Always Free ... Always Updating

Outagamie County Genealogy Trails Site

Outagamie County Wisconsin
Biographies

Jacob Heagle
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 852-853; submitted by Mary Saggio.

JACOB HEAGLE, who is one of the representative farmers and stockraisers of Osborn township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, came to this part of the country a poor man and through his energy and industry has become one of financial independence. He was born October 22, 1843, at Rawdon, Canada, and is a son of Henry and Eliza (Sharp) Heagle, both of whom were natives of the state of New York. Jacob Heagle visited Wisconsin in early manhood but remained only a short time, going back to Canada, but after the close of the Civil War, in 1865, returned to Wisconsin, with his parents and they settled in Outagamie county. In the year 1866 he married Mary Olive Dodge and they located on a partly cleared tract of land containing eighty-three acres, situated in sections 3 and 4, Osborn township. It was a lonesome place in those days, there being no road yet built, only a trail through the woods leading to their humble shanty. They were practical, hard-working people and continued to live in the shanty until they could afford to start the building of a frame house into which they moved as soon as possible. To this additions have been made and now they have a commodious and comfortable farm house. Mr. Heagle has always labored hard and in early days cleared land for his neighbors in order to get money with which to purchase a team and farm implements for himself. Twenty-three and 75-100 acres were added to the original farm and all has been cleared. The barn, with dimensions of 30x50 feet was built some years ago and has been raised and a basement with cement floor added. The sons of Mr. Heagle take considerable pride in the fine thorough-bred trotting horses raised here. Mr. and Mrs. Heagle had the following children: Mrs. Alberta Bowerman of Seattle, Washington; Arthur, of Green Bay, Wisconsin; Frank, a rural mail carrier out from Seymour, Wisconsin; May, Mrs. Loren Felio, of Niagara, Wisconsin; Henry, residing on the home place; Pearl, Mrs. Louis Reis, of Seymour, Wisconsin; and Earl and Ida, the former of whom is residing on the home farm and the latter is deceased. Mr. Heagle has great reason to take pride in what he has accomplished. He is one of the township's most respected citizens.


Michael Hechel
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 616-617; submitted by Mary Saggio.

MICHAEL HECHEL, who owns and operates a general truck and dairy farm lying just forty-three rods west of the city limits of Appleton, Wisconsin, in Grand Chute township, is one of this section’s good agriculturists. He was born October 31, 1866, in Bavaria, Germany, a son of Lawrence and Carrie (Felseis) Hechel, natives of that country. Lawrence Hechel was a soldier in the German army, and met his death in battle during the Franco-Prussian war, and his widow brought her family to America in 1884, coming direct to Appleton, where she lived until her death in February, 1904. Mr. Hechel has one brother, Fred, who also came to this country. Michael Hechel received his education in the schools of his native country, and was eighteen years of age when he came to this country with his mother and brother. His first employment was for B. C. Walter as a farm hand, at five dollars per month, and after one summer with him he worked out with other farmers in Grand Chute township for four years. He then built a home for himself and mother at No. 535 Outagamie street, Appleton, and began working as a section hand in construction work, rising to the position of section boss. After six or seven years spent in Appleton, Mr. Hechel purchased twenty acres of his present farm, and continued to work as section boss for seven years longer, when he added seventeen acres to his original purchase and began farming. Since that time he has added to this property and erected a modern house and barn, and he now has forty acres in a fine state of cultivation and follows truck and dairy farming with much success. He is a member of the Lutheran Church, and takes an independent stand in politics.

On March 20, 1892, Mr. Hechel was married to Louisa Suckow, who was born in Pommerin, Germany, April 7, 1867, daughter of William and Mary (Geisthardt) Suckow, who came to America in 1872 and located in Bern township, Marathon county, in 1881, after having resided at various other places. They still live in Marathon county, where they are well known and highly esteemed. Mr. and Mrs. Hechel have had five children: Frederick, born September 14, 1895; William, born July 25, 1896; Oscar, born July 3, 1897; Emma, born October 11, 1898, and Arthur, born October 27, 1904.


Herman Heckert, Sr.
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 1167-1168; submitted by Mary Saggio.

HERMAN HECKERT, SR., an old and honored resident of Appleton, Wisconsin, and a veteran of the great Civil War, who has been identified with the business interests of this city for more than forty- three years, is now the proprietor of a large shoe business. He is a native of the Fatherland, born in 1845, son of Michael and Anna Sophia (Brot) Heckert, who came to the United States in 1855 on the sailing vessel “Oder." Landing at New York City, the family made its way to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and traveled thence by ox team to Mayview, Dodge county, in the vicinity of which place Michael Heckert was engaged in farming until his death. He was one of the pioneer agriculturists of this section, and bore with others all of the hardships and privations incidental to the pioneer's life, working hard during his active years that he might make a home for his family and a competency for his old age. He and his wife had five children: Herman; Charles, who enlisted in 1862 in the artillery, and after his honorable discharge at Fort Monroe re-enlisted in the infantry service, and who is now deceased; August, who is a resident of North Dakota; Fredericka, who is deceased; and Mary, who married Edward Monyer of Denver, Colorado. Herman Heckert was reared on the home farm and received his education in the district schools of the vicinity of the homestead. During his youth he remembers seeing Lincoln and Carl Schurz when they were on their stump-speaking trips. On October 4, 1864, he enlisted in a regiment of Wisconsin Volunteers, being in General Thomas' division, and participated with this regiment until the close of the war, participating in a number of hard-fought engagements, among which was the battle of Nashville. On his return from the war, Mr. Heckert went to Mayville for one year, and spent a like period at Fox Lake, and in April, 1888, located in Appleton and established himself in the liquor business with another gentleman for two years. Later he engaged in business on his own account, but was burned out in the destructive fire, and in 1872 erected a building and again engaged in business, continuing in that line for fifteen years. He sold out in 1888 and opened a shoe establishment, erecting a building and later adding another story, and it is now 100x20 feet. He has continued to carry on this business to the present time and has met with well- merited success.

In early life Mr. Heckert was married to Carnestina Fischer born in Germany, daughter of Frederick and Amelia (Foster) Fischer, who came to Outagamie county about 1853, Mr. Fischer being a well-known contractor and builder. Eight children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Heckert, namely: Annie, who is deceased; Augusta; Herman, who assists his father in the shoe business; Amanda, who married Jacob Fife, a resident of Appleton; Clara, who lives at home; Robert, a farmer of Grand Chute township ; Sadie, a resident of Denver, who is studying to become a nurse; and Emil, who lives in Denver. Mr. Heckert erected a beautiful home in Appleton in 1892. He is well known in the city, and is a popular member of the Odd Fellows, the Masons and the Grand Army of the Republic.


John Stephen Heenan
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 648-649; submitted by Mary Saggio.

JOHN STEPHEN HEENAN, general farmer, stockraiser and dairyman of Grand Chute township, is operating 250 acres of fine farming land, on which he was born December 25, 1859, a son of John and Mary (Conway) Heenan, natives of Ireland. John Heenan was born in County Tipperary and his wife in County Clare, and they were married in Appleton, Wisconsin, removing to the Grand Chute township farm the day after the ceremony. At this time the farm and the surrounding country were a vast wilderness, not even a wagon road leading through, but Mr. Heenan built himself a little home, and started in to clear the brush and timber from the land and to get it ready for the first crop. After this had been accomplished, the property was rapidly cultivated, each year finding further improvements, and when he deeded the land to his son in about 1895, it was one of the best farms in this section of the township. Mr. Heenan died on this property in 1903, his wife having passed away in 1886. They were the parents of six children: Margaret, deceased; John Stephen; Bridget, wife of James Garvey, a resident of Freedom township; James, and two who died in infancy. John Stephen Heenan attended the district schools of Grand Chute township, and was brought up on the home farm, which he has never left. As soon as he was old enough he began to do his share of the clearing and cultivating, and he was given charge of the property several years before it was deeded to him. He now has 250 acres under cultivation, devoted to general farming, and he makes dairying a specialty, disposing of his milk to the cheese factories of this vicinity. He is a member of the Roman Catholic Church at Appleton, and takes an independent stand in politics. On January 30, 1894, Mr. Heenan was married to Miss Katherine Garvey, who was born in Freedom township, April 30, 1865, daughter of Patrick and Phoebe (Carney) Garvey. Patrick Garvey was born in County Westmeade, Ireland, and his wife in County Queens, and they were married in 1850 in New York, whence Mr. Garvey had come in 1848. He worked on public works in New York City for about five years, and then went to Hungry Hollow, Ohio, where he was engaged in railroad construction for about four years, at the end of which time he came to Freedom township and bought a farm. Mr. Garvey became one of the prosperous citizens of his township, and served in various offices. His death occurred in 1887, his widow surviving him until 1904. They were the parents of eleven children, of whom five are now living: Mary, a sister in the convent at Milwaukee; Mrs. Heenan; Rose, the wife of Francis J. Vanlaanan, of Green Bay; Elizabeth, the wife of Gerhart Vandelocht, of Appleton; and Patrick, a farmer of Freedom township. Mr. and Mrs. Heenan have had seven children, born as follows: John Stephen Jr., April 25, 1895; Patrick James, April 24, 1897; Mary Martha, October 30, 1898; Phoebe Ann, January 8, 1900; James Sylvester, May 3, 1901; Ruth Magdalene, November 4, 1902; and Francis Joseph, November 24, 1905.


Leo August Hegner
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 1160-1161; submitted by Mary Saggio.

LEO AUGUST HEGNER has been a resident of Grand Chute township all of his life, and is now engaged in agricultural pursuits on the farm on which he was born August 30, 1884. He is a son of John and Matilda (Tesch) Hegner, the former of whom was born in Saxony, September 1, 1839, and the latter in Pomerania, Germany, May 21, 1844. John Hegner came to America in the early '50s and first settled at Milwaukee, shortly thereafter renting land in Milwaukee county, on which he resided for three years, at which time he came to Outagamie county and bought the farm on which his son Leo A. now lives. This land was situated in the woods, and had no improvements of any kind made upon it, but he settled down, built himself a little home, and started in to clear up the property, and after many years of labor, in the spring of 1909, he turned over to his son a well-cultivated, fertile tract and retired to his home on the corner of Drew and Atlantic streets, Appleton. This handsome residence was built from attic to cellar by his son, Leo A., who even completed the inside work, plastering and painting. Of the thirteen children of John and Matilda Hegner, seven are now living, namely: Clara, who is the wife of Fred Miller, a farmer of Grand Chute township; Lizzie, the wife of Herman Vakes, a butcher of Appleton; Henry, who is a member of the Appleton marble works firm of Hegner & Wolf; Tillie, who married George Minster, an Appleton butcher; John, who is engaged in contracting in Appleton; Sarah, who is single and resides with her parents, and Leo August.

