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LA CROSSE COUNTY, WISCONSIN

BIOGRAPHIES

R. W. Abbey
Source: History of La Crosse County, Wisconsin, Chicago: Western Historical Company (1881) Transcribed by Peggy Luce Thompson

R. W. ABBEY, lumbering; born in Pennsylvania, Dec. 24, 1856; son of Edwin Abbey, who emigrated to Houston Co., Minn., about 1857; came to La Crosse about 1871, where he died, August, 1878; he left a widow, who is now the wife of Mr. Benjamin Sly. R. W. married Lucy Rora; they have two children-Edwin and Emma. 


Carl Ahrens
Source: History of La Crosse County, Wisconsin, Chicago: Western Historical Company (1881) Transcribed by Peggy Luce Thompson

CARL AHRENS, merchant on Third street, between Vine and Pine, has been in his present business in La Grosse since 1870. He was born in Brunswick, Germany, in 1842, son of Ludwig Ahrens; came to the United States in 1864, and has resided in La Crosse since that time. He is a wagon-maker by trade, and worked at that business in La Grosse till 1870. He was married in 1871, to Catharine Bey, sad has four children-Henry, Lizzie, Carl and Katrina. He has been President of the Concordia Society of La Crosse ever since its organization in 1870. 


L. W. Alger
Source: History of La Crosse County, Wisconsin, Chicago: Western Historical Company (1881) Transcribed by Peggy Luce Thompson

L. W. ALGER, M.D., homoeopathist, office in Prey's Block on Main street, between Third and Fourth; was born in West Bridgewater, Mass., in 1837. His father, Ward Alger, was a farmer, and is now living on the old homestead in Plymouth Co., Mass. The Doctor spent his early life on his father's farm when not in school. He studied medicine at Harvard and graduated from Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia in 1861; he immediately commenced practice in Canton, Mass., where he remained seven years; he came from there to La Crosse in 1868, and has been practicing in this city since that time. He is at present County Physician, and has held that office several years. 


C. Amundson
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Marilyn Clore

AMUNDSON C, St Peter. Merchant. Born Sept 13, 1835 in Biri Norway, son of Amund Christophersen and Carrie (Roste) Amundson. Married twice: 1867 to Mary Olsen and Aug 19, 1875 to Carrie Augusta Norwood. Received his education in Norway and Wis. In employ of Gov Ramsey St Paul 1855-61; clerk in hardware store La Crosse Wis 1861-63; in mercantile business Winona 1863-67; same in St Peter to date. Member Minn House of Rep 1879-81; State Board of Corrections and Charities 12 years; Board of Education 20 years; Library Board; Masonic fraternity.


Marcus Anderson
Source: History of La Crosse County, Wisconsin, Chicago: Western Historical Company (1881) Transcribed by Peggy Luce Thompson

MARCUS ANDERSON, dry goods merchant; was born near Christiania, Norway, April 11, 1840. Here he received a common-school education, and at the age of 18 came to America and located at La Crosse; he commenced business as a clerk for John Servis in a clothing store, and continued there two years; was afterward employed by Joseph Gutman as salesman in dry goods and clothing store, which position he held for eight years. At the expiration of this time, in 1868, Mr. Anderson, in company with B. O. Daley, opened a millinery and fancy-goods store at Decorah, Iowa; here he remained but one year, when he returned and resumed his position with Gutman Bros. In the fall of 1870, he opened a dry goods store in the Esperson Block, under the Arm name of Marcus Anderson & Co.; at that time, he employed but four clerks. In 1873 he rented his present location, corner of Main and Third streets, where lie has since carried on the retail dry goods business; he now employs eleven hands in the different departments. Mr. Anderson's strict integrity and business ability have established for himself an enviable reputation, and rendered his dry goods house one of the leading retail institutions in the Northwest. Mr. Anderson was married April 11, 1863, to Emelie Hoffstron, of La Crosse. The fruits of this union have been two children-Douglas, who died in infancy, and Oscar F. Mr. Anderson is a member of the Lutheran Church and Norden Society. 


Peter B. Anderson
Source: History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Kim Mohler

PETER B. ANDERSON.
In whatever vocation engaged the successful man is always the persistent man. The subject of this review was a pioneer settler of Eddy county, North Dakota, and after passed through pioneer experiences for seven years there without meeting with the desired result he became a pioneer of Wells county and has worked earnestly to gain his present holdings, and he is now one of the well-to-do agriculturists of township 149, range 71, his home being located on section 20.
Our subject was born in Norway, December 12, 1859. His father, Anders Hanson, was a native of Norway and a farmer by occupation and passed his life in his native land. Our subject was the eldest of a family of three sons and was raised on the home farm and given good educational advantages. He attended the country schools and later graduated from two high schools, and at the age of twenty years emigrated to America, landing in Quebec, Canada. He went at once to La Crosse county, Wisconsin, where he remained with relatives one year. He made his first trip to North Dakota in 1882 and worked during the summers in Traill county and spent the winter months in the lumber woods of Wisconsin. He worked two years in Wisconsin constructing railroads and in 1885 took a pre-emption and tree claim in Eddy county, North Dakota, on which he erected a claim shanty, and with three oxen, a wagon and a plow began the improvement of his farm. Crops were poor and his farm was thirty miles from a market and after seven years there he returned to Wisconsin and spent the years of 1890-1891 and in 1892 filed claim to his present homestead farm. He built a claim shanty and hauled lumber from Cathay, twenty-two miles distant, but has met with good success in his operations on that tract. He now has a substantial and commodious residence, good barns, granary and other outbuildings, and all necessary machinery and follows grain raising mostly, but is interested to some extent in stock raising. His farm is well improved and under cultivation and he is one of the substantial men of his community.
Our subject was married, in the spring of 1886, to Miss Anna D. Johnson. Mrs. Anderson is a native of Norway and came to America in 1869 at the age of six years. Her father, Nels Johnson, is a prosperous farmer of Wisconsin. Seven children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Anderson, as follows: Arthur, born April 21, 1887; Nennie, born September 19, 1889; Orren, born February 20, 1890; Cora, born May 27, 1893; Gertrude, born May 10, 1895; Esther, born May 10, 1895, and Perry, born September 28, 1899. Mr. Anderson takes an active part in local affairs and has served as school treasurer for three years. He is a member of the Populist party.


Rons Anderson
Source: History of La Crosse County, Wisconsin, Chicago: Western Historical Company (1881) Transcribed by Peggy Luce Thompson

RONS ANDERSON was born in Valders, Norway, June 8,1830. Was married in La Crosse July 23, 1853, to Miss Jane Halverson; the fruits of this union were four children-Mary (now Mrs, Bunn), Alfred H.Y Samuel W. and Emma. During his boyhood, Mr. Anderson was educated at the common schools of his native town, and at the early age of 16 came to America and located at Milwaukee. He soon found employment with Daniel Wells, Jr., then proprietor of the City Hotel; remained with Mr. Wells three years, two of which were spent at Prof. Bach's private school, and one year in the grocery house of Herbert Reed, where be served in the capacity of salesman to the entire satisfaction and confidence of his employer. Observing the necessity of capital to achieve success in the older cities of the East, he determined to make his future experiments farther West. Fascinated with the commercial advantages of La Crosse, then in its infancy, he located here in the summer of 1851; first engaged to 8. T. Smith as clerk in his store then located on Front street, between Main and Pearl; was subsequently taken in as partner, and, in 1852, became sole proprietor. Shortly after, he formed a partnership with Deacon W. W. Eustek, which lasted one year, since which time Mr. Anderson has conducted the business alone. In 1856, he built a one story brick building, the second in town, on his present location, to which he removed his stock of merchandise from Front street; in 1858, he built another one-story brick building adjoining, and increased his stock and business. In 1861, his increased trade demanded more commodious quarters, and one-third of his present elegant block was then erected. In this building, now the clothing department, he continued his extensive retail dry goods business ; having goods of the best quality, selected with refined mid educated taste; with system and good order in the establishment, and never allowing the quality of his wares to be misrepresented, his patronage very soon exceeded his expectations. The city grew and rival business rose, but he maintained his supremacy, in 1870, he built the main building and connected it with the structure erected in 1861, thus tripling the business area. Mr. Anderson is a man who does his own thinking, is original, a man of positive convictions, and shows his character and ability more by what he does than by what he professes. In his pursuit of wealth, he had not been unmindful of the comfort and happiness of his employees, nor has he been wanting in public spirit. He contributes liberally to whatever measures are calculated to promote the public welfare, whether physical, moral or intellectual. System and good judgment characterize all his work, and his sterling integrity renders his credit "gilt-edged," not only at home but abroad; his life illustrates the success an ambitious man of high moral aims may achieve in a good field with self-reliance, sound judgment, persevering industry and strict integrity. He has accumulated a handsome competency, is highly respected by his fellow-citizens, and if the moral and business sentiment of La Crosse is marked by a higher and purer practice than the average of cities, it is due as much to the example and influence of Mons Anderson as to any other man in their midst. 


Wendell A. Anderson
Source: History of La Crosse County, Wisconsin, Chicago: Western Historical Company (1881) Transcribed by Peggy Luce Thompson

WENDELL A. ANDERSON, M. D., son of Dr. A. W. Anderson, formerly of Cumberland Co., Me.; was born in Gray, Me., Sept. 9, 1840. He prepared for college at Gorham Academy, Gorham, Me., from 1853 to 1857, entering the Freshmen Class, of Bowdoin College, in August, 1857, where he remained one year. In the summer of 1859, he commenced the study of medicine with his father, and attended lectures at the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City in the winter of 1860 and 1861; continued his studies at the Portland School for Medical Instruction until September, 1861, when he entered the regular army of the United States, as a medical cadet, and was assigned to duty at Annapolis, Md. In the fall of 1862, he again attended lectures at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, where he graduated in March, 1863. In April of the same year, he was appointed Assistant Surgeon of the 3d Md. V. I., with which regiment he served in the field at Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and in all its subsequent engagements with the Army of the Potomac, from the Wilderness to Lee's surrender, having been commissioned as Surgeon in March, 1864. After the war, he again pursued his studies in New York, and in February, 1866, settled at La Crosse. From 1869 to 1873, he was Examining Surgeon for Pensions and C.

ity Physician of La Crosse from 1870 to 1875, and from 1877 to 1881; was elected a member of the Wisconsin State Medical Society in 1871; was President of the Board of Education from 1873 to 1877, and Chairman of the Democratic State Central Committee in 1875 and 1876. In March, 1864, he was married to Susie M., daughter of John G. Small, Esq., of Boston, Mass. 


Cameron Angus
Source: Blue Book of the State of Wisconsin for (1882) page 521; transcribed by Tammy Clark

ANGUS, CAMERON, of La Crosse, was born at Caledonia, Livingston county, New York, July 4, 1826; received an academic education; studied law at Buffalo, New York, and graduated at the National Law School, Ballston Spa; removed to La Crosse, Wisconsin in 1857; was a member of the sate senate in 1863, ’64. ’71 and ’72; was a member of the assembly in 1866 and ’67, being speaker in 1867; was a member of the National Republican Convention at Baltimore in 1864; was one of the regents of the University of Wisconsin from 1866 to 1875; was elected to the United States Senate to succeed Matthew H. Carpenter and took his seat March 4, 1875; was elected to the same position March 10, 1881 to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Matthew H. Carpenter. His term of office will expire March 4, 1885.


A. D. Appleby
Source: History of La Crosse County, Wisconsin, Chicago: Western Historical Company (1881) Transcribed by Peggy Luce Thompson

A. D. APPLEBY, son of Dr. J. S. Appleby (deceased). Dr. Appleby was born in Onondaga Co., N. Y., July 4, 1822. He studied medicine with Dr. Morrill, of that county, and attended the Medical College at Buffalo. He removed to Buchanan Co., Mich., where he engaged in the practice of medicine; he went to California in 1849, where he engaged in mining; also for a time practiced medicine; he returned to Michigan in 1853; afterward removed to Hampton, Ill., where he engaged in merchandising; he came to La Crosse Co. in 1854, and settled in Lewis Valley, where he practiced medicine ten yens. In 1864, with his wife and two children, one of the latter being A. D., he started for Bannock, Idaho Territory; he went as far as Kearney, when, on account of hostility of the Indians, he turned back, and went with his family to St. George, Kan., where he practiced medicine until 1867, when, with others, he Went to the south part of the State, to what was known as the Neutral Lands, and made a claim in Labette Co.; while waiting for his family to join him here, he was murdered by a band of Indians belonging to Little Bears band of Osages, while he was making an effort to recover a horse stolen from him by this band of savages. The family remained at St. George till May, 1874, when they went to Belvidere, Ill., where they remained till October of the following year, when they returned to Lewis Valley. The family came to La Crosse in 1877. The parents had three children-one son and two daughters. A. D. was born in Berrien Co., Mich., March. 1847. His principal occupation for some time has been teaching; he began teaching in the fall of 1803; he attended school for some time at Salem, La Crosse Co.; afterward at the State Agricultural College at Manhattan, Riley Co., Kan.; has taught about fifteen terms. Was married to Libbie M. Stoddard; they have two girls-Milda and Ada May. Mrs. Appleby was also a teacher before her marriage; was educated at the University at Galesville. Her father, J. Stoddard, was one of the early settlers of La Crosse Co. Mr. Appleby kept the Central Hotel several years. 


