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Romeo N. Achenbach
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 677-678 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

ROMEO N. ACHENBACH, who is engaged in operating a good farm of 160 acres in section 12, Durand township, Pepin county, was born in Belvidere (now Cochrane), Buffalo county, Wisconsin, October 15, 1875, son of William and Otilla (Heck) Achenbach. The father, a native of Sauk county, Wisconsin, was in early life a farmer, later entered the employ of the Mississippi River Logging Company and was thus engaged for twenty-five or thirty years. Still later he worked in the same line of industry at St. Paul and continued in it up to 1908, since which time he has lived practically retired, making his home with his children most of the time, but spending some winter months in a soldiers' home. His military service during the Civil war was as a private in Company M, in a Wisconsin regiment, and covered practically the entire period of the war. For a part of that time he was confined to the hospital with typhoid fever. His wife Otilla, who was born in Bavaria, Germany, in 1848, died November 1, 1909. Romeo N. Achenbach was the third born in a family of seven children and was one of twins. He attended school in Alma, Buffalo county, and resided at home until he was 18 years of age, assisting his father for the most part but occasionally working for others. He then went to rafting on the Mississippi river, being thus employed during the summers for fifteen years. After that he was employed for four years as scaler in sawmills and for the same length of time by the Winona Lumber Company. Then in 1901 Mr. Achenbach came to Lima township, Pepin county, and, buying land, engaged in farming. After ten years of agricultural work he engaged in the meat business in Durand, but eight months later sold his business and came to his present farm of 160 acres in section 12, Durand township. The land is valuable for agricultural purposes and the farm highly improved, the buildings being modern and in excellent condition, and ample tools and machinery. The situation also is pleasant. Mr. Achenbach does general farming, including dairying. He is starting to breed Durham cattle, having now about twenty head. He also raises Poland-China hogs. Mr. Achenbach is a stockholder in the Auditorium at Durand. As one of the prominent men of his township he has served more or less in public office, having been a member of the school board, two years township assessor and township treasurer, which last mentioned office he is holding at present. In polities he is a Democrat with independent proclivities. Religiously he is a member of the Catholic church, while his fraternal affiliations are with the Modern Woodmen of America and the Catholic Knights of Wisconsin. Mr. Achenbach was married September 10, 1901, to Mary Ableidinger, who was born in Austria, daughter of Ignatz and Julia (Poschel) Ableidinger, who were natives of the same country. The family came to America in 1883, locating in Lima township, where they still reside. Mr. Ableidinger, after farming for many years, is now retired on account of impaired health. He and his wife had five children, of whom Mary was the fourth in order of birth. Mr. and Mrs. Achenbach have a family of five children, one of whom they adopted. Their own children are: Edwin R., Aileen Louise, Lydia Theresa and Ruth Marie, while the adopted child is Arthur. All are residing at home.


Isaac D. Alkire
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 654 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

ISAAC D. ALKIRE, for many years a prominent farmer of Durand township, and widely known for his researches in geology and archaeology, was born near Springfield, Ill., December 2, 1826. He was reared to agricultural pursuits and remained in his native state until 1861, when he came to Wisconsin. Upon his arrival here he purchased a farm in Lima township, Pepin county, which he operated for four years, the latter three of which he lived in Durand. After the close of the Civil War he purchased a farm in the outskirts of Durand, where he lived until his death, January 25, 1913. A man of inquiring mind and studious habits, he early began making a collection of curios, and before his death he had acquired one of the largest private collections of its kind in the state. Mr. Alkire married Louisa Elmore, born near Springfield, Ill., September 30, 1832, and died near Durand, August 12, 1916. They were the parents of two children: Lissa Bell, now deceased, and William E., a farmer of Durand township.


