Wisconsin Genealogy Trails
Lincoln County, Wisconsin
Biographies


Charles Archibald
ARCHIBALD, Charles, contractor and builder, Merrill, was born in Montreal, Canada, Dec. 10, 1850. He served an apprenticeship of four years in Montreal before beginning his present occupation. He first settled in Green Bay; remained there and in that vicinity six years, following his trade. Then he went to Wausau for about four years, and from there came to Merrill. He was married in September, 1879, to Mary R. COMB. She was born in Pennsylvania. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) submitted by Mary Saggio]

John Arnold
ARNOLD John B, Duluth. Res 4331 McCullough st, office 314-317 Burrows bldg. Lawyer. Born May 22, 1866 in Stanley, York county N B, son of Allen A and Martha (McAloon) Arnold. Married Sept 8, 1898 to Mette L Jones. Educated in public schools Eau Claire Wis; high school Merrill Wis; and U of M. First engaged as police court clerk and municipal court clerk Superior; admitted to bar and practiced in Duluth 1888; in Superior 1889-1903; asst dist atty Superior 1896-97; now engaged in practice in Duluth. [Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Marilyn Clore]

William Averill
AVERILL, William, dry goods, groceries, notions, etc., Merrill, was born in Mt. Vernon, N. H., Oct. 8, 1807. He came to Geneva in October, 1840, were he lived nine years, following farming. In 1849, he came to Merrill, and lived about two miles above the present site of the place; here he remained until the Spring of 1865, engaged in lumbering and farming; he then went to Montello, and carried the U. S. mail from there to Pardeeville, which he followed about two years, then removed again to Merrill. Two years after his return, he engaged in the mercantile business. He has served as Postmaster at Merrill for ten years. He was married, in 1842, at Geneva. His wife died in the Spring of 1856. They had six children - Chilli, William, Jr., and Ella, living, and Anna, Sarah and an infant, deceased. He was again married, in the Summer of 1870, to Mrs. Agnes BALDWIN, a native of Scotland. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

John R. Babcock
There are few men more worthy of representation in a work of this kind than the subject of this biography, who for several years has been prominently connected with the business interests of Merrill, Lincoln county, of which fine city he is the present major. He is a native of New York State, having been born at Albany May 19, 1855, a son of James H. Babcock, who was born, in 1826, in Otsego county, N. Y. The paternal grandfather, Richardson Babcock, was a native of Connecticut, born there in 1798, and was a carpenter by trade; building many of the best residences and business blocks in Otsego county, N. Y. He married a Miss Robinson, who came to this country from the Emerald Isle, and they became the parents of five children — Adelia, Sarah, James H., Samuel and Mary. His wife died in New York in 1864, and he departed this life in 1875, at the age of seventy-seven. He had followed contracting until within a few years of his death, when he retired to a small piece of land he owned near Schenevus, Otsego county.
James H. Babcock, father of our subject, was educated in the common schools, remaining under the parental roof until his marriage in 1848, at which time he had attained his twenty-fourth year. The lady of his choice was Mary A. Herdman, who was born in Westford, Otsego Co., N. Y., in 1832, a daughter of John and Clarissa (Smith) Herdman, who were the parents of six children — Mary A., Martha, Georgiana, Julia, Louisa and David. Her father was a harness maker by trade, which he followed in early life, but later took up farming. His first wife died in 1844, and subsequently he married a Miss Wright, by whom he had four sons — Eugene, Charles, John and Everett. The father died in New York State about the year 1874. Mr. Babcock had five children: Frank M., John R., Clara L., Mary and Georgiana.  After his marriage James H. Babcock removed to Albany, N. Y., where he remained until 1855, serving as bookkeeper for a commercial house. In that year he came west, locating in Wausau, Wis., and then formed a partnership with one Fletcher in the lumber business which continued until 1858, when he kept a hotel, or station house, at Knowlton until the fall of 1859, at which time he was elected register of deeds of Marathon county. After his election to that office he removed his family to the city of Wausau, and held the office for six years, being elected by the Democratic party, of which he was a stanch supporter, taking an active part in politics. He died in Wausau in 1867. The mother of our subject still makes that place her home; she is now the wife of Henry French.  The primary education of John R. Babcock was obtained in the common schools, after which he attended the high school of Wausau, later taking a course at Lawrence University, Appleton, Wis., where for six months he paid his own tuition with money he had earned at the age of twelve years by clerking for Mr. Champagne, and later for James McCrossen, where he remained two years. After his return from school he served as bookkeeper in a private bank two years, and for the same length of time kept books in a store; then at the age of nineteen, with the money he had saved, he purchased some land from which he cut the timber. This was in the winter of 1874-75. In the spring of 1877 he went to Kansas for the benefit of his health, and there carried on agricultural pursuits until 1880. On his return to .Wisconsin he located at Merrill, where he engaged in clerking in Mr. Champagne's store, when the same company built a sawmill in which he became bookkeeper and time-keeper, serving thus for one year. In the fall of 1882 Mr. Babcock embarked in the lumber business, acting part of the time as expert lumberman, and the remainder as expert accountant until 1889, when he began the insurance and real-estate business. Selling out in 1894, he in company with Mr. Norway purchased the plant of the Wolf River Lumber Co., and established the Norway Box & Lumber Co., which now has a fine trade and is one of the leading enterprises of Merrill.  In September, 1882, Mr. Babcock was married to Josephine O'Neil, who was born in Wood county, Wis., and by her marriage has become the mother of two interesting sons — West O. and John R., Jr. Mr. Babcock takes great interest in the welfare of Merrill and the surrounding country, and is now serving as secretary of the Business Men's Association. He is enterprising and progressive in his ideas, and aids in every object for the good of the community. Politically he identifies himself with the Democratic party, being one of its stalwart supporters. He served as member of the city council from the Second ward; has also been city comptroller, and in 1889 and 1890 was city assessor, in which offices he served faithfully and well. In April, 1895, he was elected mayor of Merrill, having been nominated by both the Democratic party and the Republican party, his opponent being a Populist, Mr. Babcock receiving a majority of nearly 500 votes. [Source: "Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Wisconsin counties of Waupaca, Portage, Wood, Marathon, Lincoln, Oneida, Vilas, Langlade and Shawno" 1895, transcribed by Mary Saggio]

Henry Baehman
BAEHMAN, Henry, blacksmith, Merrill, was born in Prussia, Nov. 1, 1847. He first settled in Granville, Milwaukee Co., in 1866, where he lived about one year, then moved to Milwaukee, in 1867, and to Prairie du Chien in 1868, and to St. Paul, soon after, and went into the pine woods, running a blacksmith shop. He remained there one Winter then he went to Minneapolis. He returned to Milwaukee; was there a short time and went to Weyauwega, from there he went to Wausau, and came to Merrill in Fall, 1874. He was married in town of Berlin, Marathon Co., October, 1873, to Lena NINOW, who was born in Prussia, Aug. 17, 1853. They have four children - Martha, Edward, Otto and Henry Jr. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Charles Barnum
BARNUM, Charles H., restaurant, Merrill, was born in Rosendale, Fond du Lac Co., Oct. 15, 1854. His parents lived there one year and moved to Wausau, where he spent his boyhood. He afterward visited various portions of the West and finally located at Marshfield, on the Wisconsin Central Railroad. He remained eight months in that place, and followed his present occupation, then sold out and came to Merrill. He was married at Wausau, Oct. 17, 1877, to Mary I. SARVIS, who was born in East Oasis, Waushara Co., Oct. 20, 1857. The have child named Georgiana. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

John Borngesser
BORNGESSER, John, proprietor of meat market, Merrill, was born in Hartford, Wis., Feb. 26, 1858. He lived there with his parents until he was sixteen years of age, then they located in Weyauwega. He was there with them, at different times, until April 13, 1881, at which time he began his present business in Merrill. He was married in Quinnesse, Mich., Feb. 21, 1881, to Amanda D. TOURLOTT, who was born in Oconto, Oct. 5, 1853. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Herman Boettcher
BOETTCHER, Herman C. F., of the firm of BOETTCHER Bros., general merchandise and manufacturers of brick, Merrill, first came to Wisconsin, June 25, 1869; visited various places in the State and finally located in Merrill, October, 1870. He engaged in the pineries several Winters, taking contracts for piling lumber, etc. He began business in his store, Nov. 7, 1877. He was born in Plathe, Pommern, Prussia, Germany, March 2, 1844. Married, March 13, 1873, in Caarzig, near Naugard, Prussia, to Friederika KMAACK, who was born in the same place. They have had six children - Otto, Richard, Martha, and an infant not yet named; also Robert and Charles, now deceased.[Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

William Cannon
CANNON, William H., District Attorney, and one of the proprietors of the Northern Wisconsin News, Merrill, first settled in Planfield, in the Fall of 1858. He spent his school days in the above village, and lived there until he was about twenty years of age, when he went to Neillsville, where he studied and practiced law for about four years, when he came to Merrill and has since been in the practice of his profession here. He was born in North Branch, N. Y., September, 1852. Was married at Ripon, Wis., Jan. 1, 1880, to Maggie TAYLOR, who was born in Fond du Lac County.[Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Marvin H. Carpenter
Marvin H. Carpenter, born at Merrill, Wisconsin, in January, 1887. Volunteered from Ely, Nevada, November 6, 1917. Assigned to 30th Engineer Regiment and died of disease the same month, November 19, 1917. Person notified of death, Mrs. Minnie Plaisted, friend, Eureka, California. All efforts to communicate with relatives or acquaintances have failed. His name is on the Roll of Honor on White Pine County.[Source: Nevada’s Golden Stars Memorial Volume to the Relatives of those Nevada Heroes who died in the World War; prepared under the direction of Maurice J. Sullivan; transcribed by: Richard Ramos]

Hon. P.B. Champagne (deceased)
The gentleman, whose life we propose to here briefly sketch, in his day laid no claims to political distinction, far less to military renown. His triumphs may have been of a less brilliant order; but whether less associated with the well-being of his race, and with developing the resources, and fortifying the powers of the nation than those of a political leader or a military chieftain, the true friends of humanity must judge.

Mr. Champagne was a Canadian by birth, born in St. Felix de Valois, Jolliette county, Province of Quebec, December 8, 1845, son of Nelson and Amelia Champagne, well-to-do farming people, natives of France, who emigrated to Canada, where they married and had children as follows: Three sons — P. B., John N. and Nasaire — and two daughters — Mrs. L. Coulters and Mrs. R. Bressett, of whom two sons and two daughters are living with their widowed mother at the old home in Canada; the father died several years ago. At the schools of his place of birth our subject received his education, and when seventeen years old, in 1862, he came to Wisconsin, locating at Grand Rapids, Wood county, where he found employment with Francis Byron, a lumberman, with whom he worked some time, later, for one winter, lumbering for H. A. Keyes, who afterward said of Mr. Champagne: "He was a hard worker, one who took as much interest in my affairs as if they were his own, and I never employed a better man." After that winter Mr. Champagne returned to the employ of Mr. Byron, and with him remained, in the capacity of superintendent of logging, until embarking in business for his own account. For two years he followed mercantile trade at Wausau, Marathon county, after which he returned to the lumber business, continuing to make his home, however, in Wausau until 1880. When he sold out his store at Wausau he moved to Grand Father Rock Falls, Lincoln county, where his family spent their winters, their real home being in Wausau, in order to be near his logging interests, and the post office at that place was named in his honor. When the town of Rock Falls was organized he represented it at the county board three years. In 1882 he moved to Merrill (at that time called "Jenny"), Lincoln county, and he rerepresented the town of Jenny at the county board. In 1881 he incorporated the Lincoln Lumber Co., from which he soon afterward withdrew, and built the mill now owned by the Champagne Lumber Co.; then organized the P. B. Champagne Lumber Co., he being president and treasurer. This concern was in turn succeeded by the Champagne Lumber Co., our subject being treasurer and general manager thereof, which position he was filling at the time of his death. He was the most extensive lumberman on the Wisconsin river, and was possessed of superior business ability, which enabled him to weather every financial storm, of which, in his wide and long experience, there were not a few.

Mr. Champagne passed from earth July 1, 1891, after an illness of four weeks, and had the largest and most imposing funeral ever held in Merrill. It was conducted under the auspices of the Masonic fraternity, special trains bringing mourning friends and brother Masons from Wausau, Grand Rapids, Marshfield, Stevens Point and many other places. He was a most progressive business man, engaged in many enterprises, was very public-spirited, and made many friends, who one and all mourned the taking away of a good citizen. In the early days of Lincoln county he was a conspicuous member of all the Republican gatherings, for a long time was chairman of the Republican County Committee, and to him was due in the main, the success of that party in the county. In 1883 he was sent to the Assembly to represent his District, but declined re-election, though he served with distinction and eminent ability. In Merrill he did the heaviest mercantile business of any, and was never tired of giving both time and money toward the advancement and prosperity of that then rising young city. To the stock of the First National Bank of Merrill he was one of the first to subscribe, and was vice-president of the Merrill Railway and Lighting Co. Socially, he was an enthusiastic Free Mason, and at the time of his death was of the 32nd degree. Prominent among his numerous friends was Alexander Stewart - a bosom friend, he may be called - who was Mr. Champagne's first backer in business. Truly he was a remarkable man, one at all times commanding the esteem of his fellowmen - rich and poor alike - for he was universally esteemed and beloved.  On July 29, 1871, Mr. Champagne was married, at Nile, Allegany Co., N. Y., to Miss Alice G. Coon, youngest daughter of Elijah H. and Prudence (Bowler) Coon, and three children were born to them - Percy Beaugrand, now (September, 1895), twenty-three years old, a graduate of Ann Arbor, Mich., class of '94 (he is practicing law in Detroit, Mich.); Marie and Stella, attending school at Kenosha, Wisconsin. [Source: “Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Wisconsin counties of Waupaca, Portage, Wood, Marathon, Lincoln, Oneida, Vilas, Langlade and Shawno” 1895, transcribed by Mary Saggio]

Daniel Chandler
CHANDLER, Daniel O., of the firm of CHANDLER & Co., proprietors City Bakery and Restaurant, Merrill, was born at Pitcher's Springs, Chenango Co., N. Y., Dec. 23, 1848. He came to Boscobel, in 1858, living at home until the Rebellion broke out, at which time he enlisted as drummer in Co. K, 12th Wis. V. I., at the age of thirteen. He served out his enlistment, when he re-enlisted and served until the close of the war. He was mustered out at Louisville, Ky., July 16, 1865. He then went to his home in Boscobel and remained until November, 1865, when he went to Wausau, where he resided until 1876, when he settled in Merrill. He was married in Wausau, January, 1865, to Mary E. STEPHENS, who was born in Marathon County, Aug. 25, 1858. They have one child, Garfield. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Henry Chandler
CHANDLER, Henry H., general merchandise, millinery and fancy goods, Merrill, was born in Bloomfield, Me., March 1, 1836. He settled in Milwaukee in the Fall, 1857; engaged as a mechanic, and remained until the beginning of the Rebellion, when he enlisted as a private in Co. B, 1st Reg., Wis. V. I. he served three months and was re-enlisted as first sergeant in Co. D, same regiment, for three years. He served nine months in that capacity when he was promoted to second lieutenant, served about one year when he was promoted to first lieutenant. He was soon after appointed captain in 1st U. S. V. V. Engs., under Col. William E. MERRILL, and served until the close of war; was mustered out at Nashville, Tenn., when he returned to Milwaukee. From thence he moved to Green Bay, and engaged in the manufacture of shingles, remaining until the Fall of 1871. He then moved to Oshkosh, where he again began manufacturing shingles, until the Spring of 1874, when he moved to Manville, in the same business also keeping hotel and store. In November, 1879, he came to Merrill and began his present occupation. During the season of 1880, he was identified with the Jenny Lumber Co. He was married in Milwaukee, Nov. 4, 1864, to Emily S. PREVO, who was born in Milwaukee, March 21, 1842.[Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Peter B. Champagne
CHAMPAGNE, P. B., dry goods, hardware, provisions and lumbermen's supplies, also dealer in logs and lumber, Merrill. Was born in Juliette, Canada East, Dec. 8, 1846. He located at Grand Rapids, in December, 1863, where he remained until 1870, in the lumber business; from there he went to Wausau, where he was engaged part of the time in the mercantile business and lumbering until 1875, at which time he came to Merrill, and engaged in his present occupation. He was married in Friendship, Allegany Co., N. Y., in 1871, to Alice G. COON, who was born in Deposit, Broome Co., N. Y., Oct. 28, 1853. They have two children, Percy B. and Marie E. Mr. CHAMPAGNE is the present Chairman of the County Board of Lincoln County. He is also Chairman of Supervisors of his town. He does an extensive business in the pineries, and employs 150 men.[Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

