Oconto County, Wisconsin Biographies
 

Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

HAMILTON ALLAN, M.D.,
County and City Superintendent of Schools, was born in Ottawa, Canada, Nov. 8, 1844, the son of James and Jane Allan. He received his preliminary education in the public schools and the Kemptville Grammar School. In 1862, he became principal of one of the ward institutions. He then entered the Ottawa Collegiate Institute, graduating in June, l865, with the honor of being awarded the Brough gold medal, for superiority in classics and mathematics. Being appointed a teacher of the classics, he remained in that capacity until January I868, when he entered the office of Dr. James A. Grant, as a medical student. Removing to Montreal, he entered McGill University, and, taking the full four years' course, graduated in the Spring of 1872. Dr. Allan retired with the highest honors, receiving the Holmes gold medal for the best examination in all the branches, both primary and final. Having obtained his diploma, he settled in Smiths rails, near Brockville, Central Canada, and took charge of Dr. Anderson's practice, that gentleman being absent in the Old Country, After practicing his profession successfully one year, in the Spring of 1873, he came to Oconto. He first formed a partnership with Dr. I. S. Johnson, and remained with him one year. He then bought his partner's interest in the business, and established himself alone. Dr. Allan has since resided in Oconto, with the exception of nine months in 1877-78, which he spent in Milwaukee. He has not only built up a successful practice, but has established a reputation as an efficient educator. This is his third year as City Physician, also as City Superintendent of Schools. He has been County Superintendent since 1879; is one of the foremost in the formation and maintenance of a library; is, in fact, what his education has made him, an intelligent, clear-headed, popular and successful gentleman. Dr. Allan was married in 1875, to Mary, daughter of Hon. John Leigh, of Leighton, Oconto County. They have one son.


Claude E. Armstrong, M. D.
Source: "Wisconsin: Its story and Biography", 1848-1913, Volume 6, By Ellis Baker Usher - Sub. by Barb Ziegenmeyer

For twenty years Dr. Armstrong has quietly performed his round of professional services and duties at Oconto and in Oconto county, and is not only one of the oldest but one of the most highly esteemed practitioners of that state. A physician cannot live and practice his calling for twenty years in one locality without possessing a faithful character and a high ability and skill, qualities which have contributed to make the splendid type of family physician known both in literature and in actual life.
Claude E. Armstrong began practice at Oconto in the fall of 1893. The doctor is a graduate of the medical department of Northwestern University at Chicago, with the class of 1883. His first practical work in his profession was at Lomira in Dodge county, Wisconsin, where he remained a year and a half. During the following five years he was connected with the State Hospital for Insane at Mendota, where he was for a time second assistant physician and then first assistant physician. From the hospital he moved to Pond du Lac, and after a few months to his old home town of Oakfield in Pond du Lac county, where he was for a short time in partnership with Dr. William Moore. From there he moved to Oconto, where he has since enjoyed a large patronage, and a substantial position in the community.
Dr. Armstrong was born in Sussex, Wisconsin, August 18, 1861, a son of Rev. William C. and Eliza Turner Armstrong. His mother was born in London, England, while the father was a native of West Virginia, and devoted his life to the ministry of the Episcopalian church. The grandfather was a physician. The Rev. William C. Armstrong died in 1888, and the mother passed away when her son Claude was six months old. Claude E. Armstrong was reared at Oakfield, in Fond du Lac county, and also spent part of his youth at Waupaca, where he attended the high school. On leaving school at Waupaca, he entered medical college, and for thirty years has been continuously devoted to his professional work.
In 1889 Dr. Armstrong married Emma Penewell, of Stoughton, Wisconsin. Four children were born to their union, mentioned as follows: Marie Adele, who died at the age of three and a half years; June, who died when two weeks old; Claudine E., and William. Dr. Armstrong has membership in the Oconto Medical Society, which he has served as president; in the Fox River Medical Society, and the Wisconsin State Society. The doctor is affiliated with the Masonic Order, and worships in the Episcopal church. [Source: "Wisconsin: Its story and Biography", 1848-1913, Volume 6, By Ellis Baker Usher - Sub. by Barb Ziegenmeyer]


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

B. ARNOLD, saloon and billiards, Oconto, born June 22, 1823, in Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany; in 1854, came to Chicago; in 1856, he came to Oconto; has followed the carpenter and joiner trade most of the time since; he has built over half of the buildings in Oconto, consisting in part of the court house, music hall, etc., also the bridge which crosses the river at the court house; he built and owns this property which he occupies. Married, in 1850, to Anstena Denss; she was born in Nassau; died Feb. 14, 1880, in her fifty-first year; have five children, three sons and two daughters. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

GEORGE A. BALDWIN
, superintendent tie and shingle mills, Oconto Company, is a native of St. George, N. B.; June, 1859, came to Boston, Mass., thence to Bangor, Me., followed lumbering till 1861, when he enlisted in Co. K, 8th Maine Inf., served to the close of the war; returned to Boston, where he remained a short time, then came to Oshkosh, Wis., worked there at the lumber business till 1874, when be came to Oconto. The past six years he has held his present position.  


Charles A. Best.
Source: "Wisconsin: Its story and Biography", 1848-1913, Volume 6, By Ellis Baker Usher - Sub. by Barb Ziegenmeyer

Banking has been the field to which Mr. Best has devoted the energies of his active career since young manhood, and with long experience he combines an unusual equipment of ability and skill in the organization and management of financial institutions. He has assisted in the organization and the management of two substantial banks in the State of Wisconsin, and is now connected with the Citizens National Bank of Oconto, being its cashier and having been one of the organizers in 1900, in which year the bank first opened its doors for business with Mr. Best in the position of cashier.
Charles A. Best was born at Freeport, Illinois, March 18, 1863. His parents were Dr. Solomon Jacob and Catherine (Wolf) Best. His father was long an able physician and surgeon at Freeport. The mother comes of a family of bankers, different men of the Wolf name having been active in banking in the state of Iowa. Charles A. Best was reared at Freeport, where he attended the public schools, and in 1887 was graduated from the Freeport high school. Soon afterwards he got his first experience as assistant cashier of the German-American National Bank at Beatrice, Nebraska, where he remained seven years. In 1897 Mr. Best took an active part in the organization at Kiel, Manitowoc county, of the State Bank of Kiel, and remained as its cashier until 1900. In that year he played a similar role in the establishment of the Citizens National Bank at Oconto. The Citizens National has a capital stock of fifty thousand dollars, with surplus and profits of over thirty thousand dollars. It is in respect to its deposits and general facilities and strength the largest institution of its kind in Oconto county.
In 1892 Mr. Best married Miss Ida May Forbes. She is a native of Ottawa, Illinois, but for some time previous to her marriage was a resident of Beatrice, Nebraska. They are the parents of one child, Marjorie Rhea, who graduated from the Oconto high school in the class of 1913. Fraternally Mr. Best is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and he and his family worship in the Presbyterian church.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

GEORGE BEYER
, County Treasurer, of Oconto, was born in Wingerode, Prussia, Oct. 21, 1843. When but a boy of thirteen he emigrated with his parents to Milwaukee, but the following year removed to Oconto. Here his father died in 1857, and his mother in 1859, and young Beyer was left to fight his battles alone; and that he was equal to the emergency is proven by his course in after life. He already had been working in the Hubbel and the Jones mills several years, and continued thus until 1860, when he secured employment with W. M. Whitcomb. Here he remained until 1862, when he went to Chicago and took a thorough course in Bryant & Stratton's Business College. Mr. Beyer was then prepared to "step up higher," and consequently when he returned to Oconto, acted at different times, until 1864, as Deputy County Treasurer, County Clerk and Register of Deeds. He next joined an organization of one-hundred-day men, and was elected second lieutenant of Co. H, 39th Regiment Wis. V. I. After he returned from his short, but voluntary service, he was employed as book-keeper by the firm of Whitcomb & Ideson, and held this position until 1867. For the next two years Mr. Beyer carried on the lumber business, and then leased the pier from the city until 1871. Engaging in the insurance business from that date until 1878, he was elected County Treasurer, and re-elected in 1880. Mr. Beyer is a representative German-American. Although born in the Old Country, he adopted the New Country at so early an age that all his thoughts and instincts are American, and he is not only a full-blooded American citizen in everything except birthplace, but is a self-made man, which is the best possible recommendation to good and reliable citizenship. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

W. E. BARLOW
, dealer in hardware, house furnishing goods. Oconto, came to Oconto in 1860, established his present business in 1878; he carries about a $4,000 stock; he also manufactures tinware, and employs two men.


John Bell
Source: History of Northern Wisconsin (Eau Claire County, Wis.) 1881, page 315; submitted by Marla Zwakman

JOHN BELL, first engineer Eau Claire Lumber Co., Eau Claire, came to Wisconsin in 1861, and located at Oconto, and was engaged in lumber mill for four years. Came to Eau Claire in 1865, and has been employed in present capacity for sixteen years. Was born in Ireland, Dec. 25, 1836, and came to America in 1859. Was married in Oconto, Wis., July 22, 1863, to Ellinor J. Wright, who was born in Ohio. They have one child, Jennie B.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

JAMES BELLEW, boarding-house Oconto Company, is a native of Ireland; came to Green Bay at the age of fourteen years; there he followed various kinds of labor. In 1855, he came to Oconto; worked at the ship carpenter trade about two years; he then took charge of the boarding-house for Holt & Balcom, where he continued about three years. The past seventeen years he has been in the employ of the Oconto Company, and has had charge of this department. Married, August, 1856, to Catharine Moroney; she was born in Ireland; they have four children—Ella, Matthew, now assistant book-keeper for this company, Edward, also a clerk in the grocery department, and Clara, now attending school. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

O. W. BLOCH
, clerk for J. Spies, Oconto, is a native of Germany; came to America in 1853, to Wisconsin in 1854, and to Oconto in 1855; enlisted in 1861, in Co. H, 4th Wis. Vol. Inf., but not being accepted on the first call, he joined Co. K, 24th Ill. Vol. Inf., and served three years and two months; was mustered out as captain of Co. F, same regiment; was elected Register of Deeds, and served one term, and in 1880, was elected Alderman of the City Council for the term of three years.
 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

ALEXANDER BRAZEAU
, attorney, Oconto, was born in the city of Oconto: attended Lawrence University at Appleton; studied law with Hastings & Green, at Green Bay; and was admitted to the Bar September, 1878; in November of the same year, formed a partnership with W. H. Webster.

Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1883), page 499; transcribed by Susan Geist

ALEX. BRAZEAU (Dem.), of Oconto, was born in Oconto, Wisconsin, December 24, 1856; received a common school education; is a lawyer, and one of the publishers of the Oconto Enquirer; was city attorney for Oconto in 1878 and ’79, and was elected alderman in 1882 for three years; was an unsuccessful candidate for district attorney in 1879; was elected member of assembly for 1883, receiving 1,192 votes against 1,055 for G. W. De Lano, republican.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

BRAZEAU BROS
., general merchandise, Oconto. F. X. Brazeau is a native of Montreal; came to Two Rivers, Wis., in 1847; remained there three years, then went to California, engaged in mining. In 1853, he returned to Montreal, where he remained until 1870, when he came to Oconto, and established this business. Their sales amount to about $20,000.  Has been a member of the School Board about nine years. Samuel Brazeau, also a member of this firm, was born in Beauharnois, Canada, March 2, 1830. Came to Two Rivers, Wis., in 1848, lived there until 1852, then came to Kewanee. Came to Oconto, July, 1850, engaged in lumbering until 1870, when this business was formed. He has served six years as Alderman, and still holds this office.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

WILLIAM BRUNQUEST
, retired, Oconto. Born March 19, 1819, in New Brunswick. Came to Oconto, in 1849, worked by the month at the lumber business, then entered into partnership with James and T. W. Christie, in a saw-mill, at Oconto Falls; continued one year. In 1852, he opened a general store, which he continued until 1862, when he bought Jones' water-mill, ran it until 1869, when it was carried away; in 1870, he rebuilt the mill, now owned by McDonald & Billings, and ran it until 1874. In 1876, he again opened a store, and was burnt out in 1878. His residence is one of the finest in Oconto, having built it at a cost of about $6,500. He was elected the first County Treasurer of this county. Has been Clerk of the Board of Supervisors, and President of the Village Board. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

REV. C. R. BURDICK
, pastor of Presbyterian Church, Oconto. Is a native of Chenango Co., N. Y. At about the age of twenty, he commenced an academic course of studies, and graduated at the Rochester University, in the class of 1852; he also graduated at the Theological Seminary, in 1858. Was ordained, Jan. 1, 1860. He had preached, however, one year before he was ordained. He had charge of the public school in Rochester, and had charge of one of the grammar schools from 1857 to 1859. He has preached five years in Genesee County, eight years in Niagara County, two years, in Joliet, about one year, in Marquette. Came to Oconto in 1875, and at once took charge of this church. Since coming here its membership has doubled.
 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

A. P. CALL
, jail keeper, Oconto. Is a native of Essex Co., N. Y. Came to Green Bay, September, 1845, with his parents. Worked in sawmills until 1864, then followed steamboating until 1869. Was appointed City Marshal in 1863; was Deputy Sheriff in 1870-1. Was appointed jail keeper in 1877. Has held this office in all about seven years. For the past ten years he has been State Treasurer Agent. Has been Constable of the South Ward the past four years. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

TRUMAN CAMERON
, foreman at S. A. Coleman's mill, Oconto. Is a native of Rouse's Point, Clinton Co.,  N.Y.  In 1863, he came to Peshtigo, and the past eighteen years he has followed the millwright business. The past three years he has been a resident of Oconto, and now has charge of this mill. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

JOHN H. CARR
, restaurant, confectionery, tobacco and cigars, Oconto. Is a native of New Brunswick. Came to Oconto, in 1872, and was engaged in lumbering up to 1880, when he began his present business. He is Deputy Marshal of the city, and is a member of the fire department. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

EDWARD CAYO
, proprietor Chicago & Northwestern Railroad House. Oconto. Is a native of Manitowoc Co., Wis. There he grew up and followed farming and lumbering. In 1870, he came to Oconto, and has just taken charge of this house. He owns a farm of eighty acres of land in Manitowoc County, which is now rented; he also owns about 700 acres wild land in Oconto and Marinette counties, all of which he has acquired by his industry. Married, in 1871, to Adaline Valley; she was born in Manitowoc Co., Wis. They have three children, one son and two daughters.


Thomas C. Clark, M. D.
Source: "Wisconsin: Its story and Biography", 1848-1913, Volume 6, By Ellis Baker Usher - Sub. by Barb Ziegenmeyer

One of the younger members of the medical profession at Oconto, who none-the-less has taken a high stand in the community both as a citizen and as a physician and surgeon, Dr. Clark has practiced at Oconto since December 10, 1912.
Dr. Clark was born in the city of Milwaukee, January 20, 1886, a son of John M. and Anna (Fitzgerald) Clark. His father is a prominent Milwaukee attorney. Reared in his native city, Dr. Clark attended the public schools, and later graduated from Marquette Academy, and then from Marquette University. His College Literary Degree is Master of Arts. He pursued his medical studies in the medical department of the Northwestern University at Chicago, where he was graduated M. D. with the class of 1912. For several months he practiced at Milwaukee, and with that initial experience came to Oconto. Besides his general practice he is serving on the staff of the Oconto County Hospital, and he and Dr. P. E. Gaunt are the chief owners of that institution.
At Chicago, on June 25, 1912, Dr. Clark married Miss Grace McKiuley, a daughter of Milton McKinley at Chicago. They are the parents of one child, Grace Clark. Dr. Clark is a communicant of the Catholic church, and affiliated with the Knights of Columbus, and with the Medical Fraternity Phi Beta Pi. He also has membership in the Oconto County Medical Society and the Wisconsin Medical Society. His offices are in the Citizens National Bank Building.


David G. Classon.
Source: "Wisconsin: Its story and Biography", 1848-1913, Volume 6, By Ellis Baker Usher - Sub. by Barb Ziegenmeyer

When David G. Classon became county judge of Oconto county in 1894, he was but twenty-three years of age, and he served in that position until January, 1898, being the youngest county judge in the state during his service. His career has been a notable one in many respects, and as a member of the firm of Classon & O'Kelliher, the leading law firm of Oconto, his position in professional circles in these parts is undeniably secure. Judge Classon has served two terms as mayor of Oconto, and has also served as city attorney of Oconto, so that he has given freely of his ability and his time in the service of his city and county since he entered the lists in the legal profession. He is a native son of the county, born here in 1870, on the 27th day of September, and he is a son of W. J. and Adeline (Leger) Classon.
W. J. Classon was born in the state of Vermont, but was reared in Canada, which was the native country of the mother, Adeline Leger. They were married in Manitowoc, Wisconsin, from where they removed to Oconto in 1868. The father was a soldier in the Civil war, a member of the Twenty-seventh Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and he spent his days in private life as a farmer and merchant.
David G. Classon gained his preliminary education in the public schools of Oconto, and in 1887 was graduated from the high school of this city. In the fall of 1889 he entered the University of Wisconsin, and was graduated from the law department with the class of '91. Immediately thereafter the young man entered upon the practice of law in Oconto, becoming associated with Judge Bailey, then county judge, continuing with the judge until 1893, when he became a partner in the firm of Webster & Classon. In 1894 he was elevated to the county bench, at the age of twenty-three, and he held that office for four years, retiring in January, 1898. In 1911 he became associated in practice with Hon. Victor J. O'Kelliher, mayor of Oconto at the present time, and one of the prominent attorneys of the county. Judge Classon himself served as mayor of the city from 1898 to 1900, his service comprising two terms of one year each, and from 1900 to 1906 he was city attorney of Oconto, so that his public service has covered a considerable period of years. He has practiced in all the courts of the state and of Michigan as well, and his reputation in both states is that of a man of superior ability,—a wise counselor and an able advocate before the bar. He takes a prominent part in the Republican politics of the county and is a recognized leader in the party ranks. Socially he has membership in Pine Lodge 188, A. F. & A. M., and Oconto Lodge No. 94, Knights of Pythias. He was Grand Chancellor of the K. of P. 's in 1898-99. He is president of the Oconto Board of Education, and is deeply interested in educational matters affecting his city and county.
In 1899 Judge Classon was married to Miss Myrtle Orr of Oconto, and they have four children: Abigail, Edna, Mary, and an infant son, Richard Orr Classon.
The parents of Judge Classon continued on their Oconto county farm until 1893, when they took up their residence in the city of Oconto, and here the father was occupied in the grocery business for some years. He died August 22, 1913.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

AUGUSTUS COLE
, manager of the Holt & Balcom mill, Oconto, was born in Oxford, Chcnango Co., N. Y., Dec. 30, 1830. He is the son of Calvin and Fayette Cole. Mr. Cole is of pure Yankee blood, his father being born in Connecticut and coming to Oxford at an early age, engaged in business as a farmer and a lumberman. He owned a mill in that town, which is situated on a branch of the Susquehanna, and for several years was in business with Uri Balcom, of the firm with which his son is now connected. Young Cole followed much in the footsteps of his father, removing to Steuben County in 1851, where he was engaged in lumbering with Mr. Balcom, the latter being an uncle on his mother's side.   Mr. Cole's father is still living in Oxford at the advanced age of seventy-nine. His mother died two years ago. From Steuben County he removed in 1856 to Oconto, engaging with Holt & Balcom in the lumber business. With the exception of a part of 1857-8, which he spent in the western part of this State and in Chicago, looking around with a view of locating, Mr. Cole has remained with them ever since. In the Spring of 1866, Mr. Balcom removed to Chicago, and since then the latter has had the active management of the firm's extensive business. Mr. Cole has had little time or desire to figure in political circles since his long residence in Oconto. He has, however, been a member of the Village Board, and served several years after the war as one of the three County Commissioners. He has spent his business life faithfully, managing with ability and vigor a large and prosperous industry. Like all really successful men, he has given his strength and time to one thing—confined his energies in one channel. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

DR. S. A. COLEMAN
, lumber, Oconto. Is a native of Ashtabula Co., Ohio. At the age of twenty-one years he commenced the study of medicine; graduated from the Willoughby Medical College in 1847. In 1851, came to Milwaukee; practiced there till 1853, when he came to Oconto, where he has since resided, and has been in constant practice till 1880; his time now being taken up in his lumber interests. He bought this mill in 1879; it has a capacity of 6,000,000 feet of lumber, 10,000,000 shingles, 2,000,000 lath. He has held the offices of County Treasurer and Register of Deeds.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

J. H. COMSTOCK
, farmer and lumberman, P. O. Oconto. His farm is on Sec. 28, Township 28, Range 21, and contains 220 acres. He was born in Ohio; moved to Milwaukee with his parents, when quite young, and to Oconto in 1863. Has held the offices of Town Treasurer and Town Supervisor.


Joseph P. Cox, M.D.
Source: Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Lake Region (1905) transcribed by Kim Mohler.

Joseph P. Cox, M.D., one of the most prominent physicians in Northern Wisconsin, was born in Chatham, Ont., May 7, 1859, son of Dr. Joseph and Mary (O’Flynn) Cox.

