From the Mower County Transcript, June 19, 1889, page 4:

Dr. Door hears a pleasant report from Sinsinawa Mound. His daughter Miss Meda has a class standing of 90 taking first honors of the class.
From the Platteville Journal (Platteville, WI), 25 Feb 1899 (transcribed by MD):

Misses Anna Tiedemann and Lizzie Roselip left Tuesday for Chicago.

Mrs. Jas. McKernan is quite ill at the home of her daughter, Mrs. T. Leahy.

We regret to learn that Mr. Fred Libert has had quite a serious illness this week.

Misses Stella Vail, Mary Huntington and Dr. F. S. Knapp passed Sunday in Lancaster.

John Menhinaick of Ida Grove, Iowa, who has been visiting his mother, has returned home.

Mrs. William Holden, of Cincinnati, Ohio, is visiting with her daughter, Mrs. T. C. Hawley.

A. W. Hastings is on his way to Chattanooga, Tenn., where he expects to remain about 30 days.

Jesse Smelker. one of Dodgeville's prominent attorneys, visited his brother I. C. Smelker this week.

Capt. Vaughan, in the employ of the Robinson Carriage Manufacturing Co., staid over Sunday last with his family.

Mrs. Herbert Rule, (nee Ida Buchner, of Lancaster) of Wilmar, Arkansas, is visiting at the home of Clinton DeWitt.

Miss Jennie Harker of, Cuba Citv, is visiting in Platteville this week.

Misses Bee Gardner and Elsie Libert passed several days in Milwaukee this week.

Joe Longbotham, cashier of the Farmers's Bank, at Cuba, visited his family here the first of the week.

Uncle John Eplett left for Madison Monday, where he has a position in the legislature, as copying clerk.

Miss Maud Woodward, who returned from Honolulu, is teaching at Marquette, Mich., on the upper peninsula.

We are very pleased to be able to report that word has been received from Mr. W. T. Jennings, to the effect that his wife is much improved in health and that he may soon be home. They are spending the winter months in Asheville, N.C.

Frederick A. Bartle, wife and son, of Hurley, S.D., who have been visiting his brother Chas. Bartle, of this city, for the past two weeks, started for home Monday night. Mr. Bartle was formerly a resident in this vicinity, and this is his first visit, to his old home in sixteen years. He is one of the few who have made Dakota farming a success, and now cultivates 600 acres of its beautiful prairies.

Prof. Gentle, of the Normal, is on the sick list this week.

John Decker, of Lancaster, passed Wednesday in this city.

Miss March, of Shullsburg, is the guest of Mrs. Phil Hendershot.

Miss Stella Shelliem [?], of this city, is visiting in Lancaster this week.

Bert [?] Ketterer and Charlie Dixon, of Rewey, were in town Sunday and Monday.

Henry Oettiker and family are moving into the Beckwith house on west Pine Street.

Geo. A. Blackburn, of Dunbarton, called on Friends here Friday while enroute to Lancaster.

Elder Broinsdale [?] returned home Monday night from a trip to New York and Boston.

We are informed that Henry Oettiker will erect a brick house on the new addition during the coming summer.

Mr. Louis Gratz and sister Lena, and Mary Mckillip, of Yellowstone, are visiting friends and relatives in this city.

C. Eberhardt has leased the east basement in the New Bayley block, and will move his pool and billiard tables into it Monday.

Mrs. Hazzard and daughter, of Elk Grove, are moving into the Bradbury house on west Pine street, formerly occupied by A. J. Buss and family.

Mrs. Wrede is critically ill at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Henry Kleinhammer. Another daughter, Mrs. Homburg, of Butte, Mont., was also called here to attend her.

James Rowe and son of LeMars, Iowa, arrived in this city Wednesday the 22nd inst., to visit friends and relatives at his old home. He left for Mineral Point, Friday a.m. on a s hort visit and will return here again before he leaves for his home in Iowa.

Mrs. A. Curtis, of this city, who has been visiting in Waekegan, Ill., the past few weeks, returned Tuesday, accompanied by her son-in-law Sherman Rice, and wife.

Walter Marvel and wife, of Clinton, Ill., arrived in this city last Saturday for a visit with his parents, his mother, Mrs. L. J. Marvel, having been in poor health all winter. Walter holds the very responsible position of stenographer in the office of the superintendent of the Illinois Central railroad, and was compelled to return to his duties Monday night, but his wife has remained for an extended visit.