Isaac Atwood
Source: History of La Crosse County, Wisconsin, Chicago: Western Historical Company (1881) Transcribed by Peggy Luce Thompson

DR. ISAAC ATWOOD, proprietor of the Turkish bath-rooms, was born in Berkshire Co., Mass., town of Eyremont, Sept. 24, 1813. He resided there until 1836, attending the public schools, when he emigrated to Wisconsin Territory, and located in Milwaukee, May 23. He erected several buildings there during the years 1836 and 1837, and removed to the town of Lake Mills, Jefferson Co., in October, 1838. He erected the first frame dwelling house in Jefferson Co. In 1840, he moved to the city of Madison, Dane Co., where he worked on the old Capitol building until completed, and was a resident of Madison during the first session of the Legislature, at that place. In 1842, he returned to Lake Mills, and was engaged in the general nursery business, and set out the first vineyard in the State of Wisconsin, demonstrating the practicability of the successful culture of grapes, and making, from this vineyard, over 10,000 gallons of grape wine; and constructed a wine-vault, costing $6,000. This vineyard and vault is at present in good condition. He followed the nursery business, cultivating about 30 acres, until 1875, when he moved to Winona, Minn., and there devoted his whole attention to the hydropathy method of treating disease, and conducting a Turkish bath and health institute, both at Winona and Galesville, Wis. He located his institute in La Crosse, in 1880, and has it in successful operation at present. 


David Austin
Source: History of La Crosse County, Wisconsin, Chicago: Western Historical Company (1881) Transcribed by Peggy Luce Thompson

DAVID AUSTIN, of the logging and lumber firm of Sawyer & Austin, has been in business in La Crosse since the spring of 1872; came to La Crosse at that time from Cleveland, Ohio, where he had been in the same business for about four years. His early life was spent in the lumber business on the Allegany River, in Western New York, residing in Cattaraugus Co. He now resides in Sparta, Wis., and has his office in the Lumberman's Exchange, in La Crosse. His partner, Mr. Sawyer, resides at Black River Falls. 


Rev. M. B. Balch
Source: History of La Crosse County, Wisconsin, Chicago: Western Historical Company (1881) Transcribed by Peggy Luce Thompson

REV. M. B. BALCH, Pastor of the First M. E. Church, is a native of Bennington Co., Vt.; born in 1836. In his infancy, his parents removed to Saratoga Springs, N. Y., where he spent his early life. His father, W. S. Balch, was proprietor of the Columbian Hotel, at Saratoga Springs, from 1841 to 1866, and still resides in that place. Mr. Balch was educated at the Troy Conference Academy and Troy University, N. T., and studied law with Judge Willard and Judge Crane, of Saratoga, but was never admitted to the bar. He also carried on the drug business for some time at Saratoga. He entered the regular army the day after Ft. Sumter was first fired upon; enlisted for one year, and served as Hospital Steward, at Ft. Leavenworth, Kan., till he was discharged, at the end of the year. After he left the army, he came to Wisconsin, and was engaged in farming in Green Co., about three years. He was then employed by the Grand Lodge of Good Templars, as State Lecturer, till 1867; then went to Boston, and continued in the same work two years in Massachusetts; returned to Monroe, Wis., in 1869, and in 1870, entered the ministry of the M. E. Church. He was first stationed at Madison, Wis., for a few months, to fill an un-expired term, and came to La Crosse in the fall of 1870, where he remained three years; was then one year at Black River Falls, two years at the Lake Street Church, in Eau Claire, then hack to Black River Falls two years, and in Mineral Point two years, coming to La Crosse, the second time, Oct. 1,1880. He was married, in 1867, to Miss Hattie, daughter of Dr. William Monroe, of Monroe, Green Co., Wis., and has one son, Willie. 


John A. Ballard M.D.
Source: History of La Crosse County, Wisconsin, Chicago: Western Historical Company (1881) Transcribed by Peggy Luce Thompson

JOHN A. BALLARD, M. D., was born in Fryeburg, Oxford Co., Me., Feb. 11, 1842, residing there and receiving an academic education previous to his entering the war in 1863. Enlisted in Co. E, of the 3d Maine, and served in all the battles of the Army of the Potomac, from the battle of the Wilderness to the battles around Petersburg, and was at Appomattox at the surrender of Gen. Lee. After the war, he spent a winter in Massachusetts; then he came to River Falls, Wis., where he continued the study of medicine, which he had previously taken up with his brother, a practicing physician of that place. In September, 1866, he entered the Chicago Medical School, from which he graduated in March, 1868. Immediately following his graduation, he was for six months house physician and surgeon in Mercy Hospital, Chicago, after which he spent two years in Chicago, following the practice of medicine, and also being the Superintendent of the Inebriate Asylum, after which he removed to La Crosse, since which date he has devoted his time and skill to the practice of medicine. Mr. Ballard was married in Chicago, Nov. 19, 1868, to Miss Henrietta E. Sutor, a sister of W. A. Sutor, a present resident of La Crosse. 


J. M. Barclay
Source: History of La Crosse County, Wisconsin, Chicago: Western Historical Company (1881) Transcribed by Peggy Luce Thompson

J. M. BARCLAY, lumberman has been a resident of La Crosse since November, 1856. He was born in Lyons, Wayne Co., N. Y., in 1822; in the fall of 1853, he removed to La Porte, Ind, and came from there to La Crosse. He is a blacksmith by trade, and, in 1857, he bought a shop in La Crosse, and carried on the business till 1859, then sold out, and, in the summer of 1860, in company with Baatarn, built a plow-shop on Third street, opposite the court house, and carried on the business under the firm name of Barclay & Bantam for two years; then sold out his interest and worked one year for the Packet Company, making repairs. He then went to St. Paul and started a shop for the St. Paul & Pacific Railroad Company, and worked there two seasons. In the spring of 1865, he again went into the plow business in company with A. Hirshheimer, who also owned with him a one-half interest in a saw-mill at Lansing, Iowa. In January, 1880, they dissolved partnership, he taking the lumber business and Mr. H. the plow business. Has only one child-John Clayton, now in the lumber business in Lansing, Iowa. Mrs. Barclay was Rhoda S. Congor, of Cortland, N. Y. 


W. H. Barron
Source: History of La Crosse County, Wisconsin, Chicago: Western Historical Company (1881) Transcribed by Peggy Luce Thompson

W. H. BARRON, division freight agent of the Southern Minnesota Division of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad, has been in charge of the freight department of the Southern Minnesota Railroad since 1868, and a resident of La Crosse since March, 1857, and has been engaged on the river, and railroading most of the time since he came here. He is a native of Washington, Orange Co., Vt, and came from there to La Crosse. 


Frank Bartl
Source: History of La Crosse County, Wisconsin, Chicago: Western Historical Company (1881) Transcribed by Peggy Luce Thompson

FRANK BARTL, foreman in the Empire Brewery; was born in Bohemia in 1838 ; came to the United States in 1868, anD settled in Wisconsin; has been in La Crosse since 1874. He was married in Germany, in 1867, to Mary Rank, and has four children-Anna, Frank, Joseph and Mary. His father was George Bard, and he has been working at the brewing business since he was 14 years old. 


F. A. Bates
Source: History of La Crosse County, Wisconsin, Chicago: Western Historical Company (1881) Transcribed by Peggy Luce Thompson

F. A. BATES, fireman; has been in the employ of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Bail-road Company since 1859. He was born Aug. 26, 1837, in Portland, Me., where his father, Nathaniel Bates, died in July, 1854, at the age of 45. Mrs. Bates, whose maiden name was Cynthia Barstow, is still living in La Crosse with her son, in the 84th year of her age. Mr. Bates came from Portland to Wisconsin in 1859; lived in Milwaukee one year, coming to La Crosse in 1860. He has worked in the roundhouse a portion of the time, but has been firing on the road the last seven years. He was married, June 29, 1871, in La Crosse, to Martha Ann Grover, daughter of William Grover, of La Crosse. She was born in London, Eng., in 1842, and came to the United with her parents in 1849. Have no children. H. K. Bates, brother of F. A., is now master mechanic on the Missouri River, Fort Scott & Gulf Railroad. 


John Thomas Baxter
Source: Progressive men of Minnesota. Published by The Minneapolis Journal (1897) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

John Thomas Baxter is a lawyer practicing his profession at Minneapolis. His father, Thomas Baxter, was a miller, and was engaged in that business at Bangor, Wisconsin, at the time of his death in 1875. His mother's maiden name was Susannah Lewis. The subject of this sketch was born at Berlin, Wisconsin, October 14, 1863. He began his education in the common schools and attended the high school at West Salem, Wisconsin, walking back and forth, the distance of five miles, each day. In this way he made his preparation for college. He began his college course at Ripon, where he continued for three years. During his stay at Ripon college he earned his living as express messenger for the American Express Company, having a "night run," which took him away from home in the evening, brought him back in the morning, and thus enabled him to attend the college exercises in the day time. Mr. Baxter excels as a speaker, and represented his college in the Wisconsin state oratorical contest in his junior year. He took the first honors, and, therefore, represented Wisconsin in the interstate oratorical contest, held at Iowa City, in the spring of 1884. The same year he was elected president of the Wisconsin Collegiate Association. The course of study pursued by him was the classical, including Greek. At the end of his junior year he decided to drop out of college for a year and then finish his course at Williams College, to which he was attracted by the celebrated Dr. Mark Hopkins. He entered the junior class at Williams in 1885, and while there he was member of the Delta Upsilon fraternity, which was the oldest college society at that institution, and the chapter to which Garfield had belonged. He was elected editor of the Williams Literary Monthly, and received the first junior prize in oratory. In his senior year he won the Graves prize for an essay on "The New Political Economy." At graduation he was awarded the Van Vechten prize, given at each commencement to that member of the graduating class, who, by a vote of the faculty and students, is declared the best extempore speaker of the class. This distinction was won in a class of sixty-six members. But the incident of his college course which possesses the most interest for Mr. Baxter, was the fact that he was the last student who ever recited under the venerable Dr. Mark Hopkins. It was a recitation in moral philosophy. Dr. Hopkins died just before the commencement at which Mr. Baxter graduated. Mr. Baxter came to Minneapolis in 1887, and began the study of law with Kitchel, Cohen & Shaw, and was admitted to the bar in 1889. He has been in active practice since 1890, and has been the secretary of the Minneapolis Bar Association since February, 1892. In politics he is a Republican, but is independent enough to vote for measures and men without much regard for party lines. He is a member of Park Avenue Congregational church. October 14, 1891 he married Gertrude Louise Hooker, daughter of William Hooker, of Minneapolis, and niece of the late Judge Hooker. They have two daughters, Beth and Helen.


H. S. Bean
Source: History of La Crosse County, Wisconsin, Chicago: Western Historical Company (1881) Transcribed by Peggy Luce Thompson

H. S. BEAN, foreman in the saw-mill of John Paul, has been in his present situation since 1876, and a resident of La Crosse since 1865; he was born in Franklin, Belknap Co., N. H., in 1846, son of Redmond Bean; came to Wisconsin in January, 1864. Was married, April 9, 1870, in Brownsville, Minn., to Miss Marv Ryan of that place, and has two children-Ai and Mary. 


Sylvanus Bean
Source: History of La Crosse County, Wisconsin, Chicago: Western Historical Company (1881) Transcribed by Peggy Luce Thompson

SYLVANUS BEAN, millwright, has resided in La Crosse since February, 1861; he was first here in the fall of 1855, for a few weeks; then went to St. Anthony's Falls, Minn., and returned in 1861. He was born in Merrimack, N. H., in 1827, son of Redmond Bean. Learned his trade in New Hampshire and worked at it till he came to La Crosse; has two children-Nina Gertrude and Olive A. Miss Bean's maiden name was Susan L. Austin. 


S. Becker
Source: History of La Crosse County, Wisconsin, Chicago: Western Historical Company (1881) Transcribed by Peggy Luce Thompson

S. BECKER, grain and produce dealer, Front street, between Main and State, has been in the city of La Crosse since 1877; he is a native of Bavaria, born in 1834, and came to the United States in 1855. He lived in Tiffin, Ohio, one year; then went to Milwaukee and remained there till 1860 ; he came from there to La Crosse and stayed one year; then went to Trempealeau, Wis. Was married there in 1863, to Miss Emma Salomon, of St. Paul, and came from there back to La Crosse in 1877; has four children-Jacob, Albert, Cora and Ida. 