Dr. Joseph Cox, the father, was an Englishman who took his medical degree in Ipswich University, and for a time occupied the chair of chemistry at that university and at Oxford. He came to Canada in 1849, living a few years at Chatham, then going to Detroit, Mich., where for some years he was professor of chemistry in the Detroit Medical College. He then went to Milwaukee, and after a time to Oconto, Wis., where he engaged in the drug business until his health gave way. His death occurred in 1889, in St. Thomas, Jamaica, where he had gone in search of renewed health. He was but fifty-nine years of age when he died and had made a name for himself in the field of chemistry, both as a teacher and as a practical chemist. He had a family of three children, of whom two survive: Dr. Joseph P., mentioned below; and Edward A., a pharmacist in Milwaukee.

Dr. Joseph P. Cox passed his boyhood in Milwaukee, where he attended the public and parochial schools, and prepared for college. He matriculated in the University of Indiana in 1876, completing the full course and graduating in 1879. Previous to this he had studied medicine with the noted physician Dr. J. Marion Sims, and in 1880 he entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons in Minneapolis, for post graduate work, also acting for some years as a demonstrator of anatomy in the college. From there he went to Sykestown, N. Dak., and then to Fort Totten, that State, as United States Post Surgeon, serving also as postmaster at Sykestown, his commission being signed by Walter Q. Gresham. While in this part of the country he acted as commissioner in the organization of Wells and other counties, in Dakota Territory, being the first commissioner appointed by Territorial Governor N.G. Ordway. Upon the completion of this work he went to St. Paul, Minn., where for some time he was actively engaged in the practice of his profession. In 1885 he accepted the management of the Eau Claire Hospital, remaining in charge several years. He went to Hayward as government physician to the Indians of Wisconsin, receiving his appointment under President Harrison, and resigning on President Cleveland’s election. After this he devoted himself to his private practice, and organized and conducted the Good Samaritan Hospital at Hayward, at that time the largest lumbermen’s hospital in northern Wisconsin. He remained in Hayward until 1899, becoming an important factor in local politics, and filling the position of chairman of the Republican county committee for several years. During this time he also edited the Republican Hustler, a political organ established by himself, through which he carried on an aggressive campaign, and succeeded in electing Myron H. McCord, as congressman from the Ninth Congressional district. He was a frequent delegate to State and Congressional conventions, and often stumped the State in the interests of party candidates. In 1899 he came to Spooner to accept the position of district surgeon of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company, which he still retains. At the first election after his coming to Washburn county, he was elected chairman of the Republican County Committee, a position which he continues to fill with satisfaction to his party. Dr. Cox is a member of the International Red Cross Association, and has had personal supervision of all the work of the association in northern Wisconsin. He is health officer for the town of Spooner; surgeon for the North American Fidelity Life Insurance Company; and examining surgeon for the North British Life Insurance Company, of London, England; the New York Equity Insurance Company; the New York Mutual Life Insurance Company; the Phoenix Life Insurance Company, of Hartford, Conn.; the Guarantee Fund Life Association, of Davenport, Iowa; the K.O.T.M.; A.O.U.W.; Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Firemen; Endowment Rank, K.P.; Catholic Knights of Wisconsin; and M.W.A. He is a prominent member of the B.P.O.E. In addition to all his other interests Dr. Cox has found time to invent and patent the Sims Obstetrical Brace, named in honor of his famous teacher, which meets a long felt need among physicians.

Dr. Cox was married in Hayward, to Kate E. Coe, a prominent teacher in the Sawyer county schools, and they have the following children: Mary, Fabriola, Florence and Joseph McKinley. The Doctor has long been a regular contributor to the medical journals of the country, and is about to retire from active practice and establish a periodical to be called the “Aseptic Medical Journal,” a fifty page quarto devoted to the interests of physicians in America, of which he will be sole editor.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

REV. WILLIAM DAFTER
, pastor of the Episcopal Church, parish of Oconto, Marinette and Peshtigo. Is a native of New Jersey. Attended Neshota Theological Seminary in 1855, and graduated in 1861. In May, of the same year, was ordained, receiving as his first charge Geneva Parish, where he preached until 1864; then went to Watertown, in charge of St. Paul's Church, for six years. In 1870, he was called to the pastorate of St. Paul's Church at Fond du Lac, and remained there till 1876. He then resigned and came to his present charge.
 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

EDWARD DAVIS
, dealer in clothing, boots, shoes and furnishing goods, Oconto. Is a native of New Brunswick, and came to Oconto in 1863. Established his present business in 1872; carries about $10,000 in stock. Is a member of the Catholic Knights of America, and also a member of St. Joseph's Temperance and Benevolent Society.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

FRANK DE1MER, manufacturer and dealer in furniture, Oconto. Was born in Austria. Came to America in 1868; located in Appleton, and worked as journeyman up to 1870, when he came to Oconto. In 1874, he established his present business.


Thomas A. Delaney
Source: The Wisconsin Blue Book (1919) submitted by FoFG mz

THOMAS A. DELANEY (Dem.) is a successful attorney of Green Bay. He was born in Oconto, April 23, 1886, was educated in the Catholic parochial schools of Oconto and Green Bay, the East Side Green Bay high school and the law school of Marquette university, Milwaukee. He was elected police justice for the city of Green Bay at a special election June 12, 1912, to fill a vacancy and was re-elected in 1913 and 1915, serving two and one half terms, until April, 1917. He has been chairman of the Brown County Democratic Committee since Sept., 1914, and member of the Democratic State Central Committee from the Ninth Congressional district since 1916. He was elected to the assembly in 1918, receiving 1,995 votes to 1,658 for William C. Haslem (Rep.), and 166 for John B. Everhard (Ind.).


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

A. DILLON, proprietor Dillon House, Oconto. Is a native of Ireland. At the age of about eighteen years he came to Quebec, Canada. In 1864, came to Oconto; followed the lumber business till May, 1869, when he took charge of this house, which he owns. He has been
Alderman two terms.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

JAMES DON LEVY, retired, Oconto. Is a native of Ireland; was born in 1819. Came to New York in 1839; worked at the boot and shoe trade there till 1856, when he came to Oconto, and has since followed this business. He lost his store by fire, in 1871, and has since rebuilt a block consisting of six or eight brick stores. He has served as Clerk of the County Board, Town Supervisor, and Chairman of the Board, a member of the Village Board, was elected County Judge, but refused to qualify: was six years Alderman and member of the School Board. Married in 1841, in Rochester, N. Y., to Miss Elizabeth Morton, of Syracuse, N. Y. They have eight children—William, now carrying on the boot and shoe trade, Homer, Peter, George and Frank are in the lumber business, James, now book-keeper for the Oconto Company, Albert, carrying on the blacksmith trade, and Elizabeth, now Mrs. Waggoner. William, Homer and James served in the late war; Homer was promoted to sergeant on the field of battle at New Creek, Va., Capt. O'Rorke commanding, for gallantry displayed. This company was attached to Mulligan's Battery.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

J. P. DORR, land dealer, Oconto. Is a native of Gardiner, Me.; came to Oconto, July, 182, has been employed at England & Taylor's mill about five years, two years of this time he had charge of their business; the past three or four years he has been engaged in lands, etc. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

O. A. ELLIS, superintendent Oconto Co. Is a native of Maine; when a boy he commenced working at the lumber business, which he has since followed. This Company was organized in 1867; the following year he was appointed to the responsible position, which he has since held. This Company employ about 250 hands; their store, which they operate, carries on a business of about $175,000 per year. Mr. Ellis has for several years past been a member of the County Board. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

ROBERT ELLIS
, attorney, Oconto. Is a native of Maine, and graduated at Bowdoin College, in 1858; studied law with John A. Blanchard in Old Town, Me.; was admitted to the Bar in 1861; came to Oconto in 1869; in 1871, was elected County Clerk, and has held the office for ten years successively. Has held the office of City Attorney for three years, and holds that office at the present time. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

AUGUST ELLMANN
, saloon, Oconto. Born Feb. 19, 1841, in Prussia, came to Canada in 1862, where he remained till 1864, when he came to Ohio, and enlisted at Cincinnati in the 11th Ohio Cav.; served to the end of the war, was mustered out at Columbus. In 1866, he came to Oconto, peddled beer about seven years, since then he has kept this saloon, which he owns. Married in 1868, to Mary Riley; she was born in Milwaukee. They have four daughters.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

PETER G. ESSON, lumber business, Oconto. Is a native of New Brunswick; came to Oconto, Sept. 10, 1866, worked at Amey, Rice & Fitzgerald's mill, afterward for the Oconto Company. Since then he has been jobbing in logs, and locating timber and farming lands. He owns a farm of eighty acres land, now rented. He and Dr. Coleman own large interests in pine lands. He is also interested in the mill; he has been Supervisor of the town, he located the New Stiles road, running west from Oconto, the Maple Valley road and others. Mr. E. remarks that hemlock bark and hard timber is a prominent feature in this county, and should be developed.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

GEORGE FARNSWORTH
, president Oconto Company. Is a resident of Chicago, Ill.; in 1856, he came to Oconto, built a mill for R. M. Norton & Co., and ran it two years; in 1858, he bought a half interest in this mill, which was originally built by Morrill & Co., although it has since been rebuilt and has undergone several changes in ownership since then. In 1867, Mears, Bates & Co., of Chicago, bought into this company, and they with Mr. Farnsworth as president, reorganized as the Oconto Company. This company manufactures about 25,000,000 lumber, 15.000,000 shingles, 2,250,000 lath, also ties and cedar posts. They also sell about $175,000 in merchandise. All their lumber is shipped by rail, they having tracks placed in their yards for this purpose. Mr. Farnsworth is also engaged with Mr. Smith in the banking business. This bank was organized in 1871.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

K. FISHER & CO
., dealers in dry goods, notions, boots, shoes, etc., Oconto; established their business in 1878. They have a stock of about $10,000.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

S. W. FORD, druggist, Oconto. Is a native of Green Bay, Wis. In 1868, he commenced to learn the druggist business, and in 1872 came to Oconto, bought out the firm of P. McCall & Co. He now carries a very fine stock and is doing the finest trade in this line in Oconto.
 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

HON. E. FUNKE
, capitalist, Oconto. Born Jan. 20, 1835, in Prussia, came to Oconto in 1853. Followed lumbering about nine years; he then built a hotel which he managed about sixteen years, known as the Funke Hotel, this house he still owns. He with Mr. Barlow opened a hardware store, continued in that business about two years. He was one of the first Trustees of the village; has been County Supervisor several terms; was Chairman of the Pier Committee, the building of which cost $36,000; was Mayor two terms; represented this district in the Legislature two terms.


