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Outagamie County Wisconsin
Biographies

Charles Haas
Source:  History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 972-973; submitted by Mary Saggio.  

CHARLES HAAS, who has been a lifelong resident of Greenville township, Outagamie county, was born on the farm which he at present operates, situate on Dale Rural Route No. 17, September 19, 1873, and is a son of Andrew and Katharine (Marks) Haas. An drew Haas was born in Baden, Germany, April 30, 1834, and came to this country in 1853, while his wife, who was born December 9, 1839, in Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, followed him to this country in 1855, and they were married in Outagamie county, Wisconsin, in 1858.  Before coming to Outagamie county, Andrew Haas worked on a farm in New York State for a time, later going to St. Louis, Missouri, where he was engaged in driving a team.  For some years he rented a farm in Outagamie county, and then purchased the homestead in Greenville township, which was then covered with heavy timber.  Having no horses, Mr. Haas used oxen for his work, and he often drove his ox-team to Neenah to do his trading, that being the nearest and most convenient trading point at that time.  A small log cabin was the original family home, but this soon gave way to a handsome brick house, and the fine appointments of the farm as it stands today do not resemble in many respects the bleak, discouraging appearance of the virgin land of not so many years ago.  Hard and persevering work brought around marvelous changes and the Haas farm now compares favorably with any of its size in the township.  Andrew Haas operated this land from 1858 until 1899, in which latter year the active management was taken up by his son, Charles, who was educated in this township and has never left the home farm.  On February 17, 1865, Andrew Haas enlisted in Company A, Fiftieth Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and he continued in the service as a private until his honorable discharge, June 12, 1866.  Since that time he has been living on this farm, although since 1899 he has not engaged in active labor.  He and Mrs. Haas have had five children:  Theodore and Henry, who are deceased; Minna, who is the wife of Fred Abraham, a Dale township farmer; Lottie, the wife of Harry Keets, a resident of Appleton; and Charles. 

Charles Haas is a Republican in politics and a member of the Evangelical Church.  He was married March 24, 1899, to Theresa Abraham, who was born in Black Wolf township, Winnebago county, Wisconsin, November 16, 1879, daughter of John and Amelia (Haberberg) Abraham, natives of Germany who came to the United States about 1871 and located in Black Wolf township.  Mrs. Abraham now resides in Dale township, where her husband died in 1898, the family having moved into Outagamie county about 1891.  Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Haas:  Edna, November 15, 1900; Harold, March 9, 1909; and Ralph, February 28, 1911.


John Hackel Jr.
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 884-885; submitted by Mary Saggio.

JOHN HACKEL JR., who is engaged in extensive agricultural operations on section 3, in Seymour township, belongs to one of the fine old German families who left the Fatherland to come to this country and participate in the building up and development of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, which is rapidly taking its place as one of the rich agricultural sections of the country. Born in Germany, February 16, 1873, Mr. Hackel is a son of John and Kate (Neumeyer) Hackel, natives of that country, who came from Bavaria, to the United States in 1874 on a sailing vessel which took three weeks to cross the ocean, bringing with them their son John, then but one year old. Their other children, who were born in the United States, were: Joseph, who married Elizabeth Platten; Michael, who married Mary Keil; Kate and Mary, who are deceased; and Anna, Theresa, Elizabeth, Agnes and Tillie. On coming to this country, the parents of Mr. Hackel settled in Appleton, Wisconsin, for six or seven months, and then removed to section 3, Seymour township, Outagamie county, at a time when the land was a vast extent of tangled brush and heavy timberland. Mr. Hackel took up forty acres, on which he built a log house and log stable and began clearing the land to make a home for his family. The children were reared here, and as the boys grew old enough they began to do their share, John, Joseph and Michael helping their father to subdue seven forty-acre tracts. Each of the boys now has a fine home and a well-cultivated property, and all are now numbered among the good citizens and substantial farmers of their township. John Hackel, Jr., married Margaret Berner and lives on the homestead, his father now being seventy-three years of age and his mother sixty-seven. He carries on general farming and also raises fine livestock, making a specialty of Poland-China hogs, which he ships out for breeding purposes.


William H. Hackleman
Source:  History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 708-709; submitted by Mary Saggio.

 WILLIAM H. HACKLEMAN, who is well known to the citizens of Appleton as the proprietor of the jewelry establishment located at No. 1009 College avenue, has been engaged in this business here for some years, and has also a large practice as an optician.  He is a native of Connersville, Indiana, born in 1881, a son of J. W. and Martha A. Hackleman, farming people of Indiana, the latter of whom is deceased.  William H. Hackleman was the fifth of the six sons of his parents, and he received his preliminary education in the public schools of his native locality.  Later he took a polytechnic course in the Bradley Institute at Peoria, Illinois, and later spent one year at Toulon, that state, as a student of horology.  After being employed for two years at McGregor, Iowa, in the jewelry business, Mr. Hackleman came to Appleton in 1905, opening his present establishment, where he has since built up a large and lucrative trade.  Mr. Hackleman was married to Miss Bessie Miller, of McGregor, Iowa, who died in 1907, leaving one son:  John Willard Wesley, who is now four years of age.  Mr. Hackleman is a member of the Equitable Fraternal Union.  He is religiously connected with the Congregational Church, while his political belief is that of the Republican party.


John Hackworthy
Source:  History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 675-676; submitted by Mary Saggio. 

JOHN HACKWORTHY, president and treasurer of the Hackworthy Construction Company, one of the large contracting industries of Appleton, was born in England, in 1852, a son of George and Mary (Leigh) Hackworthy, both of whom died in that country.  Mr. Hackworthy secured his education in his native country and when he had attained his majority he came to the United States, first locating in Chicago for a short time and coming to Appleton in September of 1873.  He followed the trade of mason for about ten years and then started contracting.  About 1894 a partnership was formed between the brothers, John and R. F., and C. H. Vinal, and the firm was incorporated in 1905 with John Hackworthy, president; Robert F. Hackworthy, vice-president, and C. H. Vinal, secretary.  The firm has erected the county insane asylums in Outagamie, Dunn and Trempealeau counties, numerous store buildings, canals and power houses and pulp mills, and has employed as many as 250 men on one contract.  Mr. Hackworthy was married in 1874, to Ellen Perrot, of Appleton, and to this union there have been born four children, namely:  Lynn F., who is deceased; Louis F., residing at home; Rena, who married A. C. Rule, now secretary of the company; and Adelaide, residing at home, who is a student in the Conservatory of Music.  Mr. Hackworthy is an independent voter, and is a member of the Odd Fellows and the Elks.  He has always been identified with the progress and development of Appleton, and it was his concern which did the first brick paving here, as well as in Oshkosh and Manitowoc.  He is a director in the Citizensí National Bank.


Charles J. Hagen
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) page 635, submitted by Mary Saggio.

CHARLES J. HAGEN, president of the village of Black Creek, Wisconsin, who is engaged in the retail lumber business and the manufacture of cheese boxes, and is also prominently identified with other large business organizations, was born March 12, 1862, in the town of Lomira, Dodge county, Wisconsin, a son of John and Friedericka (Nehls) Hagen, natives of Mecklenburg, Germany. The parents of Mr. Hagen came to the United States in 1855 and were married in Wisconsin, settling in Dodge county, where the father died in 1871, while the mother still lives in the village of Lomira, having reached the age of eighty years.

Charles J. Hagen was the third of a family of seven children, and his education was secured in the common schools, after leaving which he learned the trade of wagonmaker. When he was twenty years old he came to Black Creek, where he opened a shop and began to follow his trade, and in this line he continued until 1890, at this time entering the box and lumber business, in which he has continued to the present time. His business, which first required the services of but five men, now necessitates the employment of about twenty-five workmen throughout the year. He is also a stockholder and director in the State Bank of Black Creek, organized and incorporated under the State, and the Four Wheel Drive Automobile Company, of Clintonville, Wisconsin. Mr. Hagen is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America. He is independent in politics, voting rather for the man than the party, and he has been elected to the town clerkís office four terms, was justice of the peace four years, director of the graded schools for eighteen consecutive years, and was the first president of the village of Black Creek, an office in which he has served to the present time. In addition he is serving for the third year as a member of the county board, and in 1904 and again in 1906 was sent to the General Assembly of the State. With his family he attends the Evangelical Protestant Church of Black Creek, being president of the church organization for the sixteen years past ending January 1, 1911, and for twenty years in succession was a member of the board of trustees.