James Barron, of Georgetown, has just returned from a visit with relatives in Manchester, Liverpool and Southampton, England.
Buss

Mr. A.J. Buss' only son broke arm while playing tree tag at home. Dr. Cronin set it. A.J. Buss, marble business in Darlington. [not word-for-word]

Source: Platteville Grant County Witness (Platteville, WI) 28 Jan 1891; transcribed by Mary Dutcher

Condon

Miss Annie Condon, teaching in Highland, spent holidays at home. [not word-for-word]

Source: Platteville Grant County Witness (Platteville, WI) 1 Jan 1894; transcribed by Mary Dutcher

Dixson

Mr. E. Dixson of Rewey, formerly of Platteville, and his son Charlie, spent Sunday in Platteville. [not word-for-word]

Source: Platteville Grant County Witness (Platteville, WI) 1 Jan 1894; transcribed by Mary Dutcher

Eberhardt, Bachelor

Misses Lollie Eberhardt and Lillie Bachelor drew the silverware given away by Kelly and Angell, Saturday evening.

Source: Platteville Grant County Witness (Platteville, WI) 21 Feb 1894; transcribed by Mary Dutcher

Fahey

Miss Margeret Fahey, who attended the Normal left today noon for her home in Belleville, where she will spend a few days with her parents.

Source: Platteville Grant County Witness (Platteville, WI) unknown date; transcribed by Mary Dutcher

Getzlaff, Tevelin

Alma Getzlaff & Marie Tevelin Attend Funeral

Mrs. Marie Tevelin and Mrs. Alma Getzlaff returned to their homes in Platteville following a week-end stay with relatives in this city. They came here on Friday to attend the funeral of their uncle, Karl Kolberg, for whom services were held Friday afternoon. Mrs. Tevelin and Mrs. Getzlaff are the former Misses Marie and Alma Wangerin of this city.

Source: The Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wis.) Monday, 18 May 1936; submitted by Jim Dezotell
Gray, Jewett, Boyse

Mrs. F. H. Gray, Mrs. E. A. Jewett and Miss Bessie Boyse left this week to remain the summer with relatives at Platteville.

Source: St. Paul Daily Globe (St. Paul, MN), 18 June 1887

Griswold (Lecturer)

Go and hear the raciest lecture ever delivered in Platteville, at Normal Hall on Monday evening.

Source: Grant County Witness (Platteville, WI), 7 Jan 1875; transcribed by MD

Griswold, the "Fat Contributor" was engaged through Bliss, of Janesville, to deliver his lecture entitled "Injun Meal" in Normal Hall, last Monday evening. A large crowd assembled but the lecturer failed to put in an appearance. Nothing has since been heard from him so that we are not able to give the cause of the disappointment.

Source: Grant County Witness (Platteville, WI), 21 Jan 1875; transcribed by MD

Heer, Hooser

Platteville votes to go dry by unexpectedly large majority--658 to 520. Dr. R.S. Heer is elected major [sic], defeating Archie Hooser. Both men had experience as mayor.

Source: Platteville Journal Flashback--75 Years Ago--April 5, 1916; transcribed by Mary Dutcher

Horr, Piquett, Rodda, Hird

Horr and Piquett, blacksmiths at Benton, sold business to Wm. Rodda of Cuba City and J.W. Hird of Benton. [not word-for-word]

Source: Platteville Grant County Witness (Platteville, WI) 7 Feb 1894; transcribed by Mary Dutcher

Inghram

Arthur and Leslie Inghram of Hazel Green, Wisconsin, are visiting relatives and friends in Carroll.

Source: The Carroll Herald, 20 Feb 1907

Jenks

Walter Jenks represented Platteville Normal in the state oratorical contest at Superior.

Source: Platteville Journal Flashback--75 Years Ago--March 15, 1916; transcribed by Mary Dutcher

Klar, Piquette

The Klar-Piquette mine declares a 10 percent dividend.

Source: Platteville Journal Flashback--75 Years Ago--March 15, 1916; transcribed by Mary Dutcher

Klar, Piquette

The Klar Piquette Mine is making about 20 tons of concentrates a day.

Source: Platteville Journal Flashback--75 Years Ago--April 5, 1916; transcribed by Mary Dutcher

Miller, Andrew

The M&A Mining Co. is being organized by a group of Platteville citizens lead by Doctors Miller and Andrew.