Herbert S. Gilkey
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Nancy Overlander

Gilkey Herbert S, Minneapolis. Res 1916 Kenwood pkway, office 628 Security Bk bldg. Lumberman. Born July 4, 1868 in Oconto Wis, son of H W and Mary (Overton) Gilkey. Married Oct 15, 1891 to Leonora Runkel. Educated in the common schools and Oshkosh Normal School. Taught school 1882-85; engaged in cedar and lumber business and formed partnership as Pendleton & Gilkey 1892 at Janesville Wis; moved to Minneapolis 1903 and has continued to date. Member B P O E and K P.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

H. W GILKEY
, of the firm of Waggoner & Gilkey, retail grocer merchants, Oconto. Was born in Houlton, Me. In the year 1846, he came West with his parents, who located at Hanchardville, Wis. In 1848 the family moved to Green Bay, where they engaged in carrying on farming and dairying, until 1852 when they resolved to try their fortune in the then wild and unexplored lumber regions of Oconto. Mr. Gilkey being, at that time, but a lad of thirteen years of age, variously occupied his time in assisting his parents about the hotel, of which his father was proprietor, and at other times about the mill. Educational advantages being very limited in the early history of Oconto, he decided in the year 1856 to attend school at Lawrence University, Appleton; his means failing him, he was most reluctantly forced to abandon his long-cherished hope of completing his college course, and in the year 1858 he entered upon the vocation of teaching in the public schools of Oconto; which position he occupied, as principal, for ten years. In the year 1869 he was elected to the office of County Superintendent of Schools for the term of two years. He was re-elected in 1871, and subsequently was appointed to fill a vacancy in the same office, serving the people in this capacity five years. A vacancy having occurred in the office of City Superintendent of Schools in 1873, he was appointed to fill that position. At the expiration of the unexpired term, he was appointed to the same position, to which he was twice re-appointed, and subsequently, appointed to fill a second vacancy in the same office, having held the office four years in all, thus being prominently identified with public schools of Oconto County for the term of twenty successive years. He also superintended the Sabbath school at Oconto, eighteen years. In 1872, his time not being wholly in the school work, he took charge, as assistant timber clerk of the so-called Sturgeon Bay Canal land grant of 200,000 acres, which position be has occupied continuously ever since. In the mean time, he had charge of lands belonging to non-residents, for whom he located pine lands, also explored for himself and did general surveying when not otherwise occupied.
 

Herbert Gilkey
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Nancy Overlander

Gilkey Herbert S, Minneapolis. Res 1916 Kenwood pkway, office 628 Security Bk bldg. Lumberman. Born July 4, 1868 in Oconto Wis, son of H W and Mary (Overton) Gilkey. Married Oct 15, 1891 to Leonora Runkel. Educated in the common schools and Oshkosh Normal School. Taught school 1882-85; engaged in cedar and lumber business and formed partnership as Pendleton & Gilkey 1892 at Janesville Wis; moved to Minneapolis 1903 and has continued to date. Member B P O E and K P.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

C. GLEASON
, proprietor of billiard hall and saloon, Oconto, is a native of Western Canada, and came to Oconto in 1871, and was engaged in lumbering up to 1879, when he commenced his present business. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

T. B. GOODRICH
, manager of the store for Holt & Balcom, Oconto, is a native of Steuben Co., N. Y.; came to Oconto in 1856, and has had charge of this store ever since it was established. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

E. W. GRAY
, proprietor of Gray's Mills, Oconto, is a native of Niagara Co., N.Y. At about the age of thirteen, he came to Kalamazoo Co., Mich.; in 1857, came to Winnebago Co., Wis.; there he followed the lumber business. In 1873, he came to Oconto; engaged as foreman at Pierce's sash and door factory; in 1877, he built this mill, which he has since run. The capacity of this mill is from 30,000 to 40,000 feet a day. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

B. G. GRUNERT
, County Clerk, Oconto, is a native of Saxony; in 1853, he came to Outagamie Co., Wis., where he assisted his brother farming. The following Winter, he removed to Ft. Howard; came to Oconto, February, 1854; worked in and around the mills; a short time afterward, appointed book-keeper for Norton & Co. and Whitcomb & Ideson; held this position till 1864. In the Fall of 1865, he was elected County Clerk; held this office five years. In the Fall of 1880, he was re-elected to this position. He has also held the office of City Clerk. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

W. J. HAGGERSON
, dealer in groceries, provisions, flour, feed, etc., Oconto, is a native of New York State; came to Oconto in 1855 with his parents. Established his present business in 1877. He carries a complete stock in his line. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

ALBERT HALBACH
, firm of Halbach & Noonan, foundry and machine shop, Oconto, is a native of Sheboygan, Wis.; learned the machinist trade in Sheboygan Falls; came to Oconto in 1871; worked at his trade till 1874, when he bought out the interest of Charles Godfrey in this shop. He continued with this firm till the Summer of 1880, when he and Mr. Noonan bought out the business. Has been Chief Engineer of the fire department. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

J. W. HALL
, editor and proprietor of the Oconto Lumberman, was born in London, Eng.; came to America with his parents in 1849, and to Oconto in 1855. In the Spring of 1859 he went into the Pioneer printing-office to learn the trade, and in 1864, established his present paper. In 1865, he bought the Pioneer office and consolidated it with the Lumberman office. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

JOSEPH HALL
, of Oconto, born in London, England, 1821, received an academic education; is a currier by trade. Emigrated to the United States in 1848, and located at De Pere, Brown Co. Remained there to 1852; thence to Green Bay, and removed to Oconto, Wis., in 1855, his present residence. Has been Justice of the Peace; Clerk of Circuit Court for twenty-two years; was Deputy Assessor for United States, also Deputy Provost Marshal for his county during the war. Was appointed Postmaster by Gen. Grant, thirteen years ago, and still holds that position. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

R. L. HALL
, abstract maker, Oconto, is a native of Chemung Co., N. Y., came to Menomonee River with his father, Dr. J. C. Hall, who carried on an extensive lumber business there, as well as practicing his profession. Mr. Hall came to Oconto in 1857; held the office of County Surveyor; he is also Deputy of the Circuit Court. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

J. A. HANSEN
, manufacturer of root beer, Oconto, is a native of Denmark, came to Manistee, Mich., in 1868; carried on a grocery and saloon; in 1873, he came to Oconto, and established this business; he is a member of the City Council; is serving on his third term; is trustee of the Oconto Cemetery; trustee and cashier of the Danish Lutheran Church. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

ALBERT HANSON
, manager of the boarding house for Holt & Balcom, Oconto, is a native of Norway, and came to Oconto in August, 1868; worked at different places up to April, 1879, when he took charge of this house. He was married to Mary E. Hanson, Oct. 24, 1869. They have four children—Cyrus, Harry, Axiom and William. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

C. S. HART
, editor and proprietor of the Oconto Reporter was born at Green Bay; came to Oconto in 1852, with his parents. His first paper was the Oconto Pioneer, in 1864. In 1872, he established his present paper. In politics he is independent. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

EDWIN HART
. Justice of the Peace and general collecting agent, Oconto, born in the city Norwich, New London Co., Conn., May 5, 1807, came to Huron Co., Ohio, in 1824; there he learned the carpenter and joiner trade; in the Spring of 1830, he emigrated to Green Hay, Wis., worked there at his trade till 1851, when he came to Oconto, was engaged at Oconto Falls in the lumber business two years; in 1853, he opened a store in Oconto, this being the first store in the place, continued this business about eight years; in 1861, he established a line of steamers between here and Green Ray, this being the first line on this route; he continued it till 1872; he was also a general agent for all boats running here; in 1833, he was appointed by Gov. Dodge, Justice of the Peace; held that appointment till the Territory became a State. From 1832 to 1835, he was in the employ of the U. S. Government, in rebuilding the garrison, and superintends the cutting out the roads from Green Bay to Manitowoc; in 1857 he established the bank of Oconto, he being president; Mr. Woodruff was cashier; he has been Clerk of the Board of Supervisors of Oconto County, and secured the first village charter; the first Sabbath-school started here was established in his house, in the Winter of 1830 and 1831. He passed from the mouth of the Menomonee River to Green Bay; there was no settlements then at Big or Little Pensaukee, there was a small mill owned by John P. Ort, of Green Bay; this mill was situated at the mouth of the Oconto; no other occupants there. At Peshtigo there was a small mill controlled by Col. Jones; at Menominee, the only settlement there, was an Indian trader, named William Farnsworth and Mr. Jacobs, of Green Bay, who kept a small store, and ran a small water saw mill. In 1855. Mr. Hart took the census of Oconto County, there being only 415 in 1860, he again took the census, which was 1530; the only communication at that time from Oconto to Green Bay was by boat. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

JAMES HENNINGSON,
sawyer at Holt & Balcon's Mill, is a native of Denmark; came to Oconto in 1870; in 1872 commenced work for this company. He was married, in 1874, to Charlotte Wilhelmin, who was born in Denmark. They have one child, Anna. Mr. H. is a leader of the Danish Lutheran Society. 


WILLIAM ARTHUR HOLT
Source: "Wisconsin: Its story and Biography", 1848-1913, Volume 6, By Ellis Baker Usher - Sub. by Barb Ziegenmeyer

William Arthur Holt has long been identified with the representative business interests of Oconto in a prominent manner, and is now vice president and treasurer of the Holt Lumber Company of Oconto, and president of the Oconto Canning Company. The latter concern, capitalized at $50,000 in 1899, has been one of the important industries of the city since its organization. Mr. Holt is also president of the Oconto River Improvement Company and a director in the Oconto Falls Manufacturing Company. His business connections are widespread and of an important nature, so that he is one of the best known men in this part of the state. The Holt Lumber Company, of which he is vice president and a director is one of the more important lumber concerns of Northern Wisconsin, and his other business interests are of an equally vital nature.
William Arthur Holt was born in Lake Forest, Illinois, in 1865, and is a son of D. R. Holt, who was for many years a leading figure in the lumber industry of the middle west. In 1863 D. R. Holt, of Chicago, and Uri Balcom, of Oconto, bought the Norton Mill property and the firm of Holt & Balcom operated it till 1888, when Mr. Balcom sold out and the Holt Lumber Co. was incorporated under which name it still operates, the present officers of the firm being the sons of D. R. Holt, who continued as the head of the concern until his death in 1899. The present officers are: George H. Holt, of Chicago, president; W. A. Holt, of Oconto, vice president and treasurer; and Charles S. Holt, of Chicago, secretary.
This representative lumber concern employs during the summer in and about Oconto, from three hundred and fifty to four hundred men, while in the winters, though the Oconto force is comparatively light, their employees number from six hundred to one thousand, in the mill and in their many camps. The firm controls vast timber holdings throughout Wisconsin and Upper Michigan and have timber to run them for many years.
William Arthur Holt was reared and educated in Lake Forest, Illinois, and in 1882, when he was seventeen years of age, he entered the employ of what is now the Holt Lumber Company in its Chicago office. His duties brought him to Oconto frequently, and in 1888 he came to Oconto and settled, since which time this place has represented his home. Although he is still a young man, he may be said to have spent a life time in the lumber business, so early did he begin.
Mr. Holt has never aspired to political office or preferment of any sort, but he was twice elected mayor of Oconto, serving from 1904 to 1908.
Mr. Holt married Miss Lucy Rumsey of Lake Forest, Illinois, and to them have been born four children: Jeannette R., Alfred H, Mary Eleanor, and Donald R. Holt.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