William E. Alkire
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 653-654 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

WILLIAM E. ALKIRE, a farmer residing in section 26, Durand township, Pepin county, was born in Durand, this county, April 13, 1864, son of Isaac D. and Louisa (Elmore) Alkire. He resided at home until one year before his marriage, when he came to his present farm, which he had purchased. There were then no buildings on the property and he had to make all the improvements, which have been extensive. The farm now contains 152 acres and is well provided with modem buildings, tools and machinery. Here Mr. Alkire carried on agricultural operations for a number of years, giving particular attention to breeding Jersey cattle. He is now living retired, having leased his farm land to others. He has served as town clerk of Durand township since 1887 with the exception of the years 1905, 1906 and 1917, and for twenty-one years he has been clerk of School District No. 4. When only a lad attending school, Mr. Alkire shared his father's interest in scientific curios. He has made extensive additions to his father's collection, which is now one of the largest—perhaps the largest of a general character—in the state, containing specimens from every part of the globe. They are kept in a building 16 by 24 feet in ground dimensions, and for proper display should have twice that much space. Mr. Alkire was married September 8, 1885, in Lima township, to Carrie Howard, of Lima, who was born June 25, 1866, daughter of Lucius and Betsey (Kinney) Howard. Mr. and Mrs. Alkire have one daughter, Anna Bell, who is a musical artist of considerable ability, spending much of her time in traveling with the Cora Youngblood Corson Company. When not thus engaged she resides at home. She is a graduate of Durand high school, and acquired her musical education in the Minneapolis School of Music and at Warren, Ohio.


E. Orlando Anderson
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919).pages 902-903 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

E. ORLANDO ANDERSON, a prominent representative of the agricultural class in Stockholm township, Pepin county, having a fine farm of 200 acres in section 29, was born in this township, Aug. 16, 1868, son of Erik and Anna (Anderson) Anderson. He is of Scandinavian ancestry, his father having been born in Sweden in 1846 and his mother in Norway in 1848. They were married May 23, 1867. Erik Anderson came to the United States in 1854 with his parents, who first settled at Moline, Ill. From there the family came by steamboat up the Mississippi River to Stockholm, this county, and here Erik Anderson was reared and grew to manhood. He became a farmer, buying land and establishing the farm which his son, E. Orlando, is now operating. His death occurred in 1910. His wife, who survived him, is living at Stockholm, Wis. They were the parents of thirteen children. E. Orlando Anderson acquired the elements of knowledge in district school No. 2, Stockholm township, and also attended for a short time the Stockholm village school. He has always resided on the parental homestead, which he has operated on his own account since he was 22 years old, and has been its owner since 1890. Many of the improvements on the place were made by him, and he has equipped the farm with good modern buildings. He is doing a successful business as a general agriculturist, and is a stockholder in the Farmers' Telephone Company and the Stockholm Co-operative Creamery. He is also numbered among the members of the Modern Woodmen Camp at Stockholm. He has served as clerk of the school board for a number of years, and is a member of the Lutheran church at Lund, Pepin township. In politics he is independent. On March 28, 1891, Mr. Anderson was united in marriage with Hilda Ahl, who was born in Pepin township, Feb. 3, 1869, daughter of John and Anna C. Ahl. Her parents, who were natives of Okna Jankoping, Sweden, came to the United States in 1865, settling in Pepin township, this county, where they engaged in farming. She was educated in the Olund district school in that township. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson have a family of seven children: Harry, who resides on the home farm; Chester, a farmer in Pepin township, who married Luella Seifert, April 19, 1916, and has one child, Maurice; and Violet, Dorance, Wilford, Ethel and Melvin, who are residing at home. Harry Anderson married Olga Bjurquist, Nov. 27, 1917, and has one child, Howard. Violet Anderson married Edward Matson, Nov. 5, 1917.