PETER B. CHAMPAGNE (Rep.), of Merrill, Lincoln county, was born at Elizabeth, Canada East, December 8, 1845; came to Wisconsin in 1863, settling at Grand Rapids, removing in 1869 to Wausau, and again in 1875 to Merrill; received a common school and a partial collegiate education; is a lumberman and merchant by occupation; has been chairman of the town of Rock Falls for four years, and chairman of Merrill one year; chairman of county board for two years; was elected member of assembly of 1883 receiving 1,490 votes against 1,365 for Herman Rusch, democrat.[Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1883) page: 484; transcribed by Tammy Clark]

Fred Clark
CLARK, Fred H., contractor and builder and architect, Merrill. Was born at New York Mills, Oneida Co., N. Y., Feb. 5, 1855. He came to Wausau, with his parents in 1859, where he spent his school days and remained until 1870; he then went to Winnebago City, Minn., where he lived three years, and learned his trade; he then returned to Wausau, where he remained until 1876; since that time he has been in business in Stevens Point, Plainfield and Marshfield. He built a number of good buildings at the above places. He came to Merrill in the Spring of 1881, formed a co-partnership with Mr. Wm. LA SELLE, of Wauwau. He was married at Plainfield, Oct. 17, 1880, to Lizzie COPELAND, who was born in the township of Maine, State of Maine, July 23, 1862.[Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

James K. Polk Coon (deceased)
Prominent among the names of the representative business men of Lincoln county, more especially of the city of Merrill, is found that of this gentleman, who for several years was a leader in the community, and became a martyr in his devotion to his country.  He was born September 27, 1844, in West Edmeston, Otsego Co., N. Y., a son of Elijah H. and Prudence C. Coon, the former of whom was also a native of New York State, born of Scottish ancestry, and was a son of Jabez Coon. The latter was one of five brothers who came to America, settling in Otsego county, N. Y., on farms near Coonsville, in that county, which village was named after them. Jabez Coon married Matilda Holmes, by whom he had thirteen children, six reaching mature age, viz.: Elijah H. (the eldest in the family), Nelson, Daniel, Joshua, Jefferson and Betsey, the others dying when young. Jabez Coon was one of a hardy, robust race, was a man of influence in his day, and was respected far and wide for his many good qualities, as was also the entire family. Mrs. Prudence C. Coon, mother of James K. Polk Coon, was an adopted child (brought up by her uncle, Rev. Daniel Coon, who was a brother of her mother, Mrs. Nancy Coon Bowler), her right name being Prudence Coon Bowler, and she was of Scotch and Irish descent. Rev. Daniel Coon and two other of her uncles were noted ministers of their day.
Elijah H. and Prudence Coon were the parents of eight children, to wit: Fannie A., now the widow of Albert Burdick, and living at Merrill; Elijah Morgan, also of Merrill; Cortland J., deceased; William M., deceased; James K. P., deceased, subject of sketch; Julius J., of Toledo, Ohio; Mrs. Emma Witter, of Wausau, Wis.; and Mrs. Alice Champagne Fleming, of Merrill. The father was by vocation a manufacturer of and dealer in furniture; was something of a politician, and held many prominent public offices. He was a man of sterling character, well educated, a leader of men, enjoying to the day of his death the esteem and respect of all classes. He died in Delaware county, N. Y., in 1853, his wife surviving him till August 16, 1887, when, in the city of Merrill, she too passed away.
James K. Polk Coon, the subject proper of this memoir, received but a limited education at the common schools of his native county, remaining with his mother up to the time of his enlistment in the army, in the meantime working out among the neighboring farmers. He had a war record worthy of prominent mention, and suffered much while in the service of the Union. At the age of seventeen, October 14, 1861, he enlisted at Friendship, Allegany Co., N. Y., in Company C, Eighty-fifth N. Y. V. I., three years' service, and was honorably discharged April 24, 1865. He participated in the siege of Yorktown, Va., battles of Williamsburg and Fair Oaks, and in the seven-days' retreat. In the campaign along the railroad between Newbern and Goldsboro, N. C, his regiment was under the fire of the Confederates seven days; thence it proceeded to Plymouth, and was in the attack on Fort Gray, where, after three days' hard fighting, the entire command was taken prisoners, Mr. Coon along with the rest. He was first confined in Andersonville and Charleston, S. C, whence, October 8, 1864, he was transferred to the stockade at Florence, where, on January 9, 1865, he and four others "made a break" for freedom. Their flight, however, was soon discovered, and bloodhounds being put on their track, they were captured seven days afterward at the Little Pee Dee river and taken to Wilmington, thence to Goldsboro, Raleigh and Salisbury, making short stops at each place till they came to the last named. On February 26, 1865, the end of the struggle being now at hand, our subject and the rest of the prisoners were sent to Greensboro, N. C, where they were paroled and allowed to make the best of their way to Wilmington, N. C, at which point the Union forces were stationed, Mr. Coon arriving there March 1, 1865, whence he was sent to Parole Camp, Annapolis, Md., where he was laid up with fever, brought about by severe hardships and lack of proper food, etc.; but, receiving a furlough, he set out for his old home and to his mother, who, until she received a letter from him, written at Annapolis after his release from captivity, thought him dead. He reached home the night of President Lincoln's assassination.  After his return to the pursuits of peace Mr. Coon was engaged some twelve years in the manufacture of butter and cheese in New York State, and in 1878 he came to Merrill, his first employment being with P. B. Champagne, merchant and lumberman. In the following year (1879) our subject went to Illinois, where he again took up, near Peoria, the cheese-manufacturing industry; but in 1880 he returned to Wisconsin, again entering the employ of P. B. Champagne, having charge of his general store at Merrill. In December, 1884, he was appointed secretary and treasurer of the Champagne Lumber Co., which incumbency he filled two years, or until 1886, when he attended the anniversary of the Grand Army of the Republic, held at San Francisco, Cal. On February 1, 1887, he took up the insurance business; later, in company with Mr. Bruce, he engaged in the real-estate and insurance business at Merrill, in which he continued up to the time of his death. He died February 21, 1893, at Tucson, Ariz., whither he had gone for the benefit of his health. He was a public-spirited, generous-hearted and whole-souled man, one who made many friends, who deeply mourned the taking away, in the prime of life, of a good man. He left a sorrowing widow and two children, mention of whom will be made further on. In politics he was a zealous Democrat, but no office-seeker, and though often urged to accept office invariably declined the honor, preferring, rather, to work for his friends. In social affiliations he was a thirty-second degree Mason, always taking a lively interest in the affairs of the Order, and he was also prominent in the G. A. R., having served Lincoln Post No. 131, at Merrill, as commander, and was junior vice-commander during the incumbency of General Weissert, as commander of the State department. He was also aid-de-camp on the staff of Gen. Lucius Fairchild during the years 1886 and 1887, up to his decease — in fact he ever took a most active interest in the G. A. R., and was a zealous, untiring worker in its interests.
On December 5, 1865, Mr. Coon was married to Miss Alice Vilmina Withey, who was born in the town of Wirt, in the western part of Allegany county, N. Y., March 9, 1849, daughter of George and Catherine (Mover) Withey, who were the parents of seven children, viz.: Mary, Caroline, Sarah, Alvira, Alice V., Jennie and Helen. The father of these children was born in Otsego county, N. Y., in 1807, and died in western Allegany county, N. Y., in January, 1879; he was a son of Stephen and Lydia Withey, who had four children: Alva, Eliza, George and Harriet. Stephen Withey was born about the year 1769, and lived to be ninety- two years of age. The mother of Mrs. Alice V. Coon was born in Germany July 22, 1821, and died April 15, 1893, at Bolivar, Allegany Co., N. Y.; she was a daughter of Jacob and Mary Moyer, farming people, who had a family of eight children, named respectively: Caroline, Dorothy, Elizabeth, Mary, Jacob, John, Catherine and Louis, all born in Germany. The parents came with their family to America about the year 1833 on account of the father's health, and decided to remain; but he did not long survive his arrival in the New World. To Mr. and Mrs. Coon have been born two children: Mamie Genevieve, born in Richburg, Allegany Co., N. Y., March 21 , 1870, married to Herman Charles Wolff (sketch of whom follows); and Georgia Prue, born in Merrill, Wis., September 24, 1880, and entered Kemper Hall school at Kenosha, Wis., on her fifteenth birthday.  Herman Charles Wolff was born in Grossborkenhagen, Germany, August 3, 1860, a son of Gottlieb and Caroline (Kluetz) Wolff, who were the parents of four children - Herman C., Edward J., Willy J. and Mary A. The father of these, who was an agriculturist, came to the United States and landed in New York City July 7, 1869. He settled on a farm in Winnebago county, Wis., although he was not dependent on farming for a living, as he was a man of means when he came to this country. On August 16, 1876, the family moved into the village of Jenny (now city of Merrill), and here the father, who was born March 31, 1810, died August 20, 1891, and the mother, born June 15, 1832, is yet living. He had been twice married, the children by his first wife being Tena, August, Carl and Caroline.  Herman C. Wolff received a liberal education at the district schools of Winnebago county, and worked on a farm until coming to Jenny (now Merrill). He then entered his uncle's store, clerking there some three years, at the end of which time, in 1879, he went to Milwaukee, where he filled the position of bookkeeper for a wholesale commission house some eighteen months. Returning to Merrill, he was employed in department stores until 1888, at which time he was elected clerk of the circuit court, serving two years, and then, in association with a partner, conducted a grocery business. On February 20, 1893, he entered the First National Bank of Merrill as book-keeper, his present position, which he is filling with characteristic ability and fidelity. [Source: “Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Wisconsin counties of Waupaca, Portage, Wood, Marathon, Lincoln, Oneida, Vilas, Langlade and Shawno” 1895, transcribed by Mary Saggio]

John P. Christy
John P. Christy, though a recent arrival in Merrill, Lincoln county, has already won the respect and esteem of all with whom he has come in contact. He is a brother of Thomas Christy, the well-known blacksmith and wagon maker of Merrill, in whose sketch a full record of the family is given. The subject of these lines was born in New Brunswick, Canada, December 1, 1830, and in that country during his boyhood and youth was educated, attending the common schools of the neighborhood of his home. He was there reared, and with his father learned the trade of a millwright, remaining with him until the latter's death, in 1872. Since then he has made that occupation his life work, and is recognized as a thorough expert. He remained in his native country until 1892, when, accompanied by his family, he came to Wisconsin, locating in Merrill, which he now makes his home. In New Brunswick Mr. Christy was married, in 1869, to Miss Frances Mitchell, a native of that country, and a daughter of William and Anna (Doby) Mitchell, who had a family of eight children, John, James, William, George, Alexander, Janet, Mary Ann and Frances. Both the parents were natives of Scotland, and were married in Canada, where the father engaged in farming. To Mr. and Mrs. Christy have been born two sons, both of whom are at home — Alexander, who is working in the mills at Merrill (he holds membership with the I.O.O.F.); and William, who is still attending school. The father belongs to no secret society; in religious faith he is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and is a consistent Christian gentleman. He bears a high character for sterling integrity, and his honesty is unquestioned. [Source: “Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Wisconsin counties of Waupaca, Portage, Wood, Marathon, Lincoln, Oneida, Vilas, Langlade and Shawno” 1895, transcribed by Mary Saggio]

Thomas Christy
Thomas Christy, a leading blacksmith and wagonmaker of Merrill, Lincoln county, is conducting a successful and well-established business, one that occupies a prominent place among the various industries of that thriving city. He is a man of high standing in the community, as he conducts his business on strictly honest principles, and is looked upon as a useful and honorable citizen.  The birth of Mr. Christy occurred in New Brunswick, Canada, August 13, 1835, and he is a son of John Christy, who was born in the same province in 1801. The grandfather, Jesse Christy, was born in New Hampshire August 1, 1755, and went to Canada in 1762 with the first colony that settled along the St. John river. He was there married in 1781 to Easter Burpee, a native of the same place in New Hampshire, born May 3, 1759, also a member of the colony. They became the parents of thirteen children, their names and dates of birth being as follows: Agnes, January 12, 1782, died 1828; James, February 2, 1783; Thomas, June 12, 1784, died 1853; Mary, June 14, 1786, died 1835; Jesse, September 25, 1787, died 1789; Jesse, June 16, 1789; Hepzibah, May 3, 1791; Elizabeth, March 1. 1793; Peter, February 15, 1795; Joshua, September 28, 1797; Jeremiah, June 16, 1799; John (the father of our subject), September 5, 1801, died September 5, 1872; George, January 3, 1803. Jesse Christy and his wife were highly-respected people, honored and esteemed. They both died in Canada, at a ripe old age, where he for many years had carried on agricultural pursuits.
John Christy, father of our subject, was a millwright by trade, which occupation he followed some fifty years. He was twice married — first time August 2, 1828, to Parmelia Quint, who was born in September, 1809, in the State of Maine, daughter of William and Susan (Payne) Quint, both also natives of Maine (the former born November 20, 1785; they were married in 1808), where the father was a sailor during the earlier years of his life. They removed to New Brunswick in 1723, where Mr. Quint was engaged in lumbering, and Mrs. Quint died. They were the parents of ten children, to wit: Permelia, born September 1, 1809, married in 1828, died in 1836; Joannes, born March 28, 1811, died 1812; Diana, born February 5, 1813, married 1833, died 1892. Eliza, born August 18, 1816, married 1834, died 1842; William Payne, born December 1, 1818, married 1846; Amsom Parker, born May 11, 1824, married 1855; Susan Payne, born July 26, 1826, married 1846, died 1861; Jane Allingham, born May 13, 1829, married 1853; Elizabeth E., born October 13, 1832, died 1842; Henry D., born August 25, 1835, married 1866. The father of these died in 1843, the mother in 1865. Samuel Payne, maternal grandfather of Mrs. Permelia Christy, was a Revolutionary soldier. To John and Permelia Christy were born children as follows: Mary Ann, May 11, 1829; John P., December 1, 1830; Diana, February 21, 1833; and Thomas, August 13, 1835. The mother of these died May 27,1836, and in 1845 Mr. Christy, for his second wife, married Miss Jane B. Perley, who was born December 4, 1808, daughter of Thomas Perley; she died September 21, 1871.
Thomas Christy, whose name introduces this record, received his education in the common schools of his native country, and remained at home until he had attained his twenty-fifth year, working with his father at the millwright's trade. He then started out in life for himself, following lumbering and milling for some six years. At the end of that time he began blacksmithing in New Brunswick, and was thus employed ten years, when he sold out and purchased a saw and grist mill, operating the same some five years. In September, 1881, he came to Wisconsin, locating at Wausau, where he worked at his trade for others about four years. He then removed to Scofield, Wis., remaining there about a year, when he came to Merrill and built his present black-smith shop, which he has since conducted. He has in his employ five workmen, and the work he turns out is all of a first-class description. During his residence in this State Mr. Christy has also superintended the construction of many dams in Michigan, Montana, Iowa and Wisconsin. He has had a great amount of experience in his line of work, for when at home he often aided his father who was an expert in that line of business. On September 3, 1868, in Canada, Mr. Christy was united in marriage with Miss Helen White, who was born in that country June 23, 1851, a daughter of Peter and Esther (Wiggins) White, who were the parents of ten children, named respectively: Ebenezer H., Elizabeth A., Henry K., Helen, Esther R., Amelia M., Neville V., Rebecca A., Carrie E. and Eva E. The father was a carpenter and mill-wright by trade, and he died in New Brunswick May 2, 1867, his wife in the spring of 1894, in Duluth, Minn. His grandparents, who were Loyalists, removed to Canada from the United States at the time of the Revolution. To our subject and wife have come two sons — John K., born September 26, 1869, and Wesley H., born June 8, 1871, both connected in business with their father. The cause of temperance has always received the earnest support of Mr. Christy, and he now stanchly advocates the principles of the Prohibition party, with which he casts his ballot, though he is no politician; he is now serving as alderman of the Fourth ward of Merrill. With the Presbyterian Church he holds membership, and is at present one of its elders; socially, he is a member of the F. & A. M. In business he has won a well-merited success, and in connection with his sons not only does general blacksmithing and repairing, but also deals in wagons, cutters, sleighs, etc. They conduct a lucrative trade, and rank among the best firms of the city. [Source: “Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Wisconsin counties of Waupaca, Portage, Wood, Marathon, Lincoln, Oneida, Vilas, Langlade and Shawno” 1895, transcribed by Mary Saggio]