Mr. Hagen was married in 1885 to Miss Louisa Machmiller, born December 22, 1862, the fourth child of the family of five of Andrew and Sophia Machmiller, natives of Brandenberg, Germany, who came to America in the early Ď60s and settled in Lomira township, Dodge county, where both died. There were seven children born to Mr. and Mrs. Hagen, but only four survive, namely: Lora, John, Freda and Lillie, all single and living at home. Mrs. Hagen died August 7, 1899, and was buried in Black Creek. In 1900 Mr. Hagen was married to Miss Mary Mack, daughter of Rev. C. Mack, of Black Creek. She was born April 17, 1877, the eldest of a family of six children. Six children, all living at home have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Hagen, as follows: Irvin, Estella, Victor, Ruth, Esther and Arthur.


Charles Hahn
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) page 777; submitted by Mary Saggio.

CHARLES HAHN, farmer, merchant and cheese manufacturer at Cicero, Wisconsin, was born at Meeme, Manitowoc county, Wisconsin, January 21, 1868, a son of William and Catherine (Blaber) Hahn, natives of Germany, who were married in Manitowoc, where they followed farming during the remainder of their lives. Mr. Hahn died in 1895, at the age of sixty-three years, and his widow survived until 1906, when she passed away aged seventy-three years. They had the following children: William; Fred; Charles; Herman; Valentine; Christina; Minnie, who married Herman Brass; and Bertha, who married Lewis Kuhn, and all are living. Charles Hahn learned the trade of cheese maker in Manitowoc, where he remained three years working at that occupation, and in 1891 came to Cicero, where, on the junction of sections 1, 2, 11 and 12, he built a 20x44 cheese factory on one-half acre of ground. In 1894 he formed a partnership with his brother-in-law. Otto Brass, the company taking the firm name of Hahn & Company, and in 1895 they built a store 24x30 feet, later adding thirty feet more in depth, and eventually built the 28x30 residence in the rear. The present creamery is 26x70 feet. When the firm started in business the daily output was about 3,000 pounds, and it now runs from 12,000 to 15,000 pounds, in addition to a large business done in cream. Mr. Hahn and his partner first invested in forty acres of partly improved land, where a 38x40 basement barn was erected, this having been added to until it now measures 38x90 feet, with a basement under all, and includes a wagon and tool shed 24x44 feet. Two eighty-acre tracts were later added to the original purchase, and the whole property is now in a fine state of cultivation. Mr. Hahn is a Republican in politics, but votes for the man he deems best fitted for the office in county and local matters. He served as treasurer of Cicero township from 1901 to 1906, and was the first and only postmaster of Cicero, holding that office from its organization in 1899 until its discontinuance seven years later

In 1894 Mr. Hahn was married to Emma Brass, who was born in Sheboygan county, Wisconsin, September 13, 1871, daughter of Cornelius and Fredericka (Strassberger) Brass, natives of Germany, the former of whom came to America when twenty years of age and the latter when she was only two years old. They were married in Sheboygan county, where they spent the remainder of their lives in agricultural pursuits, Mr. Brass dying in 1876. They had nine children: Bertha; Herman; Julius; Otto, Mr. Hahn's partner; Lena; Emma; Gustave; Ida, who is deceased and Cornelius. To Mr. and Mrs. Hahn there are three children: Fred, January 8, 1901; John, September 26, 1903: and Raymond, March 14, 1905.


Emanuel Hahn
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) page 762; submitted by Mary Saggio.

EMANUEL HAHN, who has been a resident of Seymour for the past thirty years and is now living retired from business activities, is a native of Wisconsin, having been born in Manitowoc county, September 10, 1854, and is a son of William and Mary (Beckner) Hahn. The parents of Mr. Hahn were born in Slasing, Germany, where Mrs. Hahn was first married to a Mr. Gierstorf, by whom she had two children: Annie and Joe, the latter of whom served three years as a private of Company I, Twenty-seventh Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and is now a resident of Nebraska. The family was established in the United States in about 1850 when Mr. and Mrs. Hahn settled in Manitowoc county, Wisconsin, and there their three sons: William, Fred and Emanuel, were born. In 1856 they moved to Sheboygan county, and after the Civil War Mr. Hahn secured a farm, on which he worked up to the time of his death, which occurred in 1903 when he was eighty years of age. Mrs. Hahn died in 1901, when she had reached the age of eighty-one years.

Emanuel Hahn secured his education in the public schools of Sheboygan county, and when twenty-one years of age struck out for himself. He worked out during the summers and in the winters remained at home until 1882, in which year he came to Seymour and during the eighteen years following was engaged in sawmill work. He then for six years was associated with the Muehl Furniture Company, and at the end of that period he practically retired from activities of a business nature.

Mr. Hahn was married to Elizabeth Straub, who is also a native of Wisconsin, and to them there have been born four children, namely: Walter, who married Martha Berger; Gertrude, who lives at home with her parents; Jacob, who is employed as bookkeeper at the First National Bank: and Lavina, who was married to George Tubbs.


Julius E. Hahn
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 819-820; submitted by Mary Saggio.

JULIUS E. HAHN, who is cultivating the old Hahn homestead in Center township, is one of the progressive, intelligent farmers of Outagamie county, and has been a lifelong resident of Wisconsin. He is a son of Rudwick Hahn, who came to the United States as a small boy, all alone, his parents having died in Germany, and after landing at New York, came to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where he remained six years, working by the day. He then went to Dodge county, where he was employed by the month for sixteen years, and while there was married to Lena Krueger, daughter of John Krueger. In 1847 Mr. Hahn came to Center township and purchased a farm, and five years later bought the farm which is now being operated by Julius E. Hahn, and here continued to live until his death, February 14, 1911, one of the prominent agriculturists of Center township. Mr. Hahn was one of the self-made men of this section, having started out in life with no advantages, whether of a financial or educational nature, and through his own perseverance and energy worked his way to the front rank of successful men of his township. Mrs. Hahn died in 1881, having been the mother of four children.

Julius E. Hahn was born October 6, 1850, in Dodge county, Wisconsin, and was fifteen years old when he came to the farm on which he now resides. He received most of his education in the district schools of Dodge county, but also attended a few years in Center township, and he is possessed of an education far above the ordinary, his schooling having been added to by much reading and close observation. At the age of eighteen years he bought a farm in Center township, to which he moved, and there carried on operations for three years, but eventually returned to the home farm, of which he took charge, and here he has continued to reside to the present time. In 1872 he was married to Elizabeth Nieman, who was born June 30, 1855, in Buffalo, New York, daughter of Fred Nieman and Lena (Kliss) Hahn, the former a Civil War veteran who brought his family to Center township in 1867. Mr. and Mrs. Hahn have had five children, namely: Frieda A., born in 1874, who died in 1880; William, born in 1886, who died in 1897; Louis F., born in 1877, who married Anna Schultz and has three children; Mary, born in 1879, who married Charles Krueger; and Helen, born in 1885, who married Frank Schroeder and has two children. Mr. and Mrs. Hahn belong to St. Matthew's German Lutheran Church. In political matters he is independent.


Emmet Corson Hallock, D. D. S.
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) page 900; submitted by Mary Saggio.