Leo August Hegner attended district school No. 9, in Grand Chute township, and the German school at Appleton, and when he was but seventeen years of age he commenced to work for others when he was not needed on the home farm. When he was eighteen years old he learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed during four winters in Appleton, and was also engaged in house painting. After his father's retirement he settled on the old home farm, which he is now cultivating with marked success, and the large crops which he raises denote the skilled agrculturist no less than the well-kept, substantial appearance of the buildings and equipment indicate the expert mechanic. Mr. Hegner was married November 25, 1908, to Anna Kack, who was born in Maine township, Outagamie county, March 30, 1887, daughter of William and Mary (Grunde) Kack, the former of whom was born in Germany October 15, 1848, and the latter January 19, 1850. The parents of Mrs. Hegner came to the United States in 1881, and after spending a short time in New York removed to the West, and finally settled in Ellington township, Outagamie county, where Mr. Kack cultivated a farm for about one year. He then went to Appleton, where he was employed in a brick yard for a year, at the end of which time he bought a farm in Maine township, on which he was located for nineteen years. Selling out, he went to Appleton and engaged in a retail liquor business for about five years, and he is now carrying on the same business in Forest county. Mrs. Kack also survives. They had a family of thirteen children, of whom nine survive: Tracy, who married Earl Keesler, a farmer of Shiocton; Otto, a lumberman of Lakewood; Mary, who married Ed Runge, a carpenter of Appleton; William, a lumberman of Lakewood ; Herman, a farmer on the old homestead; Anna, who married Mr. Hegner, and Albert, Letitia and Louis, who are single and reside at home. Mr. and Mrs. Hegner have had one child, Viola Hattie, born October 17, 1909. Mr. Hegner and his wife are members of the Lutheran church. In political matters he is independent.


Lawrence Hehman
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 1253-1254; submitted by Mary Saggio.

LAWRENCE HEHMAN, one of the progressive and enterprising agriculturists of Maple Creek township, is the owner of a farm of 126 acres situated on section 6, the old Hehman homestead, on which he was born April 7, 1874, a son of Garret and Margaret (Ruckdashel) Hehman, natives of Holland and Germany, respectively. Garrett Hehman came to the United States when but thirteen years old with his parents, who first settled in Shawano county, Wisconsin, where they spent their lives. Mr. Hehman's mother was fourteen years of age when she came to America, her parents being early settlers of Waupaca county, just across the line from Maple Creek, and they both died there more than thirty years ago. When Garrett Hehman was married he purchased the farm now owned by his son Lawrence, from his wife's brothers, and there his death occurred in August, 1905, when he was sixty-six years of age. His widow is now living with her son Lawrence, who was the fifth of a family of seven children. Mr. Hehman was reared on the old farm, and at the death of his father it was deeded to him. The eldest of the family was Margaret, who married George Grieshamer, and died in 1900, leaving three children; Clara, next in order of birth, married Adolph Meyer, and they now live in Eau Claire and have four children; Henry Hehman married Myrtle Otis, and lives in Waupaca county, having one child; Elizabeth married Willard G. Mansfield, and lives in Deer Creek township, having two children; Lawrence was next in order of birth; Martha married William Brummond and now lives in one of the Dakotas; and John died at the age of thirteen years. Ninety acres of Mr. Hehman's farm is in a fine state of cultivation, the property is fenced with barbed wire, and in 1907 Mr. Hehman built a modern residence of eleven rooms, and a barn 32x50 feet, although most of the buildings and improvements were built during his father's life. Mr. Hehman is engaged in general farming and stock raising and markets dairy products and hogs. He feeds all of his hay and grain, and specializes in Durham cattle and Poland-China hogs. In political matters he takes an independent stand, voting rather for the man than the party, and he and his mother are connected with the Methodist Episcopal Church of Welcome, Wisconsin. Mr. Hehman is unmarried.


John Henry Heidemann
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 1232-1233; submitted by Mary Saggio.

JOHN HENRY HEIDEMANN, one of Bovina township's good, practical agriculturists, who is carrying on successful operations on a tract of eighty acres located in section 32, is a native of Prussia, Germany, where his parents, Henry and Annie G. (Benning) Heidemann, were also born. They came to the United States in 1847, settling in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where both died, Mr. Heidemann having been engaged at various occupations in the Cream City. John Henry Heidemann was one of a family of seven children, and as the family was in rather humble circumstances, his education was cut short at the age of fifteen years, when he started out to work for himself. During the next twenty years he followed farming for wages, and he then rented a tract near Milwaukee, continuing to cultivate this property until 1888, when he purchased the land on which he now lives. At that time there was a little house, 16x20 feet, situated on this farm, and about fifteen acres of the property had been cleared, but through industry and perseverance Mr. Heidemann has succeeded in clearing and putting under cultivation fifty-five acres, and now has a fertile, productive property, on which are located good, substantial buildings and modern improvements. He has engaged in general farming and stock raising and has been uniformly successful in his operations. In 1865, Mr. Heidemann was married to Miss Jane Lynch, who was born August 1, 1845, daughter of Charles and Mary (Kelly) Lynch. Mrs. Heidemann's parents were born in Scotland and came to the United States about 1850, locating in Boston, where they remained until their death, the mother passing away when Mrs. Heidemann was but eight years old and the father dying after her marriage. Ten children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Heidemann, as follows: John, who is single and living at home with his parents; Joseph of Outagamie county, married and has six children; James of Taylor county, who is married and has three children; Mary, who married William Tyler of Shiocton and has two children; Annie, who married Henry Sommers, living in Outagamie county, and has six children: Jane, who married John Canavan, living in Outagamie county, and has three children; Ellen, who married Ferdinand Brotts, also a resident of Outagamie county; Sophia, who married Thomas McCormack of Seymour, and has two children; Addie, who married Fred Pebbles of Outagamie county, and has one child; and Clara, who is single and living with her parents. Mr. and Airs. Heidemann are members of the Roman Catholic Church. He is independent in politics.


Joseph Heidmann
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 903-904; submitted by Mary Saggio.

JOSEPH HEIDMANN, who during a residence of sixteen years in Buchanan township has become intimately acquainted with agricultural conditions and methods in this section, is the owner of sixty acres of land located in section 32. He was born in Watertown, Wisconsin, November 25, 1869, and is a son of John and Jane (Lynch) Heidmann. Joseph Heidmann was sixteen years of age when he began working for wages, and he so continued until he was twenty-one years old, at which time he began working for himself on rented property. After five years he bought the property on which he now lives, and here he has since been carrying on successful operations. Forty acres of the sixty are in an excellent state of cultivation, all fenced with barbed wire, and in addition to general farming raises dairy products, hogs and some grain for the market, although most of the hay and grain he feeds to his herd of six fine graded cows and his Poland China hogs. In 1906 he remodeled the house on the property and it now has eight rooms and is two stories in height. The barn, which was on the farm when he bought the property, has also been remodeled by Mr. Heidmann, and he put a basement under it and increased it to 34x54 feet. He is a good practical farmer and understands the value of scientific treatment of the soil, and the success of his ventures has proved his good management and knowledge of his chosen business. In politics he is a Democrat, and he and his family are members of the Kimberly Catholic Church. In February, 1892, Mr. Heidmann was married to Miss Elizabeth Pompa, daughter of Jacob and Lydia (Scouter) Pompa, natives of Holland, who were married in that country and came to America in August, 1873, settling first in Milwaukee for three years, after which they bought five acres of land in Buchanan township and here resided until Mr. Pompa's death in 1899 when fifty-seven years old. In the meantime he had acquired forty acres, and after his death his wife sold the property and built a small house in this township, where she now lives at the age of sixty-nine years. Mrs. Heidmann was the third of a family of sixteen children, six of whom are now living, and was born March 21, 1869. Mr. and Mrs. Heidmann have been the parents of six children: John; James and Bertha, twins; Marie, Adeline and Benjamin.


John Heiman
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 1149-1150; submitted by Mary Saggio.

JOHN HEIMAN, who is cultivating an excellent tract of ninety acres of farming land in Grand Chute township, has spent his entire life in this part of Outagamie county, having been born in Grand Chute township, April 3, 1873, a son of Henry and Anna (Jackman) Heiman, the former born in Holland in October, 1832, and the latter in Germany in May, 1842. The father came to the United States during the year 1858, and located at Oconto, Wisconsin, where he engaged in the hotel business for several years, and also engaged in ship loading and any other enterprise that promised fair returns for labor expended. Later he bought the farm on which John Heiman now lives, and at the time of his retirement, in 1904, he had accumulated 220 acres of choice land in Grand Chute township. His death came two years after his retirement, in Appleton, his wife having passed away in 1905. They were the parents of nine children, Mr. Heiman of Grand Chute township being the fifth born. He attended the common township schools, and also spent two years at St. Joseph's Catholic school, and until he was twenty-eight years of age he worked for his father. At this time he was married, and he rented a part of the homestead for two years, at the end of which period he bought the property he now owns, a finely cultivated property of ninety acres, equipped with modern, substantial buildings, and worked to the best of advantage with power farm machinery of the latest make. He devotes his entire time to his farm, and carries on general farming, cattle breeding and dairying. Mr. Heiman is a member of St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church, and in his political views he is independent.

On April 30,1901, Mr. Heiman was married to Crecentia Mader, who was born in Bavaria, Germany, May 25, 1881, daughter of Joseph and Crecentia Mader, who came to America in 1882 and located in Appleton, where Mr. Mader worked as a carpenter and mason for one year and then went to Gresham, Shawano county, Wisconsin, where he bought sixty acres of land in the village, and also conducts a furniture store. He and his wife, who is also surviving, have had seven children, Mrs. Heiman being the second in order of birth. Mr. and Mrs. Heiman have had three children, namely: Marie Anna, born July 5, 1902; Frank, born October 28, 1904; and Andrew, born January 27, 1908. Mr- Heiman is a member of St. Joseph's Society.


Wenzel Heindl
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 932-933; submitted by Mary Saggio.

WENZEL HEINDL, who ranks high among the agriculturists of Vandenbroek township, is now one of the large land owners of his community, and is operating an excellent property of over 200 acres. He is a native of Bohemia, and was born February 21, 1856, a son of Joseph and Barbara Heindl. Joseph Heindl came to the United States with his wife and four children, George, Joseph, Martin and Wenzel, in 1857, and settled in Washington county, town of Wayne, Wisconsin, purchasing land on which he resided for eleven years. He then bought another farm in the northeastern part of Washington county, town of Trenton, which he cleared and improved, and there his death occurred in 1905, when he was eighty-seven years of age, his widow surviving him one year and also being eighty-seven years old at the time of her demise. Two other children were born to them after coming to the United States, namely: Mary and Nicholas. Wenzel Heindl received his education in the district schools of Washington county and as a lad and young man worked on his father's farm. When he was twenty-three years of age he came to Outagamie county, and bought eighty acres of land in Vandenbroek township, which formed the nucleus for his present fine farm. At that time the property was covered with brush, no improvements had been made and the land was destitute of buildings, but Mr. Heindl cleared and cultivated the tract, putting it into a high state of cultivation, erected modern, substantial buildings and made improvements that make the farm compare favorably with any in the township. In 1881 he was married to Matilda Juchimich of Appleton, and to that union there was born one child: Hubert Martin. Mrs. Heindl died in 1883, and in the following year Mr. Heindl was married to Christina Neinhouse, born in Washington county, Wisconsin, whence her parents had come from Germany. Eight children were born to Mr. Heindl's second marriage: Frank Joseph, Nicholas, Mary, William, George, Andrew and Magdaline, and Bernard, who died when two and one-half years old. Mr. Heindl has always been known as a public-spirited citizen, and his fellow townsmen elected him to the office of supervisor for five years, and he is now serving his third term as school director of his district. With his wife he attends Holy Cross Catholic Church of Kaukauna.


