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Green County Wisconsin Genealogy Trails


Green County, Wisconsin Biographies


Thomas Hawkins Eaton
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884), transcribed by Mary Saggio. 

Thomas Hawkins Eaton, was born April 13, 1822, in the town of Elk Run, Columbiana Co., Ohio.  His great-great-grandfather, John Eaton took up arms against the infatuated despot, James the Second; and, for gallantry and good conduct at the battle of the Boyne, July 1, 1690, was rewarded by William the Third, Prince of Orange, with a liberal donation of land in Ireland, where he established his family.  The great-grandfather of Thomas was also named John.  He was born on the paternal estate which he finally disposed of and emigrated to America, settling on the shore of the Chesapeake bay.  He had, by his first wife, three children—James, Hugh and Mary.  James, the eldest of the children, was born Dec. 25, 1733, on his father's estate in Ireland; and, after the death of his mother and the second marriage of his father, he took up his residence in London.  After living in that city seven years, he enlisted in the English navy and served seven years on a British man-of-war.  During his term of service he was engaged in several battles with the French, both on land and sea.  After his term of service had expired, he traveled extensively in Europe, and finally came to America, settling at Hagerstown, Md., where he married Elizabeth Downey.  Their children were—John, Hugh, James, Elizabeth, Nancy, Rebecca and Sarah.  The father was a pioneer settler of Washington Co., Penn., where he located in 1779, on the headwaters of Pike Run.  He died there March 31, 1814.  John, the eldest of the children, and father of the subject of this sketch, was born April 25, 1778, at Green Spring Furnace, near Hagerstown, Md.  He came with his father to Washington Co., Penn., where he spent his youth and early manhood and where, at eighteen years of age, he was married to Catharine Marker.  The fruit of this marriage was eleven children, two dying in infancy.  The others were—Elizabeth, Rebecca, William, Nancy, Sarah, Horace P., James Harvey, Reason Beall and Thomas Hawkins. John Eaton, the father, was a pioneer in eastern Ohio, arriving in Columbiana county about the year 1809.  He served in the War of 1812-15, under Gen. William Henry Harrison and was one of the early settlers in Crawford county, in that State, taking up his residence in the town of Liberty, in 1830.  During the next winter (1830-31), he was instrumental by the aid of the father of the "fighting McCooks," who was then clerk in one of the branches of the Ohio legislature, in permanently fixing the county seat of Crawford county.  He died in Holmes township, that county, July 23, 1850.  He was a man of ardent temperament, generous, unsuspecting, benevolent, honest and fearless.  The youngest of his sons, Thomas Hawkins, the subject of this sketch, was raised on the paternal homestead in Liberty township, Crawford Co., Ohio.  He was, to a large extent, deprived of even a common school education, as that part of Ohio was then a "howling wilderness."  Whatever of education he acquired in after life was the result of his own energetic efforts.  He was married, on the 9th of April, 1845, to Martha Albert, grand-daughter of the celebrated Dr. Breniman, of Lancaster, Penn., the result of which marriage is six children—three dying in infancy.  The others are— Mary Frances, the wife of McCletus Chapin; James Harvey and George West.  The father, with his family, consisting of his wife and one child, emigrated to Wisconsin in 1851.  He settled in Monroe, Green county, engaging for two years in house building.  He then began the study of the law and was admitted to the bar in 1856.  He opened a law office the following year in Monroe, continuing in the practice until the second year of the War for the Union, when he enlisted as a private in company G, of 22d regiment of Wisconsin Volunteers.  He was immediately commissioned as 1st lieutenant, but was taken sick and obliged to resign his commission, returning home in March, 1863.  Mr. Eaton has served as justice of the peace three terms in Monroe and four terms in Clarno.  He has served one year as chairman of the board in the town last mentioned.  In consequence of disease contracted in the service, he was upon his return, unable to resume the practice of his profession, and has for the last twenty-one years resided on his farm on section 16, in the town of Clarno.


Mathew Edgar
Source:  History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884), page 856, transcribed by Mary Saggio 

MATHEW EDGAR was born in Cumberland Co., England, in the Lake district, Aug. 24, 1817.  In 1839 he went to St. Croix, West India Islands, and engaged on a sugar plantation, where he worked seven years; from there he went to Moore township, Canada West, and lived there, and part of the time near Woodstock, until 1849, in which year he came to Wisconsin and made his present location on section 32.  He owns here a fine stock farm of 140 acres; he lived the first five years here alone.  In 1854 he married Jane Wallace, daughter of Samuel Wallace, of this town.  She died Aug. 24, 1859, leaving two children — Isabell I. J., wife of M. L. Rossiter, of Dixon Co., Neb, and Anna, who is a school teacher in Butler Co., Neb.  On May 21, 1860, Mr. Edgar married Nancy Hanson, of Troy, Walworth Co., Wis.  They have two children — Mathew, Jr., born in 1862; Mary S., born in 1864, both are living at home.  Mr. Edgar does all he can to have his children fitted by education to help themselves through life, and counts nothing lost which aids in attaining that object.


Alonzo J. Edwards
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884), page 864, transcribed by Mary. Saggio.

ALONZO J. EDWARDS was born in Livingston Co., N. Y., in the town of West Sparta, Oct. 2, 1835. His father, Harveylin Edwards, was a farmer, and reared a family of thirteen children. All were living in 1884 except one son — Allen, who died in the army in the fall of 1864; his father died in Livingston Co., N. Y., in 1850; his mother died in 1883. The brothers and sisters are living west excepting two — James and Mrs. Lavina Dart, who live in Livingston county. Maria is the wife of H. M. Barnes of this town. William lives in Monticello; Harvey, in Albany; Andrew, in Rice Co., Minn.; Elsie Jane, wife of Eugene Witter, same county; Heman, in Polk Co., Iowa; David, in Antelope Co., Neb.; Alvah, near Fort Vancouver, Washington Ter.; Frank, in Colorado. Alonzo J. Edwards and Emeline P. Green were married in Livingston Co., N. Y., Sept. 28, 1858. Mrs. Edwards was born in that county Dec. 3, 1839. They came west and to this town in March, 1862, rented a farm on section 33 one year, and then lived in old Exeter village two years. Mr. Edwards leaving his family there went to Montana and followed mining until June, 1865, when he returned home, and lived on rented lands until February, 1868, when he bought land on section 27, and lived there until August, 1874, when he bought and moved to his present residence on section 34. He owns 160 acres, one half on section 33 and one-half on section 34. They have six children. All are living. Charles, the eldest, was born in New York, April, 1860; Jasper, born July, 1864; Mary, born March, 1867; Hattie, born May, 1869; Lester, born November, 187l; Heman, born October,1875. Mr. Edwards is an energetic, reliable and well respected citizen.


John G. Eitel
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

John G. Eitel, a native of Germany, was born in Wurtemburg, Sept. 15, 1811. His parents, John G. and Margaret (Diem) Eitel, are dead, and buried in Wurtemburg. He left his native land, and came to America, in 1848. He stopped in New York a short time, then went to Connecticut and worked upon a farm, about five miles from Norwich, one year, then hired to work in a foundry, in Norwich, where he remained about two months. He next went to Hartford, Conn., and worked in a green house one year. He was a practical florist, having learned the art in his native country. From there he went to Brattleboro, Vt., and two years later to Buffalo, N. Y., where he was employed in a nursery six months, then, concluding to go farther west, removed to Green county and hired out to work upon a farm, one and a half miles from Monroe. He, at first, purchased twenty acres of his present farm, on section 27, town of Clarno. He now owns 110 acres, having a desirable farm, which his son Edward assists him in cultivating. He was married in Wurtemburg, to Madeline Fisher, and they have seven children—Louis, Mary, Robert, Paulina, Lena, John and Edward. Four of the children are married and living in Franklin Co., Iowa, also Robert, who is not married. Mr. Eitel enlisted in 1864, in company K, of the 16th Wisconsin Infantry, and was mustered in at Madison. He participated in the battle of Kingston, N. C, and at the close of the war, was mustered out at Madison.


George Eley
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin Illustrated; chapter 35 (1884) transcribed by RuthAnne Wilke

George Eley is a native of Pennsylvania, and was born in Centre county, Feb. 28, 1807. He is the son of John and Catharine (Johnsonbach) Eley, also natives of the same State. He is of German extraction, his grandfather and great-grandfather being natives of that country. When thirty-eight years old George came to this county from Ohio, and settled on a farm in Richland, where he remained until 1875, then came to Juda. He is now comfortably situated, and lives upon the income of his money, which he loans. Mr. Eley has been married three times, and his first two wives are buried in Austin Cemetery. His present wife was Mrs. Jemima Blackford, formerly Jemima Dennis. He is the father of ten children, seven of whom are now living. He is a member of the Church of Christ (Disciples). Mrs. Eley formerly was a member of the Baptist Church, but at this time neither have any sympathy with human legislation in religion. They believe that the teaching of Christ, and his apostles, is sufficient to govern the conduct of all true Christians.