E. B. HULBERT
, superintendent box department of the Oconto Company, is a native of Saratoga County, N. Y; came to Green Lake, Wis., in 1867; followed farming there about four years; in 1871, he came to Oconto, and secured employment with this company at general work; he was afterward placed in charge of loading cars; continued in that capacity till 1874, when he was promoted to his present position. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

J. B. HUME
, with Oconto Company, is a native of Ireland; came to Muskegon, Mich., in 1871; followed the lumber business there till 1876, when he came to Oconto; he has had charge of the lumber department of the Oconto Company for the past three years; is ex-secretary of the Masonic Lodge. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

FELIX JOHNSON
, proprietor Byer House, Oconto, is a native of New Brunswick; came to Oconto in 1868; ran a billiard hall till 1876, when he took charge of the Byer House, which he managed till March 8, 1881, when this house was burned; he is new rebuilding near the same locality; has held the office of Alderman. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

HUFF JONES
, Register of Deeds, Oconto, is a native of West Virginia; in 1832, he came with his parents to Mackinaw; in 1835, they came to Green Bay, Wis.; removed to Oconto in 1845; since 1846 he has resided here; from that time till 1870, he has been engaged in the lumber business; he was elected Register of Deeds in 1870, which office he has since held; in 1846, his father, David Jones, built a water mill, now owned by McDonald & Co.; they built the first steam mill on the river, now owned by Jacob Spies; this mill was built in 1850; manufactured about 5,000,000 feet each season. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

GEO. D. KNAPP
, dealer in groceries and provisions, flour, feed etc., Oconto, is a native of Jefferson Co., N. Y.; came to Buffalo, N. Y., in 1860; after remaining a short time returned to his native county ; July, 1863, he came to Oconto, worked in McClellan's mill some time; a few years later he opened a small store on the South Side; moved to his present locality about 1874; he is now carrying a fine line of goods and doing a business of about $50 a day. When he came to Oconto he had but $700; this business he has built up by his own industry. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

MOSES LAFFAW
, engineer at Eldred & Son's mill, Oconto, has been with them since 1874. He was born in Brown County; enlisted in 1864 in Co. G, 41st Wis. V. I., and served eight months, until the close of the war. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

LEVI LANE
, billiards and saloon, Oconto, born in 1849. in the city of Calais, Me,; in 1851, came with his parents to St. Clair Co., Mich., where he followed the river and lakes till 1875, when he came to Oconto; ran this saloon three years for J. Spies; he then bought out the business and has run it since. Married, in 1879, to Anna Flattery. She was born in Oconto Falls. They have one son, William II. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

F. W. LEE
, principal of the High School, Oconto, is a native of Livingston Co., N. Y. He graduated from Colgate Institute and at Baraboo in 1872; came to Oconto in 1875; has held the position he now fills since then. The number of scholars under his charge average from eighty to ninety. He has three assistants.
 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

FRANK LEROY
, Marshal of the city of Oconto, is a native of Canada; came to Oconto, with his uncle, in 1857. In 1880, he was elected Constable, and in 1881, was appointed, by the City Council, Marshal. Mr. Leroy has been engaged in keeping hotel for the last three years. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

CHARLES LIPPERT,
Oconto, proprietor of Luxemberger House, born Jan. 18, 1848, in Luxemburg; in 1867, came to Oconto, and run a wholesale liquor store about fourteen months; he then started this house, which he has since kept. Married, in 1871, to Mary Hertges; she was born in Luxemberg. They have three children, Joseph, Mary and Frank. 


Charles A. Loveland.
Source: "Wisconsin: Its story and Biography", 1848-1913, Volume 6, By Ellis Baker Usher - Sub. by Barb Ziegenmeyer

For more than forty years identified with the Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company of Milwaukee, a resident of that city since boyhood, and a veteran Union soldier, Charles Alvin Loveland was born at Troy, Rensselaer county, New York, October 3, 1841. His parents were Horace and Sarah (Vail) Loveland. His father was born in Connecticut, and married in New York, where his wife was born. Horace Loveland was with the lumber industry in New York state until 1855, when he moved his family to Milwaukee. There he took up fire insurance and continued actively in that business and was well known and honored in business circles until his death in 1881. His wife died in 1889.
Charles A. Loveland, who was fourteen years of age when the family moved to Wisconsin, began his education at West Troy, and at Milwaukee became a student in the old Milwaukee University, near the close of its existence. He then returned to New York state and was a student in private schools until his education was finished. He was ambitious to take up the study of law, but the country was then involved in the war, and in 1862, before he became of age, he enlisted as a private in what was known as the Milwaukee Regiment, joining Company B of the Twenty-fourth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, which was organized and mustered in at Camp Sigel; he went to the front, and for nearly three years was in active service. Since the war Mr. Loveland has been affiliated with the Grand Army of the Republic.
Returning to Milwaukee, he took up the study of law in the office of Henry L. Palmer, then one of the distinguished members of the Milwaukee bar. After three years he was prepared for admission to practice, but his career was deflected and he was never a practicing lawyer. The Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company was then just entering upon its period of vigorous growth. Mr. Loveland found a clerkship in the home offices of the company, by ability and effective service won promotion, and for several years was superintendent of the Collection Department. In 1887 he became assistant actuary, and two years later was made general actuary of the company, one of the most exacting and important of the executive offices. He has remained general actuary to the present time.
Mr. Loveland has given little attention to practical politics, and in the early nineties transferred his long-time allegiance with the Democratic party to the Republican party, and still votes with the latter organization. He has long been identified with the Masonic fraternity, has taken the degrees of both the York and the Scottish Rite, having attained thirty-second degree in the latter. He has for many years been a member of the Grand Avenue Congregational church.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

CHARLES LYNES
, manufacturer of all kinds of wagons, sleighs, etc., Oconto, has the leading establishment of the kind in the city. Is a native of England, and came to Oconto in 1872. He established his present business in 1875, and employs four men. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

GEORGE LYNES,
lumberman, residence First street, Oconto, is a native of England; came to Oconto in 1857; was elected and served two terms as Alderman from the East Ward. He was one of the charter members of Lodge 130,  I.O.O.F., in Oconto. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

H. MCDONALD
, lumberman, Oconto, is a native of Canada, and came to Oconto in 1875. 


John J. McClellan
The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin History and Biography, by Parker McCobb Reed (1882); Transcribed for Genealogy Trails by Tammy Clark

John J. McClellan. What there is of a man which is creditable and favorable is, as a rule, evidenced by what appears on the surface, and what the public, generally an unerring critic, sees and knows of his outward career; and, further, by what he accomplishes that is known and read of men—those who have to do with him in business or in society. A man who is worthy of any considerable attention from the public, as identified with any legitimate calling, stands or falls upon his merits—not always, but generally true. A judge who knew John J. McClellan, the subject of this sketch, well, said of him: “He has an active, vigorous mind; an accurate and extensive knowledge of law; patient and persistent industry, and is the soul of honor.” He has been successful—won success by his native ability, energy, integrity and faithfulness to those who entrust their interests to him. The purpose of this sketch is to show the principal steps of his career leading up to this result. He was born in Livingston, Columbia county, New York, September 5, 1833; his father, Samuel R. McClellan, a physician, is of Scotch descent, and his ancestors settled in Colerain, Massachusetts, in 1723; his mother's maiden name was Catherine Garner, of Dutch descent; her ancestors settled in Columbia county. New York, in 1793, a commingling of two sturdy and vigorous peoples, both characterized by intelligence and good common sense. In 1845 the family settled in what is now Kenosha county, Wisconsin, where the father practiced his profession, and improved a large farm, and taking a deep interest in the political as well as material interests of the new commonwealth, was elected a member of the first constitutional convention, and subsequently of the state senate. John J. worked on the farm, attending school winters, until seventeen years of age, when he entered a school at Kenosha, where he remained two years, when he commenced the study of law, to make it his profession, in the office of K. W. Evans, then a prominent lawyer in Kenosha, late of the Chicago bar. In 1855 he entered the law department of the Albany University, graduated in 1856, was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in the fall of the same year in Oconto, in northern Wisconsin, and met with marked success. In the Spring of 1857 he was elected district attorney, under a new county organization, and, by successive reelections, continued to hold the office until January, 1862, when he was appointed assistant attorney-general under James H. Howe, the attorney-general, and afterward under his successor, Winfield Smith, and was acknowledged by all parties to be an efficient and faithful officer in that capacity. In March, 1863, he resigned this office and moved to Racine, and resumed the practice of his profession. In May, 1864, he was appointed, by President Lincoln, assistant quartermaster of volunteers, with rank of captain, and placed in charge of Johnson's Island, Tallahasse, Florida, and other places; remained in this service until 1866, leaving it with a clean balance sheet, and a record for faithful and honorable service. He then moved to Chicago and resumed practice, first taking charge of the legal affairs of the great dry goods house of J. V. Farwell & Company; subsequently formed a partnership with D. K. Tenney, and engaged mainly in the practice of commercial law, building up an extensive and lucrative business, which has continued to this day. He is now engaged in general practice, and is the senior member of the firm of McClellan, Tewksbury & Cummins, in Chicago. This is one of the most reliable and successful law firms in Chicago. In 1861 he married Julia G. Wheldon, of Racine. They have two children, a daughter about eighteen, and a son about fourteen years of age; a pleasant home and surroundings.


James McGee
OCONTO.
Source: The US Biographical Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Volume (1877); transcribed by Glenda Stevens

THE subject of this sketch, a native of St. Andrews, Charlotte county, New Brunswick, was born on the 18th of June, 1845 and is the son of Charles McGee and Ann Jane nee Rodgers, both of whom were of estimable character, devoted piety, and careful in the training of their children to habits of honesty and uprightness.