EMMET CORSON HALLOCK, D. D. S., an able dental practitioner of Kaukauna, Wisconsin, who has an extensive practice in that city, was born at Two Rivers, Wisconsin, October 30, 1877, and is a son of Emmet Gould and Lottie (Corson) Hallock, the former a native of Iowa and the latter of Maine. They were married in Iowa and came to Wisconsin in 1866, locating at Sheboygan and later coming to Kaukauna. Mr. Hallock was a railroad conductor and was in charge of one of the first trains to run through this city. He went to Two Rivers to reside after a short stay in Kaukauna, but eventually returned to this city, where he now is living retired. His wife, who is also living, has been the mother of eleven children, and of these four boys and two girls still survive. Emmet Corson Hallock received his early education in the schools of Kaukauna, after which he went to Chicago and entered the Chicago Dental College, graduating from that well-known dental institution in 1900. He then returned to Kaukauna, and has been in active practice here to the present time. Dr. Hallock was married March 2, 1907, to Genevieve Lindauer, of Kaukauna, and they have one son: Luther M. Mrs. Hallock is a member of the Congregational Church. He belongs to the state, county and national dental associations, and is also a member of the Chicago Dental College Alumni, in addition to being a popular member of the Masons and the Elks. He is well known in the dental profession in Outagamie county, and as a public-spirited citizen of Kaukauna has the esteem of his fellow townsmen.


Dennis P. Halloran
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) page 1123; submitted by Mary Saggio.

DENNIS P. HALLORAN, a leading agriculturist of Ellington township, who is the owner of fine farming property, was born on his present farm, July 10, 1868, and is a son of Michael and Julia (Newcomb) Halloran. Michael Halloran was a native of the Emerald Isle, and as a young man left the County Cork for the United States, locating in Ellington township in 1865. He purchased the land now owned by his son, Dennis, which he cleared from its wild state and here he continued to follow agricultural pursuits until his death, in 1891. His wife, who was a native of County Louth, Ireland, came to this country when she was fourteen years of age, and until her marriage was a resident of New York City. She also passed away in 1891. Dennis P. Halloran was one of a family of six children, and received his education in the district schools of Ellington township, being reared to the life of a farmer. He has always worked on the home farm, which he inherited at the death of his father. He has made a number of improvements on the place, remodeling the residence and erecting new buildings, and he now has one of the valuable tracts of his section. In 1896, Mr. Halloran was married to Elizabeth Laird, who was born in Ellington township, October 23, 1869, a daughter of Edward and Fanny (Hull) Laird. Two children have been born to this union: Julia, born September 14, 1901; and Gertrude, born June 20, 1902. Mr. and Mrs. Halloran are consistent members of the Catholic Church at Stephensville. Mr. Halloran is progressive in his views, and has always been an active supporter of movements that have for their object the betterment of his township or county.


John D. Ham
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 625-627; submitted by Mary Saggio.

JOHN D. HAM, one of the old and honored residents of Bovina township, and a veteran of the great Civil War, is carrying on farming operations on a tract of forty acres situated in section 33. He was born September 12, 1841, in Balston, Saratoga county, New York, and is a son of Peter A. and Margaret (DuBois) Ham. On his fatherís side Mr. Ham is descended from German ancestors, while on the maternal side he is of German, English and French extraction. His parents were both born in New York, and came to Wisconsin about 1850, settling in Winnebago county, where Peter Ham purchased eighty acres of prairie land. He erected a house on this uncultivated property, and here resided for thirty-two years, at the end of which time he had it all under cultivation. He died August 5, 1885, at the age of seventy-nine years, and was buried in the cemetery at Stephensville. Mrs. Ham, who died March 1, 1875, at the age of seventy-two years, was interred at Vineland cemetery. They had a family of six children, of whom John D. was the youngest, and but one other, Charles H., of San Diego, California, now survives. Four of the boys were soldiers during the Civil War. Ransom B. was a member of Company G, First Wisconsin Cavalry and served three years. Edward P. enlisted in Company B, Twenty-first Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and died in the hospital at Bowling Green, Kentucky, from an attack of typhoid fever. Charles A. enlisted in a New York battery of the Light Artillery and served until the close of the war. John D. Ham enlisted in January, 1862, for service in the Frist Regiment, Wisconsin Cavalry, but on account of an accident when his horse fell on his foot he was disabled so that he was prevented from serving in that regiment. In 1863, however, he was drafted for three years or during the war, and although still quite lame from the previously mentioned accident, he reported for examination at Green Bay, Wisconsin, and at the examination stated to the examining surgeon that there was nothing the matter with him except the injury to his left foot. After a thorough examination the surgeon asked him if the injury caused him much trouble, to which he replied, ďNo.Ē The surgeon then said that he guessed he would have to go, to which Mr. Ham replied that he was glad of it as he wanted to go, whereupon the former said he was glad to see one man who desired to go to war. Mr. Ham was first in Company G, First Wisconsin Infantry, but during the fall of 1864 was transferred to Company E, Twenty-first Regiment, and in June, 1865, was transferred to Company E, Third Wisconsin Veteran Volunteers, and from which he was finally mustered out of service at the close of the war. During all engagements in which his company participated, Mr. Ham proved himself a brave and faithful soldier, and when the close of the war came none had a better record for stanchness under fire, adherence to duty or efficiency and faithfulness than he. Alfred Ham, the oldest brother of the subject of this sketch, was drafted at the same time and successfully passed the examination, but, having a family of small children to provide for, his father, Peter A. Ham, paid the commutation money amounting to $300, and thus exempted him from military duty. Four of the sons of Peter A. Ham served in the Union army, the fifth and only remaining one was exempted upon the payment by his father of the $300 commutation. On completing his services to his country, Mr. Ham returned to Wisconsin and during two or three winters attended school, the summer months being spent in work on the home farm. In about 1868 he bought his fatherís farm, which he conducted until 1882, and then moved to Outagamie county, where he carried on operations in Ellington township about six years. In 1889 he bought the property which he now operates, an improved tract with a house and outbuildings, and here he has since been engaged in gardening. He has remodeled the buildings and fenced his property, and has carried on general farming, although his principal products are strawberries and cabbages.

In 1880 Mr. Ham was united in marriage with Miss Sarah Moore, who was born November 8, 1865, daughter of John and Alvira (Freeman) Moore, natives of England and New York, respectively, who were married in Wisconsin, whence they had come years before the war. They settled in Waushara county, but later removed to Winnebago county, where Mr. Moore died in 1892, at the age of sixty-seven years, and was buried in Winneconne Cemetery. Mrs. Moore is now living in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, being seventy-seven years old. Mr. and Mrs. Ham have been the parents of six children: Margaret, who married Dexter Smith, of Shiocton, has two children; Jessie, who married William Laird, living in Outagamie county; Bessie, who is single and teaching school in Outagamie county; Carrie, who married Moritz Strong, of Outagamie county; and Earl and Irwin, living at home. Mr. Ham is a Republican in politics, and he has served one term as town clerk, and as clerk of the school board for eleven years. He and his family attend the Congregational Church at Shiocton.


John Hammen
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) page 1271; submitted by Mary Saggio.

JOHN HAMMEN, the genial proprietor of the oldest hotel stand in Little Chute, Wisconsin, has been a resident of Outagamie county all of his life, having been born in Vandenbroek township, October 23, 1862, a son of Henry and Antoinette (Van Handel) Hammen, natives of Holland who came to Little Chute in 1849 and 1853, respectively. They were married here in 1854, settled down to farming, and here spent the remainder of their lives, Mr. Hammen dying in July, 1905, and his wife twenty years before. They had a family of seven children, of whom only three survive. Mrs. Jamison of West Depere; George, a prominent farmer of Buchanan township, Outagamie county; and John. John Hammen received a common school education, and in later years opened his present establishment, operating it as a saloon and hotel, and he caters to some of the best trade in this section. He has a modern, well-kept house, fitted with numerous conveniences, and his trade is large and steady. Mr. Hammen was married in May, 1885, to Katherine Schumacher, also a native of Vandenbroek township, who died in 1887, leaving one son, John P., who is engaged in the ice business in Little Chute. In 1888 Mr. Hammen was married at West Depere to Ellen Williamson, daughter of John Williamson, who now lives in Alabama, but formerly a resident of Little Chute, whence he had come in 1848, and where Mrs. Hammen was born. Two children were born to this union, but both are now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Hammen are members of the Catholic Church, and he is connected with the Foresters. Mr. Hammen has been prominent in public affairs, serving as the first treasurer of the village of Little Chute, as a member of the school board for nine years, as a member of the county board for two years, and as president of the village during 1906 and 1907.