F. Heinemann
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) page 668; submitted by Mary Saggio.

F. HEINEMANN, Justice of the Peace, Appleton, Wisconsin. Born in Prussia February 10, 1841. Came to the United States with his widowed mother, Theresa Heinemann, two brothers and three sisters in the year 1847. The family first located at Chicago, remaining there until 1855, when they removed to Manitowoc, where the family made their home. Mr. Heinemann is a self-educated man, with but an attendance of three months of school to his credit. Before the War of the Rebellion he was a clerk in the post offices of Two Rivers and at Manitowoc and also served an apprenticeship as a druggist. Entered service in 1861 as a Corporal in Co. “B,” 9th Wis. Vols. Infy.; was detached from his company in February, 1862, on staff duty as a clerk at Department Headquarters; was advanced to First Lieutenant in a Kansas Cavalry Regiment. Was commissioned as Captain and A. A. General in January, 1865, but declined – the war coming practically to an end – and returned to his occupation as a druggist, having covered a service of over three years. In 1885 Mr. Heinemann removed with his family to Appleton, where he has since continued to reside. He has served since the war; four years as a clerk in the State Treasurer’s office; four terms as clerk of the City of Manitowoc prior to his removal to Appleton, and over twenty years as a Justice of the Peace of the City of Appleton. In 1877 Mr. Heinemann was married to Miss Katie Voelchert, of Manitowoc. One child was born to them, Fred V. Heinemann, an attorney in practice at Appleton.


Charles J. Henrichs
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 1180-1181; submitted by Mary Saggio.

CHARLES J. HENRICHS. Some of the leading men of Outagamie county are to be found on well-regulated farms, which demonstrate the ability, business acumen and sense of the owners. Charles J. Henrichs, the owner of a fine property in Grand Chute township, is one of these prosperous men. He was born in Greenville township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, October 27, 1869, and is a son of Frederick and Mary (Schultz) Henrichs, natives of Germany. Frederick Henrichs was born September 7, 1841, and came to America with his parents in 1853, settling in Greenville township, where he eventually became a land owner and where he remained until 1876, in which year he removed to the farm now occupied by Charles J. Henrichs. For about twenty years he tilled the soil here, and then sold out to his son and bought a property in Greenville township, but after twelve years moved on to a farm in Grand Chute township, where he died one year later, April 28, 1908. His widow, who was born in 1845, is still living, and makes her home in Appleton. They were the parents of nine children, of whom three are living: Charles J.; Frederick, a resident of Appleton; and Mary, who is single and resides with her mother. Charles J. Henrichs was given the advantages of a good education, attending the district schools of Grand Chute township and the German school in Greenville township, and at the age of twenty years began to manage his own affairs. With the money he had earned working for his father he purchased a couple of head of cattle and two horses, together with some farm equipment, and with these he started farming. At the time of his marriage his father gave him fifty acres of land, on which he built a home, and there resided until 1903, when he bought the rest of his farm from his father, and he now has 111 acres in this property and another tract of seventy-five acres near by which he operates as a dairy farm. In addition to this he operates a threshing outfit during threshing seasons, and he has been eminently successful in all his operations. He is an excellent example of the live, up-to-date, progressive farmer of the Twentieth Century, who knows how to make his land pay him a good profit, and how to enjoy his life among the surroundings which have always been his. He is a member of the Lutheran Church at Greenville, and is a stanch adherent of republican principles.

On December 13, 1891, Mr. Henrichs was married to Sophia Grube, who was born in Grand Chute township, August 20, 1870, daughter of Frederick and Mary (Huff) Grube, natives of Germany. After coming to this country, Mrs. Henrichs' parents resided for a time at Buffalo, New York, and then came to Appleton, Wisconsin, Mr. Grube becoming a land owner in Grand Chute township, where he died in 1899. Mrs. Grube is still living in Appleton. Of their six children, five are living: Mary, the wife of George Schraeder, a retired farmer; Anna, wife of Charles Stark of Seymour; Edith, wife of John Schmidt, a carpenter of Appleton; Mrs. Henrichs; and Henry, an employe of the Standard Manufacturing Company, residing in Appleton. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Henrichs: Arthur, born December 19, 1891; Huldah G., born January 3, 1896; Clara, born June 1, 1899, who died October 28, 1899; Orrin Sylvester, born July 2, 1905; and Harwood Herman, born July 14, 1908. Mr. Henrichs is a member of the E. F. U.


Henry Sylvester Heller
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 1110-1111; submitted by Mary Saggio.

HENRY SYLVESTER HELLER, a substantial farmer of Greenville township, where he owns a well cultivated tract of thirty acres, has traveled extensively through the United States and Canada, but for the past few years has devoted his entire attention to his farm. He was born in Waukesha county, Wisconsin, near Milwaukee, September 1, 1857, and is a son of Henry and Eva (Klitz) Heller, natives of Germany. Mr. Heller's parents were married in the old country, and came to America in 1848, locating in Waukesha county, on a farm, on which they lived until 1862 or 1863, at which time they sold out and moved to Neenah, Wisconsin, near which place Mr. Heller purchased a farm. Here they lived until the latter years of their lives when they moved to the city of Neenah. They were the parents of eleven children, of whom Henry S. was the seventh born. He attended the public and Catholic schools at Neenah, and when only nine years of age he commenced working in the Neenah Stove Factory for a Mr. Brown. When he was fifteen years of age he left home and started out to make his own way in the world, his first employment being shingle making, and later he spent several years in the lumber camps. Later he became cook in the large camps of the Wisconsin woods, was employed in the same capacity on the lake steamers, and eventually became chef in the Vivian Hotel at Antigo, Wisconsin. He followed farming during the summer months and working as a cook during the winters for about twenty-five years, and in 1884 bought a farm near Antigo, which he cleared and improved. After living thereon for a long period, Mr. Heller took a trip through Canada and the Western States, including Texas and New Mexico, but not being able to secure a suitable location, he returned to Wisconsin and bought his present farm of thirty acres in Greenville township, Outagamie county, where he has since carried on general farming and dairying. Mr. Heller is a member of the Roman Catholic church at Appleton, and in political matters is a democrat. He has served on the township board, and while residing at Antigo was assessor for several years. On July 4, 1883, he was married to Josephine Fellio, born at Appleton, Wisconsin, April 29. ,1862, daughter of John and Bertha (--------) Fellio, the former a native of Canada of French descent, and the latter of ------------. Mr. Fellio was a very early settler of Outagamie county, owned land near Sherwood, Wisconsin, and later at Seymour, and eventually moved to Appleton, where he now resides. He is a mason by trade, and a veteran of the Civil War, in which he served as a member of a Wisconsin regiment. Mrs. Heller was the fourth child of her parents' family of seven. She and Mr. Heller have had nine children: Laura, the wife of Louis Tesendorf, of Antigo, Wisconsin; Arthur, residing in Portland, Oregon; Lottie, the wife of James Chirff, a farmer of Antigo, Wisconsin; Pearl, Florence, and Helen, who are single and reside at home; and three children who died in infancy.


Henry Helms
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) page 1175; submitted by Mary Saggio.

HENRY HELMS, a highly esteemed citizen of Seymour, Wisconsin, who is now living retired from business activities, was for nearly forty years engaged in agricultural pursuits in Seymour township, where he settled as a pioneer on wild, uncultivated land. Mr. Helms was born in Hanover, Germany, April 30,1847, son of Henry and Catherine (Robler) Helms, the former of whom died when our subject was but five years old. Mr. Helms was educated in his native country, and lived there until he attained his majority, coming to Cleveland, Ohio, in 1868, where he was joined by his mother, his sister Elizabeth and his brother William. Elizabeth is deceased, but William is still living and is a resident of Outagamie county. From Cleveland, Mr. Helms made his way to Winnebago county, Wisconsin, but only remained there six months, after which he came to Seymour township and purchased forty acres of wild land on section 4 on the north township line. There had not been a bit of clearing done wheMr. Helms located here, but he immediately erected a log cabin and set about to make the land productive. After clearing his original purchase, Mr. Helms added forty acres more and built a frame house and barn, and this was his home until his retirement from active life, at which time he removed to the city of Seymour, and turned the management of the farm over to his son Herman. Mr. Helms' farming operations were very successful, and he also met with success in the raising and shipping of high-grade cattle, a business which he carried on for a number of years. He interested himself actively in Democratic politics, and for a term of three years was a member of the town board.

In 1880, Mr. Helms was married to Pauline Tank, who was born at Farmington, Wisconsin, a daughter of August and Gusta Tank, natives of Germany, who came to the United States prior to the Civil War. Mrs. Helms was one of two daughters, and she also had six brothers. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Helms, namely: Elizabeth, Bertha, who married Walter Eike, a resident of Seymour Township, Outagamie county; Herman, Tilda and Emma.


Anton Henes
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 1154-1155; submitted by Mary Saggio.

ANTON HENES, who is now carrying on farming and stock- raising on a fine property of 144 acres situated on section 34, Seymour township, has been a resident of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, for nearly forty-five years and during this time has taken a prominent part in the growth and development of this section. Mr. Henes was born October 2, 1844, in Gamertingen, Hohenzollern, Sigmaringen, Germany, a son of Ezisebias and Ursula (Goggel) Henes. His brother, John, came to the United States in 1871, and his sister Mary some time later with her parents. Anton Henes came to America in 1866, on September 11 of which year he landed at New York. He had learned the trade of harness maker in his native country, and after locating in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, he worked at that occupation one year, after which he opened a shop of his own on Grove street, but in a little over a year moved to Germantown, where he remained for four or five months. Mr. Henes then went to Osborne, township, in Outagamie county and opened the first saloon in this section, but after one year disposed of it and bought forty acres of timber land in Seymour township, but after one and one-half years sold this to open the first harness shop in Seymour. Mr. Henes followed his trade in Seymour for eight or ten years and then purchased the old Columbia House, which he conducted for six years, and he was later proprietor of the Seymour Hotel, and it was while conducting this hostelry that he bought several choice properties in Seymour township, among which was his present farm of 144 acres on section 34, to which he moved about twelve years ago. Mr. Henes, who is still a strong, well-preserved man, is actively engaged in farming and stockraising, and his property is one of the most valuable in his section of the township, being equipped with a modern residence and substantial barn and outbuildings. He is a stanch advocate of the principles of the democratic party and he has served as supervisor for eight years, justice of the peace for four years and clerk of the school board for six years. He organized the first brass band in the city of Seymour, and up to five years ago played an instrument in it himself.