James received his education in the common schools of his native place, and after closing his studies, in accordance with the desire of his father, entered a printing office; finding, however, that the work was impairing his health he closed his engagement at the end of seven months, and resumed his studies and spent the next six years in school. At the expiration of that time he went to sea, making an eight months’ voyage; but it being against his father’s wishes that he should follow this life, he accepted a clerkship in a store of general merchandise and held it for three years. Wishing for a wider field of action, and drawn by its superior inducements to young men, he removed to the West in 1866, and settled at Oconto, where he has since continued to reside. Not being able to find employment suited to his tastes, upon his arrival, he spent the first winter in felling trees in the Oconto woods. In the ensuing spring he obtained a clerkship with the “Oconto Company,” a lumber-dealing firm, and remained in that position four years, and then became a clerk in the hardware store of a Mr. Barlow. Remaining here till the spring of 1874, he then opened the drug trade in which he is at present occupied. Public-spirited and enterprising, he has taken a deep interest in all matters pertaining to the growth and welfare of his town and State, and has been honored by his fellow-citizens by positions of responsibility and public trust. In 1872 he was elected city clerk of Oconto, and reelected in the following year, and in 1874 was chosen treasurer of his county, receiving a majority of four hundred and forty-two votes. In his political sentiments he is identified with the republican party. His religious training was under Episcopalian influences, and he is now a worthy member of that church. He has been a careful, observing man, and in his travels, which have extended over most of the States in the Union, he has gained a most valuable experience, and is well versed in many interesting and important topics.

Mr. McGee was married in May, 1872, to Miss Anna J. Juneau, daughter of the late Paul Juneau, a prominent citizen of Juneau, Dodge county, Wisconsin, and grand-daughter of Solomon Juneau, the founder of Milwaukee.

Their happy union has been blessed by one son and one daughter.

Though still a young man, Mr. McGee has established a worthy reputation as a business man of worth, integrity and principle. From a comparatively obscure beginning he has rapidly advanced to his present high social and business standing, and is still growing in wealth and popularity.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

W. J. McGEE
, ex-Chief of the Fire Department, contractor and architect, Oconto, is a native of St. Andrews, N. B.; came to Oconto in 1867; served as Chief of Fire Department about five years; elected Alderman in 1873, and re-elected from time to time, serving eight years in all. Is a member of the School Board, on which he has served six years. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

THOMAS McGOFF
, Sheriff Oconto County, also proprietor of livery and sale stable, and handles all kind of farm machinery. He is a native of Canada, and came to Oconto in 1864; was elected Sheriff of the county in the Fall of 1875, and holds the same office at the present time.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

M. A. McGlNNIS,
assistant teacher at the high school, Oconto, is a native of Outagamie County. He attended school at Appleton and Menasha, and began teaching in 1872; came to Oconto in 1876, and been engaged in the same school for the past four years. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

A. M. MART1NEAU
, City Clerk, Oconto, is a native of Sturgeon Bay, Wis. When a child he came with his parents to Oconto. His father carried on a general merchandise business here. He assisted in the store, and has always followed this business. For the last four years he has been in the employ of Holt & Balcon. He was one year agent of the Goodrich Transportation Company. Was elected City Clerk in March, 1881. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

JAMES MEGAN
, proprietor Travelers' Home, Oconto, is a native of Canada. Came to Oconto in 1873 and has since run this house, which he owns. Married in 1872 to Catharine Hartigan. She was born in Canada. They have five children, two sons and three daughters. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

THOMAS MILLIDGE
, dealer in general merchandise, Oconto, was born Jan. 24, 1828, in New Brunswick. In 1859 he came to Oconto; worked by the month at lumbering, afterward jobbing in logs. In 1856 he opened a general merchandise store, commencing with a very small stock, now doing a business of about $20,000 a year. He has been President of the Village Board. Has been Deputy Postmaster. Agent for steamers, and member of the Board of Supervisors. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

E. G. MULLEN
, station agent for the N. W. Railway Company, Oconto, is a native of New York State, and came to the city in March, 1872. Was employed as assistant at the station up to April, 1874, when he took charge of the station and has continued in the position to the present time.   He has four men to assist him in his duties. 


Bernard M. Mulvaney.
Source: "Wisconsin: Its story and Biography", 1848-1913, Volume 6, By Ellis Baker Usher - Sub. by Barb Ziegenmeyer

In the city of Oconto Mr. Mulvaney occupies two distinct and each a very important office, as city clerk, also as principal of the Jefferson Ward School. Education may be said to have been his life work, and he is one of the progressive teachers in northern Wisconsin. He belongs to one of the old families of Oconto, one that has lived in this section of the state upwards of half a century. Mr. Mulvaney himself is still a young man, and from his varied experience and professional activities in the past has a large place of future usefulness. He has served as city clerk since April, 1907, and has been identified with the public school system of the city since 1906, when he took charge of grades five and six in the Washington school, and in 1907 became principal of the Jefferson school.
Bernard M. Mulvaney was born in Oconto, May 5, 1883, a son of Bernard and Catherine (Nolan) Mulvaney. His father was for many years a stationary engineer. For a long time he ran a tug boat on the Green Bay. His death occurred in the fall of 1907, after a residence at Oconto for forty years. He was a hard worker and good citizen and was employed in many different capacities. At one time he was a supply teamster. Later he was an engineer at the Oconto Company's Mills, at various times worked on the drives of lumber, both in the woods and along the rivers. He was a native of the state of Rhode Island, coming to Wisconsin when a boy and after a brief period of residence at or near Milwaukee moved to Oconto. His widow is still living and is' a native of Cedarburg, Wisconsin.
Bernard Mulvaney was reared in Oconto where he attended the parochial schools and the Oconto high school, graduating from the latter in 1901. His first work as teacher was in the town of Little River in Oconto county. He then taught graded school at Mountain in the same county for two and a half years, and while there established the first graded schools. From there he came to Oconto, and was employed as a reporter on the Oconto County Reporter. For a time he represented the New York Life Insurance Company, and he studied law in the office of Judge Classon at Oconto. For six months he was principal of the graded school at Daggett, Michigan, and then returned to Oconto and began his work with the Washington schools. Mr. Mulvaney is unmarried. His affiliations are with the Knights of Columbus, the Catholic Order of Foresters, and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks of which he is secretary. His church is the Catholic.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

JOHN NOONAN
, Chief Engineer Oconto Company, is a native of Chicago. At the age of nineteen years he came to Oconto; worked for Holt & Balcom at the blacksmith trade. In 1865 he returned to Chicago and worked for Coan & Tenbroeke one year. In 1866 he came again to Oconto. Since then he has been in the employ of this company. In 1860 he was placed in charge of this department, which position he has since held. In 1871 he, with Peep, Minor & Taylor, started a foundry and machine shop. He has always been connected with this business, although it has undergone many changes since then. Since the Summer of 1880 the business has been carried on by Noonan & Halbach. He was the first engineer of the fire department and served three years. Is now engineer of the Slam Fire Engine No. 2. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

P. O'KEEF, M. D.,
Oconto, is a native of Canada and graduated at Victoria University, May, 1869; began practice at East Saginaw, Mich., remaining there five years; returned to Canada and was in practice there for one year; in February, 1875, he came to Oconto, and has followed his profession since. 


HON. VICTOR J. O'KELLIHEE
Source: "Wisconsin: Its story and Biography", 1848-1913, Volume 6, By Ellis Baker Usher - Sub. by Barb Ziegenmeyer

Hon. Victor J. O'Kellihee, mayor of Oconto and one of the best known and most successful attorneys, was born in Oconto on March 4, 1879, and has passed his life practically within the confines of this county. Since 1902, when he was admitted to the bar, he has been engaged in practice here, and since 1911 has been a member of the well known firm of Classon & 0 'Kelliher, representing perhaps the best legal talent in the city.
Mr. O'Kelliher is the son of Jeremiah and Ellen O'Kelliher. The father was a lumberman who came to Oconto in the fifties, and he died in 1895, the mother surviving the death of her husband for five years. Their son was schooled in Oconto, and when he had finished the high school course in 1897, he devoted himself for two years to work in the employ of a farm implement concern as a salesman. It was thus he earned the money that made possible his college education. He entered the law department of the University of Wisconsin in 1899 and in 1902 was graduated, being straightway admitted to the bar. He engaged in practice in Oconto in 1903, and in June, 1911, he became the junior member of the firm of Classon & O'Kelliher.
In the fall of 1912 Mr. O'Kelliher was elected mayor of Oconto, succeeding A. J. Caldwell in the office, and it should be noted that prior to his election to the office of chief executive of the city, he served as president of the city council for four years, so that he has long been conversant with the administration of affairs of the city.
Mr. O'Kelliher is unmarried and his only fraternal affiliations are maintained as a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

W. G. OLIVER
, dentist. Oconto, graduated at the Philadelphia Dental College in 1861, also at New York Dewitt College in 1865. He is a native of Philadelphia. Came to Oconto in the Spring of 1873, and has been in practice since then. When the hospital train was organized, under Dr. McLean, Dr. Oliver volunteered, and was with them for a few months. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

LOUIS P. PAHL
, brewer, Oconto, was born Oct. 13, I833, in Wurtemburg, Germany. May 10, 1854, came to New York City; thence to Albany, N. Y., where he remained one year. In 1855, came to Milwaukee, worked in Schlitz & Blatz brewery about one year; then came to Green Bay and worked in brewery about three months; then worked for Gardner & Co., in the lumber business, about fifteen months; then went to Chicago, where he remained a short time; went to Two Rivers, Wis., and worked in a brewery about one year. In 1858, he came to Oconto, formed a partnership with Anton Link & Co., in the brewing business; this partnership continued five years. Since then Mr. Pahl has conducted this business alone. When he came to America he had but $2.50. He is now doing a business of $15,000 to $20,000 a year. He has been Township Supervisor, City Treasurer three terms, member of the Assembly one term and County Supervisor for several terms.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

E. F. PARAMORE, M. D.,
Oconto, is a native of Ohio, and graduated at Cincinnati in 1856. Commenced practice in Valparaiso, Ind., remaining until 1857, at which time he came to Oconto.   Enlisted, May 16, 1861, in Co. H, 4th Wis. V. I., for one year. The regiment was then transferred to cavalry. He served about three and one-half years. After his return he stopped at his former home and followed the practice of medicine about two years, and in the Fall of 1866 returned to Oconto, where he has been practicing since. At the age of seventeen, he enlisted in Co. F, Ohio Reg. U. S. V., under Col. Curtis, and served in Taylor's line in the Mexican War. Was at the battle of Buena Vista and Monterey, and served the term of his enlistment—one year.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

B. PERRY
, proprietor of saloon, Oconto, is a native of New York State. Came to Oconto in the Spring of 1870, and was engaged in lumbering up to 1877, when he started in his present business. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

T. H. PHELPS
, book-keeper for Holt & Balcom, Oconto, is a native of Massachusetts. Came to Oconto in 1863. He has served as President of the School Board for a number of years, and has been in the employ of this company since his arrival. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

W. H. PHILLIPS
, livery, Oconto, is a native of Huron Co., Ohio. In 1873, came to Oconto; followed lumbering and jobbing in logs, etc. In the Spring of 1873, he opened a livery; commenced with one pair of horses. One of these horses he still owns, and is now thirty-one years old—he has owned this horse since a young colt. This livery now consists of twenty-two horses and twelve buggies. He owns six improved farms; one of these farms consists of 320 acres. He also owns eight dwelling houses in Oconto: his residence, the city hotel, four stores, a saloon building and barber shop. When he came to Oconto he had nothing, and worked for $14 a month by the year, and has acquired all of this property by his strict attention to business. 