Christ Hansleit
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) page 969; submitted by Mary Saggio.

CHRIST HANSLEIT, who may be named as one of the representative farmers of Seymour township, is engaged in general farming and stock raising operations on a valuable tract of fifty acres, situated on section 3. His birth occurred July 24, 1853, in Germany, and he is a son of George and Mary (Ridaud) Hansleit, natives of the Fatherland who came to the United States in 1873 with their six children, namely: Helena, Minnie, John, Zomwale, Christ and Gusta. Making their way to Wisconsin, the family settled on forty acres of land near Seymour, where the father and sons began to clear the land for cultivation, the family home at that time being a log cabin and the only other building on the farm a log barn. They remained on the original purchase for nine years, and at the end of that time came to the present family home, on section 3, then a forty-acre tract, to which ten acres has since been added, and here George Hansleit spent the remainder of his life. Christ Hansleit worked with his father until the latter's death, when he took charge of the property, and he has made many improvements both to land and buildings, and carries on general farming and raises good livestock. His mother, who is still living, makes her home with him.

Christ Hansleit was married to Reka Barth, who was born in 1876, in Germany, and they have been the parents of six children, as follows: William, Bertha, John, Mary, George and Walter.


Herman Taylor Hardacker
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 922-923; submitted by Mary Saggio.

HERMAN TAYLOR HARDACKER, in whose death, which occurred November 30, 1909, Ellington township lost one of its most prominent citizens, was known all over Outagamie county as a farmer, business man and public official, and in every walk of life sustained a reputation for honesty and integrity. Born in Ellington township, November 20, 1854, Mr. Hardacker was a son of James and Elizabeth Hardacker, the former born in Nova Scotia in 1818. He came to Wisconsin as a young man and settled in the southern part of the State, but later moved to Ellington township, and there died December 12, 1857, his widow, also a native of Nova Scotia, surviving until 1861. Herman T. Hardacker was one of nine children, and he received his education in the district schools of his native neighborhood, but was not given unusual advantages as his father died when he was three years old and his mother when he was just past six, and he was compelled to go to work when he was still a youth. At the age of nineteen years he purchased forty acres of the homestead, on which he began farming. From time to time he added to his acreage, until at the time of his death he had a well-cultivated tract of 180 acres, finely equipped with modern buildings and operated with the latest machinery. Mr. Hardacker was progressive in his ideas, and even as a young man advocated the use of power machinery in all farming operations. He was the owner of a complete threshing outfit which he operated during season, and was the first man to use successfully in the county a self-feeder and cyclone stacker. He was always prominent politically, being an adherent of Republican principles. In addition to being one of the first directors of the county insane asylum and a member of the board for fourteen years, he held numerous school offices, was president of the Home Mutual Insurance Company of Ellington for thirteen years, served on the township board and was chairman of Ellington township for many years. As a public official and private citizen he had the esteem and respect of all who knew him and who could recognize and appreciate his many admirable traits of character. With Mrs. Hardacker he attended the Baptist Church at Hortonville. In 1876 Mr. Hardacker was married to Miss Emma A. Jack, who was born. December 25, 1858, in Greenville township, daughter of Hiram and Mary (Hunter) Jack, the former born in New Brunswick and the latter in Scotland. They came to the United States in 1854, locating in Greenville township, where they spent the remainder of their lives. Seven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Hardacker, of whom two, Clyde H. and Wayne Clinton, are deceased. The survivors are Glenn Marshall, Jennie Emma, Jessie Belle, Ona Mildred and Marian Elizabeth.


John Hardy
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 866-867; submitted by Mary Saggio.

JOHN HARDY, the owner of one of Ellington township's excellent tracts of farming land, is a representative agriculturist of this township. He is a son of Owen Hardy, who was born in 1813, in County Louth, Ireland, and came to the United States in 1842, settling first in Vermont, where he resided for seven years. He came to Outagamie county, Wisconsin, in 1849, settling in Ellington township, where he homesteaded 160 acres in the woods, the nearest postoffice at that time being at Green Bay, thirty miles northeast. Mr. Hardy experienced all of the hardships and privations incident to pioneer life, but eventually cleared up his farm and put it under cultivation, and he continued to operate here until his death, April 15, 1891. Mr. Hardy married Katherine Newcomb, in New York City, she having been born within one-half mile of Mr. Hardy's home in Ireland, and she died at the age of sixty-three years, October 23, 1878. John Hardy was one of three children, and was born August 10, 1851, the first white child born in Ellington township. He received some education in the district schools of his neighborhood, but most of his learning was gained in the school of hard work, starting to do his full share of the labor on the farm as soon as he was old enough to reach the plow handles. In 1888 when his father's health failed, Mr. Hardy took over the management of the home place, and three years later, at his father's death he became owner of the property. On April 30, 1877, Mr. Hardy was married to Anne Ringrose, daughter of Morris Ringrose and his wife Anne, natives of Ireland who came to the United States and settled in Appleton, where both died, the father April 13, 1882, and the mother December 21, 1904. Mrs. Hardy was born October 10, 1855. Mr. and Mrs. Hardy have had twelve children: Katherine, John, Mary, Morris, James, Anne and Margaretta, twins, Nellie and Edward, also twins, Thomas, Genevieve and Frances. Mrs. Hardy is a member of the Catholic Church at Stephensville. For six years Mr. Hardy served as a member of the town school board of Ellington town.


Joseph E. Harriman
APPLETON
Source: The US Biographical Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Volume (1877) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

The present mayor of Appleton, Wisconsin, and judge of Outagamie County, is probably as well known in the county as any resident. That he is very popular may be inferred from the fact that, while a republican, and living in a county which usually gives from fifteen hundred to two thousand democratic majority, the people elected him judge by a handsome majority. In stature he is small, weighing not to exceed one hundred and ten pounds. He possesses an active mind, and is a man of great energy, strict integrity and thorough business tact, and in every way a man such as the people delight to honor.

Joseph E. Harriman, son of Joseph and Lydia (Stearns) Harriman, was born in Louisville, St. Lawrence County, New York, August i6, 1834, and lived on a farm until he was seventeen years of age. When about twelve he had a disease of the hip, which shortened his right limb six inches, disabling him for some time. He came to Wisconsin in 1851, and attended the Milton Academy about two years, and then spent a year in the preparatory department of Lawrence University, at Appleton. He studied law in 1858 and 1859 with Messrs. Jewett and Hudd, of Appleton, and later was a joint proprietor of a hotel at Green Bay for two years, and in 1864 resumed his law studies with Judge Cotton, of that place. He engaged in mercantile business at Appleton, and continued it for seven years, and in 1873 was elected county judge, the duties of which office he is at present (1877) discharging with great acceptance to his constituents.

Judge Harriman was elected mayor of Appleton in April 1876, and still holds that office, and acts as president ex-officio of the school board. He was city treasurer in i860, justice of the peace for several years, and has held other official positions of minor importance.

He has passed all the chairs in the subordinate lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and is a member of the grand lodge in Wisconsin.

In October 1860 Judge Harriman was married to Miss Celia A. Pratt, of Milton, Wisconsin. Of their seven children, four only are now living.

Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin History and Biography, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee (1882) transcribed by Mary Saggio

JOSEPH E. HARRIMAN, Appleton, was born at Louisville, St. Lawrence county, New York, August 16, 1834, and came to Wisconsin in May, 1852. He resided in Walworth county during 1852 and 1853, attended Milton College in 1854 and 1855, and settled in Appleton in 1856, where he still resides. In 1856 and 1857 he was a diligent student at Lawrence University. He studied law with Jewett & Hudd in Appleton in 1858 and 1859; with the late Judge Cotton, of Green Bay, in 1868, and was admitted to the bar. He has held many positions of honor and trust, and in 1873 was elected county judge for Outagamie county for a term of four years; reelected in 1877 and again in 1881, and, although the county is largely democratic, was elected by increased majorities each time. In politics he is a liberal republican.


Ferdinand Harp
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 893-894; submitted by Mary Saggio.

FERDINAND HARP, who has been identified with the agricultural interests of Buchanan township for a number of years, is now the owner of 115 acres of land in sections 26 and 27, and for the past nine years has served as road commissioner of district No. 2. He was born on the property which he is now operating. May 10, 1869, and is a son of William and Caroline (Grumall) Harp, natives of Germany. Mr. Harp's parents came to the United States in 1863, settling on forty acres of wild land which now forms a part of Ferdinand Harp's farm, where William Harp cut down trees, hewed logs and built a log house. He cleared and developed his land and resided on this property until his death, in January, 1911, when he had reached the age of eighty-two years. His wife died February 13, 1900, and both are buried in the Riverside Cemetery at Appleton. Ferdinand Harp was the fourth in order of birth of his parents' five children, and he received his education in the district schools. He always lived on the home farm and worked for his father until the latter's death, when he inherited a part of the homestead and bought the interests of the other heirs, adding seventy acres by purchase and making a total of 115 acres. He was married in 1897 to Miss Mittie Bement, daughter of Walter and Sarah (Weber) Bement, the former a native of Wisconsin and the latter of New York, and of English and Dutch descent, respectively. They were married in Wisconsin and settled in Appleton, where Mr. Bement, with Frank Clark, was the first to make sulphite pulp in the Fox River Valley. Mrs. Harp's paternal grandfather was the first city treasurer of Appleton. Her parents are both living in that city, her father being fifty-eight years old and her mother fifty-six, and they had a family of nine children, Mrs. Harp being the second in order of birth and born August 25, 1874. Mr. and Mrs. Harp have had two children: Gene and Vera. He has 100 acres under cultivation, all fenced with barbed and woven wire, and he does general farming and stock raising, marketing dairy products, hogs and cattle and some hay and grain. He milks eleven cows, keeping Short Horns and Durhams, and also breeds Yorkshire hogs and Belgian horses. His frame barn, 34x54 feet, was built in 1879, and another 30x104 feet, in 1883, the latter being equipped with cow stalls. His frame two-story residence consists of twelve rooms and was built in 1885, and he secures his water for all purposes from drilled wells. In politics Mr. Harp is a Republican and for nine years he has served as road commissioner of district No. 2. With his wife, he attends the Congregational Church.


Frank W. Harriman
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 643-644; submitted by Mary Saggio.

FRANK W. HARRIMAN, deceased. When a life full of usefulness comes to its close, it is fitting that a record should be made of those events and characteristics which made the life successful and made its ending a sorrow to those who value the best and noblest qualities among their associates. In the death of Frank Harriman, Appleton lost one of its noblest characters and most useful citizens, one who entwined his active energies with the very life of the community and helped it in a degree that it is hardly able for its citizens to appreciate. Mr. Harrimanís public career was such that even his worst enemy could not detract from its brightness as an example for the ambitious youth of this generation. Born April 22, 1861, at Appleton, he was a son of Judge Joseph E. and Celia (Pratt) Harriman, natives of New York. Joseph E. Harriman was born at Louisville, St. Lawrence county, New York, August 14, 1834, and was educated at Milton College and Lawrence University, but suffered greatly from sickness, which disabled him, partially, during the latter part of his life. However, his was the courage that overcomes such obstacles, and he rose to an enviable place among his fellows. Coming to Wisconsin in 1852, he started as a clerk, and from the time when he was first elected treasurer of the city of Appleton, in 1860, he rose rapidly, from alderman and justice of the peace, to Mayor and County Judge, and he also served in the capacities of school treasurer, park commissioner, secretary and treasurer of the Appleton Cemetery Association and various other offices in the gift of the people. He was instrumental in the promoting of many of Appletonís most beneficial public enterprises, and as a man and official was known and esteemed all over the county. He married Celia Pratt, of Milton, Wisconsin, and they had four children: Frank W.; Fred J.; Florian J.; and Flora L.

Frank W. Harriman received his education in the public schools of Appleton, and three years after his graduation from the Appleton High School he became a school teacher, serving two years as principal of the Sixth Ward School. He entered his fatherís office as register of probate, assisting him from 1882 to 1889, during which time he was studying law, and December 21, 1883, was admitted to the bar. He became a very successful lawyer, making a specialty of probate practice. He was a man of superior attainments and attained a large and valuable practice, extending to remote parts. He filled the office of County Judge after the death of his father, serving in that capacity until January 1, 1890, and during the year following was appointed postmaster of Appleton, an office in which he served four years. He was secretary of the Blaine and Logan Club, during the campaign of 1884, was secretary of the County Republican Committee for a long period beginning with 1886, was delegate to a number of conventions and the State and the National Conventions of 1888; was treasurer of the Second School District from 1887 to 1891; was secretary of the Outagamie County Bar Association from the time of organization until his death; was secretary and treasurer of the Appleton Cemetery Association for a long period, and in 1904 was elected to the office of Mayor of Appleton, in which capacity he served favorably for one term. He was also instrumental in establishing the Union High School, and did more, perhaps, for the Appleton school system than any man in the history of the city. Socially, he was connected with the Odd Fellows, in which he filled all the chairs in the Subordinate Lodge and Encampment, was grand warden of the Grand Lodge of the State of Wisconsin, and was Grand Representative of the lodge during 1898. He was an active member of the Congregational Church, in the faith of which he died May 16, 1907, mourned not only by a wife circle of friends and acquaintances, but by those who knew him as a real public benefactor, an honest and upright public official and a man in every sense that the word implies.

In September, 1884, Mr. Harriman was united in marriage with Miss Matilda Waterhouse, who was born in Waupaca county, Wisconsin, daughter of B. B. and Sarah (McKerlie) Waterhouse, old settlers of Waupaca county. To this union there were born the following children: Sarah Celia, who married Percy H. Meyers, an expert accountant, of Milwaukee; and Eleanor May, Joseph, Matilda and Francis, all at home.


Fred E. Harriman
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 1047-1048; submitted by Mary Saggio.