John Eley
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated, Chapter 37 (1884): transcribed by Tammy Clark 

John Eley removed from Ohio to Green county, in 1849. He was born in Washington Co., Penn., March 16, 1809. His parents, John and Ellen (Mosher) Eley, are deceased. The former is buried in Monroe, the latter in Ohio. The subject of this sketch remained in Pennsylvania till 1828, when the family removed to Ohio, where he lived until the date of his coming to this county. He settled on sections 21 and 22, and lived there until the time of his death, March 5, 1882. Mr. Eley was a man who took a great interest in agricultural societies and improved methods of farming. He was an enterprising and useful citizen, and highly esteemed in the neighborhood. He was married in March, 1830, to Elizabeth Parks, a native of Beaver Co., Penn. Nine children were born to them—James, who died in Ohio; William, Angeline, Leamon, who also died in Ohio; Joseph, Sarah, Harriet, Melissa and John D. The last named was born in Green county, May 2, 1851, at the place where he now lives. He obtained his education in the .schools of Monroe, for a time, attending a select school taught by a Mr. Green. He was married May 21, 1882, to Addie Whipple, daughter of Henry Whipple, who lives near the city of Monroe. The old homestead contains 110 acres. He is a member of the republican party, and now holds the office of town clerk of Monroe. Pie has not been able to walk without the use of crutches since he was a year and a half old, having lost the use of his limbs from an attack of scarlet fever. Nevertheless, he chose farming as a means of gaining a livelihood, endeavoring to fight life's battles manfully.

George F. Ellis
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884), pages 860-861, transcribed by Mary. Saggio.

GEORGE F. ELLIS lives on section 14, on the farm bought in the spring of 1855 by his father, Mark Ellis, of Alonzo Jordan. This farm contains 200 acres, forty acres being on section 22. Mark Ellis was born in Eckington, Derbyshire, England, in 1803. His father, the grandfather of George, died in 1811, and the grandmother while Mark was an infant. Mark Ellis learned the trade his father had acquired — sickle making — and worked at it until his marriage in 1828 with Mary Watts. He then became a farmer, and lived as a renter on one farm twenty-two years. All the children were born there. Their names were — Olive, wife of Joseph Jackson, of Belleville, Dane county; she died in 1876; John, who lives in Fillmore Co, Minn.; William, who died in this town in 1863; Arthur, who died in Cheyenne, Wy. T., in 1872; Thomas, now living in Green county; Elizabeth, wife of Forester Havens, of the town of Exeter; George F., and Mary, wife of Edwin Jordan, living near Evansville. In the summer of 1850 Mark Ellis and his family came to the United States, landing at New York city, and coming directly to this State, reaching Janesville July 10. He rented a farm the next spring of Judge Gibbs, and the next year of Judge Bailey, and in 1853 of Wait Wright, lived there two years, and came to Exeter in 1855 and bought a farm, where he died Sept. 4, 1878. His wife died Sept. 11, 1870. George F. Ellis and Flora Fitts were married Oct. 26, 1869. She is a daughter of Francis and Harriet Fitts, now residents of Belleville. Mr. Ellis is one among the best citizens of the town, is a good farmer, and a man of many excellent qualities.


Nehemiah Ellis
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884) chapter 36; Transcribed by Tammy Clark

Nehemiah Ellis, a native of Maine, was born near Bangor, Aug. 4, 1804. In 1819, he, with his parents emigrated to Chautauqua Co., N. Y., at which place he married to Rachael Osgood, in 1828. In 1838, he emigrated to Stephenson Co., Ill., where he purchased a farm near Orangeville, where he remained until 1847. Then on account of ill health he sold out and came to Green Co., Wis., settling near Jordan Centre. He owned a farm on section 3, where he lived till 1875. In that year he removed to Buena Vista Co., Iowa, where he owned a farm. Mr. Ellis took an active part in the organization of the town of Jordan. He was the first town clerk, also was justice of the peace and held other important offices. His reputation for honesty and integrity was unquestionable. There was born to Mr. and Mrs. Ellis eleven children, six of whom are living—Mary E., now Mrs. Kinnison; Eliza A., wife of Samuel Shook, of Buena Vista county; Richard F., of Jordan; Lewis N., Laban B., and Samuel A., of Buena Vista Co., Iowa.


Richard F. Ellis
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884) chapter 36; Transcribed by Tammy Clark

Richard F. Ellis was born in Chautauqua Co., N. Y., July 12, 1837. He remained with his parents until 1864. August 21 of that year he enlisted in company D, of the 1st Wisconsin Heavy Artillery, and served till June 17, 1865. On his return from the army he bought a farm on section 11, which he sold in 1870 and bought his present farm, which contains 180 acres, on sections 13, 14, 23 and 24. His residence is on section 24. He was married Aug. 29, 1864, to Emma Bowden, a native of Knox Co., Ill., but at the time of marriage, a resident of Monroe. They have six children—William O., Flora M., Edward S., Franklin N., Robert L. and Lewis B. Mr. Ellis has held the office of town treasurer three terms, and has been school director for twenty years. Mr. and Mrs. Ellis are members of the Church of Christ.


Conrad Elmer
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated, Chapter 37 (1884): transcribed by Tammy Clark

Conrad Elmer, a native of Switzerland, was born in the canton of Glarus, March 1, 1842. His father, Jehu Elmer, now lives in Sylvester. His mother, Fanny (Marty) Elmer, is deceased. In 1850, Conrad came to Green county with his parents, who settled in the town of Washington, where they lived six years, then moved to Mount Pleasant. They afterwards removed to Sylvester. He was married in Sylvester, Nov. 23, 1866, to Lisetta Wenger, a native of Switzerland. After marriage they lived eight months with his parents. He purchased a farm of 120 acres, which he soon after sold, and with two brothers, bought 300 acres of land in Sylvester, where they engaged in farming in partnership, two years. They then dissolved partnership, and Conrad Elmer lived upon the place three years, after which he sold out and bought a farm on section 11, of the town of Monroe, where he now owns 200 acres of fine land, one of the finest places in the town of Monroe. Mr. and Mrs. Elmer have two children—John A. and Fanny E. They are connected with the German Evangelical Church. Mr. Elmer was a member of the 3lst Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, company B, and served his country three years. He took part in Sherman's noted campaign, and marched from Atlanta to the sea, and to Washington. He is a republican, politically.


Joseph Emrick
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin Illustrated; chapter 35 (1884) transcribed by RuthAnne Wilke

Joseph Emrick came to Green county in 1858, and settled on section 28, where he resided until his death. He was born in Centre Co., Penn., April 27, 1821, and died in Green county, Feb. 11, 1876. He removed from Centre Co., Penn., to Stephenson Co., Ill., in 1848, and lived there ten years, and came from there to this county. He was married April 28, 1846, to Elizabeth Cleoanstine, a native of Centre Co., Penn., daughter of Christian and Mary (Williams) Cleoanstine, who are dead, and buried in Centre county. Mr. and Mrs. Emrick have five living children---Mary I., now the wife of J. C. Bridge, of this county; Ira C., married and living at Twin Grove; Sarah C, at home; Angie, married to H. H. Bangs, and living in Twin Grove at present; and Alonzo, born June 23, 1858, in Rock Grove. He is at present engaged in mercantile trade at Twin Grove. Joseph and Elizabeth Emrick are members of the Lutheran Church. Two children have died, and are buried with their father in Rock Grove Cemetery. Mrs. Emrick resides in Twin Grove.


Frederick Enfield
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884); transcribed by Vicki Bryan

Frederick Enfield is a resident of section 29, where he settled in 1848, and which he purchased of the government. Mr. Enfield has resided in the county since April 29, 1844. He lived in the town of Spring Grove, about one year, then removed to the town of Jefferson, where he also lived about one year. He finally settled in the town of Spring Grove in 1846, on forty acres of land, which he entered. He came here from that town. Mr. Enfield was born in Somerset Co , Penn., Jan. 13, 1819, where he was reared to manhood on a farm. He is a son of Frederick and Catharine (Boyer) Enfield, who resided in Pennsylvania until their decease. His father was born in Somerset county, and his mother was born just across the line in the State of Maryland. The subject of this sketch came direct to this county from Pennsylvania. His wife was Matilda Mitchell, daughter of John A. and Rebecca Mitchell. Mrs. Enfield was born June 9, 1825, in Somerset Co., Penn. They had thirteen children, eleven of whom are living. In the fall of 1862, Mr. Enfield enlisted in the 22nd regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and served until the close of the war. He was captured at the battle of Spring Hill, Tenn., and was sent to Libby prison, where he remained a prisoner one month, when he was exchanged. Although his prison life was short he had passed through trials and hardships that he will ever remember. Being too ill to accompany Sherman on his march to the sea, he rejoined his regiment on the Atlantic coast and took part in the grand review at Washington. He was formerly a strong man, but his army life left him broken in health. He still suffers much from disease contracted in the army. Mr. and Mrs. Enfield began life in limited circumstances, in Green county, but by industry and economy, have secured for themselves and family a beautiful home. His farm contains 160 acres.


