelser Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WILLEY, JOSIAH

JOSIAH WILLEY, farmer; P. O. Jamestown; son of Henry and Grace Willey; was born in the parish of Mullion, Cornwall, England, Aug. 18, 1819; he has a sister (Mrs. E. Dewing) residing at Lancaster, and four brothers -- Richard, residing at Little Grant; James, in Richland Co.; Edwin and Thomas, in Carroll Co., Iowa. Mr. Willey came to the United States in 1845, and settled near Benton, Wis.; he moved to the town of Paris in 1858; he owns in all 187 acres in Secs. 25, 26 and 35, valued at $10,000. He was married in 1849, to Miss Christiana Thomas, of the parish of Mullion, England; she was born Dec. 25, 1825; they have seven children -- Grace T., Charlotte I., now Mrs. Bedford; John H., living in Carroll City, Iowa; Addie E., now Mrs. Cundy, living in Colorado; Abram N., Josiah R., and Mary E., at home.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Paris Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WILLIAMS, CHARLES H.

CHARLES H. WILLIAMS, who with his son. Hector C, conducts a farm of three hundred and twenty acres of land in Colgate township, is one of the pioneer settlers of that region, and is well known as an intelligent and well-to-do agriculturist. He was born in Ontario, Canada, June 24, 1833. Our subject's parents, Daniel and Catherine (Howell) Williams, were of Welch and English- Irish extraction respectively, and were the parents of seven children, of whom our subject was the youngest son and fifth child in order of birth. When seventeen years of age Mr. Williams came with an older brother to the Michigan woods, and was engaged in lumbering during fourteen years during which time he purchased and improved a farm in Saginaw county, Michigan, upon which he finally settled and followed farming solely, but on a small scale. He lost heavily in the great Michigan fire, October 8, 1871, and in 1872 went to Grant county, Wisconsin, where he followed farming. He came to Tower City, North Dakota, October 6, 1880, and spent that fall finding a satisfactory location. After selecting the farm on which he now resides he returned to Wisconsin and in the spring of 1881 moved his personal effects to his farm and erected a 12x16 shanty, which was soon enlarged to the pretentious dimensions of 16x24 feet, which was known for many years as the largest house in the township. Our subject was the first settler of Colgate township and his buildings were the first erected. Wild game was plentiful at the time and he has dined from bison, has hunted grouse, and has seen geese in such large flocks and so tame as to pay little heed to a team driven among them. The crops were uniformly good until 1888, when in August of that year they were frozen and had to be burned on the ground. The succeeding crop was lost by drought, and it was not until 1891, the great crop year, that prosperity again seemed at hand, since which time the crops have yielded a good income.

Our subject was married, in 1856, to Miss Sarah Harris, a native of Canada. Mr. and Mrs. Williams have been the parents of eight children, as follows: Leonora, now Mrs. W.C. Gray, of Cass county, North Dakota; Benjamin T., engaged in the implement business in Wisconsin; Edward G., deceased; Daniel, a telegrapher in Wyoming; Charles L., a resident of Steele county; Yager, deceased; and Hector C., who is at present conducting the home farm. Mr. Williams assisted in the organization of Steele county and Colgate township, and served as chairman of the first board of trustees of Colgate township, which office he held six years. He is a stanch Republican, and during the campaigns he is a representative leader of his party, and lends his influence by voice and pen for the principles of Republicanism, and is a well-known attendant of county conventions.

Source: History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Susan Ripley

WILLIAMS, JOHN

JOHN WILLIAMS, miner, Jefferson; born in England in 1821; came to America in 1848, and settled here. Married Annie Pedelty, a native of England.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WILLIAMS, ROY

ROY WILLIAMS, farmer, Sec. 28; P. O. Hazel Green; born in this town in 1856; he is the son of John S. Williams, a native of England, born in 1821, who came to America in 1845, and settled in Jefferson; removed to his present farm in 1867. Married Susan Bosanko, who is also a native of England; they have twelve children -- Susan, Honor, John, Roy, William, Sarah, Mary, Grant, Alfred, Arthur and Frank.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WILLOUGHBY, S. R.