Source: Platteville Journal Flashback--75 Years Ago--March 15, 1916; transcribed by Mary Dutcher

L.M. Letter from Wisconsin

PLATTEVILLE, WIS., April 23, 1870

EDITOR, CHRONICLE: Thinking that a few lines from this part of the West would be of interest to some of your readers in old Trumbull, I will give you a few items. We have had very dry, warm weather the past three weeks. Rain is very much needed here at present. There is a large quantity of grain being sown here this Spring, considering the low prices of last year's crop. Quite a number of people have left this Spring to look for that "famous 'out West,' where the turkeys run roasted with a fork stuck in their breast." Some have gone to California, some to Nebraska, Iowa and Minnesota. The people of Platteville are about to have communication with the outside world, by rail. The railroad was built within eight miles of here last Spring. The people think the snort of the iron horse will be heard here by the first of June. The Editor of the Grant County Witness has promised us an excursion ride on the Fourth of July. Real estate has advanced twenty-five per cent, here within a few weeks, on account of the prospect of the railroad being built to Platteville soon. Mr. Joseph Barstow died February 7th, aged eighty-nine. He was one of the first settlers in Harrison, Grant county, and formerly of Johnson, Trumbull county.

L. M.

Source: Western Reserve Chronicle (Warren, OH), 4 May 1870; transcribed by MD

Niehaus

Miss Emma Niehaus has returned home from a visit to Platteville, Wis.

Source: St. Paul Daily Globe (St. Paul, MN), 22 September 1889

Nodolf

[G?]us Nodolf, a young man living a few miles west of the village of Livingston, met with a serious accident by being thrown from a wagon and breaking a leg.

Source: The Revealer (Bloomington, WI), 4 Sep 1894; transcribed by MCK
Reed

Lamps in Reed's Opera house at Lancaster came near causing a stampede by overflowing and burning on the stage. The people started for the doors but were checked by some cool heads in the crowd.

Source: The Milwaukee Journal, 18 Sep 1897; transcribed by Mary Dutcher

Robbins, Benz, Barries, Pitts

Cecil Robbins, Harry Benz, Charles Barries, and Wilbur Pitts, high school debaters, defeated Galena on debating the subjects "Should the United States Maintain a navy equal to any in the world."

Source: Platteville Journal Flashback--75 Years Ago--April 5, 1916; transcribed by Mary Dutcher

Rogness

Locals--Mr. and Mrs. Paul Rogness of Fennimore were recent overnight visitors of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Elvin Rogness, North Beaver Creek. The Paul Rognesses and Elvin Rognesses were entertained at the Donald Rogness home at Osseo. Mr. and Mrs. Paul Rogness are building a new home at Verona, Wis., where they will reside following the first school semester. Mr. and Mrs. Donald Rogness are remodeling their home at Osseo.

Source: The Blair Press, 5 Oct 1967; transcribed by Mary Dutcher

Roselip

Miss Lizzie Roselip visiting with friends & relations in Dubuque, Galena, and Cassville. [not word-for-word]

Source: Platteville Grant County Witness (Platteville, WI) 24 Jan 1894; transcribed by Mary Dutcher

Roselip

Chas. Roselip bought the Lottman building on 2nd Street at a foreclosure sale. [not word-for-word]

Source: Platteville Grant County Witness (Platteville, WI) 31 Jan 1894; transcribed by Mary Dutcher

Rountree

One of the largest and most pleasant parties of the season was that given by Maj. and Mrs. Rountree, on Wednesday evening. Invitations to the number of nearly two hundred were issued and from the size of the crowd we should judge that nearly all responded. The evening passed off delightfully.

Source: Grant County Witness (Platteville, WI), 7 Jan 1875

Royce, Sutherland

A. M. Royce, Superior, was named President of the State Normal School at Platteville. He succeeds the late W.J. Sutherland.

Source: Platteville Journal Flashback--75 Years Ago--March 15, 1916; transcribed by Mary Dutcher

Siepker, Lamberty

Misses Leona Siepker and Loretta Lamberty, accompanied by their cousins, Frank and Ed Siepker of Potosi, Wisconsin, who are visiting here, spend the week end in Des Moines with their cousins, Louis and Ben Siepker.

Source: The Carroll Herald 5 Dec 1928; transcribed by Mary Dutcher

Smith

Mr. H. B. Smith, of this city, is enjoying himself among his home acquaintances in Platteville, Wisconsin, where he will spend a portion of the summer.