Rev. James Evans
MONROE
Source: The US Biological Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Edition (1877) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

James Evans was born at St. Agnes, Cornwall, England, June 26, 1828, and is the son of John and Sophia (Martin) Evans, both natives of the same place. His father had been for forty years a miner in the tin mines of Cornwall. He came to the United States in 1848 and settled at Mineral Point, Wisconsin, and for fifteen years operated in the lead mines at that place. In personal appearance he was somewhat below middle height, robust, and strongly built, having an iron constitution and extraordinary powers of endurance. He was also endowed with high social qualities and was loved and reverenced by all who knew him. Above all, he was an eminent Christian. He had given his heart to the Lord in his youth, and for sixty years had been a local preacher in the Methodist Church. He preached from house to house, in schoolhouses, and wherever he could get an ear to hear there he delivered the message of dying love and mercy. He was indefatigable — instant in season and out of season. He was, moreover, a man of much intelligence, an incessant reader of all good books, but especially the Bible, which was his vade mecum — his encyclopedia of knowledge. He died at the residence of his sons, in Baraboo, Wisconsin, April 20, 1873, in the eighty-first year of his age.

His mother had also been a Christian from her girlhood, and was in the truest sense "a mother in Israel" — kind, affectionate, devoted, prayerful. She left the impress of her lovely character and deep religious experience upon all who knew her. She died April 17, 1875, in the seventy-fifth year of her age. She was the sister of Rev. Thomas Martin, a distinguished Methodist minister of Cornwall, whose name is still a keepsake in the church. He was the friend of Dr. Adam Clarke, Richard Watson, Robert Newton, and the leading men of that day.

They had a family of seven children, three sons and four daughters, of whom our subject is the oldest. The other sons are still living—John, the second, at La Salle, Illinois, and Charles in Darlington, Wisconsin. Two of the sisters are deceased, and the remaining two are married and comfortably settled.

The grandfather of our subject, Charles Evans, was also a Cornwall miner, as had been his ancestors for many generations, being originally of Welsh stock. His great-grandfather, Charles Evans, was converted under the preaching of John Wesley, during his first visit to the south of England in company with John Nelson, the famous stone-mason of Yorkshire, at the very time when that eminent and now world - revered divine was by ruffian hands dragged through the horse ponds and pelted with rotten eggs. He was refused entertainment in the public hostelry, and so great was the popular indignation that no private family dare receive him into their house, so that he was obliged to lodge in the open air, rest on his saddle - bags for a pillow, and subsist on blackberries from the hedges. Since then what hath God wrought? The Wesleyan division of the Lord's army is among the largest and most prosperous in the world, and growing at a ratio of increase more than ten times as large as that of any other denomination in Christendom. Since the memorable day when Wesley was thus mobbed in Cornwall, every member of the Evans family, root and branch, have been Methodists.

James received a fair English education, in his youth, in one of the Lancasterian schools of his native Cornwall, and later in life, under private tutors, studied the Latin language. He was a diligent student and close observer, and is now a man of large attainments and general information. He immigrated to the United States in 1846, two years before his father and the rest of the family came, he being the means of inducing them to come. Engaging in the clothing business, to which he had devoted some attention in England, he continued it till 1855. In 1849, at the age of nineteen years, he was licensed to preach the gospel, in connection with the Primitive Wesleyan branch of the Methodist Church, and continued to exercise his gifts in that capacity and connection for seven years, when he was regularly ordained to the ministry, and during the next five years preached at Mineral Point, Platteville and Shullsburgh, Wisconsin. In 1860 he changed his ecclesiastical relations to the Methodist Episcopal Church, and was received into the West Wisconsin Conference, with which he has since remained, having meantime filled the following appointments, namely, Fayette, two years; Providence, three years; Linden, two years; Darlington, one year; Portage City, two years; Baraboo, two years, and Monroe, his present appointment, three years. He is an earnest preacher and a fluent and ready speaker. His presentation of gospel truth is clear, simple and forcible, and his ministry has been greatly blessed. Revivals of religion have invariably resulted from his labors, and the membership of the various churches to which he has ministered have been largely increased through his instrumentality.

He was married October 28, 1850, to Miss Louisa Cheynaweth, daughter of James Cheynaweth, a native of Cornwall, England, who also descended from original Methodist stock. He came to the United States in the same year with the late Mr. Evans. In her physique and general appearance Mrs. Evans is a fine sample of the average Englishwoman—robust, stout and rosy-cheeked, affectionate, loving and devoted to her family. Like her connections, she, too, is a devout Methodist, and well qualified to fill a wife's place in the sphere in which her husband moves. They have eight children, all handsome, healthy and promising, named in the order of their birth: Thomas Martin, Richard De Lacy, Horace James, Edith, Ida Louisa, Mary Bell, Walter Howard and Clara Agness. The eldest son, a graduate of Lawrence University, Appleton, Wisconsin, has adopted the profession of his father, and is now a minister of the gospel, preaching to the Methodist congregation at North Freedom, Wisconsin, having been ordained to the ministry in September 1876. He is a youth of fine talents, noble aspirations, and destined to a career of usefulness and honor. Richard De Lacy is a student of the Lawrence University, from which he will graduate in 1878, and Horace is a sophomore in the same institution. Edith, who is a handsome likeness of her mother, is attending the Monroe High School, and is a young lady of much promise.


Oren K. Eveleth
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884) chapter 36; Transcribed by Tammy Clark

Oren K. Eveleth came to this county in 1852, remaining the first time but a few days. He traveled back and forth from his native State a number of times, and visited many of the western States. He first bought some land where
Jacob Deetz now lives, and afterwards sold it to J. Smath, and removed to section 15, where he remained two years, then, in 1 802, he removed to section 10, and bought forty acres from H. G. Cleveland. He has since bought 108 acres more. He is a native of Chautauqua Co., N. Y., born April 20, 1832. His father died in 1865, and left his property to his wife, during her life. Mr. Eveleth was married in New York to Dorriella Kibby, Nov. 6, 1853. They have had eleven children, of whom two are deceased—Harriet M., Leila A., Alira M., Ada E., deceased; Ida B., deceased; Emry I., Walter F., Charles E., Blanche, Leverna P, and Leverta J. Mr. Eveleth has been quite a noted character in an early day, and was noted for his many good qualities. He has been hard at work. He was town treasurer from 1866 to 1869. He has also held various offices in the township. He is a scientific violinist.


John G. Faeser
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated, Chapter 37 (1884): transcribed by Tammy Clark

John G. Faeser, a native of Baden, was born May 20, 1836. His father, John A. Faeser, died while crossing the ocean in 1853. His mother died in 1871, in Jordan. John A. Faeser was a contractor and builder of stone work, and his son, John G., of this sketch, learned the same trade, which he followed four years in Westmoreland Co., Penn., where he, with his mother and sister, settled on their arrival in America. In 1857 they came to Green county and settled in the town of Jordan, where he purchased 100 acres of land, afterwards forty acres, and still later 220 acres, making in all 360 acres. In 1876 he moved into Monroe, where he remained three months. He then traded one farm in Jordan for city property in Monroe and forty-six acres in Clarno, which he sold and bought his present farm in 1880. It contains 117 acres, located in Monroe. He was married Dec. 31, 1862, to Anna E. Uitiger, a native of Switzerland, but at the time of marriage a resident of Monroe. They have had eight children, five of whom are living—John A., Anna, Frederick R., Elizabeth and Lene. Three children are buried with their grandmother in Jordan. Mr. and Mrs. Faeser are members of the Evangelical Church in Monroe.

He casts his vote with the republican party.


John Ferguson
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884), page 851, transcribed by Mary. Saggio.

JOHN FERGUSON was born in county Derry, Ireland, in 1810. In 1836 he came to the United States, and in November of that year came to Wiota, Lafayette county, where he engaged in mining, which business he followed successfully a few years. Meanwhile he purchased 200 acres of land on sections 26 and 27, town of Exeter, with a view of making it his future home. Later he added 200 acres to this purchase, and after his marriage made his residence thereon. He was married Oct. 3, 1845, to Almeda Porter, Jacob Lindslay, Esq , officiating. Six children were born to them, of whom are now living — William, living in Pocahontas Co., Iowa; Elleanor, wife of Isaac Green, of Dedham, Iowa; John and Nathaniel, living at home; and Sarah, who is a school teacher, makes her home with her mother. John Ferguson died at his home March 13, 1875. He was a good citizen, and will long be remembered for his sterling qualities. He was quite prominent in town affairs. His widow now lives on the old homestead with three of her children. Mrs. Ferguson was the daughter of an old pioneer, John Porter, who was an early settler in every place he ever lived after attaining manhood. Mrs. Ferguson was the third child born where the city of Springfield, the capital of the State of Illinois, now stands. It was then, April 29, 1826, only a squatter village. John Porter was born in Harrison Co., Ky., in 1796. He was married in his native State to Nancy Turley. Two children were born to them — James, now a resident of California; and Urana, widow of Joseph McConnell, who lives in this town. Mr. Porter removed to Sangamon county about 1820, where his wife died, and he was married to Sarah Brents in 1825. He was one of the early settlers of that county. Sarah Brents was born in Kentucky in 1801. Her widowed mother and family came into Livingston Co., Ky., as pioneers. John Porter, by this second marriage, had eight children, and all were living in 1884 — Almeda, widow of John Ferguson, the subject of this sketch; John, living at Fort Dodge, Iowa; Nathaniel, now in California; Susan, wife Christopher Steele, now living in Missouri; William, in California; George, in Fort Dodge, Iowa; Rebecca, wife of T. D. Day, of this town; and Mary, who is married, and living in Iowa. John Porter, as stated, was always a frontier man. He removed from Sangamon county to Pike Co., Mo., in 1831, and from there to Lafayette county, this State, in 1833, where he farmed until 1838, then came to Monroe, this county, and lived three years, then to the old village of Exeter in 1841, and later bought land on section 35, where he lived until about 1865, when he made a home with his son, George, in Fort Dodge, Iowa. His wife died in July, 1875, and he died the May previously.