S. R. WILLOUGHBY, Principal of public schools, Boscobel; is a native of La Fayette Co., Wis.; followed farming, afterward painting; in about 1872, commenced teaching school in Crawford Co.; in 1873, he was appointed Principal of the grammar school; taught about four years; in the fall of 1878, was appointed Principal of the Boscobel High School, which position he now holds.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WILLS, JAMES

JAMES WILLS, Sec. 3; P. O. Fairview; owns 400 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre; born in Cornwall, England, in 1820; came to America in 1848, and settled in Hazel Green; located on this form in 1856. Married Jane Treglown, a native of the same place; they have thirteen children -- James, Thomas, Mary, Catherine, Jessepha, Elizabeth Ann, Marena, Emma, William, John, Hannah, Susan and Joseph Grant. Are members of the Methodist Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WILSON, JOHN DARLIN

JOHN DARLIN WILSON, Boscobel, was born June 19, 1851, at Johnston, Lamarkshire, Scotland. He was, on his father's side, related to the Camerons, his grandmother being a Cameron. His grandfather was James Wilson, the brother of Professor John Wilson, known, in the magazines, as Christopher North. While still young John Darling Wilson came to the United States, and in 1864 to Concord, New Hampshire. In the academy at this place he finished his education, which had been begun in a grammar school at Glasgow. He came to Shullsburg, Wisconsin, in 1865, and for the first two years of his stay in the state taught school at Darlington. Mr. Wilson commenced the study of law with H. S. Magoon, at Darlington, and was admitted to the bar June 22, 1873, in La Fayette county. In order to give finish to his legal training, he went into the office of M. M. Cothren, Mineral Point, and in July, 1875, they formed a partnership, and established a branch office at Boscobel. When Judge Cothren was elected circuit judge in 1876 the partnership was dissolved, and Mr. Wilson has since been alone in his practice. Mr. Wilson was admitted to the supreme court of Wisconsin in February, 1876, and to the United States district and circuit courts in January 1876.

Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin History and Biography, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Susan Geist

WILSON, DAVID

DAVID WILSON, dealer in fruit, fancy groceries and confectionery, Platteville; was born in Oswego Co., N. Y., in 1826; came to Wisconsin in 1844, and settled in Platteville; learned the jewelry business in New York City of Wilson Brothers, 460 Maiden Lane; was there two years previous to coming to Wisconsin. He was married in Potosi, Grant Co., in 1848, to Miss Mary Ann Sturgeon; he lived about a year in Platteville after marriage, then went to Canada with his family, where he remained about a year and a half, and then returned to Platteville; in 1854, he went to Richland Co., Wis., and commenced clearing up a farm; his wife died there Nov. 8, 1856, and he soon after returned to Platteville; he ran a peddling wagon about a year, then went to Reedsburg, Sauk Co., Wis., and was engaged in the jewelry business about a year; was in the same business in New Lisbon, Juneau Co., four or five years, and Elkhorn one year; he then kept hotel in Trempeleau one year, and boarding-house in Winona, Minn., a year and a half; he then went to Preston, Minn., and ran a jewelry store three years; from there he went to Fountain, on the S. M. R. R. R., and built the first hotel in the place in November, 1869; this was called the "Wilson House," and he kept it till it was burned down in November, 1872; he then returned to Platteville and bought what was called "Hodges' old stand," and carried on the grocery and and fruit business till he was burned out again in April, 1874; he rebuilt the same fall, and kept a city restaurant about three years, and since that has been engaged in his present business; his second wife, to whom he was married in New Lisbon, Wis., Oct. 28, 1857, was Mary Judd; she died Sept. 11, 1878, and he was again married Aug. 20, 1879, to Mrs. Helen Lewis, widow of J. H. Lewis, one of the early settlers of Platteville; has four children, all by his first wife.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WILSON, JOHN

JOHN WILSON, blacksmith, North Andover; business established in 1874; born in England, in 1840; came to America in 1871; settled in Glen Haven; removed to this village in 1874. Married Elizabeth Clifton, a native of England; they have three children -- Thomas, Edith and Fred.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Glen Haven Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WILSON, R. A.