William Dereg
DEREG, William, Sheriff Lincoln County. Came to Merrill in the Fall of 1870, and worked in the pine woods and lumbering. He was also engaged working on the Wisconsin River, driving logs and running the river, which business he followed about six years; then he began the lumber business for himself, which he followed four years until the Fall of 1880, at which time he was elected Sheriff of Lincoln County. He was born in New Brunswick, May 22, 1857, and spent his school days in Blackberry, Kane County, Ill. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Thomas De Vall
DE VALL, Thomas, contractor and builder, Merrill. Came direct to this place in June, 1880, from Europe. He was born in Herefordshire, England, April 28, 1847, and there learned his trade. He lived in various portions of the Southwest for eleven years, then returned to Europe on a visit, remaining two years, after which he came to Merrill. He was married in England, November, 1878, to Beatrice YAPP, who was born in England in 1852. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Melvin Dille
DILLE, Melvin B., foreman in Jenny Lumber Company sawmills, Merrill. First came to Wisconsin in October, 1849, and settled in Lomira, Dodge Co.; he lived there a greater share of the time until 1860, and from there he went to Fond du Lac, where he lived five years, and there began milling. He went from there to Green Bay, remaining three years, then to Oakfield, remaining two years, engaged in retail lumber trade. From there he went to Necedah, in 1870, where he purchased one-half interest in a shingle mill, the firm name being, "The Shingle Mill Co." composed of T. WESTON & Co., and M. B. DILLE. He remained in Necedah for ten years and then came to Merrill. He was born in Madison, Geauga Co., Ohio, July 27, 1833. He was married in Lomira, Nov. 17, 1859, to Mary J. WADE, who was born in New York. She died March 24, 1877. They had three children, named Wade M., Jennie L. and Rosa B. He was again married Oct. 27, 1877, to Margaret WALSH, a native of New Brunswick. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

John Elsen
In the career of this gentleman we find an excellent example for young men just embarking in the field of active life, of what may be accomplished by a man beginning poor, but honest, prudent and industrious. A native of Wisconsin, Mr. Elsen was born July 25, 1858, in Kenosha, a son of Adam Elsen, a native of Germany, who was one of a family of sixteen children, five of whom are yet living, the eldest being eighty years old. In December, 1817, in the Province of Rhine, the father was born, and there wedded Susan Neises, whose birth occurred in 1823. Seven children were born of this marriage: J. Albert, Peter A., and John, who are still living; one who died in infancy; Jacob and Mary, who have also passed away; and Mathias, who died at the age of twenty-three. The father came alone to America about the year 1847, first being employed as foreman on a canal in Ohio, and in 1850 he returned to the Fatherland, the following year bringing his wife to these shores. For a time he engaged in farming near Kenosha, Wis., but later sold out and opened a grocery store and hotel in that city. For many years he carried these on, though later he was the proprietor of a butcher shop; he was also employed in the lumber woods. His death occurred in Kenosha in 1886. Mrs. Elsen still makes that place her home; she is one of a family of twelve children. Her father, who was a farmer of Germany, also belonged to a large family numbering fourteen children, and his parents were also agriculturists.  In the public and parochial Schools of Kenosha, Wis., John Elsen pursued his studies until the age of thirteen, remaining under the parental roof, however, until he was twenty , giving the benefit of his labors to his father. At that time he went to Kansas, where for one year he followed farming. On his return to Kenosha, he remained there only two months, when he moved to Racine, Wis., there working as a molder for three years, which trade he had previously learned in his native city. In 18S2 he arrived in Merrill, where for four years he was employed by the McCord & Wright Manufacturing Company in their sash and blind factory. He then went to work for A. H. Stange, who was engaged in the same line of business; after a short time he was made foreman of the works, and, later, assistant superintendent. In January, 1895, when the A. H. Stange Manufacturing Company was organized he was made vice-president and now holds that position; they have a sawmill, and are engaged in the manufacture of sash, doors and blinds. It is one the leading firms of Merrill, and they are now doing an excellent business. For two years our subject was also engaged in the hardware trade; he has dealt in real estate to some extent.  On January 27, 1883, at Merrill, Mr. Elsen was married to Miss Augusta Stange, daughter of Carl and Caroline Stange, and to this union have been born three children — two sons and a daughter - Albert A., William P. and Helen S. In politics Mr. Elsen is independent, desiring to cast his vote for the man whom he thinks best qualified to fill the office, regardless of party ties. For two years he has served the people of the Fifth ward of Merrill as alderman, and one year on the county board. He was a charter member of the first volunteer fire company organized, in 1887, in Merrill, and has since been actively connected with it, having been foreman several times. At present he is president of the company, and with the exception of two years, has been since it was organized. He has the reputation of being a first-class businessman, reliable and energetic, and is a citizen of whom Merrill may be justly proud. [Source: “Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Wisconsin counties of Waupaca, Portage, Wood, Marathon, Lincoln, Oneida, Vilas, Langlade and Shawno” 1895, transcribed by Mary Saggio.]

Edward and Henry O. Evenson
Edward and Henry O. Evenson, hardware merchants of Tomahawk, Lincoln county, comprise the firm of Evenson Brothers, and carry on the leading store in their line in that city. They are men of energy and good judgment, finely adapted to their present business, which they take pride in conducting on the best known plans. Their stock is of the best grades, and they thus enjoy a liberal patronage.  These brothers were born in Waupaca county, Wis., Edward on January 6, 1861, Henry on October 23, 1863. Their father, Harold Evenson, was born in Norway, in June, 1824, and is a son of Aaron Evenson, also a native of the same country. The grandfather was married in Norway and in his family were Harold, Halver, Erick and Ole, who accompanied their parents to America in 1845. The latter both died in Dane county, Wis. The maternal grandparents with their children also came to the United States at the same time. Harold Evenson, the father, married Carrie Helgeson, in Norway, in 1845, and they immediately set sail for the New World. Locating near Madison, Wis., the father began contracting on the railroad, but later removed to Waupaca county, Wis., where he purchased land from the government, and there still resides. He had a family of ten children, all born in Wisconsin: Edwin H., who graduated from the college at Decorah, Iowa, and the university at Madison, Wis., was superintendent of schools in South Dakota, and professor of Greek and Latin in the State Normal there, and in Milton College of Wisconsin, but now lives in Seattle, Wash.; Edward and Henry O. come next in the order of birth; Clara H. is now Mrs. Frogner, and lives in lola, Wis.; Joseph T. comes next; four children died in infancy; Gustave A., who was also a graduate of the college at Decorah, Iowa, died at the age of twenty-eight years. Politically, the father is a Republican and a leader in his party in the county where he makes his home. He has held many public offices in his town, where he is an influential and highly-esteemed citizen, and the fine improvements on his place indicate him to be a progressive and prosperous farmer. Educational matters have always received his earnest support, and he has given his children the best of school privileges. He is now passing his declining days at his pleasant home in Scandinavia township, Waupaca county.
The brothers, whose names stand at the beginning of this sketch, were reared upon the home farm, their childhood days being passed in attendance at the country schools, and later in the village schools of lola, Wis. Henry also became a pupil in the high school of Waupaca, Wis., after which they both took a business course in Milton College. On leaving the schoolroom they assisted their father, who was a natural mechanic, mason, carpenter and painter, and with him learned those trades, but soon started out in life for themselves. They followed those occupations to some extent during the succeeding four years, and Henry also clerked in a hardware store, during which time he partially learned the trade of a tinner. Edward was employed in the lumber woods during the winter seasons, and for one year conducted a general store for T. Thompson, in Iola, Wis. They were very saving with their earnings, and in the fall of 1887, with their combined capital, Henry built and opened up a hardware store in Tomahawk, under the name of Evenson Brothers, and Edward who was clerking at the time soon gave up his position and joined his brother. It was the first store of the kind established in Tomahawk, and they have since continued business with excellent success. For two years they also dealt quite extensively in lumber and real estate - both city property and pine lands.
Henry O. Evenson was married in June, 1891, to Miss Blanche Spaulding who was born in Outagamie county, Wis., daughter of James and Matilda (Hulbert) Spaulding, farming people, who have two children, Charles and Blanche. The parents are both natives of Maine; the father served as a soldier during the Civil war, in which he was wounded. The Evenson brothers are Republican in politics, and though neither of them are politicians, Edward was prevailed upon by his friends to accept the office of school commissioner, which he held for two years, and is now serving on the county board, being elected from the Third ward. Religiously, they are members of the Norwegian Lutheran Church. They are industrious, energetic and progressive in nature, and are highly esteemed and respected by all who know them. [Source: “Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Wisconsin counties of Waupaca, Portage, Wood, Marathon, Lincoln, Oneida, Vilas, Langlade and Shawno” 1895, transcribed by Mary Saggio]

David Finn
FINN, David, contractor and builder, lumberer and farmer, Merrill. Settled with his parents in Oconomowoc, in the Spring of 1852. They lived there until the Fall of 1859, then moved into the town of Texas, Marathon Co.; they lived there until the organization of Lincoln County, when the subject of our sketch moved into the town of Pine River, where he at present resides. He was elected Superintendent of Schools in the Fall of 1874, which office he held for six years. He has held several town offices also. He was born in New York City, April 23, 1851. Mr. FINN established the Northern Wisconsin News, and was proprietor of the same until 1880, at Merrill.[Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

John Russell Fleming
To the land of Scott and Burns the United States is indebted for many of her most loyal, most progressive and most successful of citizens, not a few of whom are to be found in the State of Wisconsin. In this connection it is a pleasure to here outline the life of the gentleman whose name introduces this sketch.  Mr. Fleming was born in Lanarkshire, Scotland, near the city of Glasgow, November 22, 1846, and is a son of William and Janet (Mclndoe) Fleming, both also natives of the "land of the heather," where they followed agricultural pursuits, and were highly respected and esteemed for their many virtues. The father was born near Bathgate, in 1820, the mother in Dumbartonshire, in 1825; she died in Scotland in 1871. They were the parents of nine children, a brief record of whom is as follows: John Russell, the subject of these lines, is the eldest; Catherine is now the wife of R. Crum, and lives in Idaho; Jessie is deceased; Peter is a wool-grower and sheep raiser in Idaho; William is in Montana, Walter in Australia, and James in Idaho; Hugh was engaged in the sheep industry in Idaho, where, in 1894, he was killed by cowboys while protecting his flock; Agnes was married in Scotland, and emigrated to Australia, where she died.  John Russell was the first of the family to come to the United States, the date of his immigration being June 2, 1868. The rest of them followed him to the New World soon afterward, except the father, who did not come till 1889, and he is now living near Minocqua, Vilas county. Our subject followed farming some nine months in Canada, at the end of which time, his uncle, Hon. Walter Duncan Mclndoe, being a prominent resident of Wausau, Wis., he moved thither, and for three years was employed in the pineries in various pursuits. In 1872 he went to Nevada, but did not remain there long, Idaho appearing to him to be more inviting for his purposes, and accordingly he proceeded to that then Territory. In Idaho he remained nearly twenty years, engaged in the rearing of sheep, cattle and horses, besides extensive farming, and during those years he had some thrilling experiences with the Indians, Mormons, cowboys and sheep owners, with all of whom he had considerable business dealings from time to time. For nearly two years he held a government position as agent over the Bannock and Shoshone Indians while at war with the whites. In 1892 he returned to Wisconsin, and is now a resident of Merrill, Lincoln county.  On November 28, 1893, Mr. Fleming was united in marriage with Mrs. Alice G. Champagne, widow of Hon. P. B. Champagne. He is a pleasant, genial gentleman, and although his education in boyhood and youth did not extend beyond the limits of the common schools of his native county, Lanarkshire, yet by culture and close observation of men and nature he has become a man of superior literary attainments, as is evidenced by his many contributions of poetry and description to the public press; he is also a producer of music and art of high rank. A lover of fine horses, he finds no enjoyment more congenial or healthy than driving some fine team, and at the present time he is owner of a superb pair of "blacks." A familiar figure in the community, possessed of an ever-cheerful countenance, he has a smile and cheery word for all whom he meets, and no one in the county possesses more fully the esteem, good will and respect of his fellow-citizens than does John Russell Fleming. [Source: “Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Wisconsin counties of Waupaca, Portage, Wood, Marathon, Lincoln, Oneida, Vilas, Langlade and Shawno” 1895, transcribed by Mary Saggio]

John Froehlich
FROEHLICH, John J., manufacturer, cigars, of the firm of NEUBAUER & FROEHLICH, Merrill, was born in Milwaukee, July 23, 1851, where he spent his school days. After visiting various portions of the West, he finally located in Merrill, May 3, 1881. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Francis Fuller
FULLER, Francis E., photographer, Merrill; first settled at Wausau in the fall of 1869, at which place he began photographing. He remained there four years, from there he went to Manchester, Iowa, and followed the hotel business, until January, 1879, then he went to Wausau, and again began photographing. July 6, 1880, he came to Merrill. He was born in Harvard, McHenry Co., Ill., June 27, 1852. He has been twice married, and lost both wives, and also one boy. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Augustus Gorham
GORHAM, Augustus D., publisher, Lincoln County Advocate, was born in Green Bay, March 31, 1846. He lived there until the later part of 1867, and there learned the printer's trade. He went to Shawano, and followed his business in the office of M. H. McCORD, where he remained until Jan. 16, 1875; from there he came to Merrill, where he has since lived. He served one term as Clerk Circuit Court, of Shawano County. After coming to Merrill, he also served three terms in the same capacity. He was married in Shawano, May 13, 1874, to Kate M. BRIDGE, who was born in Shawano, May 13, 1857. The have one boy, William A. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

John Grignon
GRIGNON, John M., in shingle-mill of T. B. SCOTT, Merrill, was born in Green Bay, May 22, 1852. He lived there and other places in Wisconsin and Michigan,until the Spring of 1881, when he came to Merrill. He was married in Green Bay, Nov. 27, 1880, to Ellen E. McQUAID, a native of De Pere, Wis. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

H. Clark Grout
GROUT, H. Clark, log and lumber scaler, Merrill. Was born Oct. 12, 1842, in Canada East. He went to Omro, in August, 1878, and lived there a short time, and went into the lumber woods on the Wolf River, where he remained about four months; from there he went to Marshfield, and worked in a saw-mill a short time; he then went to Wausau, and engaged in the lumber business; then he came to Merrill, where he has since remained. He was married in Oshkosh, Oct. 25, 1878, to Rachael T. GROUT, who was born near Montreal, Canada, Sept. 22, 1857. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Louis Hammel
HAMMEL, Louis, hardware and agricultural implements, Merrill, was born in Hamilton, Canada, March 9, 1862. He settled in Appleton in 1866, and lived there eleven years, and attended school. He visited various places in the State and worked at the tinner's trade. He finally settled in Merrill, March 19, 1881. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Adelbert S. Hartwell
Adelbert S. Hartwell was born in Milwaukee, Wis., October 21, 1850, and is descended from ancestors who have long resided in this country. His grandfather, William Hartwell, was born in New York, and followed the occupation of farming. He wedded Betsy Heath, and their six sons were named John, William, Horace, Orin, Lewis and George. During the war of 1812 grandfather Hartwell served as an infantry soldier. John Hartwell, father of our subject, was born in Cattaraugus county, N. Y., in 1814, and he, too, carried on agricultural pursuits. In the Empire State he wedded Mary Ray, daughter of John and Mary Ray, the former of whom was a major general in the Revolution, serving with great distinction in that struggle. In his family were five children — Otis, Mary, Marcia, Augusta, and Caroline. John Hartwell and his wife had four children — Theresa, Frances, Augusta and Adelbert. The father became one of the early settlers of Milwaukee, Wis., and purchased a farm which is now comprised in the center of that city. The family located in Shiawassee county, Mich., in 1855, and there the mother died the following year, after which the father wedded Mrs. Merriam, a widow lady. The children on the death of their mother had returned to Wisconsin to live with their grandfather, who in the meantime had removed from New York to Pewaukee, Waukesha Co., Wis., where he died in 1875. John Hartwell passed away in 1877. Adelbert S. Hartwell was a child of only six summers when his mother died, and he then went to live with his grandfather with whom he remained until 1860, when he went to the western part of the State and resided with an uncle two years. At the age of fourteen he commenced the battle of life for himself, sometimes working on the river, and again on a farm in Minnesota. At the age of fifteen he went into the lumber woods and securing employment in a sawmill worked his way steadily upward, having for the past six years held the responsible position of head sawyer with the Upham Manufacturing Company.  In 1879, Mr. Hartwell married Miss Imogene Manning, a native of Jefferson county, Wis., and daughter of Adkins and Helen (Grover) Manning, the former a native of New York, the latter of Wisconsin. They lived upon a farm in Jefferson county and had three children: Imogene, Lucia and Clara. The mother died in 1866, the father in 1880. Mr. Hartwell was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife in 1888, and in October, 1891, he married Anna Judson, who was born in Rome, Jefferson Co., Wis., a daughter of Lyman T. and Angeline (Foss) Judson. Her father was born in Canada in 1829, and during the Civil war served for three years in the First Wisconsin Artillery, when he was honorably discharged. His wife was a native of Wisconsin, and died in 1884, leaving three children, Anna, Willis E. and Ernest. The father is now living with his daughter, Mrs. Hartwell, who by her marriage has one son, Earl Adelbert.  Mr. Hartwell exercises his right of franchise in support of the Republican party, and has been honored with several local offices, including that of alderman, while residing in Merrill, Wis. He belongs to the Masonic, Knights of Pythias and Modern Woodmen fraternities, and is a plain, unassuming man, devoting himself to his business interests, and by his quiet, upright life has won the respect and confidence of all with whom he has been brought in contact. [Source: “Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Wisconsin counties of Waupaca, Portage, Wood, Marathon, Lincoln, Oneida, Vilas, Langlade and Shawno” 1895, transcribed by Mary Saggio.]