Alphonse Pierre.
Source: "Wisconsin: Its story and Biography", 1848-1913, Volume 6, By Ellis Baker Usher - Sub. by Barb Ziegenmeyer

For twenty years Alphonse Pierre has been engaged as a grain dealer in Oconto, and the passing of those years has been sufficient to gain for him a place of no little prominence among the business people of the city and county. He is the owner of a large grain elevator at this point as well as the owner of three mammoth grain warehouses and a feed mill, all in Oconto, and all considered, his operations have been of an order well calculated to give him a leading place in business circles of the city. Mr. Pierre is a native son of Wisconsin, born in Door county, on June 13, 1864, and he is the son of Frank and Angeline (DeKiser) Pierre, both born in Belgium.
Frank and Angeline Pierre came to Wisconsin in 1858, settling on a Door county farm, there continuing for many years. They prospered, and in time felt themselves able to retire from business so that for some years past they have been living quietly at Beaver, in Marinette county, Wisconsin.
Alphonse Pierre continued on the Door county farm with his parents until he was seventeen years of age, and his education was gained in the country schools. His first work was in a printing office at Sturgeon Bay, where he filled the undignified post of "devil" to the proprietor of the shop, and he held that post for a year or more. In the meantime his father had entered into the flour mill business at Brussells, in Door county, and the boy gave up his work in the printing office and returned home to help in the mill, in which he continued until he first came to Oconto in 1866. Settling here, he established a small feed store, conducting the same more or less successfully for two years, and then withdrawing from the enterprise and going to Minneapolis, where he identified himself with the grain business in varied capacities. He remained there for several years learning much of the elevator business, in fact, thoroughly familiarizing himself with the enterprise, and in 1893 he returned to Oconto and established the business that has with the passing years assumed the most generous proportions and brought to Mr. Pierre a considerable wealth and position in the city. In 1903 he purchased a large grain elevator, the same having a capacity of 15,000 bushels, the elevator then being located at Green Bay, Wisconsin. In the summer of that year he moved the elevator to Oconto, floating it down Green Bay, a most unprecedented method of moving freight elevators, but one that proved most successful in his case. His entire business career has been characterized by initiative and enterprise, and his success is the result of his sturdy application to business and the constant adherence to business principle of the highest order, so that he is not indebted to the elements of chance or luck for any of his successes in his business career.
Mr. Pierre was married on February 28, 1892, to Lucy, a daughter of the late Samuel Brazeau, one time a well known merchant of Oconto, a member of the firm of Brazeau Brothers, who were established in business here as early as 1870. To Mr. and Mrs. Pierre have been born seven children, who are named here in the order of their birth: May; Esther; Ruth; Agnes; Alphonse, Jr.; Gabriel; and Helen Javita.
Mr. Pierre is a member of the National Grain Dealers' Association, and his fraternal relations are maintained as a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Modern Woodmen of America and the Equitable Fraternal Union.
A man of excellent character and standing in his community. Mr. Pierre takes a prominent place in the administration of civic and political affairs of the city, and is now a member of the Board of Supervisors, serving the west ward of the city of Oconto on the board. He is a successful and enterprising man, well established among his fellow men, and in every way entitled to a place in a historical and biographical work of the nature of this publication.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

G. T. PORTER
, contractor, Second street, Oconto, is a native of Maine. Came to Oconto, October, 1857. Was elected County Supervisor and served two years, has served as Alderman of the City Council six years, also as a member of the Board of Education for two years. Enlisted in 1868, in Co. H, 39th Wis. I. V., and served till the close of the war.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

G. A. PRELL
, dealer in dry goods, boots, shoes, groceries, etc., Oconto, was born in Jefferson Co., Wis. Came to Oconto, May, 1875, and established his present business at that time. Was elected Alderman from the North Ward, April, 1879, and served for three years. Is a member of the Turners' Society. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

A. REINHART
, County Judge, was born in Middleburg, Schoharie Co., N. Y., Nov. 8, 1825, being the son of John J. and Elizabeth Reinhart. His father was a farmer, and he, in his youth, spent his years in working and laying up a stock of health in the Summer, and strengthening his mental caliber in the Winter by attending school. Thus profitably engaged until he reached his majority, he taught school for a short time and then, in the Spring of 1857, commenced to read law with F. W. Filkins, at Burnsville, Albany Co., N. Y. He afterwards removed to Albany, and completed his legal studies with Thomas Smith, one of the most celebrated lawyers of the State of New York. In 1859, at Albany, he was examined in open court by a full bench of eight judges, and admitted to practice in all the courts of the State. After practicing his profession one year in the East, he removed West and settled in Oconto, Wis., in April, 1860. He at once opened a law office and soon brought himself into favorable notice. He was elected several times to the office of District Attorney of Oconto County, was chosen Mayor of the city three terms, was called to the position of County Judge in 1877 and again in 1881.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

ALBERT RICHARD
, proprietor of Richard House, is a native of Green Bay, Wis. In 1860, came to Oconto, worked in the mills about three years, afterward he ran the lath mill, in about 1863, he commenced jobbing and putting in logs for Tatton Jones, continued at this till 1865, when he commenced the hotel business, which he has since followed. He built this house in 1872, the dimensions are 52x80 feet, three stories, cost about $4,000. He has been Alderman of the West Ward three years, also Assessor one year. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

H. M. ROYCE
, merchant and Chairman of the County Board, was born in Clinton, Oneida Co., N.Y., Oct. 11, 1825. When about ten years of age, he came with his parents to Oberlin, Ohio. He attended school and assisted his father at farming until 1853, when he removed to Green Bay, Wis. Here he remained a year, engaged in surveying lands, when he settled in Oconto. Mr. Royce followed this same occupation here for about four years. In the Fall of 1857, he established himself in the general merchandise business, with W. L. Newton. Purchasing Mr. Newton's interest in 1864, he has conducted the business alone since. He was burned out in August, 1875, but was soon on his feet again, and moved into his present convenient quarters. Mr. Royce has held important public positions. In 1860-61, he was Deputy County Treasurer; Village Treasurer two terms, 1867, 1868; was elected the first City Treasurer of Oconto, in 1869, and represented his district in the Assembly in l874.   He was a member of the Board of Supervisors for a number of terms, and has been its chairman for the past three years. Mr. Royce was married in 1863, to Miss Aurelia Peabody, of Green Bay, Wis. His second wife was a Miss Elizabeth Chryster, a native of North Hector, Schuyler Co., N.Y. whom he married in 1869. They have three children. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

FRANK RUELLE,
saloon, Oconto, born March 24, 1827, in Belgium. Came to Green Bay in 1855, the following year he came to Oconto, worked in the mills till 1860, he then was appointed Jail Keeper, had this office about eighteen months. He enlisted in 1861, Co. G, 17th Wis. Inf. served about one year, was discharged on account of physical disability, returned to Oconto and again worked in the mill about two years. In 1865, he opened this saloon. He has been Village Trustee six years, he has been Alderman the past seven years—Republican. 


Albert Rusch
Source: "Wisconsin: Its story and Biography", 1848-1913, Volume 6, By Ellis Baker Usher - Sub. by Barb Ziegenmeyer

The present sheriff of Oconto county. Albert Rusch, has lived in this section of Wisconsin nearly all his life, a period of more than forty years, and his family were among the pioneers of Oconto county. He has long enjoyed the high esteem of his fellow citizens, and his election to his present office was but an evidence of his personal popularity and the judgment of the people of Oconto county, that he was the best equipped man for the place. He was elected on the Republican ticket in the fall of 1912, and began his official duties on the first Monday in January of the following year. In 1910 Mr. Rusch was a candidate for this office, also on the Republican ticket, but was defeated by Former Sheriff Burns. It was a close race, and a margin of only twenty-five votes prevented him from entering the office two years before he did. In 1912, though in a Democratic year, Mr. Rusch was elected by a plurality of twelve hundred and fifty-eight.
Mr. Rusch's residence in Oconto county dates from September, 1871. He was born in Germany, August 14,1864, a son of Godfried and Louisa Rusch. The mother died in 1907 at the advanced age of eighty-one, while the father is still living and has his home with Sheriff Rusch. Albert Rusch was eight years old when the family left Germany and crossed the ocean to America, going direct to Oconto county, in Wisconsin. The father settled at Stiles in this county, and in that day when the lumber industry was the chief concern of this section of the state he has retained continuously since that time, advancing in the favor of the concern until he became a partner, and later becoming secretary and treasurer of the business, as well as its general manager.
For years Mr. Ellis was a director in the Citizens' National Hank, and in 1910 he became president, it being one of the most solid financial institutions in the county. A Republican of stanch order, Mr. Ellis has been a delegate to certain national conventions, among them the one that nominated William McKinley. He is one of the most publics pirited citizens of the community, up and doing in the best interests of the city at all times, and he is now serving as chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Farnsworth Public Library of Oconto, the same having been donated by George Farnsworth, who was the father-in-law of Mr. Ellis.
In 1869 Mr. Ellis married Miss Carline E. Farnsworth, of Oconto, and to them have been born three children. Gertrude, George W., a resident of Green Bay, Wisconsin, and Fred C. Ellis, of Milwaukee, Wisconsin.


FRED SCHEDLER
Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

FRED SCHEDLER
, proprietor of Funk's Hotel, Oconto, is a native of Prussia. In 1863, came to Watertown, Wis., there attended school. In the Fall of 1864, he came to Oconto and engaged as clerk for Mr. E. Funk, at this hotel, continued in this capacity till 1872, when he rented the property which he has since run. Married in 1872, to Amelia Liese; she was born in Prussia. They have three children—two sons and one daughter. 