John J. Figi
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884) chapter 36; Transcribed by Tammy Clark

John J. Figi is a native of Switzerland, born in canton Glarus, on the 12th of August, 1845. He is a son of George and Barbary Figi, both of whom are living in Switzerland. In 1867 Mr. Figi commenced work in a calico factory, which he followed for a number of years. Having friends in this county, he came to America, stopping in New Glarus, where he hired out to a farmer. In a few months he went to Freeport. Ill. Remaining there a short time, he returned to New Glarus. In about one and a half years he went to Pennsylvania, located near Pittsburg, where he remained about six months. He then went to Chicago, Ill., but only staid a short time, when he returned to this county and worked in, Shueyville for the next two years. He purchased forty acres of land of William Bergen, upon which he lived for six years, then sold out and removed to Humboldt Co., Iowa. In about six months he returned to Green county, and rented a farm. Concluding to have a home of his own he found a location on section 21, town of Jordan, which he purchased. He now owns 220 acres, and is in a prosperous condition. He is engaged in farming and stock raising. He was married June 4, 1874, to Barbary Kundert, daughter of Jacob Kundert, of the town of Monroe. They have had six children born to them—George, Barbary, Sarah, Emma, Jacob, deceased; and Jacob. The family are members of the Evangelical Church. Politically Mr. Figi is a republican.


Adam Fleek
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884); transcribed by Vicki Bryan

Adam Fleek, oldest son of Benjamin H, Fleek, was born in Licking Co., Ohio, in 1842, and came with his father to Green county in 1845. He was married to Margaret Dixon, daughter of Martin Dixon, and they have three children — Fanny, Llewellyn and Adam. Mr. Fleek purchased his farm, which is located on section 27, of his father. It was entered by Christopher Waterkot and Anson Sheffield, and contains 282 acres. He also owns considerable land elsewhere in this town. Mrs. Fleek was born at Juda, in this county, in 1850. Her parents were early settlers in the town of Jefferson. They now reside in Evansville, Rock county.


Reuben Fleek
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated; Chapter 33 (1881) Transcribed by: Frances Cooley

Reuben Fleek, of Brodhead, came to the town of Decatur with his father in 1846 He was really instrumental in having his father remove to this State. He being the oldest son at home, the care of the family devolved upon him. And his brother, Edmund, having given a somewhat glowing account of Green county, he advised his father to remove here with his family, which he did. Reuben was born in Hampshire Co., Va., May 31, 1822. After coming to Green county he resided with his father for a number of years. His settlement on leaving his father's was on section 28, which he procured of the government and had owned since he first came to the county. He resided on this farm for twenty-five years. He purchased a home in Brodhead, where he removed from the farm in 1876. Reuben Heck, like his brothers, has been successful in accumulating property. He is somewhat eccentric, firm and decided in his opinions, and upright and honest in his business transactions. Mrs. Fleek was a daughter of Davis Bowen, who settled in the town of Sylvester in 1837. They have four children—Winfield S., William M., Charles M. and Lillian Belle.


Jacob Freitag
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884), pagse 864-865, transcribed by Mary. Saggio.

JACOB FREITAG, son of John Jacob Freitag, came with his father when young from Switzerland in 1845. While a resident of Milwaukee county he married Christine Becker, Jan. 17, 1860. One child was born to them — John, born Sept. 16, 1862. Mr. Freitag lost his wife by death, Jan. 1, 1873. He owns a valuable farm of 210 acres on section 31, and is one of the best farmers in this part of the town. He settled on this land in 1864. Henry Frietag, son of John Jacob Frietag, and brother of Jacob Frietag, was born in Milwaukee county, and came here in 1864 with his father. His residence is on section 31. He owns a fine farm of 300 acres, and adjoining sections south and west. He was married May 10, 1872, to Ursula Blumer. They have five children — Mary, Jacob, Rosina, Henry and John.


John Jacob Freitag
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884), page 864, transcribed by Mary. Saggio.

JOHN JACOB FREITAG was born in canton Glarus, Switzerland, Sept. 17, 1809. He came to America in 1845, and settled in Milwaukee county, this State. His family consisted of his wife and three children — Jacob, now lives on section 30, this town; Rosina, wife of Aug. Hirsch of Milwaukee county, and Harry, who died in the year of their coming. There were born in Milwaukee county — Barbara, wife of Fred. Klassy, living in Iowa; Henry, in this town; Mary, wife of Thomas Jenny, lives in Ohio; Anna, wife of Gabriel Blasy, living in Iowa, and John. The parents are both living. The elder Freitag, when he came to Milwaukee county, bought forty acres of land the first week of his residence, and lived there until 1864, when he sold and came to Exeter, buying 150 acres of land on section 31, which he still owns and resides upon.


John D. Fritsch
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884) chapter 36; Transcribed by Tammy Clark

John D. Fritsch was born in Bavaria, near the city of Rehau, Sept. 5, 1827. He is a son of George and Rosa (Beck) Fritsch, who emigrated to America June 29, 1852, settling in Schenectady, where they lived for six years. George Fritsch was by trade a shoemaker, and followed that business in this country. In 1858 he went to Monroe, and continued the same business until he concluded to try farming, and bought a quarter section on section 1. He also owns 220 acres on sections 21 and 22, and 100 acres on sections 18 and 19, and makes stock raising his business. He has a good farm, and is among the best class of Green county's citizens. While living in Schenectady he was married to Louisa Beck, Oct. 28, 1855. They have had five children, two of whom are living. Louisa, Jacob and Mary are dead. John, the subject of this sketch, is living on section 21, town of Jordan. Elizabeth is living with her father, but is married to William Blaseag. They are all members of the Lutheran Church.


Hermann G. Fritz
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin Illustrated; chapter 35 (1884) transcribed by RuthAnne Wilke

Hermann G. Fritz, a prosperous young farmer of the town of Jefferson, is the son of David and Anna G. (Beckman) Fritz, born Aug. 22, 1857. When seven years old, he came to Green county, and afterwards bought the place known as the “Crayton farm,” on which he lived until twenty-four years old. He then removed to Jefferson, where he now lives, upon section 30, also owns sixty-six acres in the town of Clarno, on section 25. He makes a specialty of stock raising. His wife was formerly Louisa Brunner, daughter of John and Mary (Bure) Brunner, of the town of Jefferson.


Lorenzo Fuller
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated, Chapter 30 (1884) transcribed by Colleen Weeks Breeden

Lorenzo Fuller lives on section 32, where his father, W. M. Fuller, settled Feb. 22, 1854. The latter was born in the State of Massachusetts about 1805. When a young man he went to Canada and from thence to Wisconsin in 1853. He bought this farm of Josiah Martin, which was then unimproved. He died Aug. 11, 1879, and his wife has since died. They had six children, three boys and three girls. Lorenzo owns the homestead farm, having bought the interest of the other heirs. He was born in Canada in 1844. He was married to Lana Chawgo, a native of the town of Clayton, Jefferson Co., N. Y. They have four children – Walter, Frank, Clark and Collie.


James T. Fulton
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884), page 865, transcribed by Mary. Saggio.

JAMES T. FULTON, son of William T. and Sarah Fulton, was born in Mercer Co., Penn., Aug. 19, 1844, and was but an infant when his father and family moved to Wisconsin. He lived with his parents until eighteen years old, when with their consent he started in life on his own account. The first year he worked in Wisconsin pineries, then engaged as sutler's clerk for J. S. Gold, sutler of the 15th Veteran Reserve Corps, stationed at Chicago, Springfield and Cairo, Ill. He was in this employ about one year, then went to Montana and engaged in mining two years; came back to Wisconsin in 1867, and took charge of lead mining works in Exeter for an Evansville company, and the Sugar river lead mines on section 35. A few months later the work was abandoned. In 1869 his father made a trip to California hoping to be benefitted in health. James accompanied him, and they returned the same season. James T. then settled down in life in the town of Exeter, and was married to Matilda Hayden, Feb. 26, 1871. She was a daughter of James and Lucinda Hayden, and born in Dane Co., June 12, 1851. Her father died Oct. 18, 1875, in Exeter village. Her mother now lives there with her son, James Hayden. There are four children besides James and Matilda — Elizabeth, Louisa, Catharine and William. Mr. and Mrs. Fulton have two children — William N., born Jan 1, 1872, and Cora Idell, born March 31, 1879. Mr. Fulton is an excellent citizen, and has eighty acres of land on section 34, where he lives.


William F. Fulton
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884), pages 855-856, transcribed by Mary. Saggio.

