Wisconsin Genealogy Trails
Langlade County, Wisconsin
County Description and Organization


County of Langlade
[Source: Wisconsin State Journal (Madison, Wis.) Tuesday, 1 Mar. 1881; transcribed by MZ]

As the new law for the separate organization of the county of Langlade, in Northern Wisconsin, has gone into effect, a list of names for county officers was submitted to Governor Smith, from which the following selections were made Tuesday afternoon:

Sheriff – Charles Herman, Antigo.

County Clerk – John J. Simpson, Norwood.

Treasurer – Frank A. Delglise, Antigo.

Register of Deeds – R. G. Webb, Freidenland.

Clerk of the Circuit Court – Charles Brooks, Muller’s Lake.

District Attorney – G. W. Latts, Antigo.

County Surveyor – J. R. Buckstaff, Muller’s Lake.

Coroner – David Getchell, Muller’s Lake.

County Judge – Louis Motzfeldt, Freidenland.

Superintendent of Schools – George Ratcliffe, Antigo.

The latter two are appointed until the first Monday in January, 1882; the others hold until the first Monday in January, 1883, if their successors are duly elected and qualified. The commissions have been issued to-day.


Langlade County
[Source: "History of Northern Wisconsin" 1881]

The Legislature of 1879 created from the western part of Oconto County the county of New, attaching it to Shawano for judicial and county purposes, and providing that the first election for county officers should not be held until the county had a population of 1,000 inhabitants. The Legislature of 1880 changed the boundaries somewhat, and the name to Langlade.

In 1881, the boundaries were changed to the following: Commencing at the southwest corner of township thirty (30), north of range eleven (11) east of the fourth principal meridian, running thence north on the range line between ranges ten (10) and eleven (11), to the third correction line; thence east on said correction line to the southwest corner of township thirty-one (31), of range eleven (II) east; thence north on the range line between ranges ten (10) and eleven (11), to the fourth correction line; thence west on said correction line to the southwest corner of township forty-one (41), of range eleven (11) east; thence north on the range line between ranges ten (10) and eleven (11), to the boundary line between the States of Michigan and Wisconsin; thence southeasterly on said boundary line to the range line between ranges fourteen (14) and fifteen (15) east of the fourth principal meridian; thence south on said range line to the fourth correction line ; thence east on said correction line to the southeast corner of township forty (40), of range fourteen (14) east; thence south on the range line between ranges fourteen (14) and fifteen (15) to the southeast corner of township thirty four (34), of range fourteen (14) east ; thence west on the town line between townships thirty-three (33) and thirty four (34), to the northeast corner of township thirty-three (33), of range twelve (12) east; thence south on the range line between ranges twelve (12) and thirteen (13), to the third correction line; thence west on the said correction line to the northeast corner of township thirty (30), north of range twelve (12) east; thence south on the range line between ranges twelve (12) and thirteen (13), to the town line between townships twenty-nine (29) and thirty (30) ; thence west on said line to the place of beginning.

At the same time, the county was organized with all the powers and privileges of other counties, the Governor appointing the first officers. The county was divided into the towns of Rolling, Norwood, Antigo, Gagen, Polar and Carpenter. Langlade County had a population of 685 in 1880. Its surface is greatly diversified, the northern part resembling the Lake Superior region, both in its mineral productions and its picturesqueness; the central and southern parts being timbered, or farming lands.

The Wolf River, its tributaries, and numerous smaller streams intersect the county in all parts. It is dotted with lakes. Lake Vieux Desert, North Twin, Bass, Pine, Sand, Stone and Big Pelican are the principal ones. The timber and other productions are the same as those of other northern counties.


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