Mr. Henes was married in Milwaukee to Miss Dorothea Schaumberg, daughter of John Klouse and Elizabeth (Janghaus) Schaumberg, who came to the United States from Germany in 1848 and in 1866 located in Seymour township on eighty acres of wild land. Mr. Schaumberg first erected a log house and log barn, which were later replaced by a fine modern house and stable, and on this property Mrs. Schaumberg died in 1887, aged ninety-six years and her husband in 1900, when eighty-three years of age. Their first two children, Catherine, who is now deceased, and Dorothea, the wife of Mr. Henes, were born in Germany, while the others were born in this country, namely: Elizabeth, George, Frederick, Helena, Wilhelmina and Caroline. Mr. and Mrs. Henes have been the parents of nine children: Elizabeth, born January 24, 1869, who is single; Anna Maria, born May 24, 1871, who married a Mr. Huettle; John George, born April 3, 1873, who married Mary Roeser, residing in Menominee, Michigan; Rupert, born November 5, 1875, who married Bertha Rauhn, residing in Wisconsin; J. Anton, born January 8, 1879, who married Clara Strohm, residing in Wabeno, Wisconsin; Louis Michael, born August 8, 1882, who married Anna Beyer, also living at Wabeno; and Maxmillian, born February 11, 1886; Joseph, born April 11, 1888, and Eleanor, born May 5, 1891, all living at home.


Robert E. Henry
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 620-621; submitted by Mary Saggio.

ROBERT E. HENRY, a progressive agriculturist of Grand Chute township, who has been engaged in farming and operating a threshing outfit here for a number of years, was born at Spring Lake, Washington county, Wisconsin, October 1, 1876, a son of Frank and Rosetta (Durkee) Henry. Frank Henry was born in Vermont, in April, 1852, and came to Wisconsin with his mother, settling at Spring Lake, where he was taken into the home of a farmer, John Fuller, with whom he resided until he came of age. He then began working for other farmers in that locality and eventually bought a home, in which he lived until 1882. In that year Mr. Henry came to Outagamie county, and worked for farmers in Ellington township for some years, in the meantime learning the trade of cheesemaking. He now resides on his own property in Shiocton, being practically retired. Mrs. Henry, who was born in Fond du Lac county, Wisconsin, about 1861, died March 20, 1881, having been the mother of three children: Robert E.; Gifford, a railroad man of Fond du Lac, and Ida, the wife of Lawrence Webber, a farmer near Shiocton. Mr. Henry was married again, his second wife being Nellie Peebles, a native of Ellington township, and they had three children: Alfred R., a clerk in a Shiocton store; Ethel, single, who resides with her father; and Wilmer, also living at home. Mrs. Henry died May 9, 1911. Frank Henry became one of the prominent men of his community, serving as notary public for a number of years, and also as justice of the peace, a position which he still holds. Robert E. Henry attended school in Ellington township, Spring Lake and Bovina townships, and at the age of eleven years started to work among the farmers for his board and clothing. He earned his first wages when fourteen years of age on neighboring farms, and also spent six or seven winters in the woods, as well as being employed in threshing machine outfits during the fall of the year. When he was married he moved to his present property, which he rents, and he is now operating it as a general farm. He is the owner of an up-to-date, highly improved threshing outfit, and this he operates during season. On July 2, 1904, Mr. Henry was married to Lena Moehring, who was born in Bovina township, Outagamie county, December 6, 1877, daughter of Ernest and Sophia (Morhle) Moehring, the former born in Germany and the latter in Sheboygan county, Wisconsin.

Mr. Moehring came to America at the age of nineteen years and learned the cooper trade at Sheboygan, and after his marriage removed to Bovina township, where he and his wife still reside. He has served as township assessor, chairman of the township board and in other capacities, and is one of the prosperous and influential farmers of his township, where he still operates his farm. He and his wife had ten children: George, residing on a farm near his father; John, a grocer, of Evanston, Illinois; Josephine, the wife of Gustave Schiebe, a merchant of Evanston; Mrs. Henry; Martha, the wife of Frank Minck, a resident of Hanford, California; Jennie, the wife of George Brown, a farmer of Cicero township; Benjamin, residing with his father; Richard, a farmer of Freedom township near Seymour; Alfred, who is single and lives with his parents; and Lillie, who is deceased.

Mr. and Mrs. Henry have had two children: Leonard, born February 9, 1908, and Ernest, born January 28, 1911. Mr. Henry is a member of the Odd Fellows and the F. R. A., and in political matters is an independent Republican.


Charles G. Herman
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) page 959; submitted by Mary Saggio.

CHARLES G. HERMAN, who is now operating the old Herman homestead in section 29, Cicero township, which was first settled by his father: many years ago, is one of the enterprising and progressive farmers of this section. He was born on the property which he is now operating, January 11, 1874, and is a son of Charles G. and Louisa (Noach) Herman, who are both now living at Black Creek, retired from activities. Charles G. Herman, Jr., received his education in the district schools of Cicero township, and was reared to the life of an agriculturist, his boyhood and youth being spent on the home farm, which, in fact, he has never left. He bought eighty acres of land adjoining that of the old homestead when he had attained manhood, and later purchased the home farm itself, but since that time he has disposed of forty acres and now is cultivating 120 acres, which he devotes to general farming and the raising of good blooded stock. When Mr. Herman's father first came to this section of the county, the farm was but a wilderness, the original buildings on the property being a log cabin, 18x20 feet, and a log stable, 20x24 feet, which forms somewhat of a comparison to the present handsome residence of twelve rooms, thoroughly equipped with all modern conveniences, the eight-room house adjoining it, the basement barn, 40x70 feet, and the hay barn, 22x50 feet. Other improvements made have been correspondingly great, and the farm is now one of the finest of its size in Cicero township. Mr. Herman was married in February, 1896, to Anna Trams, who was born in New York, and came to Wisconsin with her parents. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Herman, namely: Clara, Elma, Harvey, Lydia and Dora.


John Herman
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) page 831; submitted by Mary Saggio.

JOHN HERMAN, a representative agriculturist of Ellington township, who after years of hard work has eventually won success in his chosen field of agriculture, is one of the progressive men of his section and the owner of an excellent property. Mr. Herman is a native of the Buckeye State, where he was born in 1854, a son of Casper and Josephine Herman, natives of the Austrian province of Bohemia, who first settled in Ohio on coming to the United States in 1853, and later, in 1855, removed to Outagamie county, Wisconsin, and settled on the present farm of John Herman in Ellington township. Here the father died in 1890, while the mother survived until 1902. Of their six children three are still living. John Herman received his education in the district schools in the vicinity of his native place, and he was reared to the life of an agriculturist. He started to work for his father as soon as he was old enough to do a fair share, and when his father retired from active life he continued to work for him until he had accumulated enough money to buy the property. He is engaged in general farming and dairy work, and by constant and arduous labor has made his properties one of the finest of its size in this part of the township. It is well and neatly fenced, finely graded, has good pasture land and is well equipped with modern conveniences and substantial buildings in a state of excellent repair. Although he has not found time to engage in matters of a public nature, he is serving his township in another way, for the advancement of the community depends upon the development of the land, and he who brings a portion of the country into a better state of cultivation is doing as much of a service as he who spends long periods in places of public preferment. Mr. Herman has never married. He is a consistent member of the Catholic Church at Greenville, and has done his share in contributing to church and charitable movements.


John Hermsen
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 930-931; submitted by Mary Saggio.

JOHN HERMSEN, one of the good, practical agriculturists of Vandenbroek township, where he owns a valuable tract of farming land, was born in Holland, December 10, 1854, and is a son of George and Elizabeth (Geurts) Hermsen. George Hermsen came to the United States with his wife and three children, Peter, Gertrude and John, in 1855, the family locating at once in Outagamie county, where Mr. Hermsen purchased land in the township of Kaukauna, now Vandenbroek township. At that time the country in this neighborhood was all raw, uncultivated land, with no improvements whatever, and Mr. Hermsen felled trees, hewed logs, and built a log house with a wooden chimney. Later he erected a new and better house, which has since been replaced by a new and better one by the son-in-law, John Vandenhooven. Mr. and Mrs. Hermsen lived on this property during the remainder of their lives, he dying in 1883, when sixty-four years of age, and she passing away in January, 1907, when she had attained the age of eighty-nine years. The children that were born to this couple after coming to the United States were: George, Hannah, Martin and Mary. The father became a prominent man in his community, serving his township as school clerk for twenty years and as supervisor for one year. John Hermsen was still an infant when the family came to America and he received his education in the district schools of Vandenbroek township. Until he was large enough to go out among the farmers of his neighborhood, he worked on the home farm, but at the age of eighteen years he went north and worked in a sawmill, his wages being given to his parents. He so continued seven years, and in 1880 he was married to Hattie Gloudemans, who was born in Vandenbroek township, in 1859, daughter of Adrian Gloudemans. Twelve children were born to this union, two of whom, Martha and Peter, died in infancy. The survivors are: Jane, Elizabeth, George, Annie, Mary, Minnie, John, Martin, Rose and Delia. After his marriage Mr. Hermsen purchased the property which he is now operating, and has greatly improved the farm, replacing the log house and barn with modern frame structures. He carries on general farming and markets dairy products, while he raises some cattle for his own use. He is a member of St. John's Church of Little Chute, in the faith of which Mrs. Hermsen died. May 17, 1903.


Martin Hermsen
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 928-929; submitted by Mary Saggio.

MARTIN HERMSEN, a well known general farmer and dairyman of Vandenbroek township, who has developed an excellent property from what was originally a wild, uncultivated tract, was born in the woods of Vandenbroek township, December 17, 1861, and is a son of George and Elizabeth (Geurts) Hermsen. George Hermsen, who was a native of Holland, came to the United States with his wife and three children, Peter, Gertrude and John, the family locating in Kaukauna township, Outagamie county, in 1855, Mr. Hermsen purchasing wild land, on which he built a log house with a wooden chimney. He set about to cultivate his land, and at the time of his death, in 1883, when sixty-four years of age, he was not only one of the prominent farmers of his locality, but had filled various township offices, including those of school clerk and supervisor. His wife passed away in 1907, when eighty-nine years old. Four children were born to them after coming to this county, namely: George, Hannah, Martin and Mary. Martin Hermsen received his education in the district schools of the neighborhood of the home farm, and worked on the homestead for his father until he had reached the age of twenty-five years, when he purchased his present property from his father, and here he has resided ever since. There were no buildings on this land when Mr. Hermsen took possession, and but little clearing had been done on the land, but he was earnest in his efforts and now has a well-cultivated property, equipped with fine modern structures. General farming and dairy work have claimed his attention, and he is considered one of the good agriculturists of his section. Mr. Hermsen was treasurer of the township for one term, and for many years has served in a like position on the school board. He and his family belong to St. John's Catholic Church of Little Chute. In 1886 Mr. Hermsen was married to Cornelia Van Gompel, who was born in Vandenbroek township, daughter of Martin Van Gompel, and eight children have been born to this union, namely: George, Mary, Kathrine, Elizabeth, Peter, Henry, Herbert and Martha. The five oldest children, after diligent attendance at district school No. 4, received diplomas, respectively, in 1903, 1904, 1904, 1908 and 1911. Henry and Herbert are now attending the district school, while Martha, the youngest, is but five years of age.


Charles Heubner
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 1136-1137; submitted by Mary Saggio.