FRED E. HARRIMAN, one of the well known and highly esteemed citizens of Appleton, Wisconsin, was born in that city October 23, 1862, and by profession is an attorney at law, having been admitted to the bar March 3, 1885. He is quite extensively engaged in the real estate business, and together with his sons, Fred E. Harriman, Jr., and R. M. Harriman, are among the most extensive ďPure Bred" live stock breeders in the state. He is a member of one of Outagamie county's most popular and honored families which has furnished men who have become prominent in various professions. He is a son of the late Judge Joseph E. Harriman, and Celia Pratt Harriman. Judge Harriman was born at Louisville, St. Lawrence county. New York, August 14, 1834. On coming to Wisconsin in 1852, he located at Eagle, Walworth county, and four years later moved to Appleton. In 1860, Judge Harriman was married to Celia P. Pratt, daughter of Miles and Deborah (Cooley) Pratt, and sister of the late Judge Thomas H. Cooley, of Ann Arbor, Michigan, one of the justices of the Supreme Court of that state, and a noted law writer, being the author of Cooley on Torts, Cooley on Taxation, Cooley on Constitutional Law, etc., and was the first president of the Interstate Commerce Comsion, appointed by Grover Cleveland. The family is descended from the Col. Putnam family of Revolutionary War fame. To this union these survived: Frank W., a prominent member of the bar and who has been probate judge, and city mayor, and has held numerous offices of trust and honor including that of postmaster of Appleton under the McKinley administration; Fred E.; Florian J.; and Flora L., now the wife of F. E. Perry, of Pomona, California. In 1860 Judge Harriman was elected treasurer of Appleton. Later he engaged in the mercantile business, and in 1864, and 1869, he was elected alderman. He served as justice of the peace from 1869, until 1873, and in the latter year, he was elected probate judge by an overwhelming vote. In 1877 he was re-elected, and again in 1881 and in 1885, with pronounced majorities, which position he occupied at the time of his death. In 1876, he was elected mayor after the hottest contest for that office Appleton had ever known. He was school treasurer of the second district from 1884, to 1887, when he removed from the district. In 1887 he was park commissioner. In 1886 Judge Harriman with others organized the Appleton Electric Street Railway Company, and put in operation the first public electric street railway in the United States, and was president and manager of the company at the time of his demise. To him, more than any other score of men, was due the erection of the magnificent Odd Fellows' building, which was dedicated January 1, 1889, in which he took part and which was his last public act as an Odd Fellow. He was elected secretary and treasurer of the Appleton Cemetery Association in 1872, which he held at the time of his death, and it was due to his foresight, more than that of any other citizen, that Appleton is provided with a cemetery that has become famous for its attraction, natural and artificial. Endowed with a sturdy mind, fostered by an indomitable will, clothed with a conviction of right and justice, he became the leader of his time; so pronounced was his popularity that although the county and city was strongly democratic, he was the only republican at that date who ever carried the county and city, which testified to the citizens' abiding faith in him. Twenty years has passed since the flags were displayed at half mast on all the public and principal buildings of the city, and more than three thousand people followed his remains to their resting place. Reverently and tenderly his remains were returned to Mother Earth at Riverside where green grass now covers his grave, blue skies span it, sweet birds sing near it, and the music of passing waters impart a quiet bliss to his final sleep. The memory and fame of Joseph E. Harriman is seen on every side, and long after the memory of man of the present day shall have passed away, there will still remain in the archives of human events of beautiful Appleton the record of his fidelity for progress, integrity and justice.


Benjamin J. Hartsworm
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) page 717; submitted by Mary Saggio.

BENJAMIN J. HARTSWORM, a popular hotel proprietor of Black Creek township, living at Binghamton, and the owner of seven and one-half acres of valuable property on section 32, is a native of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, having been born here on December 22, 873, a son of Paul and Mary Hartsworm. Mr. Hartsworm's parents are natives of Milwaukee county, Wisconsin, and are now living in Black Creek township, the father having reached the age of sixty-seven years and the mother being sixty-four years old. They had a family of eight children, of whom Benjamin J. is the sixth in order of birth

Benjamin J. Hartsworm secured his education in the district schools of Outagamie county, and grew up on his father's farm, making the old family home his residence until he was twenty-five years old, prior to which time he was engaged in various occupations throughout Black Creek township. In April, 1898, he decided to enter the hotel business, and subsequently purchased the hotel property at Binghamton, where he now has an excellent patronage. Mr. Hartsworm is an ideal host, with a pleasing and hospitable personality, and this, with the excellent service furnished by the hotel, has made his house one of the best patronized hostelries in this section of Black Creek township. On September 30, 1902, Mr. Hartsworm was united in marriage with Miss Antonia Werhman, daughter of Simon and Fredericka Werhman, natives of Wisconsin, who are now living in Appleton, the father being fifty-seven years old and the mother fifty-three. Mrs. Hartsworm, who is the fourth in order-of birth of her parents' twelve children, was born January 7, 1884. Five children have been born to Benjamin J. and Antonia Hartsworm, namely: Delas, Ruth, Esther, Ethel and Dayton. Mr. Hartsworm is a Republican in politics, and he and Mrs. Hartsworm are consistent members of the Lutheran Church.


Paul Hartsworm
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 748-749; submitted by Mary Saggio.

PAUL HARTSWORM, whose residence in Outagamie county, Wisconsin, covers more than a half century, has for many years been engaged in farming and stock raising in Black Creek township, where he now owns a good farm of seventy acres on sections 31 and 32. Born January 1, 1844, in Milwaukee county, Wisconsin, Mr. Hartsworm is a son of Henry and Maria Hartsworm, who came from Germany to the United States in 1843 and settled in Milwaukee county, Wisconsin, where Henry Hartsworm, a farmer by occupation, passed away. His widow survived him some years and died in Outagamie county. They had ten children, and of these Paul was the fourth in order of birth. He was educated in the district schools and remained at home on the farm until 1863, in which year he enlisted for service in the Union army during the Civil War, and became a member of Company F, Forty-sixth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. He served until the end of the war, being engaged principally in guard duty, and was finally mustered out of the service at Nashville, Tenn., with an excellent war record. On his return from the army, he rented a farm in Milwaukee county, on which he resided for one year, and then came to Outagamie county and rented a property in Greenville township. Five years later he became a renter on a Grand Chute township farm, and three years later came to Center township, where he rented land for six years. During the fall of 1882 Mr. Hartsworm located on the farm which he now occupies, there then being but thirty-five acres cleared and only a frame dwelling built on the property. He settled down at once to put this land under cultivation, and he now has an excellent property, well graded, properly drained and neatly fenced. All necessary buildings have been erected and the property has been beautified by the laying out of lawns and setting out of shade and fruit trees, and the tract now presents an excellent appearance. Mr. Hartsworm carries on general farming and stockraising, and his efforts have met with well-deserved success.

In March, 1866, Mr. Hartsworm was married to Mary Reinamann, who was born in 1845, the eldest of the five children born to her father's second marriage. Mrs. Hartsworm's parents were natives of Germany, who came to the United States in 1842 and died in Appleton, Wisconsin. To Mr. and Mrs. Hartsworm there have been born the following children: George, a resident of Black Creek, who has five children; Minnie, who married Thomas Day, of Appleton, and has four children; Ella, who married Harry Allander, of Shiocton, and has two children; Henry, who died at the age of seven years; William, who is single and living at home; Benjamin, who married Antonia Werhman, living in Binghamton, and has five children; Julia, who married Martin Strope and died in 1897, leaving two children; and Mary, who is single and living at home. Mr. Hartsworm is a Republican in politics and has served as a member of the Black Creek school board.


John Hartsworn
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 710-711; submitted by Mary Saggio.

JOHN HARTSWORN, a prosperous and progressive young farmer of Center township, Outagamie county, is a member of a family that for three generations has carried on agricultural pursuits in this section of the country. His grandfather, Henry Hartsworn, was a native of Germany and came to the United States as a young man, settling with his wife, Mary, near Milwaukee, and later on removing to Center township, where he took up wild land and carried on farming up to the time of his death. His son, Frederick, the father of John Hartsworn, was born near Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1850, and was married to Anna Sitts, a native of Center township. Frederick Hartsworn followed the example of his father and took up wild land, clearing it from the forest and making it into a good farm. He and his wife had eleven children, and of these John Hartsworn was born July 16, 1879. He was reared on the home farm, and when he could be spared was allowed to attend the district schools of his neighborhood. He was brought up to the hard work of the farm, and took that up for his life occupation, and in 1903, when his father died, he came into possesison of the home place, which he has continued to operate to the present time. As a youth he had learned the carpenter's trade, a vocation which he followed for some time in conjunction with farming, but he now devotes all of his attention to his agricultural interests and has one of the well-cultivated, valuable and fine-appearing farms of Center township. Mr. Hartsworn belongs to the Reformed Church, at Dale, Wisconsin. His political faith is that of the Republican party, but he has never cared to spare time from his farming duties to engage in politics with the idea of securing public preferment. He has never married and resides on the home place with two sisters and a younger brother.


Frank J. Hartzheim
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) page 1222; submitted by Mary Saggio.