E. M. Beckwith
Source: History of La Crosse County, Wisconsin, Chicago: Western Historical Company (1881) Transcribed by Peggy Luce Thompson

E. M. BECKWITH, commission merchant and dealer in second-hand goods in Borna's Block, Third street, was born in Wayne Co., N. Y., in 1828; son of Miner York Beckwith, who moved to Michigan in 1836, and died there in 1855, at the age of 54. E. M. Beckwith learned the ship-carpenter's trade in Milwaukee, Wis., and worked at the business till 1873; was in business for himself in Racine, Wis., from 1850 to 1860, and in Grand Haven, Mich., from 1860 to 1872. In 1873, he was in Duluth, Minn., building dredges for the N. P. R. R. Co. He lived in different places in Minnesota till January, 1881, and since then has been in business in La Crosse. His first wife was Helen Bowman, of Bacine, Wis.; died in 1872, leaving eight children. His second wife was Julia E. Selby, of Blue Barth Co., Minn. 


Benson Brothers
Source: History of La Crosse County, Wisconsin, Chicago: Western Historical Company (1881) Transcribed by Peggy Luce Thompson

BENSON BROTHERS, merchants and proprietors of the Variety Store, No. 20 Main street, have been in business in La Crosse since May, 1880. The firm is composed of two brothers, Ivar and Berat Benson, both born in Norway, sons of Bernt Benson, who died in Norway in 1860. They came to America in 1875, and have lived in Wisconsin ever since, and are both unmarried. They have one brother, B. M. Benson, in the mercantile business in Dorchester, Clark Co., Wis., and another, Emannel Benson, engaged in funning near San Francisco, Cal. 


John Benson
Source: History of La Crosse County, Wisconsin, Chicago: Western Historical Company (1881) Transcribed by Peggy Luce Thompson

JOHN BENSON, contractor and stone-mason; was born in 1826 in Norway, where he learned his trade, and came to the United States in 1861, since which time he has resided in La Crosse. He was married in 1866, to Sarah Ann I verso n, daughter of Iver Iverson; she also was born in Norway, and came to the United States in 1860 ; they have two children-Ida Benson and Jacob Bernhart Benson. John's father, B. Benson, came to the United States in 1871, and now lives in Douglas Co., Minn. 


Niels Elias Bensson
Source: History of La Crosse County, Wisconsin, Chicago: Western Historical Company (1881) Transcribed by Peggy Luce Thompson

NIELS ELIAS BENSSON, cooper and stockholder in the La Crosse Co-operative Barrel Manufacturing Co.; was born in Norway in 1844; son of Bendit Andreas Nelson, who is still living in Norway, Nortland Arnt; came to the United States in 1870; settled in Lansing, Iowa, and resided there till September, 1880, and came from there to La Crosse. He was married in 1870, in Norway, in his native town, to Bliane Olson, also a native of Norway. Learned his trade of his father, who was a carpenter and cooper. 


Judge C. S. Benton
Source: History of La Crosse County, Wisconsin, Chicago: Western Historical Company (1881) Transcribed by Peggy Luce Thompson

JUDGE C. S. BENTON, was born July 12, 1810, in Fryeburg, Oxford Co., Maine. In 1824, was moved by his mother and brother to Herkimer Co., N. Y., and commenced to learn the tanner's trade. In 1830, he abandoned the business and commenced to study law, and, in 1835, was admitted to practice in the Court of Common Pleas, and, in 1836, was admitted to the Supreme Court. In 1837, was appointed Surrogate by Gov. Marcy. In 1842, was elected to the Twenty-eighth Congress from the Seventeenth Congressional District; was re-elected in 1844 to the Twenty-ninth Congress. In 1847, was Clerk of the Court of Appeals, which place he held two terms. In 1855, he came to Milwaukee and bought a one-third interest in the News, and edited the paper one year. In 1856, was appointed Register of Land in La Crosse, by President Pierce, which office he held until Lincoln's administration. In 1865, he moved to Qalesburg, Ill., where he remained four years, and then returned to La Crosse. In 1873, he was elected County Judge in La Crosse County, and was re-elected in 1874, but did not serve out his term on account of ill health, but resigned in February, 1880. Judge Benton commenced editorial work in 1832, in New York State, where he was editor of the Mohawk Courier and Little Falls Gazette for two years; was editor and correspondent for the Courier until he came West. Judge Benton was married in 1840 to Emeline Fuller, of Little Falls, by whom he had one son, who is now a member of the firm of Benton, Gove & Co., of Milwaukee. Judge Benton was married again in 1853, at Oswego, to Miss Elizabeth B. Reynolds, by whom he has had one son, who is a resident of La Crosse. 


H. Bergseth
Source: History of La Crosse County, Wisconsin, Chicago: Western Historical Company (1881) Transcribed by Peggy Luce Thompson

H. BERGSETH, cooper and stockholder in the La Crosse Co-operative Barrel Manufacturing Co.; was born in Norway in 1845, son of H. Bergseth, Sr.; came to the United States in 1873; settled in Lanesboro, Minn., and resided there till February, 1881; bought into this company in December, 1880. He was married in Norway to Paulina Peterson ; has two children-Albert and Sigurd. 


Frank Berkenmeyer
Source: History of La Crosse County, Wisconsin, Chicago: Western Historical Company (1881) Transcribed by Peggy Luce Thompson

FRANK BERKENMEYER, saloon-keeper; is a native of Baden, Germany, born in 1834; came to the United States in 1857; lived one year in Cleveland, Ohio; then went to Long Island, N. Y., And came from there to La Crosse in 1859; he lived on a farm three and a half miles from town till 1868, and since that has resided in the city. Oct. 10, 1863, he married Mrs. Virginia Nagle, who came to La Crosse from France with her first husband, Louis Oliver, in June, 1847. Mr. Oliver died soon after, and she married Charles Nagle, who had been some time in La Crosse; he died in March, 1861, leaving three children. Mr. Berkenmeyer has two children-Frank and Virginia. He was Justice of the Peace in the town of Shelby in 1866-67. 


John P. Bird
Source: History of La Crosse County, Wisconsin, Chicago: Western Historical Company (1881) Transcribed by Peggy Luce Thompson

JOHN P. BIRD, Principal of the Third District School of La Crosse; has been in his present position since 1876; for one year previous to that, he was Principal of the Fifth District School. He was born in Northampton, Mass., in 1845; his father, William Bird, removed to Martin Co., Minn., in 1865, and died there in 1879. Prof. Bird is a graduate of the Minnesota State Normal School at Mankato, Class of 1871, and has been teaching since that time. In 1880, he graduated from the National School of Elocution and Oratory at Philadelphia. He was married in December, 1879, to Helen R. Hanscom, of La Crosse.


R. R. Blackman
Source: History of La Crosse County, Wisconsin, Chicago: Western Historical Company (1881) Transcribed by Peggy Luce Thompson

R. R. BLACKMAN, proprietor of boarding-house on Windsor street, at the head of North Third street; is a native of Monroe Co., N. Y. His parents moved to Cattaraugus Co., N. Y., when he was 7 years of age. He came to Wisconsin in 1867, and was in La Crosse from August to December then came again in the spring of 1868, and has resided here since, except five years, from 1870 to 1875, in Trempealeau Co. He was married in La Crosse, May 17, 1868, to Mrs. Jane Flynn, daughter of David Young, who removed from Pennsylvania to Iowa in 1840. She was born in Lawrence Co., Penn., in 1836. Her first husband, John Flynn, was a native of Vermont; son of Thomas Flynn, and came to La Crosse in 1857. In August, 1861, he enlisted in the 8th W. V. I. (Eagle Regiment), Co. I; re-enlisted in the Veteran Corps, and died Aug. 22, 1865, of chronic diarrhea, while home on furlough, at the age of 27. He left two children-William Edward, now living in La Crosse, and Cora E., now Mrs. Edward Montgomery, of La Crosse. Mr. Blackman has one child-Mary E., at home. 


Oliver P. Blanchard
Source: History of La Crosse County, Wisconsin, Chicago: Western Historical Company (1881) Transcribed by Peggy Luce Thompson

OLIVER P. BLANCHARD, engineer on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad; has been a resident of La Crosse since 1875, and has been working on this road since 1859. Commenced firing in 1862, and has been running an engine since 1867. He was born in St. Johnsburg, Vt., in 1844. His father, Alfred R. Blanchard, came to Wisconsin in 1855; lived in Watertown one winter, then removed to Beaver Dam, where he still resides. Mr. Blanchard married in Pardeeville, Wis., Mise Sarah Connor, of Berlin, Wis., and has two children-Morris and Fred. 


John Bradley
Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1880)transcribed by RuthAnne Wilke

JOHN BRADLEY (Rep.), of Bangor, La Crosse county, was born in Litchfield, Connecticut, April 29, 1819; received a common school education; is by occupation a farmer; came to Wisconsin in 1844, and settled at Trenton, Dodge county; removed to La Crosse county in 1855; was a member of assembly in 1875, '76 and '79; re-elected for 1880 by 2,086 votes against 1,109 for Wm. Van Waters, democrat, and 769 for A. Mosher, Greenbacker


Benjamin French Bryant
Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin History and Biography, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Susan Geist

BENJAMIN FRENCH BRYANT, La Crosse, was born at Rockland, Maine, September 3, 1837. His early education was in the public schools, Maine Wesleyan Seminary, at Kent Hill, and Bowdoin College, in the class of 1863. He came west, and entered the army in 1862, enlisting at Norwalk, Ohio, in the One hundred and first Ohio regiment. He served in the army of the Cumberland till the close of the war, at first as sergeant, and subsequently commissioned first lieutenant, and still later as captain. He was mustered out of service in June, 1865, and settled at Norwalk, Ohio, where he was admitted to the bar and began practice. In May, 1868, he came to La Crosse, where he has since been actively engaged in the practice of his profession. He was appointed to the office of county judge in the spring of 1870, and held the office four years. In the fall of 1873 he was elected district attorney, which position he resigned in April, 1875, to become United States pension agent. In 1877 he was again elected district attorney, and reelected in 1879. He has been aid de camp upon the staff of Governor C. C. Washburn, and, also, upon that of Governor W. E. Smith. Captain Bryant is a finished orator.


Charles Wilson Bunn
Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin History and Biography, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Susan Geist

CHARLES WILSON BUNN, La Crosse, was born in the town of Gale, Trempealeau county, on May 21, 1855. He lived at Galesville with his father’s family until the spring of 1861, when he removed with them to Sparta. Here he attended the graded school until he was fifteen years of age, when he entered the freshman class at the University of Wisconsin, and graduated in 1874. Immediately on leaving college he entered the law office of Professor J. H. Carpenter, dean of the law faculty at Madison, and attended the law school one year, from which he graduated in the summer of 1875. In September of that year he entered the law office of Cameron & Losey, at La Crosse, as a clerk, where he remained in that capacity until the first of January, 1876, when he was taken in as a partner in that firm, and has remained there ever since. In August, 1877, he married Miss Mary Anderson, eldest daughter of Mons Anderson, at La Crosse.


W. S. Burroughs
Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin History and Biography, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Susan Geist

W. S. BURROUGHS, La Crosse, was born in Portage county, Ohio, July 7, 1837; received an academic education in his native place, and removed to Illinois with his parents in 1855. Two years later he settled at La Crosse, and began the study of law with Denison & Lyndes. He was admitted to the bar at La Crosse in 1859. In December, 1861, he began practice with Mr. Lyndes, and so continued till 1876, since which time he has been alone.


Samuel S. Burton
Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

SAMUEL S. BURTON, La Crosse, was born at Manchester, Vermont, April 10, 1822, and spent his early childhood on his father’s farm. He was educated at the Burr & Burton Seminary, at Manchester, and studied law with Miner & Burton of the same place, as well as at the Ballston Spa law school. He was admitted to the bar in 1850, and practiced at Manchester with E. B. Burton till 1857, when he came to La Crosse in April of the same year, and a member of the firm of Tucker, Burton & Morse till 1859, when, a vacancy occurring in the office of county judge, Mr. Burton was appointed to the office by Governor Alexander Randall, and at the end of three years, the expiration of the term for which he was appointed, he was elected to the same office, which he held till January, 1866. His judicial duties, then embracing civil as well as probate matters, took him quite effectually out of practice of his profession.