Hjalmer R. Anderson
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 844-845 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

HJALMER R. ANDERSON, cashier of the Stockholm State Bank at Stockholm, Pepin county, Wis., was born in this village, Aug. 24, 1878, son of A. E. and Ena (Peterson) Anderson. He comes of pioneer stock, his father and paternal grandparents having at an early date located on land in this vicinity. A. E. Anderson was born in Sweden in 1836 and was only three years old when he came to America with his parents. Locating in the woods not far from the present village of Stockholm, the grandfather there cleared a farm. The Indians, who were then numerous and were dressed usually in nothing but a few skins, would often visit the cabin and cluster around the grandmother of our subject as she spun wool into yarn on her old-fashioned spinning-wheel. As A. E. Anderson grew up he helped in the work of the farm and later became prominent in the industrial and business life of the township, being president of an insurance company and also, serving as a member of the town board for a number of years. Afterwards he went to a more western state, where he farmed for a few years, but finally returned to Stockholm, where he lived retired until his death, Dec. 19, 1910. His wife Ena, who was a native of Norway, is now living in the village of Stockholm. Hjalmer R. Anderson in his youth attended school at Stockholm, this county, later at River Falls, and subsequently the Lake City High School, where he was graduated in 1900, being then 22 years old. Elected register of deeds of Pepin county, he served in that office for six years, for the first time residing away from home. During the last two years of this period he also worked in the State Bank of Durand. The next two years of his life were spent as an employe of the Citizens Bank at Lake City. Then going to North Dakota he worked there one year for a loan and abstract company, all the while acquiring valuable business experience. He was also cashier of a bank which the firm by which he was employed established at Scranton, N. D. Later on, this bank being sold, Mr. Anderson commenced buying grain and also did a little farming. On July 28, 1916, he assumed the duties of his present position as cashier of the Stockholm State Bank, an institution which, largely through his efforts, has made rapid progress and has apparently got a prosperous future before it. On June 30, 1910, Mr. Anderson was united in marriage with Edith Larson, a native of Stockholm village and daughter of Martin and Josephine (Olund) Larson. Her father, born in Norway in 1847, was an early settler in this vicinity and for a number of years was engaged in the grain and mercantile business. He died in 1915, but is survived by his wife. Their daughter Edith (Mrs. Anderson) was educated in the Stockholm village school and at the Ladies' Lutheran Seminary at Red Wing, Minn. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson are prominent members of local society and are popular among a wide circle of friends and acquaintances.


John A. Anderson
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 680-681 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

JOHN A. ANDERSON is one of the leading representatives of the agricultural industry in Frankfort township, Pepin county, his farm of 288 acres in section 10 being a valuable piece of farming property. He was born in Smaland, Sweden, March 25, 1864, son of Andrew and Anna (Johnson) Anderson, the parents being natives of the same locality. The father was born in 1832 and on emigrating to the United States located in Henry county, Illinois, where he remained for a year. He removed from there to St. Peter, Minn., coming from the latter place to Pierce county, Wisconsin, where he lived six years. The rest of his life was spent in St. Paul, where he died in 1882. His wife, who was born in 1826, died in 1914, having survived him about thirty-two years. John A. Anderson attended village school in St. Peter, Minn., where the family lived for some years. At the age of 17, being then in St. Paul, he began working in the St. Paul Sash and Door Factory and was employed there for thirteen years. Then, at the age of 30, he took up farming in Pierce county, Wisconsin, and was thus occupied in that county for one year, when he bought his present farm in Frankfort township, Pepin county, a fine estate of 288 acres of fertile land, modern buildings and machinery, where he is carrying on general farming on a profitable basis, keeping pure-bred Red-Poll cattle. He is also a share-holder in the. Arkansaw Co-operative Creamery and the Farmers' Telephone Company. In 1918 Mr. Anderson erected a fine new modern house of fifteen rooms, installed with furnace heat, hot and cold water, and electric lights, which not only forms a delightful and comfortable home but is an ornament to the landscape of which it forms a part. As one of the leading citizens of Frankfort township, he has been called on to take part in the affairs of local government. For eighteen years he has been a member of the school board of his district, has served on the town board, and was for one term clerk of court of Pepin county. He is a member of the Methodist church in Frankfort township. Mr. Anderson was married, September 7, 1889, to Ida Peterson, a native of Sweden, born April 15, 1861, who came to the United States at the age of 21 years. Both her parents are now deceased. Her father, whose name was Peter Peterson, had an adventurous career, taking part in the rush to California after the discovery of gold there in 1849, and a few years later in the rush to the Australian diggings. He made three trips to America but finally died in his native Sweden. The home life of Mr. and Mrs. Anderson has been broadened by the birth of two children: Reuben, born June 7, 1890, who assisted his father on the home farm, and for three years served as town clerk of Frankfort township, but who is now in the United States service in France; and Leslie, born May 30, 1893, who is residing at home. Mr. Anderson and his family stand high in the social life of the community in which they reside.