WILLIAM F. FULTON was born in Clarion Co., Penn., Oct. 13, 1817. In his youth he learned the carpenters' trade. He was married in 1839, to Sarah Silver, after which he lived in Mercer county, in the same State, until 1845, when he came to Wisconsin. He spent one winter at Richland Grove, then moved to the "Mitchell place," in Mount Pleasant, which he rented one year, then removed to Attica and remained till the spring of 1848. He then bought forty acres of land on section 35, of Exeter, upon which he settled permanently. He afterwards added 101 acres to his farm, making it contain 141 acres. Mr. and Mrs. Fulton had, when they came to Wisconsin, three sons — William S., now living in Montcalm, Mich.; Albert and James T., who resides in this town. Seven children were born after their arrival — Elvira, wife of Theodore Torgorson, of Madison; Ella, who died at the age of three years; Cynthia, wife of William Edwards, of Warsaw, Wis.; Alfred, who died aged seventeen years; Frank, living at Wilmot, Dak.; Edward, also living at Wilmot, and Arthur, who lives with his mother on a part of the homestead farm. In October, 1874, Mr. Fulton moved to Cresco, Iowa, where he died July 16, 1878. His widow remained there until the fall of 1882. Mr. Fulton was prominently identified with the public affairs of the town, and was an honored citizen. He served several terms as town treasurer, also as a member of the town board. Albert Fulton resides on section 35, on the homestead purchased by his father in 1848. He was born in Mercer Co., Penn., Oct. 19, 1842. He came west with his parents and remained with them until the time of his marriage, Nov. 27, 1869, with Dora A. Gater, who was born in Chautauqua Co., N. Y., March 27, 1846. They have four children — Alma, born in 1870; Lizzie, born in 1872; Blanche, born in 1874 and Grace born in 1876.


L. H. Gapen
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin Illustrated; chapter 35 (1884) transcribed by RuthAnne Wilke

L. H. Gapen, son of Lewis and Martha (Jamison) Gapen, was born Feb. 17, 1856, in the town of Jefferson, on section 17, the same place where he now resides. He has always followed farming, and is also extensively engaged in stock raising. He was married Sept. 6, 1883, to Ella Courtney, a native of Missouri, but at that time a resident of Green county. Mr. Gapen’s parents are living in Monroe. Although still a young man, Mr. Gapen is one of the substantial citizens of the county.


Marion T. Gapen
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin Illustrated; chapter 35 (1884) transcribed by RuthAnne Wilke

Marion T. Gapen was born July 26, 1844, in Monongahela Co., Va. His parents were Lewis and Maria (Litus) Gapen. The former is living in Monroe; the latter is dead. Marion T. Gapen removed with his parents from Virginia to Pennsylvania, and from thence to Green county in 1856. He has always been a farmer, living with his parents upon the homestead until April 10, 1867, when he was married to Mary E. Chadwick, daughter of J. C. Chadwick, of the village of Juda. They have six children---Belle, George W., Lula R., Jotham C., Frances M. and Helen S. Mr. Gapen owns a farm of 120 acres on section 5, where he lives, also a farm on section 3 and 10, in the town of Jefferson. Mr. and Mrs. Gapen are members of the Baptist Church. He is a republican, and a member of the board of town supervisors.


Martin Geigle
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated, Chapter 37 (1884): transcribed by Tammy Clark

Martin Geigle, a native of Switzerland, was born in June, 1821. His father was Mathias Geigle, now deceased and buried in Switzerland. In 1854, Martin Geigle came to America and worked one year at Columbus, Ohio, at the mason's trade, which he had learned in Switzerland. He then came to Wisconsin, and located at Madison, where he worked at his trade five years, after which he came to Green county and bought a farm of eighty acres. He now owns 377 acres and is extensively engaged in stock raising. He was married in 1855, while at Madison, to Dora Baumgartner, a native of Switzerland. They have nine living children—Mathias, Henry, Annie, Martin, Jacob, Frank, John, Samuel and Dora, Mathias is married and living in Monroe. Annie is married to Gustavus Norder, of the town of Sylvester. The family are members of the Gospel Church. Politically Mr. Geigle is republican.


John Gibbons
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated, Chapter 37 (1884): transcribed by Tammy Clark

John Gibbons is a native of Ireland, born in county Galway, June 18, 1844. He came to the United States with his parents, Richard and Ellen (Joyce) Gibbons, who settled in Madison Co., N. Y., where they remained six years. In February, 1857, they came to Green county and located at Mount Pleasant, living there also six years. They then removed to the town of Adams, and one year later to Jordan, where they still reside. John Gibbons was married Feb. 7, 1875, to Margaret A. Knight, a native of Ohio, and daughter of Owen and Ann (Conway) Knight, residents of Adams. Four children have blessed this union—Edward, deceased; Mary E., Grace A. and Richard O. Mr. Gibbons owned a farm of eighty acres in Jordan, which he sold to his father, previous to his removal to Monroe. He came here in 1876, and now owns 200 acres on section 3, where he resides, and sixty-two and a half acres on sections 16 and 9. Mr. Gibbons is a democrat in politics, and holds the office of town assessor, and has been a member of the town board. The family are connected with the Catholic Church.


Richard Gibbons
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884) chapter 36; Transcribed by Tammy Clark

Richard Gibbons is a son of Michael and Anna (Joyce) Gibbons. He is a native of Ireland, born in county Gal way, Joyce's country, in January, 1811.

His parents are dead, being buried in Ireland. The subject of our sketch came to America in 1849, settling in Madison Co., N. Y. He lived there, near Syracuse, until 1856, when he removed with his family to Janesville, Wis., and in February, 1857, removed to the town of Mount Pleasant, this county, rented a farm, and lived there until March, 1863, when he removed to the town of Adams. In February, 1864, he removed to the town of Jordan, where he had purchased a farm on section 1. He first owned 120 acres, but has since purchased 120 acres on section 12, town of .Jordan, and eighty acres on section 7, town of Monroe. He makes stock raising a specialty. He leases his farm to his sons, Richard and Edward, and lives at his ease. He was married in 1838 to Ellen Joyce, a native of county Galway, Joyce's country, Ireland, and is a daughter of Martin and Kate (Sanders) Joyce, both of whom are deceased, and buried in Ireland. Ten children have blessed this union—Bridget, wife of Michael Clark, resides in the town of Exeter; Anna, who was married to George lone, is now dead; John, living in the town of Monroe; Patrick and Stephen, buried in Ireland; Mary, wife of Michael Gibbons, of Chicago; Catharine E., buried in Ireland; Edward and Richard, at home; and William M., running a clothing store in Monroe. Mr. and Mrs. Gibbons are members of the Catholic Church.


Andrew Gilbertson
Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Janice Louie

ANDREW GILBERTSON. The incomes from the well regulated farms of Buffalo township form a large part of the wealth of Cass county, and one of these carefully cultivated tracts is owned and operated by the gentleman above named. He is a pioneer settler of that locality, and is successfully conducting general farming on section 32, and his estate bears evidence of good management and skillful operation.
Our subject was born in Norway, August 25, 1841, and was a son of Ole and Bertha (Jacobson) Gilbertson, both of whom were natives of Norway. The family came to America in 1852 and located in Green county, Wisconsin, where the parents remained until their deaths. The father died in 1855 and the mother in 1884.
Mr. Gilbertson was reared and educated in Wisconsin until 1862, when he enlisted in Company F, Thirty-first Volunteer Infantry, and served three years. He was with Sherman on his march to the sea, and was in the siege of Atlanta and many of the battles of that campaign, but escaped wounds. After discharge from the service in 1865 he returned to Wisconsin, and remained there until 1872, when he removed to Minnesota. He went to Cass county, North Dakota, in 1879, and took a homestead on section 32, where he has since resided. He is now the fortunate possessor of one half-section of land, all of which is tillable and well improved, and he is among the substantial men of Buffalo township.
Our subject was married, in 1879, to Mrs. Pingrey, formerly Lucy Post, a native of Michigan. Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Gilbertson, named as follows: Joel and Bertha. Mr. Gilbertson is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, and is prominent in public affairs of his township, and has filled various township offices and labored earnestly for the general welfare of the community in which he has made his home for so many years. He is intelligent and well versed in his calling and deservedly held in high esteem.


M. T. Gleason
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated; Chapter 33 (1881) Transcribed by: Frances Cooley

M. T. Gleason, of Brodhead, is the son of Robert Gleason, who came to Albany with his family in 1846. Hobert Gleason was born in Owego, Tioga Co., N. Y., about 1805. He was engaged the greater part of his life in mechanical work. He removed with his family to Lake Co., Ill., where he resided two years, previous to coming to Green county. He erected a saw mill in 1846, for Nichols & Pond, which was the first mill built in the town of Albany. He died the following year. His wife survived until 1870. Seven children of this family accompanied their parents to this county, five sons and two daughters. Two of the eons have since died. M. T. Gleason was born in Owego, Tioga Co., N. Y., in 1830, and came with the family to this county in 1846. He was engaged in merchandising for many years, at Monticello, Albany and Brodhead. Mrs. Gleason was Ellen Corey, a daughter of M. Corey, who settled near Monticello in 1856, and in 1876 removed to Nebraska. Mr. and Mrs. Gleason have two children—Charles F. and Nettie, both of whom are married. The former lives at Princeton, Minn., and the latter is the wife of L. A. Towne, of Brodhead.