He was elected to the assembly for the session of 1864; was receiver of public moneys at the land office from 1867 to 1875, and was appointed receiver of the first bank of La Crosse upon its failure in April, 1876. In January, 1866, he formed a partnership with G. M. Woodward, and remained a member of the firm Burton & Woodward till January, 1877, when upon the organization of the National Bank of La Crosse by the wealth citizens of that place, he abandoned his profession, and has been its cashier and manager to the present time.


Alexander Cameron
Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

ALEXANDER CAMERON, La Crosse, a brother of Hugh and Angus Cameron, was born at Caledonia, Livingston county, New York, in 1832; came to La Crosse at an early day, studied law with A. Johnson, and was admitted to the bar in 1857. He went into company with his brother, Hugh Cameron, in 1858, and was elected district attorney in 1859. On the breaking out of the war in 1861 he entered the Union army as senior first lieutenant of the First Wisconsin Battery, and was in the fight at Cumberland Gap. While on duty in Kentucky he contracted consumption, of which he died in 1864. He was known as a brave and efficient officer, and as a member of the bar was noted for his native and persuasive eloquence, which scarcely ever failed on carrying court and jury with him.


Angus Cameron
Source: Blue Book of Wisconsin (1880) transcribed by Grace Greenwald

ANGUS CAMERON, of La Crosse, was born at Caledonia, Livingston county, New York, July 4, 1826; received an acdemic education; studied law at Buffalo, in that state, and graduated at the National Law School, Ballston Spa; removed to La Crosse, Wisconsin, in 1857; was a member of state senate of Wisconsin, in 1863, '64, '71 and '72; was a member of the legislative assembly of Wisconsin in 1866 and '67, and was speaker in 1867; was a member of the National Republican Convention at Baltimore in 1864; was one of the regents of the University of Wisconsin from 1866 to 1875; was elected to the United States Senate by votes of Republicans, Democrats and Liberals to succeed Matthew H. Carpenter, and took his seat March 4, 1875. His term of service will expire March 3, 1881.

Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

ANGUS CAMERON, La Crosse, was born in the town of Caledonia, Livingston county, New York, and the 4th day of July 1826. His father’s name was Duncan Angus Cameron, and his mother’s name before her marriage was Sarah Mac Call. His father was the son of Angus Cameron and Katharine MacPherson. He was born in Inverness-shire, Scotland in 1784, and came to American with his parents in the year 1800. They settled in Caledonia in 1803. The county was then a wilderness. His mother was the daughter of Hugh Mac Call and Mary Campbell, and was born in Argyleshire, Scotland, in 1788. She came to American with her father’s family in 1809. Angus Cameron’s father attended the parish school of his native parish until he emigrated to American. He possessed a quick and strong natural intellect, and acquired education rapidly. He was well educated in the branches then taught. He was an industrious reader all his life, and was thoroughly versed in history and religious subjects. He frequently held local offices. His judgment was excellent as far as his knowledge or information extended. He was often consulted by his neighbors on business matters, and his advice was highly regarded by his acquaintances. He very frequently made wise remarks, that are quoted to this day in the neighborhood. His mother was also well educated, for the time in which she lived. She possessed strong natural sense. His mother died at Caledonia in 1864, and is father in 1872. His parents and their ancestors, as far back as the days of John Knox, were rigid Presbyterians.

He began attending the district school when he was five years of age. He attended school winters and worked on this father’s farm summers until he was thirteen years of age. His father then sent him to the Genesee Wesleyan Seminary, at Lima, Livingston county, New York. This was an institution of high grade for its class. He attended this seminary for three years. He attended an academy at Geneseo, Livingston county, one year. He taught school when he was fifteen years of age, and continued to teach winters until he was twenty-two years of age. He taught one year in the seminary at Lima. He was a good Latin scholar, was also good in mathematics and in moral and natural science.

He entered the law office of Wadsworth & Cameron, at Buffalo, New York, in April, 1850, as a law student. He swept and dusted the office, copied and served papers, and made himself generally useful. He was so useful that he was paid a salary of two hundred dollars the second year. He graduated at the National Law School at Ballston Spa, Saratoga county, in March 1853, and was admitted to the bar at Albany, New York, in April 1853. After he was admitted he returned to the office of Wadsworth & Cameron, and continued there until the spring of 1856. In April, 1856, he formed a copartnership with Frederick H. Wing, in the banking business, under the firm name of Cameron & Wing, and was engaged in banking at Buffalo until the spring of 1857.

He was married at the town of Urbana, Steuben county, New York, to Mary Baker, on the 21st day of February, 1856. She is a daughter of William Baker, and a granddaughter of Samuel Banker, a revolutionary soldier, who settled in that town in 1790. Her mother was of Holland Dutch descent. Her grandmother was a first cousin of Martin Van Buren, the eighth President of the United States. He removed with his wife from Buffalo to La Crosse, Wisconsin, in the month of September, 1857, and they have ever since resided at La Crosse. His wife is still living. They have no children.

He formed a law partnership on his arrival at LaCrosse with Alonzo Johnson, under the firm of Johnson & Cameron. This firm continued until the death of Mr. Johnson, in May 1860. On the first day of December, 1861, he formed a law partnership with Joseph W. Losey, under the firm of Cameron & Losey. Mr. Losey and he are still law partners. Charles W. Bunn became a partner with them in the 1st of September, 1875,and the firm has since been Cameron, Losey & Bunn. He was a member of the Wisconsin state senate two terms of two years each – 1863 and 1864 – also 1871 and 1872. He was a member of the assembly of Wisconsin two years – 1866 and 1867. He was speaker in 1867. He was a delegate to the Baltimore republican convention in 1864. He was one of the regents of the University of Wisconsin for nine years – from 1866 to 1875. He was elected to the senate of the United States in January 1875, and was reelected in March 1881. He was an anti-slavery whig in politics until the formation of the republican party, when he attached himself to that party. He has always been regarded as a radical. Senator Cameron has been a republican of the straightest kind since the formation of that party; an ardent worker in the cause, never an office-seeker, and has proved in every station in which he has been placed a most reliable, consistent and useful public servant.

In the United States senate his career has been conspicuous as a speaker, but few members have acquired more influence than he has as a worker, and of unselfish statesmanship. He has occupied membership of some of the most important committees, and also has been placed on important select committees, one of which was the investigation of alleged frauds in South Carolina at the presidential election of 1876, and, as chairman of it, made a report which was considered able and exhaustive, and attracted general public attention. It may truthfully be said that there is no man in public life more sturdy uprightness, and who possesses to a greater degree the confidence of the country than Senator Cameron.

Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1883) Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

ANGUS CAMERON, of La Crosse, was born at Caledonia, Livingston county, New York, July 4, 1826; received an academic education; studied law at Buffalo, New York, and graduated at the National Law School, Ballston Spa; removed to La Crosse, Wisconsin in 1857; was a member of the state senate in 1863, ’64, ’71 and ’72; was a member of the assembly in 1866 and ’67, being speaker in 1867; was a member of the National Republican Convention at Baltimore in 1864; was one of the regents of the University of Wisconsin from 1866 to 1875; was elected to the United States Senate to succeed Matthew H. Carpenter and took his seat March 4, 1875; was elected to the same position March 10, 1881 to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Matthew H. Carpenter. His term of office will expire March 4, 1883.


Hon. Hugh Cameron
LA CROSSE
Source: The US Biological Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Volume (1877) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

THE subject of this sketch, a native of Livingston County, New York, was born at Caledonia, June 29, 1815. His parents, Duncan A. Cameron and Sarah (McColl) Cameron, were from Scotland; the father coming to this country in 1802, and the mother a few years later. The Camerons are of the Lochiel branch, Lochiel, the chief, being, according to custom, of the Queen's household. Hugh spent his youth on his father's farm. He prepared for college in the institutions at Middlebury and Lima, in his native State, and entered the University of Vermont in 1834, and graduated with honor four years later, excelling particularly in German metaphysics, then taught by Professor James Marsh. Returning to western New York, Mr. Cameron taught in the Avon Academy in 1838 and 1839, reading law at the same time with Amos Dann. He finished his law studies with Hastings and Husbands, of Rochester, and was admitted to the bar in October, 1841, at the first term of the supreme court ever held in that city. After practicing a few years in Livingston County, he removed to Buffalo in the spring of 1847, and there built up an excellent law business as a member of the firm of Wadsworth and Cameron, but seeing openings of great promise farther west, in the spring of 1858 he removed to La Crosse, Wisconsin, his present home, and has there become widely known as a skillful and successful attorney.

During the first six years in Wisconsin, Mr. Cameron was in partnership with his brother Alexander, who went into the army as first lieutenant 1st Wisconsin battery in 1861, and died in 1864. He was district attorney at the opening of the war, having been elected two years prior to that time, when only about twenty-two years old. Alexander Cameron was a young man of much promise.

In 1865 Hugh Cameron was elected county judge, and held that office four years and declined a reelection. The law has been his life study, his life pursuit, and he has no higher ambition than that of excelling in his profession. A prominent journalist, and neighbor of his for the last twenty years, in a private note says of him: Few men have such complete mastery of literature in all its departments as Judge Cameron. His mental grasp, acquisitions, acumen and discrimination, invest his utterances, in genial conversation or legal arguments, with strength and richness of though and language, which are best appreciated by those who have the greatest opportunity to test and verity his powers and council, in which capacity he is employed by many professional confreres in western Wisconsin and southern Minnesota, such persons considering their cases not only thoroughly prepared, but fairly tried, after having undergone his scrutiny and investigation, as the court seldom overrules his decisions.

Judge Cameron has not only a very fine literary taste, but — what is not generally known — has written many able critiques and other articles for the periodical press. But such intellectual labor he does simply for recreation after more severe studies connected with his profession.

He is of whig antecedents, and for the last twenty years he has usually voted the republican ticket.

So thoroughly has Judge Cameron been wedded to the law, that for many years it seemed doubtful if he would ever form a more tender alliance; but, on the 2d of December, 1875, he was joined in wedlock with Miss Caroline D. Starr, daughter of W. H. Starr, an early settler and prominent citizen of Burlington, Iowa, and a graduate of Yale College. Mrs. Cameron is a well-educated and highly accomplished lady.

Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

HUGH CAMERON, La Crosse. His parents were Duncan A. (who is of the Lochiel branch) and Sarah McColl Cameron, who came from Scotland early in this century, and their son Hugh was born in Caledonia, New York, June 29, 1815; and passed his youth on this father’s farm. He was prepared for college in the institutions of Middleburg and Lima, and entering the University of Vermont in 1834, graduated at the same institution four years later. Returning to western New York, Mr. Cameron taught in the Avon Academy in 1838 and 1839, at the same time reading law with Amos Dann. He finished his law studies with Hastings & Husbands at Rochester, and was admitted to the bar of the supreme court in that city in 1841. After practicing a few years in Livingston county, he went to Buffalo in the spring of 1847, and there built up an excellent business in the firm of Wadsworth & Cameron, but seeing openings of greater promise farther west, he came to La Crosse in the spring of 1858, which has become his permanent home. During the first six years in La Crosse, he was in partnership with his brother Alexander, who died in the army in 1864. In 1865 he was elected county judge, held the office four years and declined reelection.

On December 2, 1875, Judge Cameron wedded Miss Caroline D. Starr, of Burlington, Iowa. He is elder brother of United States Senator Angus Cameron. March 1, 1881, Judge Benton having resigned the office of county judge, Judge Cameron was appointed to fill the vacancy, by Governor W. E. Smith; was elected as the spring election without opposition, and is now serving in that capacity. It was an appointment particularly “fit to be made,” and the position is filled by him with dignity, ability and unswerving integrity, giving universal satisfaction to both bar and people having business in his courts.


Frank Potter Coburn
Source: “A Biographical congressional directory From the 1st ( 1774) to the 62nd (1911) Congress”; By United States Congress; Publ. 1918; Transcribed for Genealogy Trails by Andrea Stawski Pack

Coburn, Frank Potter, a Representative from Wisconsin; born in Hamilton, La Crosse County, Wis., December 6, 1858; attended the public schools; unsuccessful Democratic candidate for Representative in 1888; elected as a Democrat to the Fifty-second Congress (March 4, 1891-March 3. 1893); defeated for reelection to the Fifty-third Congress; retired capitalist and resides in West Salem, Wis.


John J. Cole
Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

JOHN J. COLE, La Crosse, was born at Albany, New York, August 29, 1824, and received his academic and legal education at the same place. At the age of twenty-one he was admitted to the supreme court and court of chancery, his license to practice in the former court bearing the signature of Chief-Justice Bronson, and in the latter that of Chancellor Walworth. In 1856 he removed to Wisconsin and settled at Viroqua, where he remained till 1839, when he came to La Crosse, where he has since remained in private practice. He has been actively engaged in his profession since he was twenty-one years of age. At Viroqua he was a partner of Judge Terhune, and at La Crosse he for a time in partnership with W. H. Tucker. He is at present alone.