CHARLES HEUBNER, who ranks high among the agriculturists of Ellington township, has been engaged to some extent in public affairs and is now serving as school clerk and treasurer of his township. He is a son of John Heubner, who came from Germany to the United States in 1852, stopping at Milwaukee for two years, where he worked by the day. He was married there to Fredericka Harback, who was born in Germany and came to this country after her father's death, with her mother, Johanna Harback, who died in Waupaca county. After leaving Milwaukee, John Heubner went to Winnebago county, where he homesteaded a farm for three years, later selling it and buying land which became the old homestead. He served in Company E, Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry during the War of the Rebellion, at the close of which he received an honorable discharge. During the last one and one- half years he has been a resident of the Soldiers' Home, at Milwaukee, being eighty-four years of age, while his wife, who is seventy-nine years old, is still a resident of the old homestead. Charles Heubner was one of thirteen children, and was born February 6, 1862, on the old home place in Waupaca county, receiving his education in the district schools of that neighborhood, at such times when he could be spared from his farm duties. His last school term was when he was sixteen years old, and the age of eighteen years found him learning the trade of carpenter, which he followed until he reached his majority. In 1883 he was married to Anna Levine, daughter of August and Sophia (Danke) Levine, who lived in Waupaca and Outagamie counties and died in 1873. They came from Germany during the '50s, and spent their lives in agricultural pursuits. At the time of his marriage, Mr. Huebner purchased the property which he is now operating, although at the time of its purchase it was uncultivated and did not reach the acreage of which it now boasts. In addition to adding to his property from time to time and clearing and putting it under cultivation, Mr. Heubner has erected new buildings and repaired the old, and stocked his farm with first class machinery and appurtenances and supplied it with good stock. In 1890 Mr. Heubner was elected school clerk and served three years in that office, and he is now the incumbent of that position by virtue of his election in 1909, and also served as assessor, being chosen for that office in 1911. He and Mrs. Heubner are members of the German Lutheran church, of Hortonia, and have been the parents of twelve children: Anna, who married Henry Lippert; Charles, who learned the carpenter's trade and cement work, but makes his home with his parents, and Robert, Alma, Allis, Henry, Minnie, Fred, Arthur, Delia and Dalia, twins, and Helen, all at home.


Nicholas Hietpas
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 1094-1095; submitted by Mary Saggio.

NICHOLAS HIETPAS, whose seventy-four acres of valuable farming land lie one and one-half miles from the city limits of Appleton, and a like distance from the village of Little Chute, in Grand Chute township, was born in what is now Vandenbroek township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, April 15, 1874, a son of Albert and Harriet (Williams) Hietpas, natives of Holland, the former born in Galden, August 28, 1838, and the latter in Geinert, July 30, 1841. Albert Hietpas came to the United States with his parents in 1850, and immediately located in Outagamie county, where the grandfather became a landowner in Vandenbroek, then Kaukauna township, as did also Albert Hietpas, who spent the remainder of his life in agricultural pursuits there and died November 26, 1907, his widow surviving him until December 12th of that year. Albert Hietpas served seven months as a member of Company G, Thirty-eighth Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and although he never was wounded, he suffered a breakdown in health from which he never fully recovered. He and his wife had a family of twelve children: John, a fireman in the paper mills at Little Chute; Henry, a farmer of Little Chute township; Anton, an agriculturist of Vandenbroek township; Peter and Barney, twins, the former deceased, and the latter a millwright in the village of Little Chute; Nicholas; Frank, who is deceased; Dinah, the wife of Lawrence Sail, a resident of Little Chute, employed in the paper mills; Joseph, who is deceased; Mary, the wife of Anton Vervort, a Vandenbroek township farmer; Joseph, employed in the paper mills at Little Chute; and Albert, who is deceased.

Nicholas Hietpas received his education in district school No. 8, Kaukauna township, and as a young man started to work in the Kimberley mills, although he made his home with his father. When he had reached the age of twenty-eight years he had accumulated enough to purchase seventy-eight acres in Grand Chute township, later adding twenty-six acres, but he subsequently sold a tract of thirty acres, and now has seventy-four acres under cultivation, which he devotes to general farming. His land is well equipped with solid, substantial and modern buildings, and his property is well cultivated and very productive. Mr. Hietpas was married June 28, 1898, to Christena Weyenberg, who was born June 14, 1872, in Little Chute, daughter of John and Mary (Johnson) Weyenberg, natives of Holland, the former born in Braband, in 1837, and the latter in Gelderland in 1847. Mr. and Mrs. Hietpas have had four children: Dora, born June 19, 1899; John, born May 28, 1902; Jacob, born May 16, 1908; and Albert, born September 23, 1909. Mr. Hietpas is a member of St. John's Catholic Church at Little Chute, and is connected with the Catholic Order of Foresters. He is a democrat.


John August Hilger
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 1147-1148; submitted by Mary Saggio.

JOHN AUGUST HILGER, an energetic citizen and practical agriculturist of Outagamie county, cultivating a tract of eighty-seven acres in Greenville township, was born in Menominee township, Waukesha county, Wisconsin, October 8, 1863, and is a son of William Joseph and Clara (Ulman) Hilger. The father was born November 1, 1817, at Ulheim on the Rhein, Germany, and came to the United States in 1842-3, locating in Menominee township, Waukesha county, where he worked for others. Industrious and persevering in whatever he undertook, he at once started working for others, but during the following year his father came to this country and bought land, and William J. went to work for him. At the time of his father's death he became the owner of eighty acres of land, to which he added from time to time, until when he died he was the owner of 200 acres of fine land, in addition to having $6,000 drawing interest, and other property. He served as assessor and on the board of supervisors of his township and was a well known and highly respected citizen. Mr. Hilger was married at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to Miss Clara Ulman, also a native of Ulheim on the Rhein, where she was born in 1827, and they had a family of twelve children, of whom John August was the sixth in order of birth. He received a common school education at Fussville, Waukesha county, and at the age of twenty-one years began working for his father. One and one-half years later he commenced renting land on which to farm, and two years later moved to Outagamie county and rented his father-in-law's farm for two years. He then bought his present farm of eighty-seven acres in Greenville township, which at that time was very much neglected, the buildings poor and the soil unfertile. The latter trouble has been remedied by scientific methods, Mr. Hilger being an expert in crop rotation, while the former defect was obliterated by replacing the old buildings with new ones, his residence being especially handsome and fitted with all modern conveniences. He carries on general farming and also does some dairying and stock raising, devoting his entire time and attention to his farm. In politics he is independent, and he and Mrs. Hilger are members of the Greenville Roman Catholic Church. On October 21, 1891, Mr. Hilger was married to Effie K. Hauf, who was born in Ellington township, Outagamie county, January 12, 1866, daughter of William and Theresa (Freis) Hauf, the former born in Rhine Province, near a town in Germany, and the latter in Bavaria. They were married in Menominee township, Waukesha county, Wisconsin. Mr. Hauf had come to the United States in the later '50s, going direct to Milwaukee, and worked for other people, then coming to Outagamie county and purchasing land in Ellington township. He resided on this farm until his retirement, when he removed to Appleton, where his wife died two years later and he returned to the old homestead. He died in 1907, having been the father of nine children, Mrs. Hilger being the eighth in order of birth She received a public school education in Ellington, and later attended a parochial school in Greenville township. Mr. and Mrs. Hilger have had twelve children, as follows: Clara, William Joseph, Michael Leonard, Charles Henry, Irene, Cecelia, Veronica, John, Edwin, Margaret, Angeline and Adeline, all being at home except Angeline, who is deceased.


Alfred Hiller
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 979-980; submitted by Mary Saggio.

ALFRED HILLER, one of the experienced agriculturists and sterling citizens of Greenville township, who is now operating eighty acres of finely improved land, has spent all of his life on this farm, and was born here, April 27, 1878, a son of William and Elisa (Jenkel) Hiller. Mr. Hiller's parents were natives of Mecklenburg, Germany, where his father was born August 1, 1839, and his mother April 22, 1842. William Hiller came to the United States in 1867, and settled at once in the town of Greenville, where he began to work at the carpenter's trade, an occupation which he had followed in the Fatherland. Shortly thereafter he went to Iowa, but after one year came back to Greenville and purchased the land now owned by his son Alfred, on which he carried on agricultural pursuits until his death, December 10, 1900. His widow, who still survives, makes her home with Alfred on the old homestead. Four children were born to William and Elisa Hiller, namely: Alfred; Dora, residing at home with her mother and brother; Henrietta, the wife of Julius Schneider, of Greenville; and one child who died in infancy. Alfred Hiller attended school in the town of Greenville and, two terms in Appleton, and was reared to the life of an agriculturist. He has never left the old family homestead, and since his father's death has been operating the eighty acres in a general way. He farms along practical lines and is largely interested in dairying. In addition to his farming interests, Mr. Hiller holds stock in the Fox River Valley Gas and Oil Company and the U. S. Meridian Oil Company, and is one of the stockholders of a sugar plantation at Tamasopa, Mexico. He is a Democrat in politics, and with his mother and sister is a consistent member of the German Lutheran Church in Greenville.


Alfred R. Hills
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 969-970; submitted by Mary Saggio.

ALFRED R. HILLS, a progressive and well-to-do agriculturist of Dale township, Outagamie county, operating a farm of 160 acres situated in section 35, was born in Dale township, August 27, 1869, and is a son of Hubbard E. Hills. Hubbard E. Hills was born April 4, 1834, in East Hartford, Connecticut, and was married in the spring of 1854, to Miss Hannah C. Akins, who was born September 21, 1837. After their marriage they came to Wisconsin and settled on wild land in Dale township, where they spent the remainder of their lives, Mr. Hills dying December 11, 1900. Alfred R. Hills was one of a family of nine children, and he received his education in the common schools, remaining on the home farm until he was twenty years of age, at which time he commenced working for wages at the cheese making trade. He continued thus for twelve years, and during the next three years was engaged in the manufacture of cheese on his own account. In 1896 his factory was destroyed by fire, and he again began working for wages, but in 1905 returned to the home farm, which now belongs to his mother, and here he has carried on general farming ever since, having about 100 acres of land under cultivation. He markets dairy products, hogs, potatoes and some grain, and is considered one of the good, practical farmers of his township. He is socially connected with the Equitable Fraternal Union and Modern Woodmen of America, and is a Republican in his political views, having served Dale township as a member of the school board for about five years. In 1895 Mr. Hills was married to Miss Minnie Alger, who was born October 7, 1875, the second of three daughters born to Hartley and Marilla Alger, natives of New York State who were married there and later moved to Illinois where Mrs. Alger died. Mr. Alger then returned to New York State where his death occurred. One child has been born to Mr. and Mrs. Hills, Murl E., who was born February 5, 1896.


Hubbard E. Hills
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 882-883; submitted by Mary Saggio.

HUBBARD E. HILLS, who during his life was one of Dale township's leading agriculturists, is remembered as an exemplary citizen and one of the honored pioneers who took part in the development of this section of Outagamie county. Born Aprir4, 1834, in East Hartford, Connecticut, Mr. Hills was the eldest of a family of four children born to parents of English extraction, and he was married in the spring of 1854 to Miss Hannah C. Aiken, the third of the seven children of another English family and born September 21, 1837. After their marriage they came to Wisconsin, settling on eighty acres of wild land in Dale township, where Mr. Hills cut logs with his axe, his only implement at that time, and built a rude log house. He experienced all the privations and hardships that were endured by the pioneers, and, ably assisted by his wife, succeeded in clearing a home from the wilderness and putting 120 acres of a farm of 160 acres under cultivation. He had built a modern residence, barn and outbuildings, and had his land completely fenced, making one of the valuable properties of this part of Dale township. He was a Republican in his political views and served his county as register of deeds and as a member of the school board for a number of years. Mr. Hills died December 11, 1900, and was buried in the South Medina Cemetery. He and his wife had nine children, as follows: Ira W., of Dale township, is married and has two children ; Charles, of Dale township, is married and has a family of ten; Howard S., of Dale township is single; Ida B., married M. Gallea and is now living in New London; Arthur I., living in Dalhart, Texas, is married and has two children; Ernest E., is single and living at home; Alfred R., living on the homestead, is married and has one child; Myron A., is single and living at home; and Rose E. married Guy Hopkins, of Medina, and has one child.