Rice D. Gorham
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated, Chapter 37 (1884): transcribed by Tammy Clark

Rice D. Gorham is a native of this county, born in the town of York April 11, 1854, and is a son of William C and Elvira Mason (Chaffee) Gorham, both of whom are now living in the town of Sylvester. He received his education in the schools of Monroe and the select school of William C. Green (also of Monroe). When eighteen years old he began teaching school. He taught in the towns of Jordan, Brooklyn and Sylvester. He was married Dec. 31, 1874, to Emma C. Bragg, a daughter of T. J. Bragg, one of the earliest residents of the county. In 1876 he commenced farming upon the west half of section 25, town of Monroe. Five years later, in 1881, he purchased the east half and moved on to it. He now owns all of the northeast quarter of section 25; also twelve acres of timber in the town of Sylvester. He is engaged in raising stock, furnishing milk for factory use, and also making a specialty of raising fine blooded horses. In 1874, he was with Sutherland & Sherman, when they were drowned, being in the water with them when they went down. Mr. Gorham is at present (1884) chairman of the board of supervisors of the town of Monroe, a member of the I. O. O. F., a member of the Royal Arcanian, and one of the first members of the Monroe City Guards.


Frank B. Green
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884), page 859, transcribed by Mary. Saggio.

Frank B. Green, son of Joseph and Ruth Green, was born May 17, 1859. He was married to Emma B. Jordan, Jan. 4, 1882, who was born in this town, Aug. 7, 1859. Mr. Green lives on the farm formerly owned by his father. This place is located on section 11, and contains 108 acres. Mr. and Mrs. Green have one child — Mabel Mary, born July 4, 1883.


Thomas Green
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884), page 858, transcribed by Mary. Saggio.

THOMAS GREEN was born in Derbyshire, England, March 8, 1841. His father, Joseph Green, with his wife and seven children, came to the United States, in 1851, coming directly from New York to Rock county, and locating in the town of Porter, where they bought a farm. There he lived until April, 1854, when he sold out and came to Exeter, where he bought the mill property from A. D. Kirkpatrick. He enlarged this mill, refitted it with new machinery, and successfully operated it until 1866, when he rented it to his son, Thomas, the subject of this sketch. The children who came to the United States with the parents were — Thomas, John, who died in Dane county, in 1877; Richard, produce dealer, at Middleton, Dane county; Mary, deceased, wife of W. B. Norris, of Topeka, Kansas; William, now in trade at Albany; Chantry, who died in this county, in 1884; and Isaac, now a resident of Dedham, Iowa. Born in this State, were Herbert, (now in Albany); George, who lives in Dakota; and Frank, who lives on the old homestead farm in this county, town of Exeter. Joseph Green was one of the prominent citizens of this part of the county, always foremost in all work which would advance the interests of his village. He was a member of the M E. Church, and a consistent, honest Christian man. He died Feb. 28, 1881. His widow, Ruth Green, survives him, and lives in the village of Dayton. Thomas Green succeeded to the mill property, by purchase, from the estate of his father, in the spring of 1881, and is now (1884) proprietor of the same. He was in the army a little more than four years, a member of the 8th Wisconsin Volunteers, known as the "Eagle regiment." he was a gallant soldier, as his comrades testify. The family did loyal service during the war, for, John Green went out as captain in the 37th regiment, and was promoted to colonelcy; another brother, William, rose from the ranks to a lieutenancy. Sept. 17, 1866. Thomas Green was married to Isabella Beattie, who was born in Northumberland, England, Jan. 20, 1840, and came to this country, with some friends, in 1861, the year following, came to Monroe, and lived with a brother until her marriage. They have four children — Maggie, Ida, .Jessie and Charles. Mr. Green owns fifty-two acres of improved land on section 11, bought from his father's estate. This with the mill property, gave him title to 105 acres. He is an energetic, reliable business man.


William Grenzon
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin Illustrated; chapter 35 (1884) transcribed by RuthAnne Wilke

William Grenzon, a native of Prussia, was born May 11, 1824. He is the son of William and Frederica (Barwent) Grenzon, who are dead, and buried in Prussia. The subject of this sketch came to this county in 1866, and settled at Spring Grove, where he owned a farm of eighty-six and one-half acres, which he sold, and removed to Jefferson. In 1852 he bought 120 acres of George W. Wells, located on section 28, where he has a fine farm, desirably located, and where he has a fine farm, desirably located, and where he has since resided. He was married in Prussia, March 11, 1849, to Wilhelmine Wolff. They have five children---William F., Augusta L., Ernest O., Frank L. and Charles F., all of whom were born in Prussia. William F. is married and living south of Juda. Augusta L. is married and lives in Spring Grove. Frank is living at home, and is married to Minnie Moyer. They are members of the Evangelical Church, and Mr. Grenzon and his sons are politically republicans.


W. F. Grenzow
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin Illustrated; chapter 35 (1884) transcribed by RuthAnne Wilke

W. F. Grenzow was born in Prussia, Germany, June 14, 1849. He is a son of William and Augusta (Wolf) Grenzow. When seventeen years old he left his native land and came with his parents to America, and remained with them until of age. March 23, 1877, he came to Green county and settled on section 12, where he had purchased forty acres of land. Since that time he now owns 120. He was married March 15, 1877, to Augusta Mdzke, by whom he had four children---Minnie A., John E., Samuel W. and Joseph Henry. They are members of the German Evangelical Church. Mr. Grenzow is a man of energy, and has been a successful farmer. He fully understands both the German and English language, and teaches the same to his children. His farm is a desirable one, well located and abundantly watered.


William Guinter
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin Illustrated; chapter 35 (1884) transcribed by RuthAnne Wilke

William Guinter, a native of Pennsylvania, was born July 12, 1825, and is the son of Charles and Anna (Cherry) Guinter, both of whom are dead, and buried at Milton, Northumberland Co., Penn. Charles Guinter was a native of Germany, and a shoemaker by trade, and followed it in Pennsylvania, also after coming to this county. At present he has a shop on his farm in which he works a portion of the time. He removed to Green county in 1858, and purchased eighty acres of land of Hugh Cameron, which is located on section 33, of the town of Jefferson, where he still resides. He was married Feb. 5, 1846, to Rebecca Steninger, a native of Pennsylvania. They have six children living---David S., now traveling salesman for the Neenah Stove Works, formerly a preacher; Ann E., married to Oscar Templeton, and living in Iowa; Agnes L., wife of William Lutz, of Shannon, Ill., Vialetta, wife of Ira Emrick; William S., married to Sarah Armstrong, and living in Jefferson; and Belle, who is living at home with her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Guinter are members of the Evangelical Association. He is a class leader in the Church, a member of the republican party, and a respected and popular citizen. He owns a good farm, and makes stock raising a specialty.


Frederick Hadinger
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

Frederick Hadinger was born in Wurtemburg, Germany, June 2, 1837. When he was three and a half years of age his father died. When fourteen years of age he came to this country, locating in Pittsburg, Penn., where he learned the trade of cabinet maker. Remaining there four years, he went to Bartlett county and engaged in the manufacture of wagons, buggies, etc. Remaining there about seven years, he removed to Janesville, Wis., and engaged in the same business. Then he removed to the town of Jefferson, this county; thence to the town of Clarno, where he purchased sixty acres of timber of Isaac Newman on section 13. He now owns 300 acres, 200 acres of which is broken, the rest being timber and pasture. He was married on the 20th of February, 1861, to Jane Henderson, a native of Ohio. They had five children—William J., Elizabeth, Harvey, Emma and Minnie. In politics he is a republican. William J. is clerk of district No. 8.


Henry Hafner
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884) chapter 36; Transcribed by Tammy Clark

Henry Hafner was born Dec. 17, 1830, in canton of Solothurn, Switzerland, and is a son of Urs J. and Mary A. (Bader) Hafner. His parents are both buried in Switzerland. In 1853, Mr. Hafner emigrated to America, locating in Stark Co., Ohio. He remained there a short time, then went to Indiana, where he lived one year, then returned to Ohio. He purchased land in Tuscarawas county and remained there some time, when he heard of the rich farming land in Wisconsin, and immediately came out, locating in the town of Jordan, this county, and purchasing a farm on section 2. In about three years he sold out and bought on section 13. In 1869, he again sold out and purchased 440 acres on the same section, where he now resides. He owns 306 acres at the present time. He followed cheese making for eight years, then gave it up and engaged in stock raising. In 1857, he was united in marriage with Fredericka Knoble. This union has been blessed with seven children—Mary, Joseph H., John V., Sarah E., George D., Frank and Anna. The four eldest live in Kansas. Mrs. Hafner died Sept. 26, 1870, and her remains are interred in Monroe cemetery. He was again married Dec. 8, 1873, to Mary Bader, a native of Switzerland. Mr. Hafner is a member of the I. O. O. F. and A. O. U. W.