Source: Arizona Weekly Citizen (Tucson, AZ), 16 April 1882

Snyder

The millinery store and adjoining residence of Mrs. Snyder at Fennimore was burned yesterday. It is supposed firecrackers are to blame.

Source: The Milwaukee Journal, 6 Jul 1896; transcribed by Mary Dutcher

Steinhoff & Stephens

Wanted: 1000 pigeons. Come and see us. Steinhoff & Stephens.

Source: Platteville Grant County Witness (Platteville, WI) unknown date; transcribed by Mary Dutcher

Taylor

A Skunk Farm

Grant County is to have a skunk farm. The man who will make the experiment, although it is hardly an experiment, as it has been tried in a number of places with phenomenal financial success, is Will Taylor, who lives some seven miles south of Stitzer. A half acre tract of land will be enclosed by a six foot wire fence, two feet of it in the ground and four above, with a number of strands of barb wire on top. This is to be the habitation of the skunks. A consignment of good breeding stock will be shipped down from the north in a few weeks. When the animals become too numerous for the quarters staked out, new territory will be added.

But, what in the world are skunks good for? His skin is used for fur and brings about seventy-five cents. But his oil is what is "farmed" for. This is very valuable and is worth $3 an ounce. It is used for rheumatism and is said to be the most effective remedy for that ailment in the market today. Skunks will thus soon command a premium in that part of Grant county, for men and boys will engage in their capture and take them to the skunk farm to sell at a good round profit.

Source: Platteville Grant County Witness (Platteville, WI) unknown date; transcribed by Mary Dutcher

Tracy

The Tracy "shebang" was well filled last night. Speeches were made by Dr. Tracy, J.C. Casselman, of Platteville, Wis., and others.

Source: Daily Globe (St. Paul, MN), 17 June 1879

Vanderbie

Vanderbie Jewelers has on display a 4 1/2 karat diamond valued at $1,500. It is considered to be a perfect stone. Mr. Vandervie is inviting the public to come in and see this beautiful stone. [Two spellings of last name as used in original.]

Source: Platteville Journal Flashback--75 Years Ago--April 5, 1916; transcribed by Mary Dutcher

Vannatta, Langkamp

Subscriptions paid: H. Vannatta; K. Langkamp, Potosi; Irvin Vannatta, Platteville [not complete list]

Source: Platteville Grant County Witness (Platteville, WI) 14 Mar 1891; transcribed by Mary Dutcher

Vannatta

We missed Mr. Milton Vannatta from our choir yesterday. We think there must be some attractions in Platteville.

Source: Platteville Grant County Witness (Platteville, WI) 23 Feb 1894; transcribed by Mary Dutcher

Vannatta

Mt. Zion--Mr. Alonzo Vannatta lost a valuable horse awhile ago of distemper.

Source: Platteville Grant County Witness (Platteville, WI) 14 Feb 1894; transcribed by Mary Dutcher

Vannatta, Head

Mt. Zion--Messrs. Head and H.L. Vannatta are packing away ice for the creamery.

Source: Platteville Grant County Witness (Platteville, WI) 14 Feb 1894; transcribed by Mary Dutcher

Wunderlin

I. N. Wunderlin, of Rockville, was a Witness caller Thursday.

Source: Platteville Grant County Witness (Platteville, WI) 14 Jan 1891; transcribed by Mary Dutcher

Anonymous

A Whole Hotel Turned Upside Down by a Sudden Cry at Night that the "Lord was Coming."

[From the Dubuque Herald.]