Sigmund Heineman
HEINEMAN, Sigmund, general merchandise and sewing machine agent, Merrill, was born in Greensfield, Germany, October 1852. Upon coming to Wisconsin, he first settled in Stockbridge, was there a short time, and then went to Appleton. He was there occupied principally clerking in stores, the sewing machine trade, and also dealt in live stock. He remained in Appleton seven years, then came to Merrill, and engaged in the mercantile business. He was married in Appleton in June, 1879, to Tena STROSSER, who was born in Rome, Wis., April 19, 1861. They have one child, Harry HEINEMAN. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

H. E. Howe
HOWE, H. E., in company with M. H. McCORD, style of firm, Jenny Lumber Company, Merrill, first settled at Weyauwega, Wis., in 1868. He lived there about one and one half years, and followed the mercantile business. From there he went to Shawano, where he was engaged in the same business, being one of the partners of POTTER & HOWE. Soon after, he purchased his partner's interest and assumed control, remaining there until the Fall of 1873. Since then, he has been engaged in lumbering and milling, having been engaged in that capacity on the Wolf River. He also spent some time in Oshkosh, in the manufacture of lumber, and taking charge of the business. In this enterprise he was in the company with J. D. GILLETTE, of Addison, N. Y. In the Fall of 1876, he engaged with C. M. UPHAM & Bro., as book-keeper, and remained with them until the Fall of 1879. From there he came to Merrill, where he immediately engaged with M. H. McCORD and H. H. CHANDLER in the erection of the mill, and formation of the Jenny Lumber Company. He was born in New York City, Jan. 1, 1834. His parents emigrated to Ohio in 1837, where he lived with them eighteen years. He was married, May 29, 1862, at Willoughby, Ohio. His wife was born Oct. 14, 1840, at Cleveland, Ohio. They have five children - Ella J., Mary, henrietta, H. E., Jr., and Lewis L. The capacity of the mill of this firm is 40,000 in eleven hours; employing seventy men. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Samuel Hoyt
HOYT, Samuel M., attorney at law, of the firm, HOYT & MEADOWS, Merrill, was born at Sparta, March 18, 1855, where he lived until he was nineteen years of age, when he began the study of law with Joseph M. MORROW. He was admitted to the Bar Jan. 5, 1878, and began practicing with the firm of MORROW & MASTERS, continuing with them two years. He then came to Merrill where he began the practice of his profession. He was married in November, 1878, at La Cresent, Minn., to Christine PETERS, who was born in Bloomingdale, Vernon Co., Wis. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Morris C. Hyman
Morris C. Hyman a prominent and popular citizen of Tomahawk, Lincoln county, is a native of Prussia, having first seen the light there November 26, 1859, in which country was also born his father, Isaac Hyman. The latter was married in early life, and had a family of eight children, six of whom are now living, viz.: Morris C., Abe D., Isaac, Rachel, Lena L. and Sarah. The mother of these died in January, 1891. At one time Isaac Hyman was a hotel-keeper, but later in life he engaged in the milling business, and at present he is the owner of a large gristmill. He visited his sons in America in 1893, remaining here one year, then returning to Europe. The subject proper of this sketch received a good common-school education, and is also well versed in the Hebrew language. He came to America at the age of sixteen, and secured a situation in a notion store in Chicago, Ill., where he remained one year; then went on the road, selling jewelry, continuing thus for five years. In course of time he and another opened a clothing store in Minneapolis, Minn., which they carried on for one year, then sold out, and in 1883 Mr. Hyman located in Merrill, Lincoln Co., Wis., and commenced the saloon business with his brother Abe, who had joined him. In the fall of 1887 he removed to Tomahawk and opened a saloon, the brothers still continuing the business at Merrill, both wholesale and retail, also conducting a similar establishment at Raum, Wis. , and they have been in business together ever since the arrival of Abe in America. The Hyman Brothers have also dealt quite extensively in pine lands and hardwood in Wisconsin, besides owning city property at Merrill. In addition to their place of business at Tomahawk, a brick store and other similar property, they are interested in real estate, in which they deal extensively. They are representative self-made men and typical "hustlers," respected for their honest straightforward way of doing business. Morris C. Hyman in politics is a Democrat, an active worker in the ranks of the party, and was a delegate to the county conventions. He was one of the first aldermen of Tomahawk, and in the spring of 1895 was elected mayor of that city, the campaign proving a very hot one. Socially he is a member of the I. O. O. F. Lodge at Tomahawk. Mr. Hyman has not yet enlisted into the noble army of Benedicts, being still single. [Source: “Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Wisconsin counties of Waupaca, Portage, Wood, Marathon, Lincoln, Oneida, Vilas, Langlade and Shawno” 1895, transcribed by Mary Saggio]

George Kallock
KALLOCK, George W., Lincoln House, Merrill, came to Wisconsin in 1840, and settled at Waukesha. He lived there until 1849, making occasional trips to the pineries, and working at Grand Rapids in 1844. He began keeping hotel at Little Bull in 1849, and remained there until the Fall of 1852. He then went on a farm and remained there until the Fall of 1857, on what was afterward known as the McINDOE place. He sold out and went again to Little Bull, and kept hotel one year; then moved across the river and kept hotel in Mosinee a year. He then moved to Jenny, and took charge of a store and boarding house belonging to B. F. COOPER. The following Fall, he moved to Wausau and bought a farm, and later went to Buena Vista, where his wife died, in the Winter of 1861. He married a second time, in September, 1862; then he farmed for two years in the town of Almond. thence he went to Jenny in the hotel business, and then went to Plover, Portage Co., and kept the Empire House for one year; from there to Wausau, in the hotel known as the Cramer House, which burned down. From there he moved to De Pere, and kept the National House for sixteen months. From there to Chilton, in the same business, two years; from there to Plymouth; from there to Princeton for one year; from there to Jenny for six months; then to Wausau, in the Marathon House; from there he came to Jenny, in the Lincoln House for five years, where may still be found the genial host. He was born in New Brunswick, Dec. 15, 1825. His wife's maiden name was E. A. BEAUMONT. She is a native of England. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Bryant Kimball
KIMBALL, Bryant B., harness maker, Merrill. Was born in Gouverneur, N. Y., July 10, 1828. He first settled in Stevens Point, in 1853, and lived there until 1861, following his trade. He then went to Plover, and remained about seven years, following the same occupation, in connection with a grocery store. He lived there five years, and from there he went to Wausau, where he remained until March, 1879. From there he came to Merrill. He was married July 4, 1853, in Almond, Wis., to Eliza GRIMM; she was born near the line of France and Germany, May 19, 1836. Has ten children living - Esmeralda E., Melinda M., Ida I., Francis F., Richard B., Katey B., Adaline E., Emily E., Nellie H. and Frederick E. Charles W., William E. and Mabel D. are not living. Married again, Oct. 11, 1879, to Mary Elizabeth OGDEN, who was born in Rochester, Racine Co., Wis., March 4, 1844. One child, Myrtle, by last marriage. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Dan Kline
KLINE, Dan A., logging and lumbering, Merrill. He came to this place, Nov. 26, 1854. He was here one year, and then went to Michigan, on the Menominee River, and began the lumber business, where he remained three years, then went to Colorado. Was there a short time, but returned to Merrill, where he has since been engaged in lumbering. He was born in Ridgebury, Bradford Co., Penn., Nov. 25, 1838. He was married at Mosinee, Wis., September, 1867, to Cornelia E. GOLDSBERRY, who was born in Shorem, Madison Co., Vt., June 28, 1837. They have one girl, Belle R. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Edward Kluetz
KLUETZ, Edward, general merchandise, Merrill. Was born in Prussia, Aug. 18, 1844. Came to America in 1871, and went up as far as Wausau, in the Summer of the same year. He remained there about one year, and taught a German school for a term of five months, at the close of which, he clerked in a store. He then came to Merrill, and clerked there for James McCROSSEN, of Wausau. He remained in the store for about thirteen months, and after that he clerked for August KICKBUSCH, until Sept. 1, 1876, then Mr. KLUETZ took full charge of the business, bought the goods, and began for himself. He was Justice of the Peace from 1874 to 1876. He has also held the office of Town Clerk. He was married in Prussia in 1869, to Emilie KOEPPS, a native of the same country. They have five children - Herman E., Martha M., Elizabeth M., Emma M., and Clara E. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Gustav Koehler
KOEHLER, Gustav F., blacksmith. Was born in Germany, April 19, 1854. He came with his parents and settled in Bloomfield, Waushara Co., Wis., in 1859. They remained there two years, then they moved to Berlin, Marathon Co., where he spent his school days, until the age of seventeen, when he went to Weyauwega, and learned the blacksmith trade, lived there one and one half years, and went to Wausau, where he remained about the same length of time. He then came to Merrill, bought a shop, and began business with the firm name of BEHMAN & KOEHLER. They were in company two years, then he went into another shop, under the firm name of KOEHLER & ADAMS; they were togerther two years, then they built a shop, ran it one year, and Mr. KOEHLER bought the whole interest, and is now alone. He was married, June 9, 1878, at Oshkosh, to Minnie RUNGE, who was born in Germany. They have one boy, Herman C. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Henry Kyes
KYES, Henry A., lumberman, Merrill. Was born in Colesville, Brown Co., N. Y., Nov. 10, 1834. First came with his parents, near Princeton, in June, 1850. As soon as he was old enough, he went into the pineries, and followed lumbering for other parties until 1861, at which time he began business on his own account. He was a member of the Board of Supervisors for some time, and was acting in that capacity at the organization of Lincoln County. He was married at Stevens Point, Jan. 3, 1869, to Jane A. HILL, who was born in New York; she died April 7, 1877. They had five children - Henry N., William A., James W., Fred and Melissa F. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

L. B. La Count
LA COUNT, L. B., M. D., physician and surgeon, Merrill, was born in Manitowoc, Feb. 28, 1843. He spent his school days in the above city, until the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted in Co. A, 5th Wis. Vol. Inf. Served three years, and was wounded at the battle of Chancelllorsville, May 3, 1863. After he recovered sufficiently from his wounds, he was transferred to Seminary Hospital, Georgetown, and served the balance of his time as clerk, dispensing drugs, etc. He was mustered out at Washington, July 15, 1864, and then returned to his home, and soon after went to Chilton, Calumet Co., where he had a brother in the practice of medicine, named D. LA COUNT. He remained with him about three years, studying medicine. Then he attended Rush Medical College, Chicago, graduated Feb. 8, 1868. After that, he went into company with Dr. J. M. ADAMS, in Oconto, where he remained one year in practice. From there he went to Shawano, and practiced there twelve years. Leaving a fine business, he came to Merrill. He was married at Green Bay, April 12, 1869, to Olive LE CLAIRE, who was born in Green Bay, Aug. 15, 1846. They have had two children, named Charles J. and Mary E., neither of whom are living. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Knudt Larson
LARSON, Knudt, mason, Merrill, settled in Wausau, May 5, 1873. He lived there four years, and learned his trade. Then he came to Merrill, and is doing a prosperous business. He was born in Koughsberg, Norway, March 19, 1855. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

M. F. Leondusky
LEONDUSKY, M. F., merchant tailor, Merrill. He was born in Fond du Lac, Aug. 1, 1859. His first move was with his parents to Stevens Point, and he afterward went to Wausau, August, 1878, and there learned his trade. In the Spring of 1881, he located at Merrill, and established his business in the firm name of M. F. LEONDUSKY & Co. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

George Christian Lickel
George Christian Lickel is a typical self-made man, one who owes his success to his own enterprise and industry. He has led a busy and useful life, and in the legitimate channels of business has acquired a competency that now enables him to live retired. Mr. Lickel was born in the Province of Darmstadt, Germany, September 13, 1841. His father, John C. Lickel, also a native of Germany, was a miller by trade, and in the country of his birth was married, in 1838, to Catherine Gris. They became the parents of five children: George C., subject of this sketch; Henry, who died in infancy; William, who died in Nashville, Tenn., in 1864, while in the employ of the government; Catherine, wife of John Metz — all four born in Germany; and Mary, who was born in this country. The family crossed the Atlantic about the year 1849, and took up their residence in Quincy, Ill., where the father worked at his trade. While in Germany he had owned and operated his own mill, and had obtained a good business education. His death occurred July 27, 1881, that of his wife on February 9, 1876. She, too, was born in Germany, and was the daughter of a miller, but nothing more is known about her people, except that she was the youngest of a large family. John C. Lickel had one sister. Our subject was about eight years of age when he accompanied his parents to the New World. He acquired his education in the public schools of Quincy, Ill., and at the age of thirteen began learning the trade of wagon making. When he had thoroughly mastered the business, he established a shop of his own in Quincy, which he conducted some three years.  On September 26, 1866, he was united in marriage with Miss Catherine Miller, who was born in Germany, in 1846, daughter of Peter and Elizabeth (Hitridge) Miller, both natives of Germany, the father born in 1796, the mother in 1800; they were the parents of four children: Lizzie (deceased), Caroline, Mary, and Catherine. Mr. Miller was a merchant tailor by trade, a well-educated man, and a leader in politics in Germany, holding public offices there for many years. He was very prosperous in his business, which he followed not only in his native land, but also in Paris, France. In the Fatherland he served in the army, for six years as an officer. In 1852 he came to the United States with his family, the voyage, which was made in a sailing vessel, occupying sixty days. Three months after their arrival in the country the family settled at Quincy, Ill., where Mr. Miller became a speculator in real estate, etc., in which he continued up to his death, in 1892. His wife had passed away in 1875. A Republican on this side of the Atlantic, he took a great interest in politics, and was honored with election to several offices of trust. He was a member of the German Lutheran Church, and in all respects was highly esteemed. Mrs. Bolman, sister to Mrs. Lickel, died in 1867, just eleven weeks after her husband had been laid to rest, leaving five children, one of whom, Katie, Mrs. Lickel adopted. She (Katie) married Robert Megow, of Minneapolis, Minn., and now Mrs. Lickel has her daughter, Lulu, adopted. Thus, if Mr. and Mrs. Lickel have no children of their own, they have been a father and mother to the children of others.
Soon after his marriage Mr. Lickel purchased a hotel at Quincy, Ill., which he conducted a number of years, when on account of his wife's failing health he removed to Wisconsin, locating at Necedah, Juneau county, where for several years he again carried on a hotel. In 1888 he came to Merrill, purchased a store and embarked in the grocery business, which he successfully conducted until January 1, 1895, when he sold out. There have been few idle moments in his life, his time and attention having been given almost unceasingly to his business interests, until within the last few months, since when he has been enjoying a rest well earned and richly deserved. He has always affiliated with the Democratic party, and his fellow townsmen have frequently called him to office, he having twice served as supervisor, once as school commissioner, and once as alderman. In his younger years he took quite an active interest in Masonry, and is now a Knight Templar; is also a member of the Knights of Pythias. He and his wife hold membership with the Presbyterian Church, and are most highly-esteemed people, their many excellencies of character winning them the regard of all with whom they have been brought in contact. [Source: “Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Wisconsin counties of Waupaca, Portage, Wood, Marathon, Lincoln, Oneida, Vilas, Langlade and Shawno” 1895, transcribed by Mary Saggio]