Douglas Hodgins
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 878-879; submitted by Mary Saggio.

DOUGLAS HODGINS, a successful agriculturist of Hortonia township, and a member of the County Board from the village of Hortonville, is a member of one of Canada's old and honored families. His grandfather, Thomas Hodgins, was born in Ireland, from whence he removed as a young man to Canada, settling in County Bruce, Ontario. He married Bridget McGuire, also a native of Ireland, and came to Wisconsin in 1864, with his family of five children, and settled in Hortonville, where he spent the remainder of his life in farming. David Hodgins, son of Thomas, was born December 31, 1850, in Canada, where he received his education and his first occupation was at the carpenter's trade, which he followed for four or five years. He then went into the woods for one winter and during the winter following was boss of the camp for W. H. Briggs. He then engaged in logging on his own account, and during the next fifteen or twenty years followed jobbing. In 1890, in company with Robert McMurdo, he bought the large stone quarry in Hortonia, and shortly thereafter bought his partner's interest. He has been very successful in his operations, owning over 500 acres of land in the neighborhood and now lives on a farm just east of Hortonville, being still actively engaged in business. Mr. Hodgins has been prominently identified with public affairs during a long period, and has served as assemblyman, supervisor, and chairman of the county board two years and a member thereof for seven years. He married Elizabeth McMurdo, who was born in Hortonia township July 4. 1852, and they had two children: Douglas and Ellsworth. Douglas Hodgins received his education in the district schools and attended Ryan High school in Appleton, after which he taught a country school in Hortonia and Maine townships for three years. He then went to Hardwood, Michigan, where he was foreman in the cedar yards for eighteen months, and in 1902 was married and rented land from his father, moving to the farm which he now owns. Mr. Hodgins was married to Miss Dama Winslow, daughter of William L. Winslow, of Foster City, Michigan, and they have had four children: Carol, born March 20, 1903; Kenneth, born July 26, 1904; Marion, born March 10, 1908; and David, born February 18, 1908. Mr. Hodgins is an official of Hortonville Camp, Modern Woodmen of America, is at present supervisor of the village of Hortonville and has been a trustee of the village for the past four years. He is the present clerk of the village board of education. Mr. and Mrs. Hodgins are consistent members of the Baptist Church at Hortonville.


Joseph Arthur Hodgins
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 1190-1191; submitted by Mary Saggio.

JOSEPH ARTHUR HODGINS, who is engaged in cultivating a farm of seventy acres in Grand Chute township, is a native of this township in Outagamie county, born June 22, 1869, a son of Patrick and Julia (O'Hare) Hodgins, the former born in County Louth, Ireland in 1826, and the latter of Irish parentage in Canada, May 1, 1832. Patrick Hodgins was nineteen years of age when he came to the United States, and he first located near Philadelphia, in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, where for about five years he worked as a farm hand. He then went to Milwaukee for a short period and later took up 160 acres from the government, later selling forty acres of this property to a French-Indian named Jake Curdy. He continued to cultivate this property up to the time of his death, at the age of seventy-eight years, changing the land from a wilderness covered with masses of white pine timber into one of the finest properties in the township. His widow survived him only two weeks. Of their ten children six are living: Theresa, the wife of Alpheus Crowe, of Lawrence, California; Katharine, who is single and resides with her brother, Joseph A.; Sarah, the widow of Harry Lowell, of Seattle, Washington; Etta, a teacher, residing with her brother, Joseph A.; Joseph Arthur; and Peter, connected with the Denver postoffice department. Joseph Arthur Hodgins attended the Second and Third ward schools of Appleton, and at the age of nineteen years became a school teacher, continuing as such in this district for one year. He then worked out among the farmers for a short time, but at the time of the death of his oldest brother, he went home and there he has continued to operate to this time. He has seventy acres devoted to general farming, to which he now gives his entire attention, although at one time he was a partner in the Lowell Drug Company. He is a member of the Bankers' Life Insurance Company of Des Moines, Iowa, is a member of the Roman Catholic Church and of the Catholic Order of Foresters, and is independent in politics and serving as school clerk. Mr. Hodgins is unmarried.


Fred W. Hoefer
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) page 708; submitted by Mary Saggio.

FRED W. HOEFER, city marshal of Appleton, Wisconsin, who has been connected with this branch of the public service since 1877, was born in Dodge county, Wisconsin, October 1, 1847, and is a son of Thomas and Philipina (Knester) Hoefer, natives of Germany, who came to Wisconsin in 1841. Thomas Hoefer, who was a farmer by occupation, served as justice of the peace during his later years and died August 14, 1857, at Mayville, Dodge county, Wisconsin. Of his family of five children one died in infancy and four sons grew to manhood. Fred W. Hoefer received a common school education and at the age of eleven years began working out as a farm hand. He came to Appleton in 1862, from whence in the fall of 1863 he enlisted in Company G, Third Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Cavalry, being at that time but sixteen years of age, and served until the close of the war. After making an excellent war record and securing his honorable discharge at the close of hostilities, he returned to Appleton and worked in the factories until April 13, 1877, at which time he became a member of the Appleton police force. On January 1, 1882, he was appointed to the position of city marshal, or chief, resigning from that office on January 1, 1885, to serve in the office of sheriff, to which he had been elected. On April 19, 1887, he was appointed a patrolman, and on April 9, 1890, was again appointed city marshal and has served faithfully in this capacity to the present time. Marshal Hoefer is the oldest city marshal (chief of police) in point of servitude in the ranks of police officials in the State of Wisconsin, and his service has always been such as to deserve the highest praise. In November, 1872, he was married to Augusta Krueger, of Appleton, daughter of Gottlieb Krueger, and to them have been born a family of seven children: Thomas A., of Pueblo, Colorado; Oscar H.; Lawrence E. and Laura P., twins, the former a resident of Spokane, Washington, and the latter residing at home; Mrs. E. H. Brooks, of Appleton; William E., a resident of Kansas City; and Charles, who died in infancy.

Mr. Hoefer is a member of George B. Eggleston Post, Grand Army of the Republic; the Modern Woodmen of America; the Equitable Fraternal Union; the Odd Fellows; and Waverly Lodge, No. 51, A. F. & A. M., and Appleton Chapter, No. 47, of the Masonic fraternity.


Fred Hoehne
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 784-785; submitted by Mary Saggio.

FRED HOEHNE, alderman of the First Ward of Kaukauna during the past eight years, and proprietor of Hoehne's Machine Works and Foundry and Garage, is a native of Germany and came to the United States in 1882, when he was twenty-eight years of age. He had learned the machine trade in his native country, and on first coming to this country found work in a machine shop in Milwaukee, but after a few months removed to Kaukauna and commenced working at his trade. On October 12, 1892, having decided to enter the business field on his own account, he opened a machine shop in this city, and he has been engaged in business here ever since. The principal output of Mr. Hoehne's shop is an invention of his own, known as Hoehne's Friction Clutch, supposed to be the simplest clutch on the market, which is used in power transmission equipments. Friction pulleys and couplings are also manufactured, and general job and contract machine work of all kinds done, and from four to eight skilled mechanics employed. Electric power is used throughout the works. Mr. Hoehne also operates an automobile garage, and he is the local dealer for the Ford and Buick machines. In 1882, Fred Hoehne was married to Attilla Knitter, who was born in Germany and came to the United States in 1882, at the same time as Mr. Hoehne, whom she had known in the Fatherland. They have had seven children, namely: Carl, a machinist by trade, working in Milwaukee; Agnes, who married John Schue, a resident of Kaukauna; William, residing at home, a machinist; Otto, a machinist and automobile builder; Herman, employed in his father's garage; and Alma and Elsie, living at home. The family is connected with St. John's Evangelical Church. Mr. Hoehne is public-spirited to a large degree, and has served his city as alderman of the First Ward for a period covering the last eight years.


Servatus Hoffman
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 633-634, submitted by Mary Saggio.

SERVATUS HOFFMAN, who is engaged in cultivating the soil of Center township, Outagamie county, where he owns an excellent piece of farming property, is a member of an old and honored Wisconsin family, founded here in 1846 by his grandfather, who came to America in 1827 from Germany, and after living in Ohio for nineteen years, came West to Wisconsin and settled in Milwaukee county. Up to this time he had followed the tailoring trade, but on coming West he became engaged in agricultural pursuits, purchasing land near Granville, where he spent the remainder of his life. Philip Hoffman, his son, was born on shipboard while his parents were coming to this country, and he was nineteen years of age when the family located in Wisconsin. At the age of twenty-one years he was married to Margaret Uhlman, and bought a farm in the vicinity of that owned by his father, but eventually moved to Menominee Falls. Later, he retired from active life and located in Fussville, where his death occurred in 1905. Servatus Hoffman was born June 17, 1857, near Granville, Milwaukee county, his education being obtained in the schools of that place and Fussville, and his boyhood was spent on his father’s farm. In 1881 he was married to Mary Brill, daughter of Peter Brill, of Waukesha county, and for ten years the young couple lived on the farm of Philip Hoffman. At the end of this time Mr. Hoffman purchased his present farm in Center township and during the next seven or eight years the family home was a little log house, but now the property is equipped with a large, comfortable residence and good barns and other buildings. Eleven children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Hoffman, namely: Lucy and William, who are deceased; Barney, who married Katherine Reuhle, of Green Bay; Peter; Philip; Josephine, who married Leo Gregorius, of Appleton; Rosa, who married Joseph Fischer, of Indiana; Margaret, who is a sister in the convent at Silver Lake; and Christina, Ottilie and Ferdinand, all living at home. Mr. and Mrs. Hoffman are members of St. Edward’s Catholic Church at Mackville.


Henry L. Hoh
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 729-730; submitted by Mary Saggio.