Ernest Hahn
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated; Chapter 33 (1881) Transcribed by Frances Cooley

Ernest Hahn is the merchant tailor of Brodhead. He engaged in business here in 1868. Mr. Hahn was born in the northern part of Germany, in 1832. He learned his trade in his native land, and came to the United States in 1856. He worked at his trade in Cleveland, Ohio, for a time; in 1857, came to Madison, Wis. In the spring of 1859, he went to Prairie du Chien, and soon after came to Morroe, Green county, and in a short time went to St. Louis and remained one year. He then returned to this county and located at Monroe, where he remained working at his trade, with his father-in-law, until he came to Brodhead. His wife was Mary Spahr, daughter of Peter Spahr, of Monroe. Mr. and Mrs. Hahn have four children. The eldest, a daughter, was born in St. Louis. Two sons were born in Monroe and one in Brodhead. Mr. Hahn is an excellent workman and does a prosperous business.


Alfred Hale
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884) chapter 36; Transcribed by Tammy Clark

Alfred Hale was born in 1842, April 19, in the State of Tennessee, but was brought up in Ohio. He was married June 6, 1875, to Ellen L. Wieland, a native of Centre Co., Penn., born Dec. 25, 1847. After marriage he lived in the town of Jefferson four years, then bought a farm on section 5, town of Jordan, where he now owns 180 acres, also sixty acres on section 6. They have two children—Marion E., and Altha M. Mr. Hale is a member of the I. O. O. F., and a republican.
 


Calvin Hale
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884) chapter 36; Transcribed by Tammy Clark

Calvin Hale, one of the earliest settlers of the town of Clarno, was born in Belvidere, Vt., and was a son of Hewett Hale, a native of the same place. In 1835 Calvin came to this county and settled on section 23, in the town of Clarno, which was his home until his removal to Twin Grove, in the town of Jefferson, where he died June 1, 1849. He was by trade a blacksmith, and in those early days work came to him from long distances. His wife was formerly Sarah Smith, who died in March, 1875.


W. F. Hartwig
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin Illustrated; chapter 35 (1884) transcribed by RuthAnne Wilke

W. F. Hartwig is a native of Prussia, born April 4, 1853, and is the son of W. L. and Sophia (Haberman) Hartwig, who live, at the present time, in Sylvester. They came to Watertown, Wis., when the subject of this sketch was eighteen months old, and removed one year later to Sylvester. He has resided in the county since that time. He was engaged in clerking, in Juda and Brodhead, eight years. He owned a farm in Sylvester, which he sold, and purchased the place where he now lives, on section 5, of the town of Jefferson. He owns 274 acres of good land. Feb. 11, 1876, he was married to Mary Arnsmeire, a native of Illinois and daughter of Frederick Arnsmeire, now a resident of Spring Grove. They have three children---Elmer E., Ada V. and William H. Mr. Hartwig is a man of education and ability, and belongs to the republican party. He is, with his wife, a member of the M. E. Church.


Peolin P. Havens
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884), page 855, transcribed by Mary. Saggio.

PEOLIN P. HAVENS was born in Hartford, Washington Co., N. Y., May 1, 1803. In his youth he learned the blacksmith trade, at which he became a master workman. At the age of twenty-two years he left home, and for the next ten years worked at his trade in different parts of the State. The last work which he did, as a hired man, was in New York city. In 1835, he went from there to Evans, Erie county, and worked in a shop of his own several years. He went from Evans to Orleans county, and in 1845 came to Wisconsin, and worked at blacksmithing two years in Evansville. In the fall of 1849 he came to Exeter and bought 240 acres of land. The village plat of Dayton was made by him at the time of his purchase. He opened the first blacksmith shop in that part of the town, in 1847. He was at one time interested in the water power at Dayton. Mr. Havens was married in Erie Co., N. Y., to Betsey A. Phillips, who was born in Niagara Co., N. Y., Jan. 23, 1812. She died in Exeter, Dec. 29, 1872. The children born to them were — Luther, who was born in 1835 and died March 11, 1866, from disease contracted while a prisoner at Andersonville. He was a member of the 8th Wisconsin regiment; Harriet, born in 1836, is the wife of James Morris, of Milwaukee; Forrester, born April 10, 1838, now owns the old homestead, and his father lives with him; Livonia, born in 1840, died at the age of four years; Albert P., born in 1843, was a member of the 42d Wisconsin Volunteer regiment. Mr. Havens has led an active and useful life. Now in his declining years he has the confidence and respect of many warm friends. Forrester Havens, who now lives upon the homestead farm, was married Jan. 3, 1865, to Elizabeth Ellis, daughter of Mark Ellis. They have three children — Jessie, born in 1866; Aldulah, born in 1870; and Theodore, born in 1876.


Henry Hefty
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884), pages 863-864, transcribed by Mary. Saggio.

HENRY HEFTY lives on section 18, town of Exeter, and owns a farm of 129 acres. He was born in canton Glarus, Switzerland, April 5, 1831. He landed at New York in May, 1854, with his wife Regula, born Oct. 30, 1831. He was accompanied by a brother named Mathias, who now lives in California. He was married April 21, 1853. After coming to the United States he lived in Philadelphia until April, 1865, then went to New Glarus, Wis., residing in that State, employed at different kinds of work until 1860, when he came to Exeter and settled on section 17, where he lived until March, 1863, then bought the farm he now occupies. He built his present residence in 1870. His children living are — Mathias, born Jan. 10, 1854; Sybilla, born Aug. 24, 1855, now the wife of Joseph Altman, of Jordan; David, born Jan. 22, 1857, now living in Brooklyn; Magdalena, born May 5, 1859, now the wife of Iosua Klassy, of Jordan; Regula, born Jan. 13, 1863, now wife of John Becker, of New Glarus; Henry, born March 23, 1868, and Mary, born Oct. 10, 1870. The last two live at home. The dead children are — Regula, born in 1861, and died in 1863; Henry, born in 1866, and died in 1867. His wife died March 23, 1876, and he was married to his second wife, Barbara Schiesser, June 7, 1877. She was born in February, 1815. In 1861 his mother died, and in 1875 his father, who was born March 23, 1806, came from Switzerland to live with him, bringing a boy, by his third marriage, called John, who was born July 10, 1871. The mother is living in Switzerland.


Martin Heinzelmann
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

Martin Heinzelmann, a prosperous farmer of Clarno, was born in Wurtemburg, Germany, Dec. 15, 1825. He served six years in the army in his native country, and, at the age of twenty-eight came to America. He first went to Connecticut where he worked on a farm, by the month, six years, then came to Milwaukee, and a month later to Monroe. He worked in a brickyard one summer, and four years on the farm of Mr. Newton. He then bought forty acres of timber land, of Alexander Morton, at $10 an acre, which he cleared and improved. To this he has continued to add, until he now owns 125 acres of choice land, with 115 acres under cultivation. He has erected good buildings, and everything about the place indicates thrift and comfort. He makes stock raising a specialty. He was married in Monroe, to Sophia Grose, a native of Mecklenburg, and nine children have been born to them—William L., and Mary E., (twins); Henrietta E., Martin F., and Annie, who is dead, and buried in the United Brethren cemetery; Herman S., Matilda A., Georgie C, and Bertha R. Mr. and Mrs. Heinzelmann are members of the Lutheran Church, and he is, in politics, independent of party.


William Henn
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

William Henn was born in Germany, but came to Green county when one year old. His parents, Philip and Bena Henn, are living in Monroe. He was married Nov. 15, 1876, to Isabel Conkey, an adopted daughter of Amos and Mary A. Conkey. Mr. Henn owns thirty-eight acres of land on section 1, in the town of Clarno, where he is desirably located, and has good buildings. He is politically a republican. Mrs. Henn's mother resides with them.


James Hickman
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin Illustrated; chapter 35 (1884) transcribed by RuthAnne Wilke

James Hickman, a native of England, was born in Lincolnshire, July 2, 1832. His parents, Jacob and Mary (Allen) Hickman, are both living in England. Mr. Hickman, of this sketch, resided in his native country until twenty-one years old. He then came to America and settled upon a farm in Lorain Co., Ohio, where he lived three and a half years, then removed to Vernon Co., Wis., and about two years later to Green county. He owns a good farm of 160 acres, on section 9, in the town of Jefferson, and is engaged in raising sheep, cattle and hogs. He was married June 7, 1862, to Mrs. Sarah (Carter) Whitehead. Seven children have been born to them---Mary Emma, Martha Jane, Sarah Ellen, John, Caroline, David and Etta M. Mrs. Hickman has four children by her former marriage---Elizabeth, Charlotte, William and Thomas. Mr. Hickman is politically a republican.


W. F. Hintzman
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated, Chapter 37 (1884): transcribed by Tammy Clark

W. F. Hintzman settled in Juda, in the town of Jefferson, in the spring of 1868. He engaged in farming two years, then followed mercantile life for nine years, in Juda and Brodhead, selling dry goods. In 1879 he removed to his present home on section 23, town of Monroe, where he owns 150 acres of land, and is engaged in stock raising. He was born in Prussia, twenty-four miles east of Berlin, Aug. 31, 1848, and is the son of David and Mary (Heis) Hintzman. His father, David Hintzman, is dead, and buried in Juda cemetery. His mother is living with her daughter, Mrs. Buer, in Juda. He attended school in his native country until fourteen years old, then worked three years learning the gardener's trade, after which he worked three years in Stettin, as practical gardner. He was married Sept. 18, 1870, to Christina Caplin, who was born near Stettin, in Prussia. She was a daughter of Michael and Dorotha (Hartwig) Caplin. She died Feb. 25, 1882, leaving seven children—Mary E., Emma V., Ida J., Clara H., Arthur W. and Anna C. and Lena (twins). Ella E. is deceased. Mr. Hintzman was again married to Rosa Knipshnild July 17, 1882. She is daughter of Adam Knipshnild, who was formerly a wagon maker in Monroe. One child has blessed this union—Edward S. Mr. and Mrs. Hintzman are members of the Evangelical Church at Monroe. He is a republican in politics.