Peter Loysen
LOYSEN, Peter U., miller, of the firm of LOYSEN & SPIEGELBERG, Merrill, was born in Milwaukee May 31, 1850. He lived there until he was seventeen years of age, when he went to Kaukauna, where he was employed as miller, and remained about two years, and then went to Minnesota and remained about four years. From there he went to Maryland, Wis., and from there to Centralia; from there to Big Rib Falls, and from there to Merrill. He was married in Berlin Township, Marathon Co., Aug. 31, 1879, to Paulina PLISCH, who was born in Germany, April 15, 1855. They have one child, Laura A. Mr. LOYSEN manufactured the first flour that was made in Lincoln County. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Myron McCord
McCORD, Myron H., was born in Ceres, McKean Co., Penn., Nov. 26, 1840. He came to Wisconsin with his father in 1854, reaching Oshkosh on the fifth day of August. On the 7th of August he started on the old steamer "Barlow" for Shawano, but that boat was destined never to rach there, for she had barely cleared her moorings when a boiler exploded, killing the engineer and fireman and badly injuring several of the passengers. The next boat that left for Shawano was the old "Peytona," which safely made the trip, and the subject of our sketch landed in Shawano on the eleventh day of August. He immediately hired out to work on a farm for the firm of LEWIS & ANDREWS, which firm owned a farm, a saw-mill and a large tract of pine timber, that afterward became immensely valuable, some of it selling as high as $7 per thousand feet on the stump. He worked for them during the Fall and the following Winter, for $13 per month. The next Spring he went on the log drive, and stayed with it until the logs were rafted out at the Bay, twelve miles above Oshkosh. For the Summer's hard work he was to receive $1.50 a day, but he never received it, as the man he worked for ran away and did not pay any of his men. These were about the first logs that were ever driven down the Wolf River from Shawano. Mr. McCORD, when he learned that the man for whom he had worked so long and hard had run away, hailed the first steamboat that came up the river, and took passage for New London, which was as near Shawano as the boats ran at that time. When the captain called for his fare, he was informed of the situation, but only remarked that he did not carry passengers for nothing, and the young boy was put off at the next landing and compelled to make his way along the bank of the river as best he could. He managed, however, to get home, and went to work again. From that time on, for the next five years, he worked by the month in Summer time, and went to school in Winter. He thus obtained experience which was valuable, and a fair education. When he was twenty years old, he began to do business for himself, putting in logs in the Winter, and doing public work, such as building bridges, roads, etc., in the Summer time. He continued in the lumber business on the Wolf River until 1874, when he closed up his business, which was very large, and removed to Jenny, on the Wisconsin River, with a view to engaging in the same business there. He did not, however, engage very extensively in business at that place until after the completion of the Wisconsin Valley Railroad. Then he formed what is known as the Jenny Lumber Co., of which company he is now president, and owns two-thirds of the stock. He is also a member of the firm of ROSS, McCORD & Co., bankers, which is a solid concern, as both Mr. ROSS and Mr. SCOTT are very wealthy men, while Mr. McCORD is now considered well off. Mr. McCORD has held several offices of trust and honor, though he by no means can be classified as an office-seeker. In 1864, he was elected County Superintendent of Schools for Shawano County, but declined a re-election. In 1869, he was elected Treasurer of Shawano County, and re-elected in 1871, without opposition. In 1872 he was elected to the State Senate, and served two sessions. He was unanimously renominated by his party, which was in the majority in his district, but he declined the proffered honor. In 1876, he was elected a Delegate to the Republican National Convention, and ardently supported Mr. BLAINE's candidacy until the very last. In 1880, he was elected to the Assembly, and was a prominent candidate for Speaker, though he withdrew in the interest of harmony in his party. Mr. McCORD has published a newspaper since he became a resident of Lincoln County, namely, the Lincoln County Advocate, and has done much to build up his town and county, and in fact the whole Upper Wisconsin River Valley. That this is fully appreciated by his friends and neighbors, cannot be better illustrated than by stating the fact that at the election for member of the Assembly, in 1880, he received every vote but twelve in the county where he lives. His contributions to public and private charities are liberal, and even generous. He is a high-minded, honorable gentleman, who has honestly and conscientiously discharged every trust, both public and private, committed to his charge. He is a man of ability and integrity, and should he live and be inclined to look after political distinction, will undoubtedly be called to places of greater distinction than any heretofore held by him. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Gustaf Markstrum
MARKSTRUM, Gustaf H., painter, Merrill. He first settled in Green Bay, in 1871; worked one season at his trade, then went to Oshkosh, where he was occupied one year; then he went to Wausau in the same business, in company with his brother K. S. MARKSTRUM, until the Spring of 1881, when he came to Merrill. He was born in Stockholm, Sweden, Oct. 1, 1850. He was married in Merrill, Aug. 18, 1879, to Augusta DAHM. She was born in Wausau, Dec. 18, 1862. They have one child, Edith. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Charles Meadows
MEADOWS, Charles W., attorney at law, of the firm of HOYT & MEADOWS, Merrill, was born in Trenton, N. J., Feb. 24, 1847. He settled in Leon, Monroe Co., and lived there ten years. He began reading law with W. J. HAHN, of Lake City, Minn., and remained there a short time; from there he went to Sparta, and remained until March, 1881, at which time he came to Merrill, where he entered upon the practice of his profession. He enlisted in Co. A, 3rd Wis. Cav., and served two years, or until the close of the Rebellion, and was mustered out Sept. 29, 1865, at Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas. He was married at Viroqua, Wis., March 3, 1881, to Edna L. IRISH, who was born in Elizabeth, Jo Daviess Co., Ill., Oct. 11, 1852. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

M. D. Morris
MORRIS, M. D., druggist, books, stationery, musical instruments, etc., Merrill, was born in Delafield, Waukesha Co., Nov. 11, 1848. He spent his early school days in Allen's Grove Academy, and then attended the Beloit College for about one year; then engaged with Dr. G. H. BRIGGS, of Delavan, in the study of pharmacy. He remained there three years, then went ot Beloit, and engaged with Mr. C. J. G. COLLINS, remaining two years. From there he went to Stevens Point, where he was employed by Mr. H. D. McCULLOCH in the capacity of prescription and drug clerk. he remained two years, and went to Omro, in company with Mr. O. W. JONES, and purchased the drug store of F. F. WHEELER & Co. They were in business four years, then Mr. MORRIS purchased his partner's interest, and ran the business until August, 1879; divided the stock, and ran the Omro store until January, 1880; sold out, and has since made Merrill his permanent place of business. He was married, Feb. 24, 1875, to Della WEBSTER, who was born near Omro, in February, 1853. They have two children, Hiram W. and Richard. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Edwin Mowry
MOWRY, Edwin W., dealer in real estate and tax paying agent, Merrill, first settled in Waupaca, in 1865, where he lived fourteen years. From there he came to Merrill and located, April 7, 1879. He was born in Lawrence, N. Y., June 5, 1829. He was married in Pennsylvania, in March, 1855, to Julia LABAR. She died, March 23, 1863. They had two boys, Wilber and Edwin Jr. He was again married, May 23, 1864, at the same place as before, to a sister of his former wife, Mary LABAR. They have two children, named Mary L. and Minnie N. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

A. J. Neusbaum
NEUSBAUM, A. J., furniture dealer, Merrill, was born at Lauvo, Alsace, France, April 13, 1841. He came to La Crosse in 1874, where he lived six years, engaged in the furniture business; from there he came to Merrill. He was married to Mrs. Anna STREEHT, in July, 1876. She was born in Baden on the Rhine, Jan. 17, 1848. She had two children by her former husband, named Augusta and Hulda. They have one child, named John. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Casper Newbauer
NEWBAUER, Casper, of the firm of NEWBAUER & FROEHLICH, was born in Austria, October, 1855. he came to Schleisingerville, Wis., with his parents, in 1855, and spent his school days there. He went to Milwaukee in 1870, and began the cigar trade. After living there some time, he went to Rochester, Minn., where he remained fifteen months, when he returned to Milwaukee. In May, 1881, he came to Merrill. His wife's maiden name was Anna FROEHLICH, she was born in Milwaukee, Wis., May 6, 1857. They have two boys, Hubert J. and John H. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Alanson Norway
NORWAY, Alanson C., County Judge and proprietor of Merrill House, Merrill, settled at Elk Horn in 1848, and lived there two years; then he moved into Marathon County, and lived at Wausau, and at what is now Merrill. He was engaged for fifteen years in the lumber business, and kept hotel two years during that time. He has kept the Merrill House about thirteen years in succession. He was elected County Judge in November, 1878, and has been re-elected for the next term, to begin January, 1882. He was born in Lisbon, St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., June 11, 1825. He was married, Sept. 1, 1856, to Martha CROWN, who was born in Groton, Caledonia Co., Vt., Sept. 13, 1838. They have two children living, Charles A. and Myron S. The deceased children were named Burton M., Clarissa, Elnora and Homer. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Alanson C. Norway
Alanson C. Norway, who is now living on a small farm of forty acres within the corporation limits of Merrill, Lincoln county, is one of the honored pioneers of that section, having arrived in that place in 1851, when the city was called Jenny, and had not more than one hundred white inhabitants, though there were a great many Indians still living in the neighborhood. Wild game was to be had in abundance, and furnished many a meal for the early settlers. The State of New York has furnished many worthy citizens to Lincoln county, not least among whom is numbered Mr. Norway, who was born in the town of Lisbon, St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., June 11, 1824, and is a son of Charles Norway, a native of New Jersey. The grandfather, who bore the name of Charles, came to this country from Scotland when a young man, locating in New Jersey, where he carried on farming. Later he removed to New York, where both he and his wife died. In their family were six children - five sons: William, John, James, Gregor and Charles, and one daughter whose name is not known.
The father of our subject was reared to manhood on the home farm, after which he married Esther Sheldon, a daughter of Nehemiah and Sarah Sheldon, and to them were born nine children: Alanson C, William and Jeremiah, who are still living; and Jerod, Sheldon, Geddin, Elizabeth, Clarissa and Sarah, who have passed away. William and Geddin were soldiers during the Civil war, fighting Indians in Minnesota in 1862. The father followed agricultural pursuits most of his life, though at an early day he ran a flatboat between Ogdensburg, N. Y., and Montreal. He was a member of the Wesleyan Methodist Episcopal Church, and a man of high moral principals, while politically he was an Abolitionist. His death occurred in New York in 1872. His wife, a woman of firm, decided character, died in 1883, greatly beloved by all who knew her.
Alanson C. Norway, the subject of this sketch, was the second in his father's family, and upon the home farm he remained, assisting in the labors of the field until he had attained his majority. He was allowed to attend school only about two months during the year, and his literary education was completed at the age of eighteen. He worked some for others while still in New York, and at one time went with a raft of square lumber to Quebec. In the winter of 1849 Mr. Norway came west, stopping at Saginaw, Mich., where he was employed in the woods until the following spring, when he continued his journey to Walworth county, Wis. In that county he engaged in farm labor during the summer, but in the fall returned to New York, where he remained all winter, and then again came to Wisconsin, spending another summer in Walworth county. At the end of that time, in the fall of 1851, he came to Merrill, locating here when the town had but one industry — an old sawmill owned by Andrew Warren. For one season Mr. Norway worked in the lumber woods, after which he made a contract with Jones & Goodard to cut and put in their logs. From that time on he followed lumbering for a number of years, meeting with a well-deserved success. In 1866, owing to poor health, he gave up that occupation and purchased a hotel, known then as the "Jenny House," but later the name was changed to the "Merrill". This he successfully conducted for sixteen years, when he built his present home on the bank of Prairie river, a beautiful spot, and his place consists of forty acres. For some time he owned an addition to West Merrill, but this he disposed of in 1880.
In Merrill, September 1, 1856, Mr. Norway wedded Martha Crown, a native of Groton, Caledonia Co., Vt., born September 13, 1838, to Alanson and Amity (Stebbins) Crown. She is one of a family of ten children: Harriet, Maria, Moses, Martha, Horace, Hannah, Cynthia, Aldin, Orin and Frank. The parents were both born in Caledonia county, Vt., and removed to Wisconsin with their family in 1848, locating in Green Lake county, where the father's death occurred in 1886. He was a farmer by occupation. The mother, who died in 1880, was a daughter of Horace Stebbins, a blacksmith, of Vermont, in which State he married Hannah Eaton, and to them were born a family of four sons and four daughters. The paternal great-grandfather of Mrs. Norway was a native of Scotland, and came when a small boy with his parents to America, locating in Vermont. Crown Point, that State, was named in honor of his father. Ebins Crown, Mrs. Norway's grandfather was captured by the Indians when a boy about nine years of age, and held by them until he was sixteen, when he was assisted to escape by a young squaw, who never dared to return to her tribe. He was afterward employed at Crown Point as an interpreter by the traders. Alanson Crown and his wife were earnest Christian people, holding membership for many years with the Methodist Episcopal Church.  To Mr. and Mrs. Norway were born six children, only two of whom survive - the eldest and youngest - Charles A. and Myron. Those deceased are: Homer, who died while young; Clarissa, who died at the age of one year; Elnora, who died at the age of three; and Burton, who died in infancy. In politics, Mr. Norway is a steadfast adherent to the principles formulated by the Republican party, although not a seeker after official positions. For six years he served as county judge of Lincoln county; has been chairman of the town and city boards; and was also assessor, in which offices he has served with credit to himself and to the satisfaction of all concerned. In religious views he is liberal, believing that every one has a right to his own opinion, and being endowed with many virtues and a genial, hospitable manner, he receives the respect and confidence of the entire community.  Charles A. Norway, a representative of one of the honored pioneer families of Lincoln county, Wis., is at present one of the leading business men of Merrill, being connected with several of the most important industries of the county. He is a native of this State, his birth having occurred in Wausau September 29, 1859, and is a son of Alanson C. Norway, one of the highly-respected early settlers of this portion of the State.  The primary education of Charles A. Norway was received in the common schools of Merrill, where he also attended the high school, and later entered the normal school at Oshkosh, Wis. At the age of seventeen he began work in the hotel owned by his father, and was admitted into partnership in the business when he was but twenty years of age. That connection continued for three years, after which he began contracting and building, following that occupation for about a year. In 1882 he was elected register of deeds of Lincoln county, serving four years, during which time he opened a real-estate office and purchased the abstracts of the county. He admitted to partnership C. L. Wiley, and they remained in that business until the spring of 1890, when they sold out and erected a saw-mill in the town of Harshaw, Wis., which they still own. They cut about fifteen million feet of lumber per year, and are doing a good business, in connection with which they have a general store at the same place. In 1893 their mill was burned, but they re-built without delay, and immediately resumed work. Mr. Norway is also interested in a drug store in Merrill, and in 1894, in company with J. R. Babcock, he built and established a factory for the manufacture of boxes, the firm being known as the C. A. Norway Box and Lumber Company. Here he is also meeting with success, giving employment to fifty men.  In 1881 Mr. Norway was united in marriage with Frances Kimball, who was born at Stevens Point, Wis., and is a daughter of Bryant B. Kimball. Unto our subject and his estimable wife has been born one child, a son, Jerry A. In politics, Mr. Norway is a Republican, and is in favor of any movement that is for the benefit of the community, or calculated to elevate the tone of society in general. He served for one year as alderman of the city. He is also interested in civic societies, holding membership with the I. O. O. F., and of the F. and A. M. (being a Knight Templar) of Wausau. He is an industrious, energetic business man, and everything he undertakes he carries forward to completion if it lies within his power. [Source: “Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Wisconsin counties of Waupaca, Portage, Wood, Marathon, Lincoln, Oneida, Vilas, Langlade and Shawno” 1895, transcribed by Mary Saggio.

James O’Connor, deceased
While transmitting to posterity the memory of such men as was the subject of this sketch, it will instill into the minds of our children the important lessons that honor and station are the sure reward of continual exertion; and that, compared to indomitable will power, abundant experience, coupled with habits of honest industry and judicious economy, the greatest fortune would be but a poor inheritance.  The subject of this memoir was a native of Wisconsin, born April 19, 1853, in Marquette county, to Edward and Bridget (O'Connor) O'Connor, the former of whom was born in Ireland, whence when a young man he emigrated to Canada, where he married, and where his four eldest children — Margaret, Catherine, Thomas and Timothy — were born, of whom Margaret and Catherine died when young; the other two children in the family — James and Charles — were born in Wisconsin. Early in 1853 the family came to the "Badger State," the father having been attracted hither by the bright promises held out for the then young State, and here, in Marquette county, near the county seat, they settled on a farm, which, by cultivation, they brought to a high state of perfection. Here the mother died in 1874, the father afterward passing away in Portage City, Wis. Thomas, their eldest son, was a soldier in the Union army, and died while in the service.
James, the third son, and the subject proper of this sketch, was reared on his father's farm, and received his education at the district school of the neighborhood, remaining at home until the death of his mother, when he moved to Lincoln county, locating in what was then known as the village of Jenny, now the bustling city of Merrill, and for several years worked in the lumber woods. He then formed a partnership with J. N. Cotter, under the firm name of Cotter & O'Connor, in the logging and lumbering and real-estate businesses, which continued until the spring of 1886, when the death of Mr. O'Connor, which occurred April 20, severed the partnership. He was reared in the Roman Catholic faith, and died in same. Politically he was a Democrat, but no office-seeker, simply quietly recording his vote at the polls according to the dictates of his conscience.
On January 1, 1884, Mr. O'Connor was united in marriage with Miss Prue Cotter, who was born in Franklin county, N. Y., a daughter of John Cotter, and the result of this union is one child, Prue L. O'Connor, who is brightening the home of her widowed mother, in Merrill. As a representative self-made man Mr. O'Connor in his day had few equals, and he deserved the highest credit for the success he secured within the short twelve years of his experience in Lincoln county - from the time he came here with all his worldly effects contained in a small parcel to the day death summoned him from his labors. [Source: “Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Wisconsin counties of Waupaca, Portage, Wood, Marathon, Lincoln, Oneida, Vilas, Langlade and Shawno” 1895, transcribed by Mary Saggio.