Ludie Anderson
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 867-868 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

LUDIE ANDERSON, who, in partnership with his brother William and his sister Anna, is operating the old Anderson farm of 200 acres in section 5, Stockholm township, Pepin county, and is also the owner of other agricultural property, was born in this township, Sept. 7, 1884, son of Andrew and Christina (Carlson) Anderson. The parents were born in Varmland, Sweden, and were among the earliest settlers of Stockholm township, Andrew Anderson taking up a homestead here when the township was a part of the primeval forest, and the Indians, of whom there were plenty, were almost the sole inhabitants. He died when the subject of this sketch was but a year old. His wife was left alone with many a heavy burden and six small children to care for. The two first children died in their infancy. Those living are: Elmer, William, Oscar, Clarence, Ludie and Anna. Elmer is farming in Beach, N. D.; Clarence is in Crookston, Minn., and Oscar is living in Pierce county, Wisconsin, on his Uncle Carlson's farm, which he bought. The mother, Mrs. Christina Anderson, passed away July 16, 1913, after a life spent in the faithful performance of duty. Ludie Anderson was educated in district school No. 2 in Stockholm township. He remained on the homestead until attaining his majority and then went to North Dakota, where he secured a tract of 160 acres of land under the homestead law. This land he sold, after improving it, and then returned to Stockholm township, where he has since been engaged in operating the home farm with his brother and sister, as already mentioned. He also owns 160 acres of land adjoining the home estate. He is engaged in general farming, keeping Durham cattle, and is also a stockholder in the Stockholm Creamery and the Farmers' Telephone Company. Ludie and William Anderson are among the enterprising and successful farmers of Stockholm township. Their knowledge of agriculture in all its branches is of a practical kind and their operations are being rewarded by good financial returns. In 1914 Ludie Anderson was united in marriage with Ellen Bergstrom, who was born in Pierce county, Wisconsin, daughter of Erik and Clarin Bergstrom, her parents being natives of Sweden. She was educated in the district school in Pierce county, and is a worthy helpmate to her husband, well skilled in all the domestic duties pertaining to farm life. They have one child, Corinne, who was born July 3, 1916. The family are members of the Lutheran church at Lund, Pepin township, and in politics Mr. Anderson is a Republican.


Oscar K. Anderson
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 865-866 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