R. A. WILSON, stock dealer and proprietor of hotel, Georgetown; was born in Posey Co., Ind., in 1840; came to Wisconsin in 1844, and with his parents located in Paris, settled in this village in 1865. Married Melissa Jordan, a native of Wisconsin; they have three children -- Lewis A., Robert V. and Alta M. Mr. Wilson served four years in the United States Army.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Smelser Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WISEMAN, EDWARD

EDWARD WISEMAN, Sec. 18; P. O. Patch Grove; owns 320 acres of land, valued at $5 per acre; born in Ireland in 1851; came to America in 1844 and settled in Wisconsin in 1848; located on present farm in 1866. Enlisted in Co. C, 2d W. V. C., in 1861; was discharged in 1865. Married Ellen Parker, a native of New Hampshire; they have one child, Maggie.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Millville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WITHERBEE, H. J.

H. J. WITHERBEE, farmer, Sec. 14; P. O. Elmo; owns 200 acres land, valued at $50 per acre; born in Hazel Green in 1847; settled on present farm in 1875. Married Susan B. Haney, a native of this county. They have three children -- Harriett Ann, Herman S. and Oliver Day. Has been a member of the Town Board one term; are all members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Smelser Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WITZIG, FRANK

FRANK WITZIG, farmer; P. O. Annaton; was born in 1840, in Germany; was a son of Martin Witzig, who came to America in 1854; located in Liberty, Grant Co., Wis.; entered 100-days' troops; served four months. He was married, in 1866, to Catharine Bunson, daughter of Andres Bunson. He has seven children; has one boy crippled for life. In politics, Democrat. He lives with his mother, Annie Witzig, and was born in 1811, in Germany. She came to America in 1854, stopping at Watertown, Wis., for one month; then to Clifton for one year; then to Liberty, where she has since lived. She was married to Martin Witzig. They had eleven children, one deceased in Germany and three in the United States; seven living -- Adam, Joseph P., Mary A., Frank, Joseph, Joan and Catharine. The deceased are Peter, John, Joseph and Rosey. Her husband died in 1862. She then married John Wealing, in 1866, who died the same year, eight weeks after marriage. He has 160 acres of land, and is a member of the Roman Catholic Church.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Liberty Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WOFFENDEN, JOHN

JOHN WOFFENDEN, Sec. 3; P. O. Patch Grove. Owns 120 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre. Born in Yorkshire, England, in 1827; came to America with his parents in the same year; at the age of 11 years, his parents returned to England. In 1848, he came back to America and settled in New York for a short time, when he removed to Wisconsin and settled on this farm. He has been twice married, first to Mary Nowell, who died in 1875; they had five children -- Mary J., Precilla, William N., Hannah E. and Abraham L. In 1879, he married Rosa Cull, a native of Ireland.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WONZOR, A. D.

A. D. WONZOR, born in Aurelia, Can.; came to Platteville in 1867, and, in September of that year, opened business as a barber in the basement of the old Tyler House; a year later he removed to a room over Wright's drug store, and, after four years, to the present Riege store; here he operated until 1876, when he purchased and located in his present building, on Main street; here he has a large and well appointed shop, and the three chairs are well patronized; he is eminently the barber of Platteville; his wife is an adept at the manufacture of hairwork, and keeps in stock everything that the ladies desire in that line of rolls, puffs, switches, etc., etc. Mr. Wonzor likewise has rooms devoted to the dyeing of clothing which has proven a most remunerative business; as his means have increased he has gratified his love for fine and fast horse; was at one time the owner of Wild Rose, a 2:35 trotter which was stolen by her trainer in Milwaukee during the State Fair of 1868; Tyler's Black Hawk, one of his best horses, died on his hands in 1878. He now owns a Black Hawk mare, "Creole;" time 2:45, and a noble stallion of the English coach, and Morgan stock, called Black Prince; he is a fleet and powerful horse; his pride now, however, is Bay Charlie, which beautiful horse he purchased in March, 1880; Bay Charlie trots in 2:35, and has beaten many of the best steppers of Dubuque; his sire, Patchen, Jr., had a record of 2:27 1/2, and a half brother; Sam Purdy went in 2:20 1/2; he is a mahogany bay, with black points, mane and tail; weight, 1,050 pounds.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WOODHOUSE, JAMES