HENRY L. HOH, who has been a life-long resident of Greenville township, where he now operates a farm of 160 acres, was born on the property he now owns, October 9, 1869, and is a son of Henry R. and Bertha (Eberhardt) Hoh, natives of Schwartzburg, Sanders Haufen, Saxony, where the former was born October 2, 1835, and the latter April 2, 1842. Henry R. Hoh came to America when nine years of age with his parents, the family coming direct to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where they resided for a number of years, then coming to Outagamie county and locating in Grand Chute township. Mrs. Hoh came to America when one year old, and with her parents also located in Milwaukee. Mr. Hoh resided with his parents until he had reached man's estate, at which time he began working for others, following the trade of cooper until 1861, when he married and moved to Grand Chute township and engaged in the cooperage business. He remained here until 1892, in which year he retired and moved to Appleton, where his death occurred in December, 1903. His widow, who survives him, still makes her home in Appleton. They had a family of five children, as follows: Lovina, the wife of Otto Younger, a grocer of Appleton; Clara, who married Charles Menning, engaged in farming in Greenville township; Henry L.; Sarah, the wife of Charles Meltz, of Menasha township; and Levi, residing on Second avenue, Appleton, within the city limits in Grand Chute township. Henry L. Hoh attended the Greenville township schools and also spent one year in the old Ryan High School, Appleton. He was married January 12, 1892, to Anna Woltersdorf, born in Columbus, Wisconsin, December 13, 1867, daughter of William and Bertha (Briese) Woltersdorf, natives of Germany, who came to America in 1867 and located at Columbus, where Mr. Woltersdorf died about 1888, his widow residing there until 1909, when she went to live with Mr. and Mrs. Hoh. Mr. Hoh has never left the old homestead farm. He assisted his father in clearing the land and in cultivating it, and at the time of his marriage he began renting it and working it on his own account. When his father died he bought the interest of the other heirs, and he now works 160 acres, engaging in farming along general lines, and in stock raising. He has also a tract of twenty acres of timber land in Grand Chute township. Mr. Hoh's farm is one of the best equipped properties in Greenville township, his buildings being large and substantial, including a barn 36x117 feet. He is a member of the Lutheran Church, and in political matters is independent, never aspiring to office. Mr. and Mrs. Hoh have four children, namely: Lorena, Ruth, Alfred and Clarence, all single and at home.


Louis Hoh
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 649-650; submitted by Mary Saggio.

LOUIS HOH, who owns a general stock and dairy farm of 112 acres, located in Grand Chute township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, has been a resident of this section all of his life, having been born on the farm which he now operates, February 2, 1877, a son of John and Katharine (Rinamann) Hoh. John Hoh was born in Germany, April 27, 1837, and came to America at the age of five years, and was reared in Milwaukee, from whence his parents moved to Grand Chute township. Here Mr. Hoh settled down to make improvements, and after clearing and cultivating it engaged in agricultural pursuits until his retirement in 1902, at which time he removed to Appleton, and now resides on State street. He and his wife had a family of seven children, namely: Daniel, a retired citizen of College avenue, Appleton; Anna, the wife of Fred Zachow, a carpenter of Appleton; John, residing in Appleton; Louis; Minnie, who married Andrew Gehring, a farmer of Grand Chute township; Helen, who is single and residing with her parents; and Katharine, who married Harry Howe.

Louis Hoh secured his education in the Greenville district schools, and was married September 27, 1902, to Hattie Jennerjohn who was born in Greenville township, October 30, 1883, daughter of Henry and Sophia (Bushman) Jennerjohn, natives of Germany, who now reside in Greenville township. Mr. Hoh has never left the homestead farm. He worked with his father after leaving school, and continued to remain there after attaining his majority, and in 1902 when John Hoh retired, he took charge and operates a general stock and dairy farm. Mr. Hoh is a member of the Greenville Lutheran Church, and in political matters is independent. He and his wife have had three children: Wilbert, born in 1903; Leland, born in 1906; and Reuben, born in 1908.


Anton Hoier
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) page 1135; submitted by Mary Saggio.

ANTON HOIER, who has been a lifelong resident of Ellington township, Outagamie county, and is now engaged in cultivating the soil of a fine general and dairy farm, was born June 17, 1866, in Ellington township, and is a son of Frank Joseph and Catherine Hoier, natives of Germany who came to the United States with their six children, settling at once in Ellington township, where both spent the remainder of their lives, Mr. Hoier passing away in 1887 and his wife in 1905. They had two other children after locating in the United States, of whom one was Anton, and he received his education in the district schools in the neighborhood of his father's farm. As soon as he was able to do his share of the work on the home place, he began to assist his father, spending his spare time in attendance at school and gaining a good, practical education. As a youth and young man he worked for his father, and when the latter's health failed, the management of the home place fell to the lot of young Hoier, who purchased the property in 1903. Since that time he has made numerous improvements, including the erection of a good, comfortable modern residence, in which he lives with his youngest sister, Matilda, who keeps house for him, Mr. Hoier being unmarried. He has carried on general farming and dairy work, and his operations have been so successful as to stamp him as one of the able agriculturists of this section. He is a good neighbor and a public spirited citizen, and has the confidence, esteem and friendship of his fellow townsmen.


Alfred P. Holz, M. D.
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) page 657; submitted by Mary Saggio.

ALFRED P. HOLZ, M. D., a well-known physician and surgeon of Seymour, Wisconsin, who for the past thirteen years has been conducting the Seymour Hospital, was born August 6, 1873, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, a son of Louis and Johanna (Odenbrett) Holz, and a grandson of Jacob and Magdalina Holz. Jacob Holz was in early life a manufacturer of pottery and earthenware in Wurttemburg, Germany, but during the last fifty years of his life he served as a police official. He had a family of nine children, namely: Louis, the father of Dr. Alfred P.; Jacob, who died in Germany; Fred, who died in Milwaukee; John and Christ, who are now living in Milwaukee; Elizabeth, who married Fred Meyers and lies in Switzerland; Anna, who married a Mr. G. Ulrich, of Milwaukee; Lena who lives in the Fatherland; and Maria, who died at the age of eighteen years in Germany.

Louis Holz, the father of Dr. Holz, was born in Wurttemburg, Germany, June 1, 1845, and on his twenty-first birthday left his native country for the United States. Being a millwright by trade, he soon secured employment in the mills of Milwaukee, and was the first to install the roller for patent process flour in the State for his employer. Mr. Holz still lives, although he is now retired from active pursuits, and makes his home in Seymour. He was married June 6, 1869, to Johanna Odenbrett, who was born January 14, 1852, daughter of John and Louisa (Lienzeman) Odenbrett, and granddaughter of Philip Odenbrett and Johan and Johanna Lienzeman. The parents of Mrs. Holz came to the United States from Germany in 1848 and settled in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where their seven children were born, namely: Johanna; Louis (I.), who is deceased; Louis (II), also deceased; Edward and Louisa, deceased; Maria, who resides in Elm Grove; and William, deceased.

Alfred P. Holz secured his education in the graded schools of Milwaukee, the high school at Seymour and the Wisconsin College of Physicians and Surgeons, from which latter institution he was graduated with the class of 1898. He immediately located at Seymour, where he engaged in a general practice for six years and then opened the Seymour Hospital, of which he has been the proprietor to the present time. The hospital is devoted to cases of a surgical nature only.

Dr. Holz was married in 1906 to Minnie Droeger, daughter of George F. Droeger, of Seymour, and to this union there have been born two children, namely: Dorothea and Alfred.


William Holz
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) page 1270; submitted by Mary Saggio.

WILLIAM HOLZ, a representative farmer of Black Creek township, Outagamie county, who is living on an eighty-acre farm on section 21, and who also owns twenty acres in section 22, is a native of Waukesha county, Wisconsin, where he was born August 15, 1875, a son of Charles and Annie (Maylahn) Holz, natives of Germany who came to America in 1870 and settled in Black Creek, Wisconsin. Mrs. Holz died in 1888, at the age of thirty-six years, while her husband survives her, and lives in Center township, aged sixty-two years. William Holz was the eldest of his parents' children, and his education was secured in the public schools of his native vicinity. As a young man he learned the trade of carpenter, and when he had attained his majority he went to work as a journeyman, following that occupation until 1901, when he was married to Miss Mary Mau, who was born April 6, 1877, daughter of Fred and Maria Mau, natives of Germany. Mrs. Holz's parents came to the United States in early life, and were married in Outagamie county, where Mr. Mau purchased the farm now occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Holz. He continued to live on this property until his death in 1907, at the age of seventy-two years, and his widow died the year following, being sixty-four years old. Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Holz, namely: Elsie, Elmer, Walter and Sylvia, Elmer being now deceased.

After marriage Mr. Holz settled on his father-in-law's farm in Black Creek township, which he rented for five years and then purchased. Since locating here he has built a large machine shed, windmill and well, but all of the other buildings had been put up by Mr. Mau. He has about sixty acres in a good state of cultivation, and raises large crops of general farm products, marketing dairy products, and shipping hogs and cattle. In his political belief he is a republican. Mr. and Mrs. Holz attend St. John's Evangelical Church of Black Creek.


William M. Hoyt
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 771-772; submitted by Mary Saggio.

WILLIAM M. HOYT, resident manager of The Union Bag and Paper Company, one of the largest business enterprises of its kind in Wisconsin, was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, March 16, 1879, and is a son of P. D. and Agnes O. Hoyt, who in 1880 located in Geneva, Illinois, where P. D. Hoyt, who was a glucose and starch manufacturer, died in 1903. William M. Hoyt received his education in the schools of Geneva, and in 1899 came to Kaukauna as clerk for the company of which he is now manager, having been appointed to the latter position October 1, 1903. Mr. Hoyt is well known Kaukauna, and is a member of the Elks and Masonic fraternities. The mill property now occupied by The Union Bag and Paper Company was originally built in 1882 by Colonel H. A. Frambach and his half-brother, John Stovekin, and was burned twice, the last time in 1888, and it has passed through the hands of the Frambach Paper Company, the Kaukauna Paper Company, the Van Nortwick Paper Company, and the Western Paper Bag Company, which latter concern acquired it in 1892. In 1899 this firm sold out to The Union Bag and Paper Company, and during the following year the latter company moved from Batavia, Illinois, where it had been formerly located, to Kaukuana, and added another story to the structure, also building two warehouses, the factory now covering a floor space of 138,000 square feet in the main buildings, besides owning a large boiler house, barn and smaller buildings. The water power used amounts to 1660 horse-power, and they have auxiliary steam engines of 400 horse-power. The product of the company is shipped west of Ohio and the Great Lakes. One hundred and forty people are employed in manufacturing seven tons of ground wood pulp and the output of the factory, which manufactures twenty-five tons of paper daily and has a capacity of 4,000,000 bags per diem. All grades and sizes of paper bags are made.


Ernest A. Huebner
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 1198-1199; submitted by Mary Saggio.