Source: "Wisconsin: Its story and Biography", 1848-1913, Volume 6, By Ellis Baker Usher - Sub. by Barb Ziegenmeyer

This pioneer now in the seventy-fifth year of his age, who with firm step and unclouded mind still walks the streets and attends to his daily routine of affairs, has during a long and useful residence in Oconto county, for almost fifty years witnessed almost its entire development and borne a share in the course of its progress. Starting in as a lumber jack, he was for many years well known as a hotel proprietor, and by judicious investments and able management has become one of the most influential men in financial and civic affairs in Oconto county. He manifests a keen and intelligent interest in all that affects the welfare of this section of the state, and is widely and favorably known as a man of progress and public spirit.
Mr. Schedler is vice president of the Oconto National Bank, and has been a director in that institution since it was organized in 1886. He became vice president in the spring of 1913, succeeding the late William Young, who died in 1913. Mr. Schedler is also a director of the Oconto Canning Company at Oconto. From 1867 to 1897 Mr. Schedler was in the hotel business at Oconto, during most of that time conducting the Schedler Hotel. His home has been in Oconto county since December, 1864, and he is thus one of the pioneers in that region, which when he came was a wilderness and its chief activity lumbering.
Fred Schedler was born in Prussia, Germany, April 28, 1838, a son of Gottlieb and Susanna (Brandenberg) Schedler. Both parents died in Germany. Reared in his native land, Mr. Schedler was educated in the public institutions of education, and spent two years in the Prussiau infantry. He was an agricultural expert and instructor in Germany, but in spite of his congenial position and his business prospects, after his term of army service was completed, he left Germany and came direct to Wisconsin; first locating at Watertown. There he started out without capital and with complete reliance upon his individual resources to find fortune and position in the world. He spent a couple of years in farming near Watertown, and then in 1864 arrived at Oconto, where he went into the woods and spent a winter in the lumber camps. For two years he was employed as a sawyer in a lumber mill, and then was employed in a local hotel. Subsequently he bought out the man he had previously worked for, and after conducting the hotel for some years erected a much larger and more commodious structure, known as the Schedler House, which was conducted under his management and proprietorship until 1897. In that year he sold his hotel and engaged in the real estate business, and general finance, handling loans, mortgages and other investments. Mr. Schedler owns a large quantity of fine farm lands in Oconto county, and has many interests in the business affairs of this section.
In 1872 at Green Bay, Mr. Schedler married Amelia Liese, also a native of Germany. Their four children are mentioned as follows: Herman Frank, a resident of the state of Idaho; Hermina, wife of D. H. Mooney; Paul Arthur, of Spokane, Washington; engaged in the real estate business; and Martha, wife of Charles Lingelbach of Oconto.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

JOSEPH SEDMIHRADSKY
, engineer at Holt & Balcom mill, Oconto, is a native of Bohemia. Came to America in l860, and located Baltimore. In 1865, came to Manitowoc and settled at Two Creeks, was there and at other places up to 1873, when he came to Oconto, has been with this company since. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

F. G. SHANABROOK
, head filer at Eldred & Son's mill, Oconto, was born in Williamsport, Penn.; came to this city in 1873; has been in the employ of this firm since he attended college at Gettysburg and studied for the ministry. When the war broke out, he enlisted, April 24. 1861, at Lock Haven, in the Rifle Guards, which afterward became Co. D, 7th Reg. Penn. Vol. Reserve; was in the service nearly one year after the close of the war. He carries several scars which he received in battle.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

D. SHARROW, proprietor of the American House, corner of McDonald and State road, Oconto, is a native of Detroit, Mich.; came to Oconto in 1857; established his present business August, 1878.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

JOHN SHERIDAN, dealer in hardware, stoves, and farm implements, Oconto, is a native of Canada West; came to Oconto in 1873, and engaged in lumbering up to the Fall of 1878, when he established his present business. He was in the Government service for about two years during the war. In the Spring of 1881, be was elected Alderman from the North Ward. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

PETER SHUFELT
, foreman Oconto Saw Mill, is a native of Steuben Co., N. Y. When a boy he commenced working in a saw-mill, which he has since followed. In 1857, he came to Green Ray, Wis.; there he was employed at filing gang saws, remaining there about one year; then removed to Stiles, where he was employed as foreman for Eldred & Balcom; remained in their employ four years. In 1861, he came to Oconto, and has since then been foreman of the saw-mill of the Oconto Company. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

WILLIAM K. SMITH
, firm of Farnsworth & Smith, bankers, Oconto. 



JOHN SIMON
, miller for Oconto Company; born Jan. 12. 1853, in Denmark; came to Escanaba in 1870; worked for the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad about five years. He then came to Oconto, and has had charge of the Oconto flour-mills since then, he having learned this business in Denmark with his father, who was also a miller; worked at this trade till he came to America. Married, in 1879, to Sophia Stone. She is a native of Norway; came to America when a child.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

THOMAS SIMPSON, lumber, Oconto, is a native of New Brunswick; came to Oconto in 1862, and has always followed the lumber business. He has been Chairman of the Board of Supervisors, and Clerk of the School Board.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

JACOB SPIES, manufacturer of lumber and dealer in general merchandise, Oconto. Is a native of Prussia. In 1849. came with his parents to Oshkosh, Wis. In 1856, he removed to Winneconne, Winnebago Co.; there started a meat market, which he has since followed. In the Fall of 1859, he came to Oconto, continuing this business. Commenced the manufacture of lumber in 1870. His mill has a capacity of five or six millions a year. Since coming to Oconto, he has been engaged in merchandising; enlarged his store in 1880.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

JOHN STRACK, saloon, Oconto. Is a native of Prussia. Born April 18, 1821. Came to Green Bay, Wis., in 1855. where he remained until the Spring of 1863, when he came to Oconto. Built his house in 1868, where he now resides. In 1879, he opened this saloon. Married, in 1853, to Mary Mie?; she was born in Prussia. They have five children—Mary, Conrad, Kate, Nick and Lizzie. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

P. H. SWIFT
, editor and manager of the Oconto County Reporter was born in Topsham, Orange Co., Vt., Dec. 28, 1844. His parents Henry S. and Diana C. Swift, came, with their family, to Edgerton, Rock Co., in 1853. Young Swift received his education at the Academy and Teachers' Seminary, in Albion, Dane Co. He did not complete his course, however, for his blood was so fired at the firing upon Ft. Sumter that he, with about thirty of his friends, said good-bye to schooldays and joined the army. Young Swift, then in his eighteenth year, enlisted in Co. C, 11th Wis. V. I., in June, 1861, serving in the armies of the Missouri, Tennessee, Trans-Mississippi and the Gulf. From the ranks he was promoted, by regular gradations, to the captaincy, receiving his commission in August, 1863. He was wounded at the battle of Tupelo, in July, 1864, and received an honorable discharge from the service in the Winter of the same year. Mr. Swift next studied law with Bennett & Norcross, of Janesville, being admitted to the bar in June, 1867. In the practice of his profession he remained one year at Waseca, and some years at Beaver Falls, Minn. In 1870 the St. Peter district returned him to the Legislature. Two years later he was appointed supply clerk for the Calumet & Hecla Mining Co., a Michigan corporation. In December 1878, Mr. Swift commenced his newspaper life, at Clinton, Wis., by the publication of the Rock County Republican. In October, 1880, he located in Oconto, and established the Oconto Republican, which was merged into the Reporter in July. 1881. Mr. Swift is a Mason, a member of the Temple of Honor, and a strong Republican. Although comparatively a new comer, he has both established himself and his paper in the confidence of the Oconto public. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

S. B. TALLMADGE
, dealer in fruits, candies, nuts, etc. Is a native of New York State, and came to Oconto in 1869. He established his present business in 1878. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

WILLIAM TAYLOR
, farmer, Sec. 18. Little River Township, P. O. Oconto. Is a native of Canada. Came to Oconto in 1867; worked there at the lumber trade four or five years; since then he has been engaged in farming; he owns a farm of eighty acres. He is Treasurer ol the School Board. Married, in 1872, to Sarah Ann Brockett; she was born in Wisconsin.   They have two sons and two daughters. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

H. THIELE
, merchant tailor and dealer in ready-made clothing, Oconto. Was born in Prussia. Came to Milwaukee in 1867, and to Oconto in 1870., when he established his present business. Upon arriving in Oconto, his means were small, and by close application to business and economy, he has built up a good trade, and carries a nice stock of goods in his line; his sales amount to from six to ten thousand dollars a year. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

M. C. THOMPSON
, with Oconto Company. Is a native of Maine. Came to Oconto in 1856; first worked for Norton & Co., in the lumber business, and since his residence in Oconto, has always been identified with the lumber business. Since the organization of this company, he has held the position as foreman and overseer of their logs, etc. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

MICHAEL VOY
, river overseer, Oconto, is a native of Ireland; came to New York with his parents in 1834. In 1847, they came to Grand Rapids, Mich.; there they remained a short time, and removed to Milwaukee; in 1851, he came to this locality, where he has since lived. He has always been engaged in rafting and superintending river work. He owns eighty acres of land, forty-four acres of which is in the city limits. He has been Town Treasurer of the town of Oconto; has been three years Alderman. 


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

CARRIE F. WATERS
, teacher in the high school building, intermediate department, Oconto. She was born in the county of Oconto, and received her education in her native city. Began teaching in 1877, and has been in charge of the room she now occupies for three years.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

W. H. WEBSTER, attorney at law, was born in Farmington, Oakland Co., Mich., June 11, 1850; educated at Hillsdale College, in that State; he graduated in the class of 1868. He then studied law in St. Paul with Brisbin & Palmer and Lamprey Brothers, of that city, and was admitted to the Bar in June, 1871. In November of that year he commenced the practice of his profession in Oconto, Wis., and has here continued since. In 1878 Mr. Webster formed a partnership with Alexander Brazeau, under the firm name of Webster & Brazeau, of which he is still a member.


Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

WILLIAM H. YOUNG. Mayor of the City of Oconto, was born in Woodville, Wilkinson Co., Miss., August 11, 1845. He is the son of Uriah and Lucretia Young, and worked on his father's farm up to the time of his parents' death, who both died in 1859. When the United States troops reached Baton Rouge, La., Mr. Young, then but a youth of eighteen, joined them, enlisting in Co. H, 4th Wis. C. His company was attached to the 19th Army Corps, Department of the Gulf, being engaged principally in picket-duty at various points in Texas, Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama and Georgia. Mr. Young was mustered out as a first lieutenant, at Madison, in May, 1865. He next located in Chicago, where he remained nearly a year, and completed a course in the Bryant & Stratton Business College. From Chicago he removed to Oconto, in 1866, and has since resided here, having been connected with the Holt & Balcom mills during all this time. He is now assistant manager of their business. Mr. Young's public life consists in his election to the Board of Aldermen, in the Spring of 1874, holding that position five years, and his selection to the Mayoralty in 1879-81. Although yet comparatively a young man, his course from the first, whether in business or local legislation, has been marked by ability and consistency. Mr. Young was married to Mrs. Ellen E. Russel of Oconto, Jan. 1, 1872. They have one child, a daughter, Ina, six years old. 

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