JAMES WOODHOUSE, furniture manufacturer and dealer, Lancaster ; established this business in the fall of 1878 with about $1,000 capital invested. A native of Pennsylvania, born July 5, 1834, in Pottsville, a son of John and Ann (Newton) Woodhouse, both from Staffordshire, England they came from England to Pennsylvania in 1826, bringing with them four daughters and five sons ; from Pennsylvania they moved to Potosi, Grant Co., Wis., in 1836, and have since died. Mr. Woodhouse was married Feb. 13, 1858, to Miss S. J. Huey, daughter of Joseph Huey, who died in the army during the rebellion. Mr. W. enlisted in August, 1862, as private in Co. I, 20th W. V. I., he was in active service until December of the same year, when he was wounded at the battle of Prairie Grove, Ark., by a gunshot which caused the loss of his right leg, was in the hospital until March, 1863, when he was discharged and returned to Grant Co.; from April, 1863, to January, 1869, he was employed in a plow-shop. He was elected Register of Deeds in the fall of 1865, and filled that office acceptably for eight years. Mr. and Mrs. Woodhouse have two sons and three daughters, Laura, Mary L., William, Eugene and Nettie.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

WOODRUFF, F. G.

F. G. WOODRUFF, farmer and broom-maker, Sec. 32; P.O. Platteville; was born in Chenango Co., N.Y., in 1831; came to Wisconsin in 1844; owns 80 acres of land. His wife, Elizabeth Calloway, was born in Cornwall, England, in 1838; married May, 1860. They have five children--Albert, born Feb. 16, 1861; Eva, June 13, 1862; Elsie, Oct. 9, 1863; Lovilla, Aug. 7, 1864; Jesse, July 20, 1876. In politics, Republican; in religion, liberal believer. Has been School Director, Clerk and Pathmaster. His father died January, 1866; is mother January, 1871.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

WOODWARD, EDWARD M.

EDWARD M. WOODWARD, Section 20 and 21; P.O. Platteville; born March 27, 1817, in Steuben Co., N.Y., where he was, in early life, a day laborer. He became cooper's apprentice in Trumbull Co., Ohio, where he settled in 1844; ten years later, he came to Lima and settled on 10 acres of timbered land. He began with scarcely a dollar, and has literally hewed out of the original timber of Lima, a farm of 310 acres. He married Sarah Hake, who was born near Little York, Penn. The two eldest children--John W. and William W., were born in Trumbull Co., Ohio; the others--Elizabeth, Mary, Minerva, Albert, Wilson, Rhoda and Phebe were all born in Lima, where all now live, except Mary, who resides in Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Woodard have lost four children.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Lima Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Sandra Wright

WOOLISTENHOLME

NATHAN & WOOLISTENHOLME, dealers in general merchandise, Lancaster, commenced business in the fall of 1869, with a $2,000 stock and small capital of about $1,500, doing a trade the first year of about $2,500 ; their business has since increased threefold. Joseph Woolstenholme, of this firm, is a native of Lancaster, Grant Co., born Nov. 1, 1860, son of John W. and Annetta Nathan Woolstenholme ; his father was bore in Philadelphia, of English parentage, and his mother was born in Germany. He has always been engaged in this business. A graduate of Lancaster High School.
WOOLSTENHOLME, JACOB