Homar S. Daniels
Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

HOMAR S. DANIELS, La Crosse, was born at Ahnapee, August 25, 1856, and was educated at the State University of Wisconsin, graduating in the class of 1876. He studied law with Stogdill & Daniels, and was admitted to the bar in 1877 at La Crosse, where he began practice at once. A year later he was admitted to the partnership of Stogdill & Daniels. In 1880 he formed a partnership with Frank J. Toeller, under the firm of Daniels & Toeller.


John A. Daniels
Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

JOHN A. DANIELS, La Crosse, was born in Delaware county, New York, and educated at the Delaware Literary Institute. He studied law at Kenosha, Wisconsin, with H. F. Schoff, and was admitted to the bar at Manitowoc in 1856, and afterward commenced practice in Kenosha county. Two years later he went to Trempealeau county. In 1864 he formed a partnership and entered upon the practice of law with W. H. Stodgill at La Crosse. In 1879 his son, H. S. Daniels, was admitted to the firm. He was district attorney of Trempealeau county in 1858 and 1859.


John Dawson
Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1883) page 494; transcribed by Tammy Clark

JOHN DAWSON (Dem.), of La Crosse, was born in England, May 20, 1832; is engaged in farming; came to Wisconsin in 1840 and settled in Racine county; removed to la Crosse in 1852, and has been a permanent resident thereof since 1856; has held all the local town offices; was member of county board from 1878 to 1882; was an unsuccessful candidate for member of assembly in 1880 to ’81 and was elected assemblyman for 1883, receiving 2,780 votes, against 1,627 for Daniel Shane, republican and 239 for L. W. Wood, prohibitionist


William Edgar
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Anna Parks

EDGAR William C, Minneapolis. Res 66, Groveland term, office Miller bldg. Editor and publisher. Born 1856 in La Cross, Wis. Son of J C and Lucy D Edgar. Educated in St Louis. In 1882 came to Minneapolis and became business mngr Weekly Northwestern Miller; has been its editor since 1886 and is pres Miller Publishing Co. Founded The Bellman (Weekly) 1906 and conducts it in connection with his other work. In 1891 secured and sent shipload of flour to Russia for famine sufferers. Author Story of a Grain of Wheat and numerous pamphlets; contributor to magazines. Member Minneapolis. Minikahda, Lafayette and Skylight clubs Minneapolis; St Louis Club St Louis; Salmagundi Club New York. Member American Free Trade League Boston; American Social Science Assn N Y; National Municipal League Philadelphia and Minnesota Trade Press Assn.


J. J. Fruit
Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

J. J. FRUIT, La Crosse, was born in Grant county, March 29, 1849, and worked upon his father’s farm until seventeen years of age. He had a common school education, then took a course at the Platteville Normal School, graduating in 1871. He was engaged in teaching, as principal of one of the public schools of La Crosse, for five successive years. He then chose the profession of law, and was graduated from the law department of the State University in 1877. He began practice at once, in partnership with H. Pfund, as La Crosse. After the removal of Mr. Pfund to Madison he continued practice alone, until June, 1880, when he took in as partner, John Brindley, formerly of Boscobel, Grant county, Wisconsin.


William Furst
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Nancy Overlander

Furst William, Minneapolis. Res 128 W 27th st, office 403-407 N Y Life bldg.. Lawyer. Born Sept 12, 1872 in Davisville Cal, son of Leo and Margaret Furst. Married Aug 27, 1898 to Flora R Dopping. Graduated from Onalaska Wis High School 1889; U of M, B S 1896; B L 1897; M L 1898. Has practiced law in Minneapolis 1898 to date. Sec St Anthony Oil Co; treas Merchants Ins Agency; resident v pres Federal Union Surety Co; v Pres American Land co; sec North Star Mnfg Co; v pres Northern Investment Co; resident sec Bankers Confidential Service; sec Salmon Canneries Co. Member Commercial Law League and American Bar Assn.
 


Joel A. Gleason
Source: History of Northern Wisconsin Containing An Account Of Its Settlement, Growth, Development and Resources; An Extensive Sketch of Its Counties, Cities, Towns and Villages Their Improvements, Industries, Manufactories; Biographical Sketches, Portraits of Prominent Men and Early Settler; Views of County Seats, Etc. ILLUSTRATED Chicago: The Western Historical Company A. T. Andreas, Proprietor, (1881) - Submitted by Diana Heser Morse

JOEL A. GLEASON, lumberman and farmer, resides three miles east of Fox Lake, Dodge Co., Wis. Mr. Gleason first settled at La Crosse, Wis., in 1856, and followed the lumber business there one year. Then he moved to Tomah and followed the same business until 1878. Then he sold out at Tomah, and moved on his farm, as above stated, three miles east of Fox Lake, which he had purchased fifteen years previous. Mr. Gleason was born in Franklin Co., Mass., July 29, 1827. He was married at La Crosse, Wis., May 2. 1859. His wife's maiden name was Martha J. Braman; she was born in Northampton, Mass., Sept. 25, 1833. They have four children, two boys and two girls, named — Chester W., Minnie L., Leslie J. and Josie J. Gleason. Chester W. was married, Oct. 25. 1880. His wife's maiden name was Nellie Culver. They live at Sheffield, Iowa.


Clark L. Hood
Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

CLARK L. HOOD, La Crosse, began life in Delaware county, New York, June 23, 1847. He was educated at the Delaware Literary Institute, in Franklin, New York, and studied law with Hotchkiss & Seymore, in Binghamton, where he was admitted to practice in 1868. In 1869, he came to La Crosse and engaged in practice, being for two years in partnership with M. P. Wing. He has held the position of city attorney three years. In August, 1863, he entered the army, and served till the close of the war, with an honorable record. Since returning to the arts of peace he has devoted himself to the practice of his profession, in which he has had distinguished success. He is a ‘stalwart’ of the La Cross bar.


William E. Howe
Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

WILLIAM E. HOWE, La Crosse, was born in Monona, Clayton county, Iowa, January 17, 1851, his parents being H. E. and M. A. Howe. His education was completed in the University of Wisconsin, after which he studied law with J. H. Carpenter, Madison, and was admitted to the bar in that city in 1874. He practiced his profession in the city of St. Louis two years, and has been in successful practice in La Crosse six years. At the latter place he was, for a time, in partnership with M. Tourtelotte, which connection was dissolved in 1881. In La Crosse he has held the office of municipal judge. He left St. Louis for the benefit of his health, leaving a good practice there, but has been equally successful in La Crosse. On graduating from the State University in June, 1873, Judge Howe was awarded the first honors of the class in the scientific course. Promptly on the succeeding day he entered upon the study of the profession he had chosen, and was as diligent in its study as he has since been industrious, laborious and successful in its practice. When in practice in St. Louis he was in partnership with O. B. Givens leaving there in June, 1876.


Harvey E. Hubbard
Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

HARVEY E. HUBBARD, La Crosse, was born in Onondaga county, New York, on the 17th day of March, 1830. He lived at home upon his father’s farm until sixteen years of age, attending district school and also the Manlius Academy. In 1846 he came with his parents to Milwaukee, and spent two years as clerk in a store. He then began the study of law with Haven Powers, with whom he remained about a year and a half; then spent another term of about the same length of time in the office of Judge A. D. Smith and H. L. Palmer, when he was admitted to the bar of the circuit court for Milwaukee county, then presided over by Judge Levi Hubbell, in the spring of 1851, at the age of twenty-one. In July of the same year he moved to La Crosse, and commenced practice. In January, 1852, he was elected clerk of the senate, and during that winter was admitted to practice in the same supreme court. Upon his return to La Crosse, in the spring of 1852, he was appointed clerk of the circuit court by Judge Knowlton to fill a vacancy, and at the end of his term was elected by the people. In 1853 he was appointed postmaster by President Pierce, and was reappointed by Buchanan in 1857, and held the office eight years. Mr. Hubbard was the first police justice under the city charter, holding the office at that time two years; afterward from 1864 to 1874, and from 1878 to the present time, 1881, he has filled the same position. He has discharged the duties of United States court commissioner, being first appointed by Judge Miller, and subsequently by Judge Hopkins, of the United States district court, and holds that position to the present time. Judge Hubbard has also held various local offices of importance, and at this writing is discharging the duties of police justice, which office he has held for sixteen years, having been placed in that position by votes of the electors of the city of La Crosse.


Charles J. Lee
Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Kim Mohler

CHARLES J. LEE, well-known druggist of Valley City, North Dakota, is one of the prominent young men of that place, a leader in business and social circles. The business interests of the city are well represented by him and whether in public or private life, he is always a courteous, genial gentleman, well deserving the high regard in which he is held.
Mr. Lee was born in the village of Arcadia, Trempealeau county, Wisconsin, January 9, 1869. His father, John Lee, was a native of Norway, born in 1810, and in early life he engaged in farming in that country. On his emigration to America he settled in La Crosse county, Wisconsin, during the pioneer days of that state, when but two houses stood on the present site of the city. Subsequently he took up a homestead where Winona, Minnesota, is now located. In West Salem, Wisconsin, he married Miss Christina Johnson, who still survives him and makes her home in Green Bay, that state.
During his boyhood and youth Charles J. Lee aided his father in the operation of the home farm and acquired his early education in the district schools of the neighborhood. On coming to Barnes county, North Dakota, he worked for one season on a farm and then removed to Valley City, where he attended school and also worked. In 1893 he entered the Northwestern University at Chicago, Illinois, and took up a pharmaceutical course, graduating the following year. He at once returned to Valley City and has since successfully engaged in the drug business at that place, having built up a large and constantly increasing trade. He is now a director in the Valley City State Bank and is also extensively interested in real estate, owning at the present time about one thousand acres of land. This property has been acquired through his own well-directed efforts and good management, for he is a business man of more than ordinary ability, enterprising and energetic.
In 1897 Mr. Lee married Miss Mary Holverson, of Trempealeau county, Wisconsin. He takes a commendable interest in public affairs and although still a young man he has most creditably served as president of the city council. In 1898 he was president of the Pharmaceutical Association of North Dakota, and is past chancellor of the subordinate lodge of Knights of Pythias.


John M. Levy
LA CROSSE
Source: The US Biographical Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Volume (1877) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

John Meyer Lew, one of the first settlers in La Crosse, was born in London, England, about 1819, his parents, Meyer and Eve (Worms) Levy, being natives of Germany. His father was a reader in the synagogue, though not a regular rabbi. John spent his younger days largely at school, part of the time in Amsterdam, Holland. After living about six years with an elder sister in Paris, he in 1837 immigrated to America. After spending a short time in traveling he settled in St. Louis, and there was engaged as a clerk in a mercantile house about four years. Early in 1844 he went up the Mississippi river as far as Prairie du Chien, and in the autumn of that year settled permanently at what was then called Prairie la Crosse, having with him his wife, whom he had taken at St. Louis. Winnebago Indians were abundant, but white people were scarce. Nathan Myrick, H. J. B. Miller, Asa White, and two or three others, were all the white men with families living there at that time.

At first Mr. Levy's business was trading with the Indians, buying furs, and paying for them in various articles of merchandise. He opened a hotel after a year or two, and thus became the pioneer innkeeper of La Crosse, though one other settler about the same time began to entertain strangers.

In 1849 Mr. Levy built a store, which he conducted for some years, buying all his merchandise in those days at Galena, Illinois, of Benjamin Campbell and Captain Orrin Smith, who were then the leading wholesale merchants in that place.

About 1853 he built a warehouse, and becoming agent for the steamboat companies, conducted a large forwarding business. This he continued until 1857, when he opened a bank, and in a few months, with thousands of other businessmen that year failed, paying, however, every dollar which he owed depositors.

In 1858 he engaged in the grocery trade, but afterward sold his interest to Charles K. Solberg. Engaging in real-estate operations he continued the same until the autumn of 1876, when he again became a forwarding and commission merchant. At sundry times during these years Mr. Levy had many buildings erected, some for his own use and some to rent. He built the Augusta House in 1857, and was receiving the rent of it when, in March, 1862, It was destroyed by fire, together with a do/en other buildings owned by himself and three times as many owned by other parties.

Although he has met with frequent reverses he has never become disheartened. No man in La Crosse is more plucky or full of business. He saw the last wigwam disappear long since, and where thirty-three years ago he found half a dozen families he now sees a city of twelve thousand inhabitants, who seem to reverence him as one of the fathers of La Crosse. He has been elected mayor three times; has been an alderman about eight years, and has always looked well to the interests of the city.

In politics he has always acted with the democratic party.