OSCAR K. ANDERSON, who is numbered among the thriving agriculturists of Pepin township, Pepin county, residing in section 27, was born in Nerike, Sweden, June 14, 1860, son of Victor and Annie Anderson, who were natives of the same locality. As immigrants in Wisconsin in 1875, they settled in this township on farm land, which they improved, erecting better buildings and putting in a good equipment. The mother passed away in 1903, but the father is still living and resides with his son, Oscar K. The latter in his boyhood attended school in Pepin township. At the age of 15 he began working out on farms, but later became a brakeman on the Canadian Pacific Railroad. After some years of railroad work he returned from Canada to Pepin county, and having saved money, wisely invested it in land, turning his attention to the cultivation of the soil. In this independent occupation he has made a success and is doing a good business as a general farmer. He has 160 acres of fertile land, and in addition to its operation, which takes up most of his time, he owns and operates a grain threshing-machine. A Republican in politics, Mr. Anderson for nineteen years has been a member of the Pepin town board and nearly all this time has been its chairman. By virtue of this office he is also a member of the county board, on which he has done good work. For a number of years he has also been a member of the school board of his district. He was married, June 6, 1886, to Emma Peterson, who was born in Sweden, daughter of Erick and Carolina Peterson, and who came to America when about 20 years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson are the parents of four children: Mabel, Henry, Eddie and Merritt. Mabel is now the wife of Lawrence Bloomquist, a farmer, and has one child, Vivian; Henry, who is a farmer in Maiden Rock township, Pierce county, married Anna Magnuson and has one child, James Gordon; Eddie resides at home, while Merritt is abroad in the United States service. Mr. Anderson and his family occupy a high social position in Pepin township — a position based on character and achievement. Through enterprise and industry, backed by steady habits and intelligence, he has attained prosperity, and his service as a public official has been efficient and marked by a regard for the best interests of the community, an attitude appreciated by his fellow townsmen.


Walter H. Anderson
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 731-732 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

WALTER H. ANDERSON, who is now living practically retired on a valuable farm of forty acres in section 26, Waterville township, Pepin county, was born in Faribault, Minn., October 15, 1856. His parents, Lemuel and Martha (Holder) Anderson, were natives of Ohio who came west to Minnesota at an early date, Mrs. Anderson dying there in 1861. In the year after her death Mr. Anderson moved to Durand, Wis., where, however, he remained but a short time, as he soon set out for California, intending to try his fortune in the gold fields, or perhaps because he felt lonely and craved excitement and change of scene. It is probable, however, that he never reached his destination, as he was taken sick at Pike's Peak, Colorado, and soon after all trace of him was lost, and he has never more been heard from. In those adventurous days, before the Pacific railroad linked the Eastern and Middle States with those on the Pacific coast, the overland journey was fraught with dangers, and one human life was little regarded, the westward-rushing pioneers having their hands full in preserving their own existence and guarding their lives from the perils of the way. Mr. Anderson probably, therefore, shared the fate of the thousands who set out full of hope and courage, but whose remains were laid to rest in hastily dug graves all the way along the route from the settled communities of the East to the far western El Dorado. Lemuel and Martha Anderson had but two children, of whom Walter H., the subject of this memoir, is the younger. Their other child is Fannie, now the widow of Henry Amidon, her husband having died in 1915. Walter H. Anderson acquired his education in Buffalo and Pepin counties, attending district school. After losing his parents he was received into the family of John Plummer, by whom he was reared until 12 years of age, and then went to live with Nathaniel Plummer. At the age of 14 he went to work in the stave and sawmill of Nathaniel Plummer, located one mile west of Mr. Anderson's present residence, and for over twenty years remained in his employ. Besides attending to his duties connected with that position, he had owned and operated land in Waterville township from the time he was 23 years old, and he now gave his undivided attention to farming. In this line of industry he has had a successful career, having owned various farms, all of which he developed, putting them on a profitable basis. To his present farm he came in 1907, and is here living practically retired, enjoying the fruits of his former enterprise and industry. His land is valuable and well improved, and he has a comfortable modern residence. During his active career he served as school treasurer for seventeen years, and for one term was township treasurer. In politics he is a Republican. Mr. Anderson was united in marriage, June 23; 1878, with Mary H. Plummer, who was born in Durand, Wis., daughter of Samuel L. and Eunice (Belknap) Plummer. He and his wife have three children, Walter W., Lillie Irene, and William Henry. Walter W., who worked his way through the University of Nevada, was for two years principal of the high school at Dayton, that state. He is now president of the School of Mines at Ely, Nev. He married Hope Bain of Nevada and has three children, Walter Lindley, Harry Leroy and Dorothy Hope. Lillie Irene, after attending district school, was graduated from the high school at Arkansaw and a business college at Lake City, Minn. She has taught in various schools for the last ten years and is now a teacher in Big Coolie. William Henry, who was educated in Pepin county, was in the employ of William V. Dorwin at Dorwin's Mill. He is now a first-class machinist in the United States navy on the U. S. S. New Mexico. Lillie and William are both unmarried.