The guests at the Lorimer House had a lively shaking up about five o'clock on Friday morning which for a few minutes was of a serious nature in the great fright it produced, but which fortunately turned out to be of a harmless nature, and, to look back upon, rather ludicrous. For about five minutes, however, times were lively, and there was the fasted getting out of bed that has been witnessed in Dubuque since the cold weather set in. the cause was a lady who had been seized with insanity during the night, and insanity of a religious nature too; she stationed herself in the hall near the head of the stairs, and suddenly, in a loud and piercing voice, called everybody to repentance, for the Day Star had come, saints, sinners and all. The lady is the wife of an old citizen of Platteville, Wisconsin. Her husband is among the most respectable citizens of that place, and she is described as a lady of more than ordinary ability and culture. It seems that ten or a dozen years ago she was insane, and been treated in an asylum, but had recovered, as was supposed, years ago. On Tuesday last she came to Dubuque to make some purchases, and while here had the misfortune to attend some of the revival meetings now in progress. These, with the attendant excitement, must have unhinged her mind. On Thursday, some of her actions were peculiar, but nothing was thought of them at the time. But her conversation ran wholly to religion and its kindred topics. After she had retired, it seems that her insanity came violently upon her once more, and she got up, kindled her fire, burned up a wood box of wood, and devoted herself to writing incoherently upon the subject uppermost in her mind. At the hour above mentioned, she lost all control of herself, and going into the hall in her night dress, she lifted up her voice, crying for all to seek repentance. "See," says she, "the Star of the East appears; the wise men are coming. Get ye ready to meet them. Believe, believe. See, see; they come, they come; beautiful in form, clothed in white, glorious to all. These are the days when old men see visions and young men dream dreams. Be ye prepared. Cry, cry loud," and cry aloud she did, and no mistake. Of course, all the guests were wrapped in the profoundest sleep; and, wakened suddenly in this manner, they could not help but be frightened. There was the liveliest tumbling out of ben that had been witnessed for many a day. The call was sudden and short, and it did not seem to make much difference. Universalists, Presbyterians, Episcopalians, Congregationalists, Catholics, Methodists and all, were brought to their feet instantly, and [ ] it was noticed that none of them seemed above the rest to be in a hurry to accept the sudden invitation. By this time two or three men came upon the scene, and, after a short resistance, secured the unfortunate lady.--She was finally led back to her room, and was quieted as well as could be.

Source: The Petroleum Centre Daily Record (PA), 5 February 1873; transcribed by MD

Anonymous

The Plunkett Theatrical Troupe has arrived and are now giving entertainments in Thomas's Hall. They will remain in Platteville during this week. They are billed in Mineral Point for next Monday evening.

Source: Grant County Witness (Platteville, WI), 21 Jan 1875; transcribed by MD

The small pox is raging with much severity in many of the Western villages of Wisconsin, and is working its way Eastward toward Madison, the seat of Government. In Platteville, at the latest dates, there were twenty-two cases.

Source: New York Daily Tribune, 15 January 1844
At Platteville, Wisconsin, a village of about 800 inhabitants, there have been 22 deaths by small-pox during the past winter.

Source: New York Daily Tribune, 5 March 1844
A fire at Platteville, Wisconsin, on Sunday, destroyed the Gales House, the bank building of Isaac Hodges, and McArthur's store and residence. Loss, $15,000.

Source: The Evening Telegraph (Philadelphia, PA), 15 June 1870
Great Fire in Galena.

A fire broke out in the city of Galena on the night of the 13th instant and before the flames were extinguished $75,000 worth of property was destroyed. The fire started in the clothing store of A. J. Louchheim, destroying almost entirely his extensive stock. The splendid store of J. & R. H. Fiddick also fell a prey to the flames, and the large and elegant store of H. H. Chandler was also totally destroyed. The night was of intense severity and it was with great difficulty that the fire engines were kept at work. The Mayor of Galena sent a dispatch to Dubuque Fire Department for assistance; and that city responded with such promptness that in just 23 minutes from the time the engine loaded it was landed in Galena on board a special train. The several firms burnt out carried $63,000 insurance.

Louchheim, Fiddick, and Chandler have procured store rooms and will continue in business.

Source: Grant County Witness (Platteville, WI), 21 Jan 1875
A Case of Hereditary Baldness in an Entire Family Reported.

The Dubuque Telegraph tells the following: Over in Harrison Township, Grant County, Wisconsin, a few miles from Platteville, reside a family who have been singularly afflicted, and whose story, so far as we have been able to learn, has never been given to the public. Some twenty years ago Wm. Steinhoff, with a young wife, came from Germany and settled near Platteville.

A year or two afterward, a son was born to them, but much to their sorry the child was perfectly bald. Months passed away, but the boy's head remained without a vestige of hair. The parents feared that their child would continue bald and were much grieved at the thought.

Finally they wrote to friends in Germany, narrating the singular circumstances. An answer was returned, stating that several of the ancestors of one of the parents had been afflicted in a similar manner, but that their hair had grown out before they reached maturity.

This gave the parents some hope that their child's baldness would not be permanent. Since then eleven children have been born to them, ten of whom are still living. They now have eleven children, five of whom, two boys and three girls, are perfectly bald. The oldest is now a grown man, and his singular affliction is a great annoyance to him.

Source: The Highland Weekly News (OH), 15 March 1877; transcribed by MD

DAVID BLACK, of Platteville, who has for a year or more been troubled with throat disease, recently coughed up a hard black substance weighing one ounce and a half. Where it came from or what it is, is puzzling the medical fraternity.