J. W. Holmes
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin Illustrated; chapter 35 (1884) transcribed by RuthAnne Wilke

J. W. Holmes was born Jan. 11, 1850, in Ashland Co., Ohio. He is the son of David and Mary (Weaver) Holmes, who now live in the town of Jefferson. J. W. Holmes, at the age of sixteen, came to Green county and settled upon section 22, where his parents now reside. He now lives on section 5, of the same town, and owns 230 acres of land. He was married Nov. 17, 1872, to Isabel Chryst, a native of Green county, born in the house in which they now live. They have four children---Jasper E., Leroy E., Clayton O., and John D. Mr. Holmes is engaged in grain and stock raising and is politically a democrat. Both he and his wife are members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church.


John Hosken
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884), pages 850-851, transcribed by Mary. Saggio.

JOHN HOSKEN, son of Richard and Mary Hosken, was born Jan. 15, 1844, in the town of Exeter. He now owns and resides upon the land bought from the speculators by his father, on section 22, in 1854. He was reared a farmer, and lived with his parents until their death, except during the short time he served in the army. He enlisted in company F, 42d Wisconsin Volunteers, and served until the regiment was mustered out, June 20, 1866. July 13, 1874, he was married to Mrs. Brabyn, widow of William Brabyn, of England, where her husband died. She came to this town in July, 1869, with four children — Joseph, now in Colorado; William H., now in Washington Territory; Elena, wife of Charles Storrs, of Dane county; and Mary Jane, who lives with her mother. A child, named William J., of Mr. Hosken's deceased brother, Joseph D., was made one of the family, but he died Oct. 27, 1881, at the age of ten years. Mr. and Mrs. Hosken have no children. His father, Richard Hosken, was born June 20, 1801, in England, where he learned the trade of carpenter. In his youth he came to the United States, landing in New York in November, 1838 or 1839, in company with some others and their families. He reached Wiota, where he worked at his trade among the miners until 1841. He was married to Mary Cherry, a native of Dublin, Ireland, who came from there with a brother and two sisters in 1840. After marriage he bought land in Exeter, where he settled. Four children were born to them — Joseph D., who died in 1871; John, the subject of this sketch; William, who died in 1867; Ann J., wife of Charles George, died in 1879. Mr. Hosken died Nov. 17, 1869. His wife died April 1, 1872.


John Huntly
Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1883), page 502; transcribed by Susan Geist

JOHN HUNTLY (Rep.), of Avon—P. O., Brodhead, Green county—was born in Hamburgh, Erie county, New York, April 10, 1847; received a common school and partial high school education; is a farmer; came to Wisconsin in 1849 and settled in Avon, where he has continued to reside; has been town clerk from 1874 to 1881 and justice of the peace for four years; was elected member of assembly for 1882, and re-elected for 1883, receiving 1,588 votes, against 802 for J. B. Dow, prohibitionist.


Richard Johns
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated, Chapter 37 (1884): transcribed by Tammy Clark

Richard Johns, the father of the subject of the above sketch, was born in the State of Pennsylvania, July 29, 1805. His father, Nathan Johns, was from Maryland, as was the mother, Rachel (Jones) Johns. From Pennsylvania Mr. Johns moved in 1810, to Columbiana Co., Ohio, where they remained until 1849, then again removed to Pennsylvania, thence back to Ohio, thence again to Pennsylvania, and continued in the east until they removed to Rock county. The next move brought them to this county, first settling at Juda, in 1861, where they purchased a farm. In 1866 they removed to Monroe, where the family remained three years, then removed to the town of Mount Pleasant.

Afterwards he sold this property and purchased a farm on section 28, where they now live. Richard Johns was married Jan, 5, 1828, to Betsy Carleton, from Chester Co., Penn. They had ten children—Beulah A., Samuel, Susanna, Caleb C, Henry, Phebe A., Maurice R., who died in the army, Rebecca, Lavina E. and Spencer M.
 


Samuel Johns
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated, Chapter 37 (1884): transcribed by Tammy Clark

Samuel Johns, a prominent farmer of the town of Monroe, was born in Belmont Co., Ohio, May 3, 1832. He is a son of Richard and Betsy (Carleton) Johns. Samuel's history is merged in that of his father until he went for himself to Beaver Co., Penn., where he engaged in the hydraulic business, putting up machinery. In 1856 he came to this county bringing a drove of horses which he sold, and has since been extensively engaged in the horse business. During the war he bought horses for the government. Mr. Johns has traveled a great deal, especially in the west. In the spring of 1866 he went to Helena, Montana, and stayed one year, thence to Idaho, where he engaged in mercantile trade until 1867, then returned to Helena and remained until 1868, speculating. He was in Salt Lake City for a time and had a large and varied experience through-out the whole western country. In 1869 he run the mail route between Monroe and Darlington six months. He then removed to the town of Mount Pleasant, thence back to Monroe, frequently changing his place of abode, until settling down on his place, a short distance northwest from Monroe. He was married Feb. 21, 1870, to Mary A. Whitesett, a native of Illinois, and a daughter of Jefferson and Betsy (Lockhart) Whitesett. They have three children—Lettie L., Clyde C. and Willie I. Mrs. Johns is a member of the M. E. Church.


Jacob Jones
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

Jacob Jones is a native of Maryland, born Jan. 5, 1820. He is a son of Thomas and Susanna (Trotton) Jones, both of whom are dead and buried in Baltimore Co., Md. Jacob came to this county in 1853, and settled in the town of Monroe, on the Mineral Point road, where he lived until 1862, then returned to Maryland and remained one year on account of his health. In 1863 he came again to this county and bought ten acres of land from Dr. Sherman, and now owns twenty-four acres, located a short distance from the village of Monroe. He was married in Maryland to Mrs. Emeline Wilkinson, a native of that State. She died in May, 1867, and was buried in Monroe cemetery. She left two children—John T. and Mary A. Mr. Jones was again married Dec. 28, 1871, to Nancy Crow, daughter of Abram and Elizabeth Crow, who are living in the town of Clarno. By this union there are four children—Harry F., Bertha M., Jacob Arthur and Robert R. Mr. and Mrs. Jones are both members of the M. E. Church. John T., the son from first marriage, is a master mechanic on the Texas & St. Louis Railroad, and stationed at Jonesboro, Ark. Mary A., the daughter, is running a millinery and dress making establishment in Wayne, Lafayette county.


Alonzo Jordan
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1884), pages 865-866, transcribed by Mary. Saggio.

ALONZO JORDAN brought his family from Chittenden Co., Vt., in 1850, and made his home near Dayton, on the place now owned by G. F. Ellis. Mrs. Clarinda Jordan, his first wife, died in Vermont, March 5, 1848, leaving four children, who were a part of Mr. Jordan's family when he settled in the town of Exeter. They were — Frances, the deceased wife of Warren Hill; Alonzo P., Edwin T., who now lives in Rock county; and Eliza, wife of Frank Edwards. In January, 1849, the year before coming west, Mr. Jordan was married to Charlotte Parker, a native of Franklin Co., Vt., born March 14, 1827. Before leaving Vermont, one son — Lucuius O. — was born to them, and afterwards, in this town, were born — Wilber, who now lives in Belleville. Volney, who was married to Minnie Prucia, and has there children — Frank, Belver Pearl, and an infant daughter, now living in Dayton; Emma, wife of Frank Green, and Fred, who now owns the homestead, and was married to Mary, daughter of Charles and Ann Parkin, Nov. 27, 1883. Alonzo P. Jordan, the oldest son of Alonzo Jordan, was married June 11, 1865, to Frances Hunt, daughter of Homer and Mary Hunt. She was born in Dresden, Ohio. Her parents came to this town in 1866, and have since that time lived with Mr. and Mrs. Jordan. Mr. and Mrs. Jordan have two children — Lizzie May, born in 1870, and Charles Homer, born in 1873. Mr. Jordan owns 105 acres on section 26. Lucius O., the first born of Alonzo Jordan by his marriage with Charlotte Parker, owns 100 acres of land where he resides on section 26. He was married Oct. 8, 1872, to Angeline Vest, daughter of Henry Vest, residents of Eau Claire, Wis. Her mother died when she was quite young. They have seven children — Alonzo W., Emma A., Charlotte A., Orphia, Orlando, Lucius and Lewis, (twins). In 1856 the father, Alonzo Jordan, sold his. place near Dayton, and moved on 160 acres of land he had previously bought on section 26, where he lived until his death, which occurred Feb. 12, 1872. The homestead is now the residence of his widow and his son, Fred, who owns the property.


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