Mr. Levy is a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity; was grand treasurer of the Grand Chapter of the Royal Arch Masons eleven years; is now treasurer of both the lodge and chapter of La Crosse, and the oldest member in point of time of joining them. He is also one of the trustees of the Independent Order of Benai Brith, a Jewish secret society.


Cyrus K. Lord
Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

CYRUS K. LORD, La Crosse, was born in Parsonfield, York county, Maine, January 10, 1811, and was educated at Limerick Academy in the same county. In 1837 he came west and settled first at Galena, Illinois. He afterward went to Platteville, Wisconsin, in 1838, where he began the study of law with B. C. Eastman. He as admitted to the bar in 1842 at Lancaster, and commenced practice at Potosi in the spring of that year. In 1853 he came to La Crosse, where he has since remained. In the interval from 1850 to 1853 he has county judge of Grant county, having common law as well as probate jurisdiction. From 1853 to 1856 he was register of the land office at La Crosse. In 1874 he was made police justice, which position he has filled for about four years, and is now somewhat retired from the active duties of his profession, enjoying the pleasures of a competence, and the respect of the community.


Joseph W. Losey
Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

JOSEPH W. LOSEY, La Crosse, was born at Honesdale, Pennsylvania, December 30, 1834, his parents being Ebenezer T. and Lucy M. Losey. He was educated at Honesdale Academy and Amherst College; studied law with Denison & Lyndes at La Crosse; was admitted at Sparta in October, 1858; practiced in company with James G. Lyndes in La Crosse from 1858 to 1861, with Angus Cameron from 1861 to 1876, and then with Angus Cameron and Charles W. Bunn up to the present time, the firm being Cameron, Losey & Bunn.


Polydore S. McArthur, M.D.
LA CROSSE
Source: The US Biographical Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Volume (1877) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

Polydore S. McArthur was born at Wales, Erie County, New York, October 30, 1822. His parents, Moses and Mary (Salisbury) McArthur, farmers by occupation, were plain, industrious people. The son aided his father until about eighteen years of age, and during the next three years attended the Aurora Academy, in an adjoining town, teaching school meanwhile during two winters. He studied medicine with Dr. Paul, of Honeoye Flats, Ontario County; and after attending lectures two terms at Geneva Medical College he graduated in February 1847. He practiced medicine at Holland, Erie County, three years, and at Caledonia Livingston County, six years, and on October 22, 1855, settled in La Crosse, Wisconsin. Here, as in western New York, Dr. McArthur has attended very closely to his profession, except during two seasons when he was absent from home. In 1861 he went to New York city, and attended a full four-months course of lectures at the Long Island Hospital and two months at the Eye and Ear Infirmary, and repeated exactly the same course in 1866. Few physicians in western Wisconsin have had better opportunities for obtaining a knowledge of medical science, or have been more entirely and successfully devoted to the application of that knowledge. Dr. McArthur is a thorough devotee of the science of medicine. He obtains all the new and most valuable works pertaining to his profession; and being partially deaf, and in a measure shut out from the socialities of life, he devotes all the leisure time at his command to reading and hard study. Pathology and the news of the day essentially monopolize the odd moments and half hours.

Dr. McArthur calls himself a "hard-shell" democrat. He always votes the democratic ticket, but has no political aspirations, and makes everything subordinate to his medical studies and medical pursuits; hence his eminent success.

He was married on the 1st of January 1852, to Miss Mary Dean, of Caledonia, New York, and by her has two children.

Dr. McArthur's life furnishes a brilliant example of what may be accomplished by choosing a vocation suited to one's tastes, and following it faithfully to the exclusion of all others. He has clung to his profession, and by persistence and perseverance has reached an exalted position in La Crosse County.


Hugh A. McConville
Source: History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Kim Mohler

HUGH A. McCONVILLE, one of the early settlers of Cass county, has gained the esteem of his fellow men by his earnest labors and sound business methods and he is successfully conducting the affairs of the Beidler Robinson Lumber Company, of Wheatland, as their manager. He has resided in Wheatland nearly fifteen years, and is well known as a capable business man and exemplary citizen.
Our subject was born at Barrie Mills, La Crosse county, Wisconsin, September 12, 1858. His parents were Terrence and Margaret (Collins) McConville, the former a native of County Down, Ireland, and the latter of Toledo, Ohio. His father was a youth of fourteen years when he came to America in 1845, and he located first in New York city and from there went to Wisconsin, where he engaged in business and is now a resident of La Crosse, Wisconsin. Four sons and three daughters constituted the family of children, and our subject is the only one in North Dakota.
Hugh A. McConville was reared and educated in La Crosse, Wisconsin, and there began life as a newsboy. He worked through the east in 1876 and finally engaged as a clerk in Michigan and later went into the pineries of Michigan. He came to Casselton, North Dakota, in 1881, and entered the employ of Wallace Grosvenor in his lumber yard and in 1884 went to Wheatland as manager of a branch yard, and later, when the business was sold to the Beidler Robinson Lumber Company, he assumed the position of manager, in which office he still remains.
Our subject was married in Cass county, North Dakota, in 1883, to Julia B. Henderson, a native of New York. Mr. and Mrs. McConville are the parents of two children, as follows: George T. and Margarette. Mr. McConville was town clerk seven years and is a member of the school board, and is active in public affairs of his community. He holds membership in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and was grand master of North Dakota in 1895-96. He is a Republican in political faith and stands stanchly for the principles of his party.


Donald A. McDonald
Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1883) page: 482; transcribed by Tammy Clark

DONALD A. McDONALD (Dem.), of La Crosse, was born in Gairloch, Nova Scotia, January 1, 1833; received an academic education; is engaged in lumbering and steamboating; came to Wisconsin in 1855 and settled at Trempealeau, removing to La Crosse in 1869 where he still resides; has held a number of educational offices at various times; was a member of assembly in 1874 and was elected state senator in 1882, receiving 2,853 votes against 1,618 for John Brindley, republican, and 231 for John James, prohibitionist.


Alexander McMillan
LA CROSSE.
Source: The US Biographical Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Volume (1877) Transcribed by: RuthAnne Wilke

The subject of this sketch, a native of Finch, Stormont county, Ontario, was born on the 23d of October, 1825, and is the son of Duncan B. and Mary McMillan, both of whom were natives of Inverness-shire, Scotland, whence they immigrated to Canada in 1815. His father, who was a ruling elder of the Presbyterian church at Finch, trained his children strictly in the doctrines of that faith. Alexander passed his boyhood and youth in his native place, dividing his time between study in the common and farm work, and at the age of twenty-one removed to the State of New York, where he spent time, and in the spring of 1850 settled in Madison, Wisconsin. Here he spent one year clerking, and at the expiration of that time went to Portage, at which place, also, he passed one year. In 1852, in partnership with his brother John, who died in 1865, he established himself in the lumber trade at La Crosse, which place he has since made his home. The business is more properly what is known as logging, the timber and logs being cut on the Black river and sold to manufacturers on the Mississippi, The business is a very extensive one throughout Wisconsin, and especially in this section of the State, and Mr. McMillan is one of its most prominent representatives, being the oldest logger on the Black river. He is still extensively engaged in this business, although largely interested in other enterprises.
He has always held decided, views on the political and municipal affairs of his State and city, and been honored by his fellow-citizens with many positions of public trust. He was for three years a member of the city council, for several years county supervisor, and for two years chairman of the county board, a position to which he was reelected in 1875. He was mayor of La Crosse in 1871m and is now (1876) chairman of the directors of the Board of Trade. In 1873, he was elected to the State Legislature on the republican ticket, receiving twenty-one hundred and forty-five votes; and during the same year, it being the year of the great financial crisis, he was president of the First National Bank of La Crosse.
Aside from his activity in political matters he has always shown a public-spiritedness and been deeply interested in the public-spiritedness and been deeply interested in the public enterprises of his city. In 1869 the McMillan brothers became chief owners of the La Crosse Gas Works, which were incorporated in 1863. Alexander McMillan is now president of the same, and Duncan D. McMillan vice-president. Mr. McMillan is also engaged in the temperance movement; has always been an earnest supporter of the cause, and in 1873 was president of the La Crosse Temperance League.
He was married in 1858 to Miss Sarah L Parker, daughter of Mr. Herrick Parker, of La Crosse, formerly a prominent citizen of Elyria, Ohio. Mrs. McMillan is a lady of fine native endowments, highly accomplished, and has attained local celebrity for her skills in oil painting, many of her pieces having taken premiums at various county and city expositions.

Mr. McMillan possess excellent personal qualities, social and genial. He is a most agreeable companion.

By promptness and industry he has gained the reputation of being a thorough business man, and as a reward of his honorable and fair dealings has the respect and esteem of all who know him, and lives in the enjoyment of an ample fortune.


Duncan D. McMillan
Source: The US Biographical Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Volume (1877) transcribed by Denise Moreau

Duncan D. McMillan, a native of Finch, Ontario, was born on the 20th of June, 1837, and is the son of Duncan B. McMillan and Mary née McMillan. After receiving an ordinary English education in the common schools of his native place, he engaged for a time in lumbering, in Canada West. His natural tastes inclined him toward mechanics, but his circumstances were not such as to allow him to gratify his desire. In 1859, being then twenty-two years of age, he removed to the West and made a permanent settlement in La Crosse, Wisconsin, where his two elder brothers had previously established themselves in the lumbering and logging trade. At once entering their employ, he continued with them until 1861. Finding the business ill suited to his taste, he abandoned it at this time, and entering the office of another brother, E. H. McMillan, a lawyer of La Crosse, he began the study of law, and applied himself with diligence till his admission to the bar, in the following year. He did not, however, enter upon the practice of his profession, but a few months later accepted a clerkship in the quartermaster’s department at Memphis, Tennessee, under Colonel A. R. Eddy, a position which he held during portions of 1863 and 1864. Returning to his home, he purchased an interest in the lumbering business of his brothers, and has continued in the same up to the present time, 1876. Upon the death of his brother John in 1865, the firm name changed to A. and D. D. McMillan. His attention, however, has not been wholly confined to the lumbering trade, but being a man of enterprise and thorough business qualifications, he has employed his capital in other enterprises, not only remunerative to himself, but also tending to, and directly connected with, the welfare of his city. He is vice-president and, with his brother, one of the largest stockholders in the La Crosse Gas Light Company. His political sentiments have always been republican. When he first began to be interested in political affairs, slavery was the great issue between the different political parties, and naturally a lover of freedom and equal rights he, from the first, cast his influence on the side of liberty. His first presidential ballot was cast for Abraham Lincoln. He is not, however, a partisan, but independent in his habits of thinking, always exalts the man above the party, and supports for office him whom he considers most worthy and best qualified. In 1872 he became identified with the reform party, and has continued with it to the present time. His ambition has not been for political honors, finding in his regular business ample scope for the exercise of his best talents. The only official capacity in which he has served was as member of the board of supervisors, during 1873 and 1874. Mr. McMillan’s parents were devoted members of the Presbyterian church; and the principles and doctrines which they instilled in his early life have been strengthened and confirmed as he has grown older, and he is now on active and worthy member of that body.

He was married in 1866, to Miss Mary J. McCrea, daughter of Stephen McCrea, Esq., of Huntingdon county, in the province of Quebec.


Nathan Myrick


Levi E. Ober, M.D.
LA CROSSE
Source: The US Biographical Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Volume (1877) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

Dr. Ober, a native of Vermont, was born at Rockingham, Windham County, July 31, 1819, and is the son of William and Fanny (Fairbanks) Ober. In 1830 the family removed to Ohio and settled on a farm at Claridon, Geauga County, Levi remaining constantly at home until eighteen years of age, assisting in tilling the soil and attending school, a part of the time at an academy near by. Having an ingenious turn of mind, he was naturally led into mechanical pursuits; for some years he worked more or less at different trades in order to procure means for prosecuting his studies, and continued his literary studies, interspersed with manual labor, until about 1843. Mr. Ober began to study medicine with Dr. Storm Rosa, of Painesville, about 1845. He continued the same with Dr. Richmond, of Chardon, and attended lectures in the medical department of Western Reserve College, Cleveland, and at the Eclectic Medical College, Cincinnati; and in March 1850, he took the first diploma issued by the last-named institution. Subsequently he received a homoeopathic diploma from the same college. Afterward he attended a course of lectures at the Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia.

During the year 1850 Dr. Ober began the practice of homoeopathy at Moline, Illinois, and continued there for seven years. He removed to La Crosse, Wisconsin, in 1857, and has there been constantly engaged in practice until the present time (1877), except when attending medical lectures or traveling to recruit his health, impaired by overwork. Twice he has been obliged to retire for a season to recuperate. In 1872 he went to Europe, traveling through England, Belgium, parts of Germany, Switzerland and spending the winter of 1872-73 in Italy. While abroad he visited hospitals, and in various ways largely extended his researches in medical science. Dr. Ober has spared no pains in cultivating himself and in increasing his skill in the healing art, and spent some time in attending clinical lectures and in the Eye and Ear Infirmary of New York.