John Anibas
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 634 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

JOHN ANIBAS, a general farmer in Lima township, Pepin county, operating 126 acres in section 26, was born in Austria, June 23, 1865, son of Anton and Johanna (Ibel) Anibas. The parents came to the United States in 1892, Anton Anibas settling on a farm in Durand township, this county, where both he and his wife subsequently died. John, the subject of this sketch, attended school in his native land and was 18 years old when he came to America. He worked out for others, carefully saving as much of his earnings as possible until he was able to purchase his present farm, to which he came in 1891. This he is operating successfully, raising the usual crops and keeping a sufficiency of good stock. He is also financially interested in the Inter-County Telephone Company. Independent in politics, he has never aspired to public office. He attends the Catholic church in Lima. In March, 1891, Mr. Anibas gave up bachelor life and was united in marriage with Mary Sabelko, who was born in Austria, daughter of Michael and Johanna (Durham) Sabelko, natives of the same country. The family located in Lima township at an early date and Mr. and Mrs. Sabelko are still residing here. Of their four children Mary was the third in order of birth. Mr. and Mrs. Anibas are the parents of eleven children: Frank, John, Andrew, Mary, Florian, Louisa, Agnes, Anthony, Anna, Philip and Thomas. All are unmarried and all are residing at home except Andrew, who is temporarily absent.


Josef Anibas
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 732-733 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

JOSEF ANIBAS, who is engaged in general agriculture on a farm of 240 acres in section 13, Durand township, Pepin county, was born in central Austria, February 4, 1873, son of Anton and Hannah (Ibl) Anibas. His parents, also natives of Austria, came to this country in 1892, settling in Durand township, Pepin county, Wisconsin, on a farm. There they subsequently died. Josef, who was the youngest member of the family, attended school in his native land and was 16 years old when he came to America. He soon found employment and worked for others until he bought his present farm, which contains 240 acres of valuable land. Here he carries on general farming, including dairying and the raising of cattle and hogs. He is also a stockholder in the telephone company. Religiously he belongs to the Catholic church, and in politics is independent. Mr. Anibas was married in May, 1912, to Dana Meixner, a native of Austria, who was one year old when she came with her parents to the United States. They settled on the north side of the Chippewa river, near Arkansaw, Pepin county, where Mr. Meixner engaged in farming, and where Mrs. Anibas' mother died. Mr. and Mrs. Anibas are the parents of six children: William, Mary, Margaret, Henry, Johanna, and Matilda, all of whom are residing at home.


Garrett Auth
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 766-767 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

GARRETT AUTH, who founded the Auth farm in section 16, Waterville township, Pepin county, was born in Fort Wayne, Ind., Dec. 6, 1842. In early manhood he worked in lumber mills, being an expert sawyer. He was also a soldier in the Civil War, enlisting as a private in Company D, 10th Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and seeing active service from 1861 to 1864, or until the end of his term, when he was honorably discharged and returned home, without having been either wounded or captured. Immediately afterwards he came to Pepin county, Wisconsin, entering the employ of Knapp, Stout & Co., at Waubeek, and remaining with them until their mill was burned. His employment being thus terminated for the time being, he resolved to take up farming, and accordingly bought the land in section 16, Waterville township, on which his son, John H. Auth, now lives. This was a wild tract, necessitating pioneer work to clear and develop, and his first task was to build a small log house. He then pursued the even tenor of his way, clearing the land and extending his acreage of cultivation until his death, on Feb. 27, 1889, as the result of injuries received from a falling tree. His death was much regretted, as he was a well-liked citizen and for a number of years had been one of the leading men of his township, serving as chairman of the township board and also as treasurer. He had accumulated land to the amount of 240 acres. Garrett Auth married Augusta Haag, who was born in Prussia, Germany, July 22, 1848, and who is now residing with her son, John H. Auth, on the old homestead. Their children, six in number, were as follows: Margaret Josephine is the wife of James Liddy, a farmer of Waterville township. Joseph P. is operating a farm adjoining the old homestead. Mary is now a widow, residing in Valley City, N. D. Her husband, Louis Bardwell, was president of the Bank of Litchville. Edward, residing at Mohall, N. D., is engaged in the elevator business. John H., as previously stated, is now proprietor of the home farm. Evalyn is the wife of Nicholas Herman, a newspaper publisher and editor of Marion, N. D.