ERNEST A. HUEBNER, a representative and highly esteemed citizen of Deer Creek township, who is engaged in the furniture and undertaking business in the village of Welcome, was born August 1, 1872, in Caledonia, Waupaca county, Wisconsin, and is a son of John and Fredericka (Habeck) Huebner, natives of Germany who immediately after their marriage came to America. They settled first in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, for two years and then removed to Waupaca county, buying land and engaging in farming. John Huebner is still living at the age of eighty-four years and his wife has reached the age of seventy-nine. Mr. Huebner enlisted in the Union army in 1861, becoming a member of a regiment of Wisconsin Volunteers, and served until the close of the war. with the exception of a short time spent in the hospital when he was recovering from the effects of an injury that broke both of his legs, he was with his regiment during all of its service, and had a record of which any man might well be proud. He is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic and is now living in the Soldiers' Home at Milwaukee, having signed all of his property, consisting of 360 acres of land in Waupaca county, to his wife and children. His wife makes her home with her son, John F. Huebner, on the old homestead. Ernest A. Huebner was the eleventh of a family of thirteen children, of whom nine are alive today, and he received a common school education. At the age of fourteen years he commenced working for wages on a farm, and one year later went to work for a butcher, with whom he remained about eighteen months. He then returned to the farm for two years, after which he engaged as a helper in a cheese factory, and a year later established a factory of his own in Liberty, Outagamie county. This was in the spring of 1893, and after four years he engaged in the same business at Shiocton, operating that factory until the spring of 1904. In the meantime he had acquired an interest in a farm implement business at Shiocton, and in 1904 he sold out his cheese and butter making business to devote his whole time to the implement business. During his partnership in this new venture, he traveled for one year for the International Harvester Company in Michigan and Wisconsin and then combined his implement business with his furniture and undertaking business, which had been founded by A. K. Dewick of Shiocton, the firm becoming Dewick & Huebner. Mr. Huebner resided in Shiocton until 1910, when the firm established a branch store at Welcome, and since that time he has continued at the latter place in charge of the branch. In 1892, Mr. Huebner was married to Miss Eva E. Spurgeon, born May 29, 1875, the eldest of the two children of George and Sarah (McClellan) Spurgeon, natives of Virginia and Ohio, respectively, who came to Wisconsin during the early days with their parents and were married in Dale township, Outagamie county. Mrs. Spurgeon died September 5, 1907, aged fifty-five years. Her husband, who still survives, is a veteran of the Civil War. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Huebner, namely: Evelyn and Eveline, twins, the former of whom died in infancy; and Isla. Mr. Huebner is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America and is independent in politics. With his wife he attends the Methodist Episcopal Church of Welcome.


John Hunsicker
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) page 888; submitted by Mary Saggio.

JOHN HUNSICKER, one of the highly esteemed retired citizens of Dale, Wisconsin, who was for many years engaged in agricultural pursuits in Outagamie county, was born March 14, 1839, in Pennsylvania and is a son of John and Elizabeth (Kotz) Hunsicker. Mr. Hunsicker's parents were natives of Pennsylvania and spent their entire lives there. He was the third of their family of nine children and received his education in the schools of his native vicinity. At the age of twenty years he began working for wages as a carpenter, continuing thus for four years in Pennsylvania and two years in Ohio, and on July 4, 1863, came to Wisconsin, settling at once in Dale, from which place he enlisted, February 10, 1865, in Company A, Forty-seventh Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteers, with which organization he served until the close of the war. After his service to his country had been completed, Mr. Hunsicker returned to Dale, where he rented a farm for four years, and then purchased a farm in Dale township, on which he erected a frame house and log barn and lived there for four years. At the end of that time he traded his land for property in Oshkosh, but after residing in that city for seven months he traded it for forty acres more in Dale township, ten acres of which had been cleared. Here he built a frame house and log barn, and lived on that property for thirty-four years, in the meantime building a modern frame house and a basement barn 60x34 feet, and when he sold the land in 1901 it was all under a high state of cultivation. In 1862 Mr. Hunsicker was married to Miss Elizabeth Degal, who was born in October, 1839, the fifth child of the family of seven born to Jacob F. and Mary Degal, natives of Wittenberg, Germany, who came to America and settled in Ohio, in which state Mr. and Mrs. Hunsicker were married. She died April 2, 1889, and is buried in Dale Cemetery, having been the mother of four children: Mary Elizabeth, who died at the age of three years; Edwin, who died when thirty-five years of age, leaving six children: Rosetta, who married Charles Tore, of Dale, has four children; and William, who died in childhood. Since his wife's death, Mr. Hunsicker has been living retired with his children, and during the last nine years has been living with his son Edwin's family. He is a popular member of Hortonville Post, Grand Army of the Republic, and is connected with the German Reformed Church. He is a Republican in politics, and has served as a member of the township board of supervisors and as treasurer of the school board.


Arnold Hurkman
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 933-935; submitted by Mary Saggio.

ARNOLD HURKMAN, one of the pioneers of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, who for many years was well known as a leading agriculturist and large land owner of Vandenbroek township, was a native of Holland, and came to the United States when a lad of sixteen years. He had always cherished a great ambition to become a mighty hunter, and on first arriving in this country displayed what his conception of the New World had been by marching down Broadway, New York, with his shot-gun on his shoulder, looking for “b'ar." He soon came West, settling in Minnesota, but after a short time heard that the hunting was good in Wisconsin and subsequently came to Outagamie county, locating on the south side of the Fox River, one-half mile from the city of Kaukauna, where he bought a small tract of land, built a little log cabin and began raising potatoes and pork, which he traded to the Indians for skins. After one year, in partnership with a friend, Henry Hammond, he bought 200 acres of land north of Kaukauna, and in dividing the property, Mr. Hurkman gave Hammond a double-barrelled shotgun for twenty acres of his share. In a few years he bought 180 acres more, just east of the original purchase, and in 1872 he erected a log house which still stands, and in which his hired help lived. Eventually, he sold off all of his land but 120 acres which became his home farm, and there he continued to reside until his death, April 17, 1886, when he was fifty-eight years of age. In 1858 he was married to Jane Verstegen of Little Chute, who died one year later, and in 1861 Mr. Hurkman was married to Hedrina Berendsen, who came from Holland with her parents, Henry and Katherina Berendsen, locating in Freedom township. To this union there were born six children: Mrs. Annie Deering; Mrs. Mary Gloudemans; Mrs. Nellie Vandenberg; John B., born July 11, 1872; Henry L., born July 8, 1874; and Bernard W., born October 16, 1877. Mrs. Hurkman died December 27, 1910, aged seventy-seven years, in the faith of the Holy Cross Catholic Church of Kaukauna, of which her husband had also been a member. The three Hurkman brothers were educated in the Parochial school of the Holy Cross Church, and as lads they worked on their father's farm. In 1893 John Hurkman went to Appleton, where he lived for two years, and then, with his brother-in-law, G. Deering, he rented and operated the home farm for four years. The younger brothers, John B., Henry L. and Bernard W., then rented the home place and operated it for a year, and in 1900 the three boys bought the home place, which they have since operated as a dairy farm. They sell and deliver milk to the city of Kaukauna, having the largest dairy business there. They have made numerous improvements to the home place, including the erection of a new $5,000 dairy barn, and they have also added to the acreage of the property, buying 163 acres to the east in 1901, and in 1911 purchased 74 acres to the east of that. The production of the farm has also been greatly increased, and nearly all of the product is fed to the animals. The property covers lots Nos. 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18 and 20, in the south one-half of Private Claim No. 35, and 163 acres in the west one-half of the same claim. The brothers are known as enterprising and progressive business men, and have the esteem of their fellow townsmen as public-spirited citizens. John and Bernard are unmarried, but Henry married Miss Annie Segglink, daughter of George Segglink, of Kaukauna, a retired farmer, and has one child, Arnold George, born May 10, 1910. The brothers are all members, of Holy Cross Catholic Church.


Frank Huse
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 638-639; submitted by Mary Saggio.

FRANK HUSE, an influential citizen and practical agriculturist of Black Creek Township, Outagamie county, residing on his fine farm of 100 acres located on Section 20, is a son of George and Elizabeth (Farnum) Huse, and was born in the town of Ellington, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, November 4, 1852. George Huse was born in Massachusetts, and was a soldier during the Mexican War, after the close of which he came to Wisconsin and took up a land grant of 160 acres in Ellington. He was married in Freedom, Wisconsin, to Elizabeth Farnum, a native of New York State, and they started married life on the farm which he had taken up a short time before. A short time later, however, Mr. Huse sold this property and went to live in Stephensville for a short period, after which he came to Black Creek township and purchased 160 acres of wild land from the Fox River Company. Here he continued to carry on agricultural pursuits until his death, May 7, 1881, at the age of sixty-six years, after which the mother sold sixty acres of land, while the family continued to operate the other 100 acres. This land now belongs to Frank Huse, who has sixty acres under cultivation. Mrs. Huse died May, 1892, aged seventy-three years. She had been the mother of five children, Frank being next to the eldest. He secured his education in the public schools of Outagamie county, after leaving which he worked on the home farm until reaching the age of twenty-one years, at the end of this time securing employment in the woods at lumbering and river driving. After ten years spent in this kind of work, he had accumulated forty acres of land, and this he partly cleared and sold. For a number of years thereafter he was engaged in working at the carpenter’s trade, and in the spring of 1894 commenced cultivating the old homestead farm, where he now carries on general operations and stockraising, and markets hogs, cattle and dairy products. His efforts have met with a satisfactory degree of success, and his farm shows the beneficial effect of well-directed labor.

On December 30, 1894, Mr. Huse was married to Miss Sophia Mielke, born April 5, 1869, the sixth of the thirteen children of Adam and Minnie Mielke, natives of Germany, who were married in Wisconsin. They came to Outagamie county in 1878 and settled in the town of Cicero, where Mr. Mielke still lives, at the age of seventy-nine years, Mrs. Mielke having died April 13, 1906, at the age of sixty-eight years. Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Huse, namely: Henry L., Dewey F., John E., Electie J., Frances G. and Goldier K. In political matters Mr. Huse is a Republican. With his family he attends the Black Creek Methodist Episcopal Church.


Frederick W. Huth
Source: History of Outagamie County Wisconsin, Goodspeed Historical Association Publishers, (1911) pages 1091-1092; submitted by Mary Saggio.

FREDERICK W. HUTH, who is the proprietor of the Seymour Creamery, one of the large business enterprises of Seymour, Wisconsin, was born in Germany, September 28, 1875, and is the son of Helmuth and Wilhelmina (Rohda) Huth, who came from the Fatherland to the United States in 1884, settling first in Illinois, but soon removing to Troy, Wisconsin. Mr. and Mrs. Huth, who still survive and are living on a farm near Troy, have been the parents of the following children: Frederick W.; August, who is a resident of Troy Center; William, whose home is in Detroit, Michigan; Carl, who is employed by his brother Frederick W.; Rosa, who married Floyd Dunham of Eagle, Wisconsin; and Frank, who still makes his home with his parents. The first three, named of these children were born in the old country and the others in the United States.

Frederick W. Huth secured his early educational training in the schools of his native country, and this was supplemented by attendance at school after coming to America. At the age of twenty years he went to work on his own account, entering the employ of the Troy Creamery, with which he was connected for ten years and nine months, and he then went to Elkhorn, Wisconsin, where for four years he worked for the Grove Creamery. In 1909 he decided to go into business for himself, and purchased the Seymour Creamery, which was then known as the Otto Sons Creamery, which had a last annual output of $97,000. Under Mr. Huth's management, during 1910, the output of the creamery was 720,000 pounds of butter, or nearly three times the amount of the former output. Mr. Huth is sole proprietor of this large business, which is growing steadily and fast becoming one of the leading creameries of the State.

In 1895, Mr. Huth was married to Luella Swoboda, who is a native of Wisconsin, and they have had five children, namely: Forrest, Esther, Alvin, Gerald and Claud, of whom Gerald died when two years of age. Mr. Huth is interested in the growth and development of this section of the State and has always supported movements which have for their object advancement along industrial lines, but he has never allowed his name to be put forward in the way of public preferment, preferring to give his time and attention to his large business interests.



Biographies Index



BACK -- HOME
Genealogy Trails

Copyright © Genealogy Trails
All data on this website is Copyright by Genealogy Trails with full rights reserved for original submitters.