FRANK J. HARTZHEIM, an enterprising and progressive young farmer of Buchanan township, who is operating forty-three acres of valuable farming land situated in section 34, is now making his home with his uncle, Fred Hartzheim, who lives in Calumet county on the line opposite the land now being cultivated by Frank J. Hartzheim. The latter was born July 24, 1882, in Outagamie county, Wisconsin, and is a son of Andrew and Lena (Miller) Hartzheim, natives of the fatherland who were married in Wisconsin and after marriage settled in Buchanan township, where Mrs. Hartzheim died in 1889. Andrew Hartzheim is living in Shawano county, having reached the age of sixty-one years. Frank J. Hartzheim was the oldest of a family of five children, of whom one other child is living: Sophia, who is single and a resident of Appleton. After his mother's death Mr. Hartzheim was. reared until he was twelve years old in the Orphans' Home, and at that time began to work to support himself, continuing to work at various occupations for wages until 1906, when he rented his father's property of forty-three acres in section 34, where he has continued to operate ever since. He carries on general farming, in which he has been satisfactorily successful, and he has maintained the respect and esteem that have been his as a self-made man. Mr. Hartzheim is single. He is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, votes with the democratic party, and attends the Holy Angels church at Darboy, Wisconsin.


F. J. Harwood
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 1028-1029; submitted by Mary Saggio.

F. J. HARWOOD, president of the Appleton Woolen Mills, one of the largest manufacturing concerns of Wisconsin, has been prominently identified with the business interests of this city for more than thirty-five years. Born at Crown Point, Essex county New York, December 25, 1855, he is a son of Allen P. and Ann (Penfield) Harwood, the former of whom was engaged as an iron manufacturer for over thirty years and in 1874 came west to Wisconsin, locating on a farm near Ripon, where he lived retired until his death in 1894. F. J. Harwood came to Appleton February 15, 1876, and in the following year bought an interest in the business of which he is now the president. This firm, originallv organized as Hutchinson, Fay & Ballard in 1861, sold out later to Fay, Ballard & Robinson, which in turn disposed of its interests to Hutchinson & Company, the firm consisting of W. W. Hutchinson, Dr. J. T. Reeve and F. J. Harwood. They continued to operate it until the mill property and the Appleton Chair Company's plant were destroyed by fire June 17, 1881. The loss being too great for the one firm to stand, on June 30, 1881, the present firm was established, with A. P. Harwood, of Ripon, as president; C. A. Beverage of Appleton, vice-pres dent; W. W. Hutchinson, secretary and treasurer, and F. J. Harwood, general manager. The business began manufacturing knitting yarns exclusively, but in 1888 a weaving plant was added, and in 1892 equipment was added for the manufacture of papermakers' felts, etc. During the following year a large, three-story addition was built on the southeast corner of the plant, and in 1900 another addition was found necessary to handle the large amount of business, and was accordingly built, it extending along the entire length of the north side of the mill. Later, in 1902, the firm purchased the Reedsburg, Wisconsin, Woolen Mills, where cassimere for men's wear is manufactured. The present officers of the company are F. J. Harwood, president and general manager; F. I. Phillips, vice-president and mill superintendent; D. V. N. Harwood, secretary and treasurer. The mills now use 450,000 pounds of wool annually, employ over 150 mechanics and workmen and market their product as far away as China. Mr. Harwood is a director of the First National Bank. He has served for nine years on the school board, was alderman of the First ward for six years, and served two terms as president of the council. Fraternally he is connected with the E. F. U. and the Temple of Honor January 24, 1882. Mr. Harwood was married to Harriet A. Harwood, of Holly, Orleans county, New York, and they have had two daughters: Ruth, who married S. F. Shattuck, Neenah, Wisconsin; and Anna P., a graduate of Smith College, who is now engaged in teaching. Mr. Harwood and his family are members of the Congregational Church, and he has served as superintendent of the Sunday school for the past twenty-five years. He is a member of the board of directors of the Wisconsin Congregational State Association, and a director in the Young Men's Christian state association. Mr. Harwood is a man of great executive ability, and has been especially successful as an organizer. His business interests have kept him very busy, but he has always found time to assist in forwarding those movements which he judges will be of benefit to his adopted city.


Edward L. Hassinger
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 1131-1132; submitted by Mary Saggio.

EDWARD L. HASSINGER, the proprietor of a large poultry farm in Greenville township, is a native Wisconsinian, having been born in Newburg, Washington county, July 22, 1863, a son of Adam and Frances (Starch) Hassinger. Adam Hassinger was born in Hessen, Germany, February 8, 1833, and died February 6, 1911, while his wife was born in Austria, July 25, 1837, and still survives. Mr. Hassinger came to the United States when about twenty-two years of age, and came immediately to Milwaukee, where he followed the trade of butcher until coming to Greenville township in 1898, with the exception of one and one-half years spent at Newburg. He spent the remainder of his life in agricultural pursuits on the farm now operated by his son Edward L. Edward L. Hassinger was the oldest of the nine children born to his parents and he attended school in Milwaukee, after leaving which he learned the trade of butcher with his father, and was engaged in that business in Milwaukee until 1893. In that year he rented his father-in-law's farm, on which he remained five years, at the end of that time coming to the farm which he now conducts, a tract of sixty acres, which he devotes largely to poultry raising, making a specialty of Rhode Island Reds and Wyandotte, and marketing his product in Appleton. Mr. Hassinger was married December 26, 1888, to Elizabeth Krueger, who was born in Milwaukee county, Granville township, July 20, 1867, daughter of Albert and Ernestina ( ------------- ) Krueger, natives of Germany and early settlers of Milwaukee county, having located here when the Indians were still plentiful in this part of the country. Mr. Krueger is deceased, but his widow still survives him. Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Hassinger, namely: Lillian, born February 25, 1889, wife of Augusta Winter, a fireman of Minneapolis; Edward, born July 25, 1890; Rose, born October 7, 1891; Laura, born September 15, 1893; Harry, born November 8, 1896; and Roland, born July 26, 1897, all living at home. Mr. Hassinger is independent in his political views.


Frank W. Hauert
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 730-731; submitted by Mary Saggio.

FRANK W. HAUERT, who was born in Brookfield, Waukesha county, Wisconsin, August 6, 1865, is one of Appleton's well-known business men, and is proprietor of the oldest grain and feed establishment in this city. He is a son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Reineman) Hauert, the former a native of Baden, Germany, and the latter of the same country, from whence she came with her parents. Jacob Hauert came to the United States as a young man and settled first in Milwaukee, from whence, in 1849, he traveled overland to California during the days of the discovery of gold. Having accumulated considerable means there, he returned by way of boat, and was married in Milwaukee, after which he purchased land in Waukesha county, where all of his children were born. Mr. Hauert started to come to Outagamie county about 1868, to loan money, and about 1874 he settled in Appleton and bought a half interest in the Charles Morey flour mill. Later Nicholas Weiland bought Mr. Morey's interest in the business, which still later became Wambolt, Hauert & Company, Incorporated, and eventually the Hauerts all sold their interest in the business and Jacob Hauert retired, living a quiet life until his death in 1905, at the age of eighty-four years, his widow surviving until January 22, 1909. Although not a member of any church Mr. Hauert was liberal in his contributions to church and charitable movements. He had a family of nine children, as follows: Henry, who is deceased, was manager of the flour mill and later with his brother, Jacob J., in the flour and feed business, and had a wife and one son, Robert; George, a retired farmer of Oshkosh, has a wife and two children; Jacob J., engaged in the hardware business in Appleton, is married and has five children; one child who died in infancy; Annie, who died at the age of 13 years; Julia, who married Henry Kossel, a resident of Oshkosh, engaged in the real estate business; Frank W., Appleton; Fred C, resident of Black Creek, Wisconsin, the proprietor of a general store, has a wife and two children; and Amelia, who married Henry Losselyong, a mail carrier of Appleton, has two children.