John Oelhafen
John Oelhafen, a prominent and influential citizen of Tomahawk, Lincoln county, is a native of Bavaria, Germany, born January 22, 1836, a son of Andrew Oelhafen.  The father of our subject was born in Bavaria, Germany, June 15, 1806, and was a man of rank and owner of a large estate. He came to America in 1845, landing in Milwaukee, and purchased a quarter section of government land in Washington county, Wis., which he cleared and cultivated, living there until 1863. He then removed to Milwaukee, residing there until his death, in 1875. He was united in marriage with Elizabeth Beck, daughter of a well-to-do farmer, and one of a large family. Their children were: John, Jacob, Maria E., Margaret E., Fritz, Frederick, Elizabeth, Ludwick and Marguerite.
John Oelhafen, the subject proper of this sketch, came to America with his parents when eight years of age, and his childhood days were spent on the farm, his primary education being received in the village schools. He remained on the farm, assisting his father until he reached his majority, although at the age of seventeen he commenced working in the pineries, giving his earnings to his father to help in the support of the family. In September, 1861, he was united in marriage with Anna S. Miller, daughter of Andrew and Mary (Krouse) Miller, the former of whom was an extensive landowner in Germany. Anna S. came to America, alone, at the age of seventeen. To this union were born six children, viz.: Anna E., born October 3, 1862, now the wife of August Zastrow, living in Tomahawk; Andrew, born February 29, 1864, married, and is clerk in his father's store; John W., born May 11, 1866, married, and also a clerk in his father's store; Mary E., born June 28, 1868, now the wife of George Pfeiffer, of Wausau, Wis.; William, born April 2, 1872, and Anna L., born November 19, 1878. After their marriage Mr. Oelhafen and his wife removed to a farm in Washington county, where they remained for about two years. Mr. Oelhafen then sold his interest in the farm and removed to Milwaukee, where he opened a general store, remaining there some ten years. In 1872 he removed to Wausau, at which place he opened a general store, and also engaged in the lumbering business, both in Wausau and in Millbank, S. Dak., where he still has large interests in farm lands and city property. In July, 1887, he erected the first building in Tomahawk, Lincoln county, before the days of railroads in that section of the country. At Tomahawk he again opened a general store, which he still carries on, being assisted by his three sons.  Mr. Oelhafen has invested heavily, but profitably, in pine and farm lands all through the northern part of the State. He owns a very handsome residence in Wausau, and has always been an enterprising and influential citizen. He at one time filled the office of vice-president of the first bank of Tomahawk, now Bradley's private bank. The family are all leading members of the Lutheran Church. In politics Mr. Oelhafen is a Republican, and although often urged by his friends would never accept any office. He is a man of considerable means, which he has acquired by a life of industry. [Source: “Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Wisconsin counties of Waupaca, Portage, Wood, Marathon, Lincoln, Oneida, Vilas, Langlade and Shawno” 1895, transcribed by Mary Saggio.

Charles Osborne
OSBORNE, Charles J., Postmaster and book-keeper, Merrill, was born Aug. 27, 1854, in the town of Nepeuskun, Winnebago Co. He finished his education at Madison, in the classical college and school of B. M. WORTHINGTON. He then went to Chicago, and was engaged in the patent right business about one year. There he went to Oshkosh, where he remained about a year, employed in the insane asylum. From there came to Merrill, and was engaged in the grocery business for two years, but sold out and began the drug business, which he followed for about two years. During this time, he was appointed Postmaster, Feb. 18, 1869. He was married in Oshkosh, in February, 1876, to Nellie BENNETT, who was born in Oshkosh, in June, 1856. They have two children, Birdie and an infant daughter. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

John Phelps
PHELPS, John, lumberman, Merrill, purchased upon coming here a tract of pine land, consisting of 35,000 acres, bordering the Wisconsin River, and beginning inTown 35, and ending in 42, in Ranges 9, 10 and 11, east, and said to contain when located 300,000,000 feet of pine. It embraces some of the best pine lands in Wisconsin. It is owned by the following gentlemen: Francis PALMS, three quarters interest, and John PHELPS, one quarter interest, with his sons, who are now asssocated with him. Mr. PHELPS settled in Wausau in May, 1878. He moved to Merrill in May, 1880. He was born in township of Rush, Monroe Co., N. Y., June 4, 1819. He moved to Michigan, November, 1830, and from there to Wausau. He was married, Oct. 25, 1840, in Addison, Oakland Co., N. Y., Dec. 11, 1822. They have four children - George M., Milo D., Orlo and a daughter living at home, Eliza L. Mr. George M. PHELPS enlised in Co. A., 9th Reg. Mich. Vet. V. I., and served until the close of the Rebellion, and was mustered out at Nashville, Tenn., in October, 1865. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Jules Pose
POSE, Jules, proprietor Lincoln House, Merrill, was born in Montreal, April 18, 1821, and came to Wausau in the Spring of 1849, where he was occupied in lumbering and logging. Then moved to Trapp River, where he lived four years, in the same business. From there he went to Rock Falls, where he kept the stage station, and remained ten years. He then moved to Merrill, where he was engaged in lumbering for two years. Then he followed the hotel business for nine years, when his house caught fire and burned. In 1878, he erected the Lincoln House, a fine, large building. He was married, Aug. 9, 1858, in Marathon Co., Texas Tp., to Ann KEMP, a native of Scotland, born October, 1835. They have five children - James A., POSEY, Julius W., Jr., John, Paul and Robert. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

George Ripley
RIPLEY, George H., mail carrier between Merrill and Rock Falls, was born in Perry, Washington Co., Me., Feb. 27, 1832. He came to Point Bois in 1848; lived there a short time, and then went to Grand Rapids, Wis., in 1850, following the lumber business until 1866. From there he went to Stevens Point, and followed running the river as pilot for eight or ten years. From there he went on the Northern Pacific Railroad, and engaged in the restaurant business; he was there one and one-half years. From there he returned to Stevens Point, and then went to Rock Falls, in the employ of the Improvement Company. He was married in Grand Rapids, July 8, 1854, to Nancy GORDON. She died July 12, 1854. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Edward J. Roller
Edward J. Roller (deceased) was born March 25, 1857, in Watertown, Dodge Co., Wis., a son of John and Anna (Johis) Roller, natives of Austria, who were the parents of six children - Mary, Augusta, Edward J., John, Anna and Amelia.  In 1853 the parents of our subject came to America and to Wisconsin, settling in Watertown, Jefferson county, where they remained some ten years, then removing to Richwood, Dodge county, where the father is yet living, all these years following his trade, that of blacksmith, in connection with farming. The mother died November 20, 1886. John Roller, paternal grandfather of Edward J., came to America from Austria with his children, and died in June, 1891, at the age of eighty-eight years; the grandmother, now at the patriarchal age of ninety years, is at present living at the home of her son John; they had two children - John and Anna.
The subject proper of this memoir was reared on the farm, assisting his father until he was twenty-two years of age, at which time he went to Minneapolis, where he commenced the trade of cooper, which he carried on there some live years, and then selling out in 1883 embarked in the saloon trade, continuing thereat in Minneapolis till 1887, in which year he came to Tomahawk, Lincoln county, and opened out a general mercantile business, one of the first in that line to be commenced in the place. By strict attention to the wants of his customers, honest dealing and courteous deportment, he succeeded in building up a remunerative business and surrounding himself with hosts of friends, among whom he was a recognized leader. In addition to his mercantile business he was interested in other industries, including logging and handling of wood, etc., for he was one of the most active business men in northern Wisconsin. But death interrupted his busy life, he being called from earth January 1, 1893, in the heyday of his early manhood and zenith of his usefulness, deeply mourned by all who knew him.  In June, 1885, Mr. Roller was married to Miss Josephine M. Cabott, daughter of Martin and Henrietta Cabott, who were the parents of six children, to wit: Michael, Leopold, Julia, Amelia, Leonard and Josephine M. Martin Cabott, father of this family, was born near Berlin, Prussia, in 1821, learned the trade of carpenter, was married in Posen, Germany, in 1840, and came to America in 1855, taking up his residence in Detroit, Mich., where he died in 1855. His wife was born in Berlin, Prussia, in 1822, a daughter of Judge John Van Zoebol, a man of considerable prominence in that city, who had a family of seven sons and five daughters. After the death of her husband Mrs. Henrietta Cabott moved from Detroit to Watertown, Wis., and was there married to a Mr. Howard, by whom she had five children, named respectively, Theodore, Albert, Rosa, Ferdinand and Henry. Mr. Howard died in the fall of 1893, but Mrs. Howard is yet living.  To Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Roller were born two children — Julian A. and George E., who died in infancy. In National and State politics Mr. Roller was a Democrat, but in local affairs he invariably cast his ballot for the candidate he considered best suited for the position, regardless of party ties. He served as deputy sheriff two years, and constable four years, filling both offices with eminent satisfaction. The entire family (as was also Mr. Roller himself) are consistent members of the Catholic Church, and enjoy the highest esteem and regard of the community at large. [Source: “Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Wisconsin counties of Waupaca, Portage, Wood, Marathon, Lincoln, Oneida, Vilas, Langlade and Shawno” 1895, transcribed by Mary Saggio.]

Emil Ruder
Emil Ruder (deceased), who for some twelve years conducted the well-known brewery owned by him at Merrill, Lincoln county, was born November 29, 1859, at Stevens Point, Wis., a son of George and Louisa (Schmidt) Ruder.  George Ruder was born September 7, 1827, in Nuremberg, Bavaria, and was a son of Wolfe and Katrina Ruder. The family are of German ancestry, and Wolfe Ruder, as was his father before him, was born in Germany. George Ruder was educated in his native land, and in early life learned the trade of brewer in his father's brewery, afterward worked at his trade in some of the large cities of Europe, and traveled extensively through Germany. In 1854 he came to the United States, locating first in Milwaukee, where he worked at his trade upward of two years, and then, in 1856, he removed to Stevens Point, Portage county, purchased a brewery there, and conducted it some four years. At Stevens Point he married Miss Louisa Schmidt, who was born in the Province of Posen, Germany, April 25, 1835, and children as follows were born to them: Louis, Emil, Herman, Louisa, Clara, Emma (wife of Henry Mombart, residing in Wausau), Edward (in Merrill, Lincoln county), Henry (in Wausau, Marathon county), William and Lena, of whom Emil, Louisa and Lena are now deceased. In 1860 George Ruder removed to Wausau, Marathon county, and there erected a brewery which he conducted up to 1887, when he retired from active business, the following year, accompanied by his wife and daughter, Emma, visiting his native land, and spending upward of twelve months in travel and sight-seeing, among other places visiting Berlin and Munich. His death occurred December 29, 1893, at Milwaukee, Wis., whither he had gone for medical treatment, and was buried in Wausau cemetery. He was a member of the I. O. O. F., was president of the village, and alderman of the city of Wausau four years.
Emil Ruder, whose name appears at the opening of this sketch, on leaving school entered his father's brewery in Wausau, in order to learn the business, and in 1882 accompanied him to Merrill. Here in 1886 he bought the brewery built by his father, and which he enlarged and improved, conducting same until his death, which occurred May 23, 1894. He left a widow and six children to mourn the early taking away of a loving husband and kind, indulgent father, besides many sorrowing friends who knew him as an active business man, generous-hearted and highly respected by all. Politically a Democrat, he served the city of Merrill as alderman; socially, he was a member of the Sons of Hermann, and a member of the Order of Druids of Merrill, and of the German Benevolent Society.  On July 27, 1884, Mr. Ruder was married, in Wausau, Wis., to Miss Mary Laessig, who was born in Chicago, Ill., daughter of Edward and Janette (Baenen) Laessig, who were the parents of twelve children: Edward, Mary, Henry, Augusta, Minnie, Frederick, Frank, Charles, Louis, Julia, Anna and Nellie, the last named dying in infancy. The father was born July 15, 1835, in Saxony, Germany, whence when a young man he came to America, and for several years worked as a common laborer. In 1856, in Chicago, Ill., he married Miss Janette Baenen, who was born in Holland, in January. 1838, and same year came to America with her parents, who had a family of seven children, namely: Frank. Mary, Janette, John, Henry, Bell and Minnie. After marriage Mr. and Mrs. Laessig moved to Green Bay, Wis., and there resided nine years, when they moved to Wausau, and at the end of four years bought a farm in Marathon county, Wis., whither they removed and where they are yet residing. The children born to Emil Ruder are Lena, Lizzie, George, Edward, Willie and baby Emil.  William Ruder, a younger son of the late George Ruder, by his wife, Louisa (Schmidt), was born in Wausau, Wis., Aug. 12, 1873. Until he was fifteen years of age he attended school at Wausau, and then went to Milwaukee, where he took a course in a business college in that city, graduating from same in June, 1889. In the following August he came to Merrill, where he entered the employ of his brother Emil, in the capacity of bookkeeper, collector, etc., positions he held until the death of the latter, since when he has had entire charge of the business for behoof of the widow. Though yet a young man, he has made many friends among the business men of Merrill. In his political affiliation he is a sound Democrat, while socially he is a member of the Sons of Hermann, the German Benevolent Society and the Order of Druids of Merrill, of which latter he is secretary.  On April 24, 1894, William Ruder and Theresa Bott were married at Wausau, Wis. She is a native of Illinois, born at Rockford, daughter of Marcus and Eva (Harris) Bott, who were the parents of five children: Theresa, Tillie, John, Frank, and one that died in infancy. Mr. Bott was a native of Germany, and came to America when a young man; a mason by trade, he followed it successfully until his death in Merrill, April, 1885. His widow was born in Wisconsin, near Milwaukee; she remarried, her second husband being Henry J. Hampel, by whom she has two children: Henry and George. [Source: “Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Wisconsin counties of Waupaca, Portage, Wood, Marathon, Lincoln, Oneida, Vilas, Langlade and Shawno” 1895, transcribed by Mary Saggio.]