John H. Auth
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 766 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

JOHN H. AUTH, a prosperous general farmer and stock breeder, operating a good farm of 200 acres in section 16, Waterville township, was born on the farm where he now resides, Jan. 31, 1886, son of Garrett and Augusta (Haag) Auth. He acquired his education in the district schools of this township, and has always resided on the parental homestead, the management of which he took over on coming of age. Here, besides raising the usual crops, he is successfully engaged in breeding Holstein cattle and Duroc-Jersey hogs, with other good stock, and is also financially interested in the creamery and telephone companies. His farm is admirably managed and yields good returns, and Mr. Auth is numbered among the well-to-do and prominent men of his township. He is a member of the Roman Catholic church at Arkansaw, and in politics is independent. Mr. Auth was married, June 8, 1915, to Mary Drier, who was born in Waterville township, daughter of George and Rose (Pomasl) Drier. Her father, who was born in this township, Dec. 28, 1867, is a farmer still in active life here. His wife, Mrs. Auth's mother, was born in Austria, Sept. 2, 1864, and is now living in Waterville township. Mrs. Auth was educated in Waterville township, attending district school. She and her husband are the parents of two children—Edith Mary and Evalyn Esther.


Charles N. Averill
Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

CHARLES N. AVERILL, farmer, Durand, Sec. 31, 280 acres. Came with his family into Pepin County, in the Spring of 1855, the first that came through in a wagon from Osseo. There was no road, no track, no bridges, these he had to make as he went along. One McGuinn had entered an 80 in the Fall of 1854, but had not yet settled on it, and Mr. A. was the second to enter land, and the first to settle upon it, in the whole Bear Creek Valley. He was born in Bethany, Genesee Co., N.Y., Nov. 1, 1825. His father moved to Indiana in 1837, where his father and mother have since died. In the Spring of 1852 he moved to Oregon, Dane Co., Wis., and remained there nearly three years, then moved to Lima, Pepin Co., as before slated. He has been County Clerk, County Treasurer and County Commissioner three terms, and Chairman of County Board many years. He was married in Dane County, Nov. 1, 1848, to Miss Fanny Keenan. They have four children living—Kattie, Mrs. Black, of Fairfield, Iowa; Caroline, Fanny and Charles.


William P. Averill
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 634-635 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

WILLIAM P. AVERILL, proprietor of the old Averill homestead in section 31, Lima township, Pepin county, was born in this township Sept. 13, 1862, son of Harvey Putnam and Frances (Keenan) Averill. The father, who was a native of New York state, when a young man learned the carpenter’s trade, which he followed for a while as a journeyman. His wife was a native of Ireland. Harvey P. Averill came to Pepin county in 1855, locating on the land that now constitutes the farm of his son, William P. At that time, of course, it was wild, and he was the first settler in the locality. One of his first acts was to build a log house, in which he resided with his brother. Later, at the time of his marriage, he built one for himself. He became the owner of 120 acres of land and resided on the place until his death, which occurred in May, 1874. His wife survived him but a short time, passing away in August of the same year. During the Civil War Mr. Averill served in the quartermaster’s department with a Wisconsin regiment. William P. Averill, who was the eldest of six children, attended district school in Lima township. He resided at home until he was about 12 years of age, and after his parents’ death, went to live with his uncle. At the age of 22 he began operating the home farm, where he has since remained. He now owns the original 120 acres, on which he has made all the most important improvements, and is carrying on general farming successfully. He is also a stockholder and vice president of the Inter-County Telephone Company. He has held various township offices and has served as school director. Mr. Averill was united in marriage Nov. 17, 1889, to Lillian Dorwin, who was born in the town of Durand, daughter of Vivus W. and Helen M. (Van Hoesen) Dorwin, who came to Durand, Pepin county, from Adams county, Wisconsin, in 1856. He and his wife are the parents of four children: Harvey Putnam, Lillian May, Ella Cora and William Phillip. Mr. Averill belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America and to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, including both the lodge and encampment.