Frank W. Hauert received a common school education in the schools of Waukesha county, and as a youth came to Appleton and went to work for his brothers, Henry and Jacob, who were engaged in the flour and feed business here. After the death of Henry Hauert, Frank W., on April 25, 1894, bought his brother's interest in the business, which he has since conducted alone with great success. The present store was erected by Mr. Hauert's father, in 1883, and is a two-story structure, 53x80 feet. Mr. Hauert is the leading flour, feed and seed merchant in Appleton, and his stand is the oldest in the city. On January 19, 1891, Mr. Hauert was united in marriage with Mary Bowhousen, and they have had four children: May, who is deceased; and Helen, Ervin J, and Lorine, all at home. Mr. Hauert's fraternal connections are with the Woodmen and the Eagles.


Fred C. Hauert
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 635-636; submitted by Mary Saggio.

FRED C. HAUERT, a representative citizen of Black Creek, Wisconsin, where he is engaged in a large general mercantile business, has been identified with the general growth and development of this village ever since locating here eleven years ago. He was born January 6, 1878, in Brookfield, Waukesha county, Wisconsin, a son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Reineman) Hauert, natives of Germany. The parents of Mr. Hauert were married in Milwaukee, and in 1886 went to Appleton, where the death of his father occurred January 19, 1904, and the mother passed away January 21, 1906, both being buried at Riverside cemetery. Fred C. was the next to the youngest of their nine children.

Fred C. Hauert received a common school education at Appleton, and when but fifteen years of age commenced working for himself, securing employment in a retail grocery store in Appleton, and then, after five years, learning the tinnerís trade. After three years he went to Milwaukee, where he worked at his trade for one and one-half years, and he then returned to Appleton, where he followed his trade for eight years. On July 28, 1900, Mr. Hauert came to Black Creek and established himself in business, buying out a general merchandise firm, and here he has continued to the present time, his business increasing steadily. He is the owner of the building in which he conducts his business, and of the residence in which he resides. Mr. Hauert is a member of the E. F. U. He is a Democrat in politics, and has served as a trustee of the village for three years. With Mrs. Hauert he attends St. Johnís Episcopal Protestant Church of Black Creek.

In 1894 Mr. Hauert was married to Miss Emma Fisher, daughter of Edward and Bertha (Durdell) Fisher, natives of Berlin, Germany, and Paris, France, respectively. Mrs. Fisher came to America with her parents when she was five years old, and Mr. Fisher was fifteen years old when he came to this country. They were married in Appleton, Wisconsin, and are now living at Tower, Wyoming. Mrs. Hauert, who was the eldest of the fourteen children of her parents was born June 3, 1876. She and Mr. Hauert have had two children: Elsie and Sidney.


Jacob J. Hauert
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 737-738; submitted by Mary Saggio.

JACOB J. HAUERT, one of the leading merchants of Appleton, Wisconsin, who is the proprietor of a large hardware business, is also well known in fraternal circles of this city. He was born in Brookfield, Waukesha county, Wisconsin, February 21, 1858, and is a son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Reineman) Hauert, both of whom are now deceased. Jacob Hauert was born in Baden, Germany, from which country he came to the United States in young manhood and settled in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. During the year 1849, when gold was discovered in California, he decided to try his fortunes in the far West, and traveled overland to the goal of the gold seekers. He was more fortunate than a great many other prospectors, and soon had accumulated enough money to return by boat, and bought Government land in Waukesha county, Wisconsin, after his marriage in Milwaukee. Here, while he was engaged in farming, all of his nine children were born, as follows: Henry, deceased, who was engaged in business with his father and brother for some years, was married and had a son, Robert; George, a retired farmer of Oshkosh, has a wife and two children; Jacob J.; one child who died in infancy; Annie, who died at the age of thirteen years; Julia, who married Henry Kossel, a resident of Oshkosh engaged in the real estate business; Frank W., engaged in the flour, feed and seed business in Appleton, is married and has three children; Fred, who conducts a general store at Black Creek, Wisconsin, has a wife and two children; and Amelia, married Henry Losselyoung, an Appleton mail carrier, and has two children. In about the year 1868, Jacob Hauert began to make trips to Outagamie county in order to invest his money in loans, and about 1874 he purchased a half interest in the Charles Morey flour mill, the firm becoming Morey & Hauert, which later changed to Weiland & Hauert, and Wamboldt, Hauert & Company, Incorporated, and eventually the Hauerts severed their connections with the concern entirely. Mr. and Mrs. Hauert came to Appleton to live in 1875, and his death occurred here January 19, 1905, at the age of eighty-four years, Mrs. Hauert passing away January 22, 1909. Mr. Hauert was always a supporter of church and charitable movements, and of anything that promised to benefit his community.

Jacob J. Hauert received a common school education, and at the age of sixteen years commenced to learn the trade of miller in the mill of his father. In 1881 Mr. Hauert and his brother Henry engaged in the flour and feed business in Appleton, and they continued together until 1888, when Jacob J. sold out to engage in the hardware business with William Hagen. In 1895 he bought Mr. Hagen's interest in the business, and during 1892 he erected the present building, a two-story structure with basement, 25x90 feet, and in July of that year established his business there. He has been very successful in his venture and is considered one of the substantial men of his city. On January 10, 1882, Mr. Hauert was married to Sophia Koehn, of Appleton, daughter of Henry Koehn, and they have had five children: Emma, who married Max Elias and resides in Appleton; Wilbert, who is engaged in business with his father, marrried Dora Polland; Alvin, connected with the Majestic Construction Company of Milwaukee; and Roy and Adeline, at home. Mr. Hauert is prominent in fraternal circles of Appleton, being a member of Rhine Lodge of Modern Woodmen, the Equitable Fraternal Union and the Eagles, and he is treasurer of the Harmony Club and of the Fair Association. In 1910 he was elected to the office of city assessor.


John Haug
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 1145-1146; submitted by Mary Saggio.

JOHN HAUG, who has been a resident of the city of Appleton for more than a quarter of a century, has been identified with the Appleton Brewing Company ever since its organization, and now is acting in the capacity of brewmaster. He is a native of Germany, and learned the art of brewing in the Fatherland, coming in 1882 to the United States and working at his trade in Ohio for four years at Bellefontaine, although he spent a short time on a farm. On coming to Appleton, he was first employed by Freis & Walters, and rose to the position of brewmaster in 1896, and when the Appleton Brewing Company opened its brewery in Appleton his services were secured in the same capacity. Mr. Haug went to Chicago in 1899 to attend the Wahl-Henins Institute of Fermentology, and he was graduated therefrom on June 1 of that year, when he returned to Appleton. Mr. Haug was married to May Alberty of Appleton, and they are members of the Sacred Heart Catholic Church. They have had four children, of whom two are deceased. In politics Mr. Haug is a democrat.


James E. Hawley
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) page 919; submitted by Mary Saggio.

JAMES E. HAWLEY, who has developed one of the finest farms in his section of Greenville township through a knowledge of soil and climatic conditions, backed by hard work and good management, is a son of David Hawley, a native of County Tipperary, Ireland. David Hawley came to the United States in young manhood, and was about twenty years of age when he settled in Greenville township, after having spent a short time in Green Bay. He settled on wild timber land, on which he built a little log house, and this was his home until he had cleared and cultivated a part of his farm, when he erected a better home of frame, and here he continued to reside until his death, January 11, 1890. Mr. Hawley married Margarette Sheirdan, who was born in County Wexford, Ireland, and she died January 4, 1906, having been the mother of nine children. James E. Hawley was born August 20, 1876, and received his education in the district schools of Greenville township and St. Mary's school in Appleton. He has always worked on the home farm, and when his father died, his elder brother, Thomas, took charge of the property, being the manager thereof until James E. was nineteen years old when the latter took charge, and so continued until the mother's death in 1906, at which time James E. purchased the interest of the other heirs and has since operated the farm alone. He has been a hard and faithful worker and has brought the land into a high state of cultivation and equipped it with good, substantial barn and outbuildings and with modern power machinery. He carries on general farming and dairying, and the large crops which he raises testify to his ability as a farmer. Mr. Hawley has never married, but since his mother's death his niece, Mary Mailey, daughter of his sister Margaret, has kept house for him. He is a consistent member of St. Mary's Catholic Church of Appleton.



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