He was one of the original organizers of the Illinois Homoeopathic Medical Association, and aided in forming the present Homoeopathic Medical Society of Wisconsin, and has been president of both organizations, and also presided over the National Medical Society. He has an honorary degree from
the Hahnemann Medical College, Chicago.

Dr. Ober is a very active member of the Baptist Church, a deacon of the same, and one of its most liberal supporters. In all religious and benevolent matters he takes a deep interest, and is in every respect a kind, sympathizing and true man.

In politics he is a republican of whig antecedents, but takes little interest in political matters more than to perform his duties as a citizen.

Dr. Ober has had two wives: the first was Abigail Carr, of Jefferson, Ohio, to whom he was married in November 1843, and who died in August 1875, leaving two children; the second was Mrs. Helen M. Burbank Whitney, of St. Paul, Minnesota; they were married in September, 1876.

Dr. Ober is a good surgeon, a skillful aurist, and an eminent and successful general practitioner.


G. C. Prentiss
Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

G. C. PRENTISS, La Crosse, was born at Georgia, Franklin county, Vermont, January 11, 1824; was admitted to the bar at Burlington in September, 1847, and practiced in his native state till 1852, the last two years being associated in business with David A. Smalley, late district judge for the United States for the district of Vermont. In November, 1852, he removed to Wisconsin and formed a partnership with Judge L. S. Dixon, at Portage, with whom he practiced till 1857. In 1872 he removed to La Crosse, when he is still in practice in partnership with M. P. Wing.


Benjamin M. Reynolds, A.M
LA CROSSE
Source: The US Biological Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Volume (1877) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

Benjamin Miles Reynolds was born at Barnard, Vermont, July 12, 1825, his parents being Ezekiel and Lydia (Barnes) Reynolds. He lived on a farm, more or less, until twenty-one years of age. At the age of nineteen he began preparing for college, attending, at first, the Royalton Academy, and finishing his preparatory studies at the Thetford Academy, under Professor Hiram Orcutt, then at its head. He entered Dartmouth College in 1848, and graduated in course, paying his entire expenses by teaching and different kinds of manual labor. Since graduating in 1852, Professor Reynolds has been engaged steadily in educational work. He was principal of the Windsor, Vermont, high school, and of the Bradford, Vermont, Academy two years; of the high school at Barre, Massachusetts, a still longer period; of the Union school at Moline, Illinois, one year; superintendent of schools in Rock Island, and principal of its high school nearly four years, being the first superintendent in that city; principal of the Union school in Lockport, New York, more than five years; superintendent of schools at Madison, Wisconsin, six years; principal of the graded school at Monroe, Wisconsin, one year; and in 1873 became principal of the high school in La Crosse, having at the same time charge of the second ward school. He has raised the grade of these schools more than one hundred per cent. One of the leading citizens of La Crosse thus speaks of Mr. Reynolds' work here:
Professor Reynolds efficiency as an educator is' noticeable in the noble purpose and diligent efforts of his scholars in attainments of knowledge, and in the completeness of preparation with which his advanced students have entered various colleges, whose acknowledgement of his success in
this respect are highly complimentary to La Cross schools, whose enviable excellence dates from and is largely attributable to his connection with them.

Since he has been in Wisconsin Professor Reynolds has held a prominent position among its educators. He has been president of the State Teachers Association; has been on the committees appointed at different times to visit the normal school; also on the committee to visit the State University; and in meetings of the State Teachers Association and in other convocations of teachers he has been one of the leading men.

The Professor is preeminently a self-made man, and may truly be called the "architect of his own fortune." In his early years he had good teachers who gave him wholesome advice, which he has not failed to profit by. He has an exalted idea of the mission of a teacher, and strives to be a model in the profession.

Professor Reynolds is a Master Mason. In his religious sentiments he is a Congregationalist.

He was reared in the Webster school of whigs, was strong in the faith, and voted with that party till its dissolution, since which time he has been identified with the republican party.

His wife was Mary Ann Morey, daughter of Mitchell C. Morey, a prominent citizen of Windsor, Vermont, and for twenty-one years deputy warden of the State prison. They have lost one child, and have two sons and two daughters living. Since Professor Reynolds took charge of the La Crosse high school, he has sent to the universities at Madison and Chicago, and also to Beloit College, some of the best students who have entered these institutions.

Physically Professor Reynolds is about five feet seven inches in height, rather heavy set, and weighs one hundred and eighty-five pounds. He has gray eyes and a full, round face. He possesses most excellent social qualities, being generous, genial, vivacious. He is a man of thorough culture, and his influence over his pupils is in all respects healthful and refining.


Charles W. Roby
Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin History and Biography; by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee (1882) transcribed by Rhonda Hill

CHARLES W. ROBY, Portland, Oregon, was born at Stoughton, Wisconsin, April 20, 1850, and was educated at Stoughton and at the Wisconsin State University. Completing the course in the law department of the university in 1872, he received the degree of LL.B., and was admitted to the bar. After practicing about a year in Madison he removed to Winnebago county, where, in 1874, he was made county superintendent of schools. The next year he removed to La Crosse and engaged in teaching for two years or more. In 1877 he commenced the practice of law at La Crosse, and also held the office of city superintendent of schools during the years of 1877, 1878 and 1879, but in 1880 he again devoted himself exclusively to the law. At the age of nine years Mr. Roby was thrown entirely upon his own resources for a living. He began teaching school at the age of sixteen years, by which means he not only succeeded in securing a liberal education, but has aided in the support of his mother. The dean of the law faculty, now a distinguished judge, observes: “Mr. Roby is a young man of fine attainments, good abilities and unblemished character.” In 1880 Mr. Roby went to Portland, Oregon, where he has taken up his residence.


Theodore Rodolf
LA CROSSE
Source: The US Biographical Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Volume (1877) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

The subject of this sketch, a native of Switzerland, was born in the canton of Argovia, October 17, 1815. He devoted his earlier years entirely to educational pursuits, and later graduated from a college of Aarau, the capital of his native canton, and from the University of Zurich. When he was about seventeen years of age his father immigrated with his family to the United States, and afterward died in New Orleans, of the yellow fever. In 1834 the mother and her children removed to southern Wisconsin, and settled on a farm near Wiota, Lafayette County. In 1840 we find Theodore Rodolf at Mineral Point, keeping store, employing miners, and trafficking in lead. Thirteen years later he settled in La Crosse, and there assumed the duties of receiver in the land office, under appointment of President Pierce, a position which he held by reappointment of President Buchanan until 1861. Since that time he has been engaged largely in insurance and in real-estate operations. Aside from this, Mr. Rodolf has held many other offices has in fact been in some official position most of the time for thirty years. He was captain of the Mineral Point Guards from 1848 to 1851, and of the La Crosse Rifles from 1856 to 1860. He was president of the village of Mineral Point two years, a member of the board of supervisors of La Crosse County about four years, and chairman of the same one year. He was mayor of his city in 1868 and 1870, and a member of the assembly during the same years, and while in the legislature did good service on the committees on railroads, lumber and manufactures, etc. He received the democratic vote for speaker the second time he was in the legislature, but the republicans being in the majority, he was defeated. He was the democratic candidate for presidential elector-at-large in 1864, and the same party's candidate for elector in the sixth district in 1868, the republicans in both instances being in the ascendant. He was the democratic candidate for State senator in 1876. He has always been a democrat, and for a long time one of the leaders in western Wisconsin, and is well known throughout the State. During the administration of Governor Fairchild he was appointed by him a member of the visiting committee to the State institutions. He has been for several years secretary of the La Crosse Board of Trade. In many ways he has made and is still making himself a very useful man, and is an esteemed and most worthy citizen.

Mr. Rodolf is a prominent member of the Odd Fellows fraternity and in 1875 was Grand Master of the State. He is now Grand representative, and attended the meeting of the Grand Lodge of the United States held in Philadelphia in September 1876.

He was reared in the Reformed Church of Switzerland, but having found no organized society of that people since coming to Wisconsin, although holding Christian people in high respect, has identified himself with no religious body.

His mother, who died at Mineral Point in 1856, was a member of the Episcopal Church, and his sisters belong to the same body in La Crosse.

The wife of Mr. Rodolf was Miss Marie Thomas, of New Orleans. They have had twelve children, six of whom are now living. Four died within as many weeks, of diphtheria. The eldest son, Theodore F., who is a partner of his father in the insurance business, married a granddaughter of Henry Dodge, first territorial governor of Wisconsin, and daughter of Governor Clark, of Iowa, when it was a territory. She died in September 1875, leaving two small children, who live with their grandfather. Mr. Rodolf has two daughters married and living in La Crosse, the wives of William Servis and F. A. Copeland.


H. M. Safford
Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

H. M. SAFFORD, La Crosse, was born at Cambridge, Vermont, May 14, 1825, and was educated there, in his earlier days, afterward receiving a thorough academical education at Johnson Academy, Johnson, Vermont. He studied law with Judge Salmon Wires at Johnson, and with Judge H. P. Smith, at Hyde Park. In 1846 at the December term of the Lamoille county court he was admitted to practice. Three years later he was admitted to the supreme court at Montpelier, and subsequently to the United States courts of the state. He began practice at Washington county in 1846, where he continued three years, when he removed to Franklin county, where he continued practice from 1857 to 1870. During this time he was deputy collector of customs at Richford, a frontier port of entry, for five years, from 1852 to 1857. In November, 1870, he came to La Crosse, where he is still in active practice in the state and United States courts. In 1874 he was appointed district attorney for La Crosse county to fill a vacancy of one year and nine months, at the end of which time he as elected to the same position for the regular term of two years. Mr. Safford is also justice of the peace.


Samuel T. Smith
LA CROSSE
Source: The US Biological Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Edition (1877) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

Samuel Tinker Smith, the first man to run a temperance and anti-gambling steamboat on the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers, was born in Delaware County, New York, May 9, 1801. His maternal grandfather was a revolutionary soldier. His father, Noah Smith, was a native of Long Island, and his mother of Lyme, Connecticut. His father lived in Delaware County until 1812, when, with six other families, he moved to Ohio. Reaching Wheeling, West Virginia, they built a flatboat and floated down to Cincinnati, reaching there in October. The next year he moved to a tract of land three miles from the city, and opened a farm, Samuel at the same time becoming a clerk in a store, remaining in and near the city, merchandising and farming, until 1828. In April of that year he visited the Galena lead mines, and during the next month went into Wisconsin — at that time part of the Northwestern Territory. Stopping about half way between the present sites of Potosi and Platteville, he built a cabin and engaged in mining for one year. He afterward went to Galena and taught school two years, and there, in 1831, organized the first Sunday school in that part of the country. Returning to Cincinnati in 1832, he farmed a short time, and subsequently engaged in the mercantile trade in that city, and continued it until 1840. He then built his "Sunday keeping" steamboat, and ran it and others for nine years on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers and the tributaries of the latter.

In 1849, while his steamboat was at the St. Louis landing, it was burnt, with twenty-two other steamers and seven blocks of city buildings. Immediately after this calamity he opened a dry goods store in that city. In July, 1851, he removed to La Crosse, then a village of about fifty genuine settlers. Here he continued the mercantile trade between two and three years, and in 1853 opened the land agency, which he has continued ever since, at the same time engaging more or less in farming.

Mr. Smith was early taught that riches take to themselves wings, and he was impressed with the truthfulness of the scriptural statement when, in the crash of 1837, he lost a round hundred thousand dollars, and half that sum in a similar visitation in 1857, to say nothing of the sudden reduction of his steamboat to ashes just as he had repainted it and was about to sell it, and minor losses in La Crosse by fires. Pecuniarily, Mr. Smith is in comfortable circumstances. His wealth, however, is not all of this world — he is "rich toward God." Few Christian lives have been more consistent or more noteworthy. When he landed in what is now the State of Wisconsin, in 1828, he knelt down alone, in the solitude of the forest, under a large oak tree, and took possession of the land in the name of his Master. Shortly after reaching La Crosse, on the 22nd of January, 1852, he gathered the few Baptist people (fourteen in all) and a church was organized at his house. He brought with him to La Crosse three or four families, seven members of which were Baptists. He was chosen the first deacon, and has held that office for twenty-five years. The Congregationalists met at his house on the same day and at the same hour, and the ministers present assisted each other in organizing the two churches. On the 22nd of January 1877, the two Christian bodies again met, and observed their quarter centennial, upon which occasion Deacon Smith read an intensely interesting history of the Baptist church.