Lloyd A. Axtell
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919).pages 896-897 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

LLOYD A. AXTELL, proprietor of the Pepin Herald, and a business man and journalist of ability, was born in Pepin, Pepin county, Feb. 11, 1881, son of Dr. Milton B. and Emaline (McMichael) Axtell. After passing through the school grades he entered the Pepin High school from which he was graduated 1897. He had already begun industrial life on the Pepin Star, then conducted by his brothers, and he continued in the Star office until the fall of 1901. He then visited the Pacific coast, working as a journeyman printer, and returning from San Francisco in the fall of 1906 to be present at his parents' golden wedding anniversary. On Feb. 13, 1908, he established the Pepin Herald, which he is still conducting, and which now enjoys a good circulation, the result of Mr. Axtell's practical journalistic experience and careful management. For two years also he conducted a paper at Maiden Rock, but sold out his interests there so as to devote practically his whole time to the Herald. He is well equipped both for job and newspaper printing, and his job work is by no means an unimportant part of his business. Mr. Axtell is a notary public, and the only court commissioner in Pepin county. He is an active and efficient member of the Booster Club and the Civic League, which have done and are doing much to promote local interests. He was instrumental in the organization of the Oakwood Cemetery Association and has been secretary since its organization in 1909. His fraternal affiliations are with Pepin Lodge, No. 90, A. F. & A. M., of which he is a past master and present trustee, and of Pepin Chapter, No. 32, O. E. S. Mr. Axtell was married June 30, 1917, to Lora Frances Hill, daughter of Alvah Herbert and Frances (Moore) Hill, natives of New England. Mr. and Mrs. Axtell have one son, Alvah Thomas, born April 29, 1918.


Dr. Milton Blachly Axtell
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919).page 896 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

DR. MILTON BLACHLY AXTELL, pioneer of Pepin Village, was born in Mercer county, Pennsylvania, Nov. 28, 1825, son of Samuel and Mary (Loveridge) Axtell. He came to Pepin in 1856, and followed his profession as physician and surgeon until his death. He was one of the best known men in the county, and was an important factor in shaping its destinies. The intimate friend of every family for miles around, he shared their joys and sorrows, and was widely loved and respected. He served in numerous county and local offices, and constantly demonstrated his worth as a useful citizen. After a well spent life he died August 3, 1907. He was married, Sept. 9, 1856, to Emaline McMichael, who was born in Crawford county, Pennsylvania, Feb. 25, 1836, and died May 28, 1916, the daughter of Robert and Katharine (Randolph) McMichael. Dr. and Mrs. Axtell were the parents of twelve children: Robert Arthur, born Nov. 11, 1857; Mary Ella, born Oct. 1, 1860; Oscar M., Nov. 6, 1862; Orla B., Nov. 6, 1862; Samuel, Sept. 25, 1864; Katharine, July 21, 1866; Emaline, March 29, 1869; John Milton, March 18, 1871; Ethel Luverne, Sept. 18, 1875; Annie Delle, Oct. 1, 1877; Edith Ciscilia, June 19, 1879; Lloyd A., Feb. 11, 1881.
 


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