Herman Rusch
RUSCH, Herman D., County Clerk of Lincoln County, Merrill, was born in Dodge County, Aug. 10, 1853. He spent his school days in Horicon, where he remained until he was seventeen years old, when he went to Merrill, working at lumbering, which included rafting and running the river. He then tried lumbering on his own account, and continued at it three years. He has been in the business occasionally since, during the Winter. He was first elected to his present office in the Fall of 1876, and has since been re-elected for the terms of 1878 and 1880. He was married Jan. 1, 1880, to Lizzie KICKBUSCH, a native of Germany, born Nov. 23, 1860. They have one boy, Walter H. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Ulric St. Amour
ST. AMOUR, Ulric C., principal clerk in dry goods, store of T. B. SCOTT, Merrill. He first settled in Grand Rapids, August, 1856. He went to Minnesota in 1859, and remained until 1861, when he returned to Grand Rapids, and was elected Register of Deeds of Wood County. He served one term, which expired Jan. 1, 1863. He then clerked in a store until December, 1864, at which time he enlisted in Co. B, 46th Regt. Wis. Vol. Inf., served one year, and was mustered out at Nashville, Tenn. He returned to Grand Rapids and worked for John EDWARDS & Co., where he remained two years. From there he went to Montreal, Canada, where he went into business for himself, in the mercantile trade, and remained but a short time. Returned to Grand Rapids, where he stayed a greater share of the time, though he went to Dakota Territory, and took up a homestead, returning to Grand Rapids, where he remained until he came to Merrill. He was born in St. Paul, Canada East, Aug. 20, 1837. He was married in Henderson, Sibley Co., Minn., Oct. 8, 1857, to Christe CORMIER, born in St. Charles, Canada East, June, 1841. They have three children - Albert C., Oswald H., and Delia C. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Carl Schield
SCHIELD, Carl W., of the firm of SCHIELD & KUHL, furniture dealers, Merrill, was born in Milwaukee, Nov. 26, 1858. He settled in Merrill in 1866, and began business. He was married Dec. 10, 1880, at Merrill, to Amelia WILKE, who was born in Germany, Dec. 19, 1858. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

James Scott
SCOTT, James W., proprietor Merrill livery stables, was born in Canada East, Sept. 6, 1842. He first settled in Oasis, Waushara Co., in 1855, where he lived seven years. Then he went to Minnesota, and drove stage for several years. From there he went to Council Bluffs, Iowa, and then to Denver, in the employ of the Wells & Fargo Stage Co. He lived there three years, driving between the latter place and Salt Lake Ctiy. From there he went on the Cheyenne and Wyoming stage; then to the Kit Carson and Lake Station stage road, and from there to Baxter Springs, Ark., where he was a short time on the Baxter Springs and Sherman, Texas route. From there he went to Ft. Smith, Ark. and drove to Pierce City, Mo. Then he drove from Ft. Smith to Muskogee, Ind. Ter. From there he returned to Sherman, Texas, and drove to Gainesville, Texas. Then to Ft. Smith, Ark., where he rigged up a four-horse team and wagon, took his family, and came overland to Wausau. They were two months on the route. Then he went to freighting, to Lake Somo, and then ran a freight and express between Wausau and Merrill; also ran a stage one and one-half years, until the advent of the Wisconsin Valley Railroad. He was born in Canada East, Sept. 6, 1842. He was married Sept. 1, 1872, at Ft. Smith, Ark., to Mrs. Margaret CAMPBELL. She was born in Indian Territory, Jan. 28, 1845. She has one son by her first husband, named John CAMPBELL. They have one boy, named Clyde SCOTT. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Charles Searl
SEARL, Charles E., watchmaker and jeweler, Merrill, was born in Grand Rapids, Wis., March 14, 1851. He spent his boyhood in that city. Then his parents moved to Adams County, where he lived over a year, when he returned to Grand Rapids and learned the jeweler's trade. He lived three years and a half, then went to Wautoma. He came to Merrill, November, 1879. He was married at Wautoma, Dec. 23, 1875, to Emma A. BEAN, who was born in Wautoma, Dec. 31, 1859. They have had three children - Eddie W., Glen C. (now deceased), and Karl. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

CHARLES E. SEARL
Charles E. Searl, the pioneer jeweler of Merrill, Lincoln county, still continues in the same line in that city, where he is one of the leading business men. He was born in Grand Rapids, Wis., March 14, 1851, and is a son of J. K. Searl, a native of the Buckeye State, born on June 2, 1818. The paternal grandfather, Elisha Searl, was born in Vermont, and by his marriage with Miss Boborety, who was of German descent, became the father of six children, namely: William, Frank, J. K., a daughter whose name is not given, Loretta and Jemima. Near Dayton, Ohio, he carried on a hotel, but later removed to Illinois, locating near Rock Island, but afterward went to Iowa, where he passed his last days.  J. K. Searl, who was next to the youngest in his father's family, acquired his education in the common schools. On reaching man's estate he was married in Illinois to Miss Leah Kline, who was born in Nunda Valley, N. Y., in 1824, a daughter of George Kline. Her parents were both natives of Germany, where they were married, and to them was born a family of eight children: George, John, William, Elizabeth, Sarah, Leah, Charles and Mary. Her father was a contractor and builder, and on first coming west, located in Illinois, but in 1838 removed to Grand Rapids, Wis. His eldest son, George Kline, Jr., was among the first settlers of the latter place, arriving there in 1833. The son's wife was the first white woman north of Fort Winnebago; she was the widow of Daniel Whitney, who built the first sawmill on the Wisconsin river. George Kline, Jr., also erected a mill at Grand Rapids at an early day, and his father's death occurred there in 1853; the mother of Mrs. Searl died in 1870. George, Jr., went to California about the year 1851.
The father of our subject also located in Grand Rapids, Wis., in 1844, where he lumbered, afterward dealing extensively in horses, and was something of a politician, holding many minor offices. He departed this life in December, 1892, in Merrill, though his home at the time was at Wautoma, Wis. To him and his worthy wife were born twelve children, two of whom died in infancy. The others are Mary J., Alonzo W., Charles E., Lillian, Henry, Emma E., Elbert F., Ernest E., Nila B. and Vinnie D. E. The mother after her marriage taught the first school in Grand Rapids, or in fact north of Fort Winnebago; this was in 1846, and was a private school. She was called to her final rest January 4, 1888. The eldest brother of our subject served during the Civil war as a member of the Fifty-second Wis. V. I.  
Until he had reached the age of eighteen Charles E. Searl was able to attend school, thus acquiring a good common-school education, and then carried the mail from Grand Rapids to Friendship, Wis., for his father. In the spring of 1870 he accompanied his parents to Adams county, Wis., but in the following fall he returned to Grand Rapids and commenced to learn the trade of jeweler with his uncle, William Kline, for whom he worked four years. In 1875 he went to Wautoma, Wis., and started in business for himself, at which place he continued three years, when he removed to Westfield, Wis., remaining there but one year, during the fall of 1879 closing out his business there and coming to Jennie, now known as Merrill. When he arrived here the village contained only about five hundred inhabitants, while now it is a flourishing little city of nine thousand. He was the first jeweler in the place, and still continues to conduct the same business, in which he has met with excellent success.  On December 23, 1875, Mr. Searl was united in marriage at Wautoma, Wis., with Miss Emma A. Bean, who was born in that city, in 1859, to Albert and Arvilla (Conner) Bean, both of whom were natives of New Hampshire, and is one of a family of eight children - Charles, John, Francena, George, Fred, Katie, Ed and Emma A. Her parents came to Wisconsin in 1856, where her father followed his trade of blacksmithing; his death occurred in 1872, that of his wife in 1880. To Mr. and Mrs. Searl were born six children, to wit: Ed, who is married and lives in Merrill; Harl, Ethel, Arthur and Nile at home; and Glen, who died at the age of about eighteen months. Mr. Searl may be properly classed among the self-made men of Lincoln county, who by the exercise of their own industry and perseverance have not only gained for themselves a competence, but have materially assisted in the progress and advancement of the country around them. He has made many friends since coming to Merrill, and by all with whom he comes in contact is held in the highest respect. Socially he is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, while politically he casts his vote with the Prohibition party as it embodies his views on the temperance question. [Source: “Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Wisconsin counties of Waupaca, Portage, Wood, Marathon, Lincoln, Oneida, Vilas, Langlade and Shawno” 1895, transcribed by Mary Saggio.

O. B. Smith
SMITH, O. B., lumberman, Merrill, was born in Erie, Pa., Sept. 10, 1823. He first settled at Trapp River, in 1844. He lived there but a short time, then went to Wausau, and made that his headquarters until 1853, dealing in lumber and logs. Then he located at Merrill permanently, and has since followed his present business. He was married at Kanesville, Ill., in 1856, to Sophronia RAVLIN, who was born in Clymer, Chautauqua Co., N. Y., Nov. 22, 1832. They have five children - Katie, Frank and Fred (who were twins), Dora and Charles. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

William Spiegelberg
SPIEGELBERG, William F., miller, of the firm of LOYSEN & SPIEGELBERG, Merrill, was born in Germany, March 28, 1850. He first settled in Wolf River Township, in December, 1854, with his parents, and lived there until the Fall of 1877; came to Merrill, and engaged in his present business. He was married, at Merrill, June 14, 1880, to Ida PLISCH, who was born in Berlin Township, Marathon Co., Wis., Dec. 23, 1858. They have one child, Lenora F. The mill of this firm was completed in August, 1878, and has a capacity of from seventy-five to 100 bushels in twenty-four hours. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

August H. Stange
August H. Stange, president and manager of the A. H. Stange Co., Merrill, and whose enterprise, energy and business tact and public-spiritedness have done so much toward the building up of the city of his adoption since he came to it, is by birth a German, having been born near the city of Berlin October 10, 1853.  Charles F. Stange, his father, also a native of Germany, born in 1820, was married in the Fatherland to Miss Caroline Boetcher, of the same nativity, the date of her birth being February 6, 1826. In Germany three children -Caroline, August H. and Charles - were born to them, and in 1856 the family came to America, settling in Watertown, Jefferson Co., Wis., where six more children were born - Ida, Augusta, Anna and Emma, living, and two that died in infancy. The father was called from earth in 1886, while a resident of Merrill, Lincoln Co., Wis., having been an invalid for eleven years; the mother is yet living.
The subject proper of these lines secured but a limited education, as on account of his father's ill-health he had early to commence work in order to aid in the support of the family. To the astonishingly rapid development of lumber manufactures in Wisconsin during the past quarter of a century Mr. Stange has conspicuously and effectually contributed, and he entered the arena of business with a vigor and energy which has never flagged. At the age of thirteen we find him in a sash, door and blind factory, giving all his earnings to his parents, which, in fact, he did until he was married. When eighteen years old he went to Racine, Wis., to accept the position of foreman in a sash and door factory, where he remained eleven years, or until coming to Merrill in the spring of 1882, in company with H. W. Wright, working for him on salary until the organization of the H. W. Wright Lumber Co., of which he became a member. After two years, however, he sold his interest, and in partnership with Mr. Mihill, bought the present plant consisting of sawmill, sash, door and blind factory, which he has vastly increased and improved, employment being now given to an average of 350 hands. Within one year Mr. Stange bought out his partner's interest, and the business was conducted in Mr. Stange's own name until January, 1895, when it was organized into a stock company, know as the A. H. Stange Co., of which he is president, a part of the stock being distributed among his trusted employes, Mr. Stange owning the controlling interests. When he bought his present plant, it was far from new, and considerably run down; but his energy and business ability soon built it up to its present standard of efficiency, and to-day the concern stands at the head of all similar industries in Northern Wisconsin. Mr. Stange enjoys the unqualified esteem and respect of his employes, for reasons, chief among which, probably, is his thorough personal knowledge of the business in every detail, there not being a single machine in all the extensive plant that he can not operate himself — well-establishing his claim to be recognized as a master of every department of the industry.
In February, 1874, at Racine, Wis., Mr. Stange was married to Miss Emily Miller, a native of that city, and daughter of William and Hattie Miller, Germans by birth. Six children have been born to this union, named respectively: Hattie, Charles, Adaly, August, Emily and Lydia. In religious faith the entire family are identified with the Lutheran Church, while, socially, they are held in the highest esteem by the community.  Mr. Stange's business interests will not permit of his taking much, if any, active part in politics; but his popularity is such that he has, even in a measure against his inclination, been placed in public offices of trust and honor. For six years — or in fact until he positively declined to act longer — he served the city of Merrill as alderman, and in the spring of 1895, although a Democrat, he was offered the nomination for mayor of his adopted city by the best representatives of the Republican party of Merrill. We have said he does not take active part in politics, but he is looked upon as such an able adviser that he is repeatedly waited on and consulted on political questions of moment. One of his business capacity, administrative ability and unblemished integrity is certain to be sought after to fill positions where experience and sound judgment are essential, and to-day Mr. Stange is vice-president of the First National Bank, as well as one of the directors of the National Bank of Merrill. He takes great interest in the welfare and advancement of the city. Liberal in his views, and charitable almost to a fault, yet quiet and unostentatious, as becomes a man of modest mien, he has ever been a powerful supporter of any philanthropic or similar cause to which he could conscientiously give his sanction. [Source: “Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Wisconsin counties of Waupaca, Portage, Wood, Marathon, Lincoln, Oneida, Vilas, Langlade and Shawno” 1895, transcribed by Mary Saggio.

Mitchell Sweeney
SWEENEY, Mitchell W., druggist, Merrill, was born in Grand Island, N. Y., June, 1850. He came, with his parents, to Milwaukee in the Spring of 1855, remaining there about one year; then went to Grand Rapids, Wis., where he spent his school days, he also learning the drug business there. In 1870, he went to Wausau, first clerking in a drug store three years; then beginning business for himself. This he followed three years; then sold out and went into the lumber business. After following that three years, he came to Merrill, where he is in the drug trade. He was married, at Grand Rapids, 1871, to Lill A. BURDICK; she was born in Deposit, Broome Co., N. Y., Sept. 3, 1853. They have two children, Albert H. and Ethel B. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

David D. Tarr
David D. Tarr, a representative of one of the honored New England families who for generations have made their home in Maine, was born in Salem, that State, in May, 1839. His father, Mark P. Tarr, also a native of Maine, married Sophrona P. Merchant, who was born in Massachusetts, and they became the parents of three children - Hiram P., Mary E. and David D. The father, who was a farmer and lumberman, died in the Pine Tree State in 1889, where his wife had passed away two years previously. The paternal grandfather, John Tarr, lived all his life in Maine, and by his marriage became the father of eight children - John, Abraham. William, Rufus, Abigial, May, Harriet and Mark P.  David D. Tarr, the subject of this sketch, was educated in the high school, and remained at home until he had attained his majority. In May, 1861, he enlisted in Company C, Second Maine V. I., becoming corporal, serving three months, during which time he participated in the first battle of Bull Run. At the end of that time he re-enlisted for two years, remaining in the service until the spring of 1863, as a member of the Army of the Potomac. He was in the siege of Yorktown and Hanover Court House, and in the Chickahominy Swamps he was taken sick, on which account he was sent to the hospital at York, Penn., from which in time he was discharged, but after returning home he did not recover his health for over a year. For a time Mr. Tarr was employed in a mill, after which he made a trip to Omaha, Neb., for his health, and, in 1868, went to Minneapolis, Minn., where for a year he clerked in a hotel. At the end of that time he went to Big Rapids, Mich., being in the employ of O. P. Pillsbury & Co., remaining there ten years, serving in different capacities, including the positions of scaler, foreman and, later, as superintendent of their upper river branch. He also engaged in general merchandising in Stanwood and Hersey, Mich., and on selling out that business returned to Maine, where he remained one year. In May, 1884, he came to Wisconsin, in the employ of the Merrill Boom Company, which belonged to the Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad Company. O. P. Pillsbury sent for Mr. Tarr to come to Merrill and accept the position of superintendent of Merrill Boom, in which capacity he still continues to serve, being held in the highest regard by his employers. This company employs about eighty men, and handles as high as one hundred forty million feet of lumber for Merrill, and one hundred million for parties down the river.
On September 16, 1880, Mr. Tarr wedded Sarah Jane Palmer, who was born in Nobleboro, Maine, October 10, 1845, and is a daughter of Elisha R. and Sarah (Dunbar) Palmer, who had eight children: Halsey H., Arlinda R., Bertha A., Orlando A., Gulinglus C, Sarah J., Byron W. and Sanford K. The parents were natives of Maine, where the father was employed as a shipbuilder and carpenter until his death, which occurred November 10, 1868; the mother now makes her home with Mr. Tarr. She is of Scotch lineage, being a direct descendant of Earl George Dunbar, who on the occasion of his marriage was knighted by King James I. For a time he stood very high in the King's favor, but in March, 1425, he was arrested and imprisoned on suspicion, his estates being confiscated to the Crown. The Dunbar family occupies a conspicuous place all through Scottish history. To Mr. and Mrs. Tarr were born, June 18, 1882, twins: Arthur Jay and Alta May. Our subject takes a warm interest in public affairs, and uniformly casts his vote with the Republican party. For three years he served as postmaster at Stanwood. Socially he is identified with several civic societies, belonging to the F. & A. M., in which he is a Knight Templar, and the Grand Army of the Potomac. He is frank and open in the expression of his opinions, and has the confidence and respect of all. [Source: “Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Wisconsin counties of Waupaca, Portage, Wood, Marathon, Lincoln, Oneida, Vilas, Langlade and Shawno” 1895, transcribed by Mary Saggio]

William Swineheart
SWINEHEART, William H., County Treasurer, Merrill, was born in Avoca, Iowa Co., Wis., Feb. 9, 1855. He spent his boyhood days at the above place, and afterward attended a classical and musical academy at Madison. Graduated at Northwestern Business College, in Madison, June 1, 1874. He went to Merrill, in December following, and engaged in the employ of State Senator Thomas B. SCOTT, as book-keeper until Jan. 1, 1881, when he assumed the duties of his present office, having been elected in November, 1880. He was married, at Merrill, Dec. 17, 1877, to Rhoda J. KLINE; she was born at Gilletts, Bradford Co., Penn., January, 1862. They have one child living, named Leta T. Lena M., born Jan. 6, 1879, is not living. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Julius Thielman
THIELMAN, Julius, proprietor City meat market, Merrill, was born in Watertown, Sept. 21, 1858. He lived there until seventeen years of age, and then went to Grand Rapids, Wis. June 1, 1881, he came to Merrill and opened his present market. He was married, at Grand Rapids, March 18, 1879, to Minnie PLAUMER. She was born in Berlin, Prussia, March 28, 1858. They have one child, Amanda. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