Source: Weekly Expositor Independent (Sturgeon Bay, WI), 28 April 1882
HERMAN PESCHELL, a carpenter, was badly injured at Platteville, on the 14th inst., by the fall of a windmill. His right leg was crushed below the knee, and he received other bad cuts and bruises.

Source: Weekly Expositor Independent (Sturgeon Bay, WI), 1 Sep 1882
Remarkable Resuscitation.

GALENA, Ill. Dec. 31--John F. Munger a well known citizen of Platteville, O. [sic], has suffered greatly from rheumatism in the feet. Two days ago, with the hope of relieving the pain he bathed his feet freely with tincture of aconite and then thrust them into a pail of hot water. A tingling sensation followed, the pulse weakened, the skin became moist and clammy and violent vomiting and itching ensued. A doctor was called, but on his arrival found Munger apparently dead. The heart seemed to have stopped beating, and the doctor with other medicel men who were summoned, decided that Munger died from aconite poisoning, having absorbed the drug through his feet. An undertaker set about preparing the body for burial, when the doctor, as an experiment, injected with a hypodermic syringe a mixture of brandy and digitalis near the heart. In a few minutes the supposed dead man began to gasp, and there was a faint sound of breathing over the heart. More hypodermics were given, the death pallor was succeeded by a reddish glow, the muscles relaxed, perspiration broke out and Mr. Munger slowly returned to life. He is entirely out of danger. The doctors consider his resuscitation most remarkable.

Source: St. Paul Daily Globe (Saint Paul, MN), 1 Jan 1886
Nearly Buried Alive.

GALENA, Ill. Dec. 31--John F. Munger a well known citizen of Platteville, Wisconsin, has suffered greatly from rheumatism in his feet. Two days ago, with a hope of relieving the pain, he bathed his feet freely with tincture of aconite and then thrust them into a pail of hot water. A tingling sensation followed, the pulse weakened and the skin became moist and clammy. A doctor was called, but on arrival found Munger apparently dead. The heart seemed to have stopped beating, and the doctor decided that Munger died from aconite poisoning, having absorbed the drug through his feet. The undertaker set about preparing the body for burial, when the doctor, as an experiment, injected a mixture of brandy and digitalis near the heart. In a few minutes the supposed dead man began to gasp, and there was a faint sound of breathing over the heart. The death pallor was succeeded by a reddish glow, the muscles relaxed, perspiration broke out and Mr. Munger slowly returned to life. He is now entirely out of danger.

The Emporia Weekly News (Emporia, KS), 7 Jan 1886
The powder mills at Platteville, Grant County, Wis., blew up the other night. Twenty thousand pounds of powder were in them at the time. No one killed.

Source: The Iola Register (Iola, Kansas), 3 Dec 1886
Set Fire to Her Own Bed.

Platteville, Wis., Jan 4.-- Mrs. J. W. Smelker, one of the oldest residents of this city, set fire to her bed while lying thereon. When discovered her body was badly burned and her hair singed from her head. She was carried to her son's house, where she lies suffering. Neighbors rushed into the house and extinguished the flames and saved the residence from destruction.

Source: The Rock Island Argus, 4 Jan 1899; transcribed by MD

FLOODS, STORMS STRIKE MIDWEST

Tornadoes, hail, drenching rains and high winds pounded some sections of the Midwest over the weekend with heavy damage. One death in Wisconsin was attributed to a flash flood.

The tornadoes struck near Craig and Cordova, Nebr. Saturday night, and floods occurred in the east central part of the state for the second successive weekend.

A downpour of more than three inches of rain sent the little Pecatonica river out of its banks and into the streets of Darlington, Wis. Accompanying high winds blew down trees, telephone and power lines in the area.

Walter Wunderlin, 31, of Platteville, Wis., drowned in the Little Platte river when a weakened bridge span collapsed into the rising stream as he drove over it.

Buildings on five farms and a schoolhouse near Craig, Nebr. were leveled by the tornado which injured six persons.

Rains which followed the tornadoes measures as much as five inches in places. At Crete, Nebr., and some other points the Big Blue river overflowed but the flood damage was described as minor.

Thundershowers, locally heavy at some points, also were reported in the upper lakes region, the middle and upper Mississippi Valley, the lower Missouri Valley, the southern plains and extreme southwestern states.

Source: Saratosa Herald-Tribune, 17 Jul 1950