JACOB WOOLSTENHOLME, Lancaster, a native of Philadelphia, Penn., where he was born May 27, 1838. His father came to Grant Co. in 1843, and still resides there ; his brother John died Aug. 20, 1880, in Lancaster, leaving a wife and four children.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

WOOLSTENHOLME, JOHN

JOHN WOOLSTENHOLME, deceased, was born in Philadelphia, Penn., in 1836, where he lived until 14 years of age, when he moved with his father, William Woolstenholme, to Grant Co., and settled on Fennimore Prairie in 1850. He followed farming until 26 years of age, when he enlisted as a private in the 25th W. V. I., Co. C, Capt. H. D. Ferguson; he served one year, when he was discharged on account of disability. He returned home, and, in 1868, was engaged in building the company's store, in company with Mr. Nathan, which they occupied till his death, which occurred Aug. 20, 1880. His wife survives him, and the business is still continued, his sons representing him.

Source: History of Grant County Wisconsin (Lancaster Township Biographies) by the Chicago Historical Company, 1881; Transcribed from the book and contributed to Genealogy Trails by Friends For Free Genealogy

WOOLLEY, LUCIUS JASON

LUCIUS JASON WOOLLEY, Boscobel, was born in Westminster, Vermont, December 1, 1820. His father was from the original stock of that name, and lived in New Bedford, and his mother was a Colvinn, of New Hampshire. His early education was in the public schools, afterward in a normal school, and completed in the Black River Literary and Religious Institute, at Watertown, New York. At the latter place he studied law four years with W. H. Shumway, when he was admitted to the bar in advance of the usual seven years' course of law study. In the fall of 1855 he came to Wisconsin, prosecuted further the study of law with J. T. Mills, at Lancaster, and was admitted to the Grant county bar, at Lancaster, at the spring term of the circuit court of 1856. He then established himself in practice at Lancaster, and continued there until 1861, when he came to Boscobel, and entered into a law partnership with G. Hartshorn, but since the spring of 1863 has been alone in business. Mr. Woolley has been much in public office; has been chairman of the county board of supervisors three years, and, consequently, a member of the board three terms; is notary public; circuit court and United States court commissioner; is now justice of the peace, having held the office several different years, and has been engaged in prosecuting pension claims against the United States government since 1863.

Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin History and Biography, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Susan Geist

WRAGE, HENRY

HENRY WRAGE, wagon-maker; P. O. Ellenboro; was born in Germany in 1825; came to America in 1852; remained a short time in Chicago; then to Galena; then in 1857 to Grant Co., Wis.; learned his trade in the old country; was also in the army in the old country, in the war between Denmark and Germany. His wife, Gertrude Otten, who was born in Germany, came to America in 1850; married in 1854; they have five children -- Emma, Henry, John B., Harry W. and Augustus. In religion, he was raised a Catholic, his wife Lutheran. He owns 10 acres near the village, with good house; also, 120 acres in Secs. 14 and 13, Ellenboro.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Ellenboro Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WRIGHT, WILLIAM C.

WILLIAM C. WRIGHT, merchant and Postmaster, Martinville; was born Feb. 24, 1821, in Herkimer Co., N. Y. He came to Winnebago Co., Ill., in 1839, with one shilling in his pocket; worked out by the month two years, and received $15 per month; then went to Galena, Ill., where he worked one year in the lead mines; then went to Rockford, Ill., and was married to Mary Keith, by the Rev. John Crummer. They then removed to McHenry, Ill., where he bought 120 acres of land from the Government and went to farming, at which he continued eighteen years; came to Wisconsin, and bought 120 acres of land on Sec. 13, town of Clifton, and farmed it for one year; then sold out the farm, and bought the place where he now lives from S. Millard, and commenced as a merchant; was appointed Postmaster, and has been the same ever since. He has been a church member forty-seven years, and was one of the builders of the Free Methodist Church, and now owns it. Rev. G. C. Coffee preached the first sermon there in the fall of 1872. Mr. Wright has been on the School Board, and has always taken an active part in the interest of the town. He is a temperance man, and assisted to organize a Good Templars' lodge in the village, which meets in the M. E. Church. They have one daughter -- Emma E., who was married to William Stephens, by Rev. G. C. Coffee, at the residence of her father. She has two children -- Idah May and Arthur W.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Clifton Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WYNE, B.F.