He has had two wives, the first being Miss Martha Ellen Longley, of Cheviot, Ohio, to whom he was married in 1827. She died in 1834, leaving two children, one of whom is now living. To his second wife. Miss Sarah Hildreth, of Cincinnati, he was married in 1835. They have had eleven children, of whom five are living. Orren L., the only child by his first wife now living, is married, and residing in La Crosse. The eldest daughter, widow of the late Jacob P. Whelpley, with her three children, is living with her father; another daughter is the wife of W. L. Card, of Moberly, Missouri; and a third is the wife of Spencer Way, of Rockford, Illinois. The other children are unmarried.

Of the many interesting anecdotes connected with Deacon Smith's nine years of steamboat life we mention the following: As he was starting on his first trip from Cincinnati to Pittsburgh, two fast young Southerners came on board, and before the boat was fairly under way began to inquire for the card table and the bar. Captain Smith politely informed them that there was nothing of the kind on board; that neither drinking nor gambling was allowed on his boat; that he had a good library and he hoped they would make free use of it, and that when they reached Pittsburgh, if they were not satisfied with the accommodations, he would refund the money. They used his books very liberally, one of them reading through Knowles's life of Ann H. Judson, and both becoming thoroughly absorbed in literary recreations. When near Pittsburgh they went on the hurricane deck and reminded the captain that they were near the end of the voyage, and he asked them if they wanted their fare refunded. They told him frankly that when they came on board and found no bar, they made up their minds to jump off at the first wood-pile landing; that on the whole, however, they had been greatly pleased, actually delighted, with the trip, and that if they ever had occasion to make the same trip again, if necessary they would wait three days for the sake of getting his boat.


Charles B. Solberg
LA CROSSE
Source: The US Biographical Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Volume (1877) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

In and near La Crosse, Wisconsin, is a very large number of Norwegians, and they are among the most industrious and thrifty class of people. This is true, whether they be farmers, mechanics, professional mien or merchants. Among the last named class of businessmen in the city of La Crosse the two most successful are Norwegians, and one of them is the subject of this sketch. A native of Lillehammer, he was born August 20, 1835. His parents were Ole N. and Mary (Andersen) Solberg. His father was a merchant in his younger years, but on immigrating to this country with his family, in 1853, purchased land near La Crosse and opened a farm, which he still cultivates. Both he and his wife are living, and are hale, industrious, well-to-do people.

On reaching La Crosse the son accepted a clerkship in a store, which he held until 1861, when he rented a store, and with about two thousand dollars capital opened a grocery trade, a business which he has steadily followed for sixteen years with marked success. He early secured a large amount of the Scandinavian trade, and always doing business in a prompt and strictly honorable manner, he retained his old customers. Their indorsement of his character brought him new ones, and his business has gradually increased until it has assumed very large proportions. In 1876 it amounted to three hundred and fifty thousand dollars, and having just doubled the capacity of his mercantile building he expects to do at least four hundred thousand dollars the present year. He who sixteen years ago began business for himself in a two-story store, twenty by sixty feet, now has a store three stories above the basement, averaging fifty by one hundred and fifty feet, and usually containing from forty thousand to sixty thousand dollars worth of merchandise. This growth in business is purely the result of close attention and care, and prudence and honesty in all its details. There is not a more thoroughgoing businessman in La Crosse.

Mr. Solberg is an ardent republican. He discharges his duties faithfully as a citizen, but does not covet office. He has held some useful positions in the municipality of La Crosse, has been on the republican State central committee, and was a presidential elector in 1876. He, however, allows neither politics nor anything else to interfere with his legitimate business.

On the 21st of September 1861, he was married to Miss Alice Johnson, of La Crosse. They have had six children, five of whom are still living.


Frank J. Toeller
Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Nancy Overlander.


FRANK J. TOELLER, La Crosse, was born at Cologne, Prussia, October 20, 1856, and came to this country in 1859, with his parents, settling in Minnesota. At the time of the Indian raid in 1861, he left with his parents and came to La Crosse, where he was educated, and, after studying law with T. J. Widvey, was admitted to practice November 11, 1878. He began practice in La Crosse the same year, and in 1879 formed a partnership with C. J. Stevens. He was elected justice of the peace November 5, 1878, to fill a vacancy, and was reelected in 1880. He dissolved partnership with C. J. Stevens in 1880, and formed a co-partnership with H. S. Daniels the same year.


Mills Tourtellotte
Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

MILLS TOURTELLOTTE, La Crosse, is a native of Holyoke, Massachusetts, and was born August 31, 1853. When about two years of age his parent moved to La Crosse county, Wisconsin, where they purchased a considerable tract of land just out of the present village of West Salem, La Crosse county, where they now reside. His father, M. L. Tourtellotte, was among the earliest settlers of La Crosse county, he having come here in 1855, and shortly thereafter assisted to lay out the village of west Salem. The subject of this sketch was educated at the University of Wisconsin, and he graduated in the law class of 1875. In June of the same year he was admitted to the bar at Madison, Wisconsin, and moved to the city of La Crosse, where he further prosecuted his studies in the offices of B. F. Bryant, and Lyndes & Burroughs until August 1, 1876, when the copartnership of Howe & Tourtellotte was formed. Mr. Tourtellotte continued to be a member of the firm of Howe & Tourtellotte until the month of May, 1881, when the copartnership was dissolved. After the dissolution of the firm of Howe & Tourtellotte he continued the practice of his profession in the offices formerly occupied by the firm. Mr. Tourtellotte was married in August, 1878, to Miss Lillie Woodbury, daughter of Captain W. W. Woodbury, of Somerville, Middlesex county, Massachusetts.


Gysbert Van Steenwyk
Source: Blue Book of Wisconsin (1880) transcribed by Rhonda Hill

GYSBERT VAN STEENWYK (Rep.), of La Crosse, was born in the city of Utrecht, Netherlands, January 13, 1814; received an academic education at the University of Utrecht, graduating in philosophy and classical literature 1836; is a banker by profession; came to the United States, May 1849, and located at Milwaukee until 1851, then removed to Newport, Sauk county, where he resided until 1858; then removed to Kilbourn City, Columbia county, and in January, 1862, removed to La Crosse; volunteer in the army of the Netherlands in 1830, ’31, and commissioned officer of the National Guards from 1838 to 1849; Brigadier General of State Militia in 1857; Commissioner of Immigration for Wisconsin in New York City, by appointment of Gov. L. J. Farwell, from 1852 to 1853, under the law of 1852; appointed consul of the Netherlands for Wisconsin 1849, also for Michigan and Minnesota, 1850; resigned as consul 1859; member of assembly, 1859; bank comptroller 1860 and 1861; mayor of La Crosse in 1873 and ’74. Elected senator for 1879 and ’80, receiving 1,849 votes against 729 for W. A. Anderson, Democrat, and 747 for Edward Cronan, Greenbacker.


Merrick P. Wing
Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Nancy Overlander.

MERRICK P. WING, La Crosse, was born at Hinsdale in Berkshire county, Massachusetts, September 10, 1833, and came to Michigan with his parents, at the age of about four years. Part of his education was obtained at common school in Michigan. In 1853 he returned to his native state and completed his education at Hinsdale Academy. In 1855 he came to Portage, Wisconsin, where he afterward began the study of law. He was a member of the law school of Michigan University in the years 1861 and 1862. He was admitted to practice by Judge H. s. Orton at Portage, upon the conclusion of his law studies in 1862, and came to La Crosse in 1863, where he has since remained. Since 1872 Mr. Wing has been in partnership with Judge G. C. Prentiss. In 1876 he was elected state senator, served the term acceptably to his constituents, and was again elected in 1880. At the session of 1881 Senator Wing served on the committees on the judiciary and public lands.


George B. Winship
Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Brenda Shaffer

HON. GEORGE B. WINSHIP, founder and publisher of The Herald, the leading daily paper west of the Twin cities, is on of the prominent men of North Dakota. He has devoted his attention to the growth and success of the Herald, and after over twenty years of earnest labor has met with the success he so well deserves, and may well be proud of the results of his effort. Aside of his work in connection with the Herald, he has found time to labor for the advancement and development of the social and financial resources of North Dakota, and is one of the well-known public-spirited men in the state. A portrait of Mr. Winship will be found in connection with this sketch.
Our subject was born in Saco, Maine, September 28, 1847, and emigrated to Lacrosse, Wisconsin, with his parents in 1851, and to LaCrescent, Houston county, Minnesota, six years later. He attended the district school until thirteen years of age, and then spent three years sanding brick molds, and setting type in the local printing office. He offered himself as a soldier for the Civil war in 1862, and was rejected on account of his youth, but in 1863 he was accepted and became a member of the second Minnesota Calvary, in which he served till the close of the war. He was then engaged at various employments and in 1867 started to the Idaho gold fields with Captain Davy s expedition, but part of the outfit failed to arrive at Fort Abercrombe, and our subject, with others, declined to go on account of danger from hostile Indians, and he then spent a year driving a freight team from the end of the railroad at St. Cloud to the various posts for the government, and in the spring of 1868 he engaged with Dr. Schultz, of Winnipeg, (who later became the lieutenant-governor of the province), and the work of our subject was on the Norwester, then the only paper published north of St. Cloud. He remained there about two years and then went to Pembina and spent a year in the employ of A. W. Stiles, post trader. There he met William Budge, and in 1871, when the Blakeley & Carpenter line of stages from Breckenridge to Winnipeg was started, the two men formed a partnership, and established a stage station at Turtle River, fourteen miles north of Grand Forks, where Manvel is now located. They built rough stables for the accommodation of stage and other horses, and a rough log house furnished shelter for guests, and thus business prospered at Turtle river station. In 1873 Mr. Winship sold his interests to Budge and Eshelman, and went to St. Paul, where he stayed three years, setting type on all the prominent papers then established in the city. He moved to Caledonia, Minnesota, in the spring of 1877, and established the weekly Courier, which he operated two years with success, and in 1879 he moved his plant to Grand Forks, North Dakota, and established the Herald, and has remained here continuously since that date.
Our subject has taken an active interest in public affairs, and has served as state senator, to which position he was elected in 1889, being the first state senator from the seventh district, and gave his best energies for the interests of his community. In politics he is an ardent Republican, and the policy of the Herald has always been for the advancement of the principles of that party. Mr. Winship was married, in 1874, to Miss Mary J. Minshall, of La Crescent, Minnesota. Mr. and Mrs. Winship have one daughter now, Mrs. F. W. Weego, of Grand Forks. He is a member of the G. A. R. and Masonic fraternity.


Gilbert M. Woodward
Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Nancy Overlander.

G. M. WOODWARD, La Crosse, was born in Washington, District of Columbia, December 25, 1835. In the capacity of printer and proofreader he was in the office of The National Intelligencer from 1850 to 1860, at which time he came to Wisconsin and began the study of law at La Crosse, where he was admitted to the bar in April, 1861. Enlisting as a private of Company B, Second Wisconsin regiment, May 22, 1861; in September of same year he was made orderly sergeant; and later held commissions of second and first lieutenant and adjutant. During the Gettysburg campaign, in which he was wounded, he was aide-de-camp on the staff of the first brigade, first division of the first army corps. During the Wilderness campaign he held the same position in the fifth army corps. July 30, 1864, he mustered out at Madison, and has since practiced law at La Crosse. He was district attorney of his county for eight years, from 1866 to 1874; was elected alderman in 1868, and held the office for two terms of three years each; was mayor in 1874, and a candidate for state senator on the democratic and liberal ticket in 1872.

Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1883) Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

GILBERT M. WOODWARD, of La Crosse, was born in Washington, D. C., December 25, 1835; received a common school and printing office education; is a lawyer; came to Wisconsin in 1860 and settled in La Crosse, where he has continued to reside; enlisted in Co. B., 2d Wis. Vol. Inf., May 22, 1861, as a private; appointed orderly sergeant September 23, 1861, 2d lieutenant August 25, 1862, 1st lieutenant September 14, 1862, adjutant 2d regiment June 2, 1863; was on division staff during campaign in the Wilderness in 1864; mustered out of service with the regiment July 2, 1864; was engaged in a number of battles, among which were Blackburn’s Ford, first Bull Run, Gainesville, second Bull Run, South Mountain, Fredericksburg, Fitz Hugh’s Crossing, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, at which he was wounded, Mine Run, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Laurel Hill, North Anna and Coal Harbor; has been district attorney of La Crosse county, mayor, alderman and city attorney of La Crosse; was an unsuccessful candidate for the state senate in 1872; was a delegate to the liberal republican convention which nominated Horace Greeley for president in 1872, and to the democrat national convention which nominated Hancock at Cincinnati in 1880; was elected to the forty-eighth congress as a democrat, receiving 11,908 votes, against 10, 640 for C. M. Butt, republican, 1,877 for B. F. Parker, prohibitionist, and 360 for Reuben May, greenbacker.
 



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