JULIUS THIELMAN.
Among well-to-do citizens of Merrill, Lincoln county, not the least worthy of special mention in the pages of this volume is the gentleman whose name here appears, who is a thoroughly representative, progressive German-American.  He is a native of Wisconsin, born in Watertown, Jefferson county, September 20, 1860, a son of Gottfried and Julia (Baum) Thielman, natives of Prussia, Germany, where the father was born, in 1829, and where they were married. They came to the United States in 1852, making their home in Watertown, Wis., where the father followed the business of contractor and builder, for many years also being employed on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul railroad. In 1888 he came to Merrill, Lincoln county, where he and his wife are at present residing. To them were born eleven children, named respectively: Alvina, Louisa, Julius, Emil, Albert, Robert, Helen, Louis, Theodore, Amanda, and Mollie. Julius, the subject proper of this article, received his education at the common schools of Watertown, Wis., and at the age of fourteen commenced to learn the trade of butcher. When eighteen years old, in 1878, he started in the same line of business for himself at Grand Rapids, Wis., which he continued until the spring of 1881, when he sold out there, and, coming to Merrill, opened out a first-class butchering establishment, the business of which has since so increased that now he has two leading markets in that city, besides one in the city of Tomahawk, in the same county; these are, it is unnecessary to say, retail establishments, and in addition he does a lucrative wholesale business. On April 20, 1879, at Grand Rapids, Wis., Mr. Thielman was married to Miss Minnie Plahmer, a native of Germany, whose parents, John and Carolina (Knutt) Plahmer, came with their nine children to America in 1870, settling at Grand Rapids, Wis., where the father followed farming pursuits. He is now living in the town of Grant, near Grand Rapids. To Mr. and Mrs. Thielman have been born three children: Amanda, Lillian, and William. In politics our subject is a strong Democrat, active at all times in the workings of the party, and for three years he was chairman of the Democratic County Central Committee; was mayor of Merrill one year; chairman of the county board of supervisors, and alderman two terms. In July, 1893, he was appointed postmaster at Merrill, an office in which he gives unbounded satisfaction, and each and every one of these incumbencies he has filled with scrupulous integrity. For six years he was secretary of the Central Manufacturing Co., which establishment burned in May, 1894, and he is a director of the First National Bank of Merrill. In religious faith he and his wife are members of the Lutheran Church.  Mr. Thielman is a typical self-made man, one whose only capital, when at the age of fourteen, he vaulted into the arena of business life, was naught save a level head, a stout heart and a willing pair of hands, and bearing for his motto the words: "Fortuna favet fortibus." He is now one of the leading business men of Merrill, is a power in his party, and a leader in the development of all enterprises tending to the growth and prosperity of the city of his adoption — a typical Western man. Without ostentation, either in their manner or style of life, he and his amiable life partner always maintain a high social position, and are at all times in the enjoyment of the highest esteem and regard of the community in which they live. [Source: “Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Wisconsin counties of Waupaca, Portage, Wood, Marathon, Lincoln, Oneida, Vilas, Langlade and Shawno” 1895, transcribed by Mary Saggio.]

Robert Weiss
WEISS, Robert, hardware, Merrill, was born in Cassville, Wis., June 28, 1857. He spent his school days there, andin the Spring of 1875 made a journey to Iowa, and located at Shell Rock; he was there nearly two years, and learned the tinner's trade; then he came to Merrill with a capital of $35 cash. He has been quite successful, as he carries a good stock and is doing a good trade. He was married, at Merrill, April 9, 1880, to Mrs. Martha J. WELLS, who was born in Tarmouth, N. S. They have one boy, Anton. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

James Wescott
WESCOTT, James S., County Superintendent of Schools and Deputy Register of Deeds, Merrill, settled in Horicon, in 1876. He lived there over one year, occupied in the Prresbyterian pulpit. He came to Merrill as Presbyterian minister, and remained in that capacity until his election to the Superintendency of Schools in 1880, when he ceased preaching. He was born in Ramapo, Rockland Co., N. Y., Jan. 21, 1848, and was married, in Merrill, April 30, 1881, to Eva WALKER. She was born in Friendship, Allegany Co., N. Y., Aug. 11, 1864. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Jacob Whiting
WHITING, Jacob F., practicing physician and surgeon, Merrill. Was born in Bangor, Me., Sept. 24, 1844. He came to Oconto in the Fall of 1856, with his parents, where he remained until the Fall of 1877. He then went to Ann Arbor, Mich., where he studied medicine for two years, graduating from the College of Physicians and Surgeons, March 26, 1879. From there he went to Medary, D. T., and there began the practice of medicine. In the Fall of 1879, he returned to Oconto, and in October, 1879, he came to Merrill, where he entered upon the practice of his profession. He was married at Oconto, Sept. 1, 1865, to Emma LEWIS, who was born at Hillsdale, Mich., Feb. 2, 1846. They have four children - Isabel M., Henry W., Annie C. and Jennie. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Edward W. Whitson
It is believed the Whitson family, of whom this gentleman is a worthy representative, were of Welsh descent, immigrating to this country about the time the English captured New Amsterdam (now Long Island) from the Dutch. They were all Quakers, and, as a rule, followed agricultural pursuits.
Abraham Underbill Whitson, the father of our subject, was born on Long Island, in Queens county, in 1810, where he received his primary education and was employed about the farm. In early manhood he was united in marriage with Hannah C. Willis, of Long Island, where she was born in 1810, of English parentage. To this union were born six children, viz.: Ann, now Mrs. Miles (a widowj, living in Marquette county, Wis.; Sarah, now Mrs. Frink, a resident of the same place; Abraham, the eldest son, who went west and was killed by the Indians (when last heard from he was in Idaho); Daniel, unmarried, and living in southern Nebraska; Townsend W., married, and living on the old homestead, in Packwaukee, Marquette Co., Wis., where the father settled in 1851, and died in in 1880; the mother's death occurred in 1892.
Edward W. Whitson is the youngest of the family, having been born on Long Island, April 1, 1851. He was but an infant when his parents came to Wisconsin in 1851, and here he received his primary education in the common schools, but later in life attended the academy at Madison, Dane Co., Wis., for two years. During his early life Mr. Whitson was employed about the farm; but on attaining his majority he accepted a position as clerk in a store at Madison, remaining there one year. In 1882 he was married to Anna D. Jones, at Montello, Marquette Co., Wis., and immediately afterward entered the employ of D. J. Spaulding, of Unity, Clark Co., Wis., as clerk and lumber shipper, remaining there three years. He then moved to Merrill, Lincoln Co., Wis., and engaged in the lumber business. In 1889 Mr. Whitson came to Tomahawk and entered the employ of the Tomahawk Lumber Co., as foreman of their lumberyard, which position he filled one year; but being a young man of great ambition, he soon afterward engaged in the mercantile business for himself, which he still continues to carry on, having been very successful. In 1878, before his marriage, Mr. Whitson worked for one year in the Black Hills mines, being employed by a government surveying party, and also by a stage company for one year. Mrs. Whitson is a daughter of John C. and Jane (Pritchard) Jones, both natives of Wales, who came to America when very young. They were married in Pennsylvania. Mr. Jones was a farmer by occupation, a highly-educated man, very much respected, and one to whom people often went for advice. His death occurred in 1867; his widow is still living. Mrs. Whitson is one of a family of ten children, viz.: John C, Richard L., Anna D., Maggie, William C. Elias, David C, Robert R., Edward and Ellen. Mr. and Mrs. Whitson have four children: Anna E., Grace M., Mabel and Edward.
Mr. Whitson has always been a stanch Republican, a man of strong character and great influence, and is looked up to, respected and admired by the entire community. In 1874 he was elected mayor of Tomahawk, this being his first public office. Socially, he is a Mason, being a charter member of Tomahawk Lodge No. 243, and has filled all the chairs, having been a member of this society since he was twenty-two years of age; he still takes an active part in the work. In religious faith the family are members of the Congregational Church. [Source: “Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Wisconsin counties of Waupaca, Portage, Wood, Marathon, Lincoln, Oneida, Vilas, Langlade and Shawno” 1895, transcribed by Mary Saggio.

John Wiley
WILEY, John, M. D., Merrill. Was born in Argusville, Montgomery Co., N. Y., April 5, 1825. His parents settled near the State line of Wisconsin and Illinois, in the latter State, in 1848, where soon after their arrival, the subject of this sketch began the study of medicine with Dr. Lewis WOOD. He continued with him four years, during which he taught several terms. He then practiced a short time with Dr. BLANCHAND, of Delavan, and from there went to Waukau, where he remained about two years in the practice of his profession. From there he went to Shawano, having received inducements to go there, by the Government, as physician for the Indians. He remained about thirteen years in the above place, and during the time, he was elected County Treasurer of Shawano County, which he held ten years. He was also elected to the legislature for the session of 1859-60. From there he moved to within three miles of Fond du Lac, and engaged in the lumber business and farming. He remained there about eleven years, then moved to De Pere, and practiced medicine. He remained in De Pere one and one half years, then moved to Merrill, where he is at present practicing his profession. He was married at Waukau, November, 1852, to Elizabeth T. DOUSMAN, who was born in Green Bay, in 1827. They have four children - John D., Rosalie, Helen M. and William. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Van Willard
WILLARD, Van R., dealer in lands, proprietor of abstract office, real estate office and lawyer, Merrill. Settled in this place in the Spring of 1874. He was elected Register of Deeds, at the organization of Lincoln County, in 1874, re-elected in 1876, 1878 and 1880. He was born in Buffalo, Tioga Co., Penn., June 8, 1842. He lived at Neenah, where he spent his school days, until the beginning of the Rebellion, when he enlisted in Co. G, 3d Wis. V. I. He served three years, and was mustered out at Kenesaw, Mountain, Ga., June 8, 1864. From there he returned to Neenah, Wis., and soon afterward attended Bryant & Stratton's Commerical College, at Milwaukee; graduated the following Winter. He afterward studied law, and was admitted to the Bar, at Green Bay, in March, 1873. He was married at Beaver Dam, May 24, 1867, to Cynthia E. PERKINS, who was born in Owasco, Cayuga Co., N. Y., in 1849. They have one child, Lee M. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Willie Winchester
WINCHESTER, Willie G., groceries and provisions, at the upper part of town, in Prospect Park. Was born in Boston, Mass., Aug. 25, 1858. He came with his parents to Menasha in 1866, and spent his boyhood days there for eight years, then he went to Oshkosh; was there four years, and attended school, and clerking in a store. During this time, he went to Iowa, and made a short visit. From Oshkosh he went to Manville, on the Wisconsin Central Railroad, and remained until October, 1879, employed for Mr. H. H. CHANDLER, also acting as Postmaster. From there he came to Merrill; still in the employ of Mr. C., and remained with him until May 1, 1881, then he began business for himself. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]

Hon. Henry W. Wright
Under different circumstances and in the many varieties of human character we find exhibited in biography something to instruct us in our duty, something to encourage our efforts under every emergency and, perhaps there is no combination of events which produces this effect more certainly than the steps by which distinction and positions of honor have been acquired through the unaided efforts of youthful enterprise, as illustrated in the life of Henry W. Wright.  A native of Wisconsin, he first saw the light at Racine, March 10, 1846, and is a son of Thomas W. Wright, who was born in the city of Manchester, England, a son of James Wright, also of English birth, who was married in the Mother country, some years later emigrating to the New World, and settling on a farm in Michigan where he died. The son Thomas W., however, had come to this continent prior to this, making his first American home in Syracuse, N. Y., where he married Miss Angeline Knowles, a native of New York State, by whom he had a family of eight children: Thomas, James (I), Lydia, Mary, Henry W., James (II), Charles and Belle, all born in Wisconsin except Thomas and James (I). In an early day Thomas W. Wright and his wife came to Wisconsin, at first making their home at Geneva, afterward removing to Racine. By trade he was a carpenter, and was engaged in the manufacture of wagons. In 1854 he went to California, and died there; his wife was called from earth May 6, 1882, while residing in Racine.
The subject proper of this writing received his education at the common and high schools of Racine, Wis.; but at the age of seventeen he laid aside his books for the rifle, enlisting, in 1862, in Company K, Seventh Missouri Cavalry, in which he saw active service two and one-half years, when he was appointed second lieutenant of Company H, First Missouri Cavalry, having previously been promoted, while in the Seventh, to sergeant and sergeant-major, respectively. While scouting he was captured by the enemy, but succeeded in making his escape twelve hours afterward. He participated in the battles of Memphis, (Mo.), Prairie Grove (Ark.), Springfield (Mo.), Cassville (Mo.), and Helena, Little Rock, Pine Bluff, and Saline River, or Jenkins Ferry (Ark.). He was mustered out of the service in June, 1865, with an excellent war record, and returned to Racine, Wis., where for a year he was employed on the railroad, afterward keeping books for several prominent commercial firms.
In 1871 Mr. Wright commenced business for himself in Racine, in the manufacture of sash, doors and blinds, an enterprise he successfully conducted until September, 1881, when he sold out and, in company with ex-Congressman Myron H. McCord, commenced business in Merrill, Lincoln county, and laid the foundation for the present vast plant of the H. W. Wright Lumber Co., of which our subject is the chief moving spirit - "the head and front." The firm have the most extensive plant of the kind in the Upper Wisconsin Valley, consisting of sawmills, sash, door and blind factory, etc., which, combined, give employment to an average of 300 men, at times as many as 640 names being on the pay-roll. The buildings, which in every respect are first-class, are equipped with all modern improvements, and are lighted throughout with electricity. With all his employes Mr. Wright is on the most friendly terms, and if there are any wrongs to be righted or favors granted, he is appealed to individually.  On November 1, 1871, Mr. Wright was united in marriage with Miss Carrie Buchan, who was born in Dover, Racine Co., Wis., daughter of Edward and Jane (Tillie)Buchan, who were the parents of eight children, named-respectively: Andrew, Oliver, Mary, Edwin, Alfred, Samuel, Carrie and Thomas, all born in America. The parents were both natives of Scotland, whence, about the year 1840 they came to the United States, and here Mr. Buchan for a time followed his trade, that of miller; but his health failing him, he settled on a farm near Dover, Racine Co., Wis., whereon he passed the rest of his days. He died in 18__; his widow is yet living, now at the advanced age of eighty-three years. To Mr. and Mrs. Wright have been born three children: James A., manager of his father's lumber yard; Alfred H., in his father's office, and Nettie E., attending school at Kemper Hall, Kenosha, Wis. Mrs. Wright is a member of the Presbyterian Church.
In politics Mr. Wright is an uncompromising Republican, and, as a local paper has said of him, "while he has never sought an office of honor or emoluments in his life, yet he has filled responsibilities of trust, and helped to shape the policy of the Republican party in Wisconsin." While a resident of Racine he served as postmaster for nearly six years, having been appointed to that position by President Hayes; he was also alderman and supervisor of that city. Since coming to Merrill he has served as alderman of the Fifth ward, and filled the mayor's chair one year, during which administration it was demonstrated that the management of the city affairs could not be improved upon. At present Mr. Wright takes no more interest in politics than any good citizen ought, being too closely engaged in business to devote more than a little time to political affairs. While a resident of Racine he was secretary of the Building Committee of that city. In Merrill he is a stockholder in the First National Bank; is a member of the Lumberman's Association of the Wisconsin Valley, and of the F. & A. M., in high standing. Mr. Wright is a man of commanding presence, possessed of great force of character, and "when he undertakes to do anything the work is almost done before it is begun. Such men are generally stern men, not easily swayed from any given path, and this can be said of the subject of this sketch. Yet he has a heart as tender as a woman, and no man, woman or child ever went to good, big-hearted Henry W. Wright with a tale of woe without coming away helped and encouraged." [Source: “Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Wisconsin counties of Waupaca, Portage, Wood, Marathon, Lincoln, Oneida, Vilas, Langlade and Shawno” 1895, transcribed by Mary Saggio.]

Edward Zastrow

ZASTROW, Edward F., dry goods and groceries, Merrill. Came with his parents to Concord, Jefferson Co., in 1861, where he spent his school days. He came to Merrill, Feb. 16, 1879, and began in the mercantile line with a partner. After seven months, he purchased the whole interest, and soon after closed the stock out. He then bought a new stock of merchandise, and again began trade. He was born in Germany, Nov. 5, 1852, and was married Feb. 29, 1876. His wife's maiden name was Johanna OESTREICH, she was born in Milwaukee, Dec. 4, 1854. They have two children, Arthur F. and Ollie I. [Source: History of Northern Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881) Submitted to G.T. by Mary Saggio]



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