B.F. WYNE, Postmaster; was born in Adair Co., Ky., in 1818; came to Illinois in 1837 and settled in McComb, McDonough Co., where he engaged in the jewelry business which he continued in that and Schuyler Co. till 1848; in October of that year he came to Platteville and carried on the same business till April, 1864, when he received the appointment of Postmaster, and has held that office ever since; he held the office of Justice of the Peace twenty-five years, resigning in 1880; he was also Town and Village Clerk for about fifteen years. He was married in 1846, in Rushville, Ill., to Miss Cynthia Potter, a native of Connecticut; and has had nine children, seven of who are still living.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

WYNNE, ELLIS

ELLIS WYNNE, blacksmith, Hazel Green; born in Wales in 1808; came to America in 1850. Married Elizabeth Huse; she was born in Wales; they have two children -- John and Margaret.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

YORK, H. D.

H. D. YORK, attorney at law and collecting agent, Hazel Green; born in Oxford, Chenango Co., N. Y., in 1823; came to Wisconsin in 1843, and settled in Hazel Green, and engaged in mining and land agency. Married Mary E. Tyler, a native of Ohio; they have two children -- Dwight S., R. Aruba. Mr. York was a member of the Legislature three terms.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Hazel Green Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

YOUNG, CAPT. H. F.

CAPT. H. F. YOUNG, Sec. 26; P. O. Patch Grove. Owns 200 acres of land, valued at $25 per acre; born in Mercer Co., Penn., in 1824; came to Wisconsin 1850, and settled in Millville in 1878, he settled on this farm. Married Delia Warner, a native of Ohio; they have two children -- May and Harry. Mr. Young enlisted in 1861, as Second Lieutenant of Co. F, 7th W. V. I.; was afterward promoted to Captain; he served until 1864.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Patch Grove Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

YOUNG, JACOB

JACOB YOUNG, farmer; P. O. Muscoda owns 200 acres land on Sections 15 and 16; was born in Bavaria Jan. 23, 1842; he is a son of John and Margaret Smith, both natives of Bavaria, where his father engaged in the several occupations of farmer, miller and paymaster of railroad. Father died in the old country in 1858; mother still living in this town. Jacob Young came to America in 1858, and located first in Potosi, afterward moved to his present location. Enlisted Sept. 10, 1861, in Company D, 7th W. V. I., for three years. The regiment was attached to 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of the Potomac. He participated in all the battles of the regiment previous to the battle of the Wilderness, except South Mountain and Antietam. May 5, 1864, he was shot through the right lung at the battle of the Wilderness and taken prisoner, and lay in the field hospital thirty-one days, when he was sent to Andersonville; was a prisoner nine months, and was one of the first 1,800 exchanged. He re-enlisted with the regiment the same day its first term of service expired for three years longer. Dec. 28, 1863, they were then stationed at Culpeper, Va. They served until the war closed and was mustered out in August, 1865. He was discharged on account of disability June 10, 1865. After the war, he spent three years on the plains for his health. He was married Nov. 22, 1868, to Miss Harriet Markt, by whom he has two boys and one girl.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

YOUNG, JOSEPH

Joseph Young came from Doylestown and started a German paper in Johnstown in 1857. After a few issues he was placed in jail, for lack of bail, on some charge or libel suit growing out of something in his paper against his political opponents. He was liberated and left town. He had brought his motherless daughter, a small girl, to Johnstown, and in the incarceration dilemma her friends took her back to Doylestown. A romance grew out of this. M. P. Rinlaub, a brother of the wife of speaker, came to visit us, your speaker being then teaching school in Johnstown, and he getting a job with Colonel Bowmen in the "Tribune" office remained some months and became acquainted with the young lass, Kate Young. They kept up a correspondence. He removed west and became editor of the "Grant County Witness" in Platteville, Wisconsin. Seven years afterward he came east to Doylestown and married that girl, and she is now the mother of several type setters and several lasses, who in a few years will also be on the outlook for stray, lonely typos belonging to several other mothers.

Source: Huntingdon Journal (PA), 10 October 1879

YOUNG, V. H.

V. H. YOUNG, photographic artist, Platteville; was born July 19, 1848, in the town of Lima, Grant Co., Wis. His father, Dr. D. B. F. Young, was a native of New York; he came to Wisconsin in the winter of 1845, and settled in Lima, his family coming in the spring of 1846, he practiced medicine in Lima and vicinity till his death, which occurred March 6, 1862, at the age of 45. Mrs. Young, whose maiden name was M. A. Barstow, daughter of Joseph Barstow, is still living in Lincoln Co., Dak. Dr. Young was a graduate of Cleveland Medical College, and attended medical lectures at Cincinnati, Ohio. He was married in Trumbull Co., Ohio, where he practiced his profession before coming to Wisconsin. V. H. Young learning photographing in Webster City, Iowa, commencing in July, 1871; he worked in various places in Wisconsin, Illinois and Michigan, and finally located in Lincoln, Neb., in February, 1872; he remained there till October, 1877, then went to Webster City, Iowa, and from there to Platteville in 1879; the first three years of his stay in Lincoln, he was in partnership with J. W. Chase, formerly of Chicago, firm of Young & Chase, and since he came to Platteville, has been in company with John Robertson. Mr. Young was married in Ludington, Mich., Jan. 28, 1872 to Miss Louisa Voigt, and has two children -- Virgil Herbert and Winnefred Louise.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Platteville Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ZIEGELMAIER, GEORGE

GEORGE ZIEGELMAIER, brewer, Boscobel; is a native of WurtemSberg, Germany; worked at the baking and milling business for about three and a half years in the old country. July 2, 1854, he came thence to New Hartford, Conn., where the first year he engaged in farming, and the second year in the milling business. In 1856, he came to Crawford Co., and engaged in farming for one year, and moved thence to McGregor, Iowa, and followed the bakery business. In November, 1857, came to Boscobel and commenced the bakery and saloon business. In 1859, returned to McGregor and re-engaged in the bakery business. In 1866, returned here and bought out the first brewery, which burned, then rebuilt, and has continued since. He was married in June, 1860, to Sarah Koss; she was born in Mecklenburg; they have four sons and three daughters.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Boscobel Biographies) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ZIMMERMAN, CHARLES

CHARLES ZIMMERMAN, farmer, Sec. 16; P. O. Boscobel; born in Baden in Germany, in 1828. He lived there till 22 years of age, and followed the vocation of stone cutter. Came to this country and located in Ulster Co., N. Y., remaining there six years, following this trade. He then moved to Grant Co., entering a farm from the Government, where he lived four years. In 1860, he came to his present location. He owns 305 acres of land, of which 110 are improved. He has held the office of School Treasurer three years. Was married in 1854 to Miss Mary E. Buchler, who is a native also of Baden. They have nine children -- four sons and five daughters.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Marion) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio

ZWOLANEK, JOHN

JOHN ZWOLANEK, physician and minister, Muscoda; was born in Bohemia in 1815, and educated in a literary course, in Hungary, and graduated in medicine at Vienna. He practiced medicine eleven years in the old country, and came to America in 1853, and located at St. Philip, Texas, where he remained five years, and he followed his profession, that of minister and physician; then he came to Port Washington, Ohio, where he pursued his vocation four years; from there he went to Indiana, where he remained two years and then came to Fond du Lac, this State, and from there to Muscoda in 1868, where he has remained and pursued his vocation to the present time.

Source: History of Grant County, Wisconsin (Town of Muscoda) (Publ. 1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio