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George Henry Pabst
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 769 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

GEORGE HENRY PABST, who owns and operates a fine 200-acre farm in section 28, Albany township, Pepin county, was born in Buffalo county, Wisconsin, Dec. 5, 1891, son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Schreiner) Pabst. Both parents were natives of this part of Wisconsin, the father having been born in Buffalo county and the mother in Albany township, Pepin county, on her parents' homestead. Joseph Pabst was born June 28, 1860, and died in 1913. He served as chairman of the township board, besides holding school office for a number of years. His wife, who was a few years younger, is now living with her daughter, Inez Borgwardt, in Buffalo county. George Henry Pabst was one of the older children in a family of five. He attended school in Albany township, and resided with his parents, helping his father, until he married. He then settled on his present farm of 200 acres, which he is operating with good financial results, doing general farming. He is a member of the Lutheran church and in politics is independent. On April 29, 1914, he was married to Floy Black, daughter of Nathan and Hattie (Kruger) Black, natives of this locality, where for a number of years the father was engaged in farming, but is now residing at Harshaw, Wis., being still active industrially. His wife died in Buffalo county about 1904. Their daughter, Floy, was educated in the schools of that county and at Stanley, Wis. Mr. and Mrs. Pabst are the parents of three children: Wilbur Harold, Virginia Dare and George H., Jr.


Willis Adna Parker
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 838-839 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

WILLIS ADNA PARKER, chairman of Albany township, Pepin county, whose farm of 240 acres is one of the well improved and paying farms in this township, was born in Eau Claire, Wis., Sept. 16, 1859. His parents, Alfred and Louise (Powers) Parker, were born in New Hampshire, the father Nov. 15, 1815, and the mother June 17, 1829. Alfred Parker when a young man learned the shipbuilder's trade, and was employed for some time in the navy yard at Charlestown, Mass. In 1857 he felt the lure of the West and located in Madison, Wis., where he found work as a carpenter. Subsequently he removed from there to Eau Claire, where he became engineer in the Ingraham & Kennedy lumber mill. Settling in Albany township, Pepin county, in 1875, he engaged in farming, in which occupation he continued until his death, March 15, 1887. For a number of years he served on the school board of his district and was a prominent and respected citizen. His wife died Feb. 22, 1917. Willis Adna Parker attended graded school at Eau Claire, after which he followed the high school course for two years in the same city. After working on the home farm until the age of 21, he was subsequently employed for one year in the Wabasha Lumber Mills. Then he became guard in the state penitentiary at Sioux Falls, S. D., serving in that position two years. Since he gave up that employment he has been engaged in farming at his present location, raising both crops and stock and doing a profitable business. A man of marked energy and. enterprise, his progress has been upward in the world, and he has taken his place among the well to do and respected citizens of Albany township. Mr. Parker is a Republican in politics, and has been frequently called upon to serve in public office. In 1892 he was elected clerk of court of Pepin county, and held that position for two years. In 1896 he was elected chairman of Albany township, in which position he has served intermittently for fourteen years, being, as previously mentioned, chairman at the present time. In 1905 he was appointed assistant postmaster in the State Senate at Madison. He has served in all several years on the school board, and was chairman of the county board for two terms. Since war was declared against Germany he has taken an active part in patriotic work, having served as a member of the Pepin County Council of Defense, and been a strong and arduous worker on all Liberty Bond issues. On Feb. 3, 1881, Mr. Parker was united in marriage with Anna Roundy, who was born in the village of Pepin, this county, March 19, 1860, daughter of Pearl and Anna (Hastings) Roundy. Mr. and Mrs. Parker have had seven children: Frank Ingram, Lida, Willis Adna, Jr., Belle, Pearl, Louise and Blanche. Pearl is now deceased. Louise and Blanche are residing at home. Frank Ingram was graduated as an engineer from the University of Wisconsin in the class of 1906, and subsequently became consulting engineer with the Cutler-Hammer Manufacturing Company of Milwaukee. While thus employed he won the distinction of having designed the largest lifting magnet in the world. He died Oct. 18, 1918, leaving one child, Frank. His wife before marriage was Miss Belle Stevens of Oconomowoc, Wis. Lida, who married Martin Vanderpan, lives on a farm in North Dakota. Willis Adna, Jr., who married Essie Silvernail, is a farmer in Albany township, this county; he has five children, Laurel, Roger, Donald, Willis and Kenneth. Belle is the wife of George Young, butter maker in the creamery at Mondovi, Buffalo county, and has two children, Margaret and Marjorie. The wife and children of Mr. Parker are members of the Congregational church at East Pepin. Pearl Roundy, father of Mrs. Parker, was born in Bangor, Me., in 1812, and was educated for the Baptist ministry, but instead became a mechanic and shipbuilder. He also followed the jeweler's trade at Brookville, Pa., where he made the acquaintance of Anna Hastings, who became his wife. Mr. Roundy followed the trade of shipbuilder at Rock Island, Ill., for a year, and later at Pepin, Wis., where he and his family resided for some years. Afterwards he was captain of a boat yard at Wabasha, Minn.


Reuben A. Parkhurst
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 705-706 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

REUBEN A. PARKHURST, proprietor of a productive farm of 40 acres in section 27, Durand township, Pepin county, was born in Beloit, Wis., Dec. 5, 1863, son of James Monroe and Lydia (Belden) Parkhurst. The father, who was a native of the little village of Pomfret, in Windsor county, Vermont, came west, and located in Beloit, Wis., where he learned the mable-cutter's trade. From there he came to this locality in 1867, locating in Bear Creek Valley, Buffalo county, where he engaged in farming. Later he went to Barron county, resided there a few years and then settled in Dunn county. His wife Lydia, who was born in Plattsburg, N. Y., in 1821, died in Colfax township, Dunn county, in 1892, after which James M. Parkhurst made his home for some time with his son, Reuben. He died in Durand, where he was then living retired, on April 14, 1904. Reuben A. Parkhurst, who was the ninth born in a family of eleven children, attended district school in Buffalo and Barron counties, Wisconsin. He resided with his parents until two years before his marriage, working out at times in Durand township, and then engaged in farming at his present location. Though his farm is small compared with some, the soil is excellent, the buildings modern, and Mr. Parkhurst realized good returns. In politics he is a Republican but has taken no active part in public affairs. He was united in marriage, July 13, 1905, to Agnes Stewart, who was born in Durand village, daughter of Charles and Mary (Sleeper) Stewart, and they have one child, Dorothy May, who has graduated from the common school in Durand township. Mr. Parkhurst belongs to the Odd Fellows' lodge at Durand, in which he has passed through the chairs, and is also a member of the Beavers fraternal society, while Mrs. Parkhurst has passed through the chairs in the Rebeckah lodge, affiliated with the Odd Fellows, and is an ex-secretary of the ladies' branch of the G. A. R. Charles Stewart, father of Mrs. Parkhurst, is thought to have been a native of Massachusetts, and his wife a native of Bristol, N. H. They came from Massachusetts to Durand, Wis., in 1850. Mr. Stewart had been a mason and plasterer by trade, but on coming here engaged in farming, though for a few years subsequently he occasionally worked at his trade. He died about 1892, his wife surviving him about two years. They were the parents of eight children. The name of Charles Stewart is a famous one in history, having been borne by two sovereigns of England. A few words in regard to the family, of which Mrs. Parkhurst's father was a descendant, may be of interest. "Every man or woman who bears the name of Stewart must look back to Walter Fitz Alan, as the progenitor of this most illustrious family of Scotland. Walter Fitz Alan was the second son of Alan, son of Flad, who died in the twelfth century. Alan is said to have been a Norman, who came to England with William the Conqueror, and from him received a grant of land with the title of Lord. Alan's eldest son, William Fitz Alan, remained in England and was the progenitor of the Earls of Arundel. The second son, Walter Fitz Alan, went to Scotland, where he became the Lord High Steward of the country under King David. It was Walter Fitz Alan's grandson who changed the name from Fitz Alan to Stewart. From him have sprung the illustrious family of Stewart in Scotland, England and Ireland; from him were descended the Stewart kings of England—James I, Charles I, Charles II and James II—and the colonist who brought the name to America. The spelling 'Stewart' is the one usually insisted on by families in this country and Scotland. Mary Queen of Scots was the first to employ the French spelling of the name, 'Stuart,' when she married the king of France. There are at least ten distinct families in America who can trace their establishment back to colonial days. One of the most prominent of these families was established by Robert Stewart, a covenanter from Scotland, who came to Boston in 1718 in search of religious freedom. He settled in Londonderry, N. H. Another New England Stewart progenitor was Duncan Stewart, who settled in Rowley, Mass. The Baltimore family of Stewart was founded by David Stewart, who was born in Ireland in 1745. The New Jersey family was established by Charles Stewart, who was born in County Donegal, Ireland, and came to this country in the middle of the eighteenth century. A description of the arms of the Stewart family may be found in any book of heraldry, but as such description, couched in heraldic terms, would be unintelligible to the great majority of readers, it is here omitted."


Charles Patrow
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 647 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

CHARLES PATROW, for many years a well-known and highly esteemed citizen residing in the vicinity of Durand, but now deceased, was born in Versia, Canada, April 20, 1825, and there resided until he was eight years old. In 1833 he accompanied his parents to Vermont, in which state he was married in 1847 to Louisa Bashaw. Two years later he removed with his wife to New York State, where they made their home until 1864, coming in that year to Pepin county, Wisconsin. Mr. Patrow’s first industrial occupation was that of a farmer, but later he engaged in shoemaking and afterwards became a stone mason, which trade he continued to follow in Durand and vicinity until his advancing years prevented him. His death took place at the home of his son Joseph in Durand on Monday, March 25, 1906, he having then attained the advanced age of 80 years, 11 months and 6 days. Mr. Patrow was a hard working and industrious man, and until the infirmities of age came upon him, was always diligent in providing for his family. A kind and faithful husband and father and good neighbor, he was held in much esteem by all his many relations and friends. His wife survived him until 1911. Of their large family of 14 children, four died before the father. Those who survived him were five sons: David, of Gilmanton; Charles, of Mondovi; John, of St. Paul; and Saul and Joseph, of Durand; and four daughters: Lydia, Mrs. William Moore, of Modena; Lucy, Mrs. Eli Bilderback; Rosella, Mrs. Albert Yarington, of Maxwell; and Oreal, Mrs. Simeon Yarington, of Durand. Mr. Patrow left 52 grandchildren and 27 great grandchildren, with many other relations to mourn his loss.


Joseph Patrow
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 647-648 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

JOSEPH PATROW, a general farmer residing in section 25, Durand township, Pepin county, where he is successfully operating 260 acres of land, was born in this township, Sept. 27, 1867, son of Charles and Louisa (Bashaw) Patrow. He was the twelfth member in a family of 14 children and attended school at Spring Creek, Buffalo county. Until he was 22 years old he resided at home with his parents, and then engaged in the teaming business in Durand, continuing in that occupation for 18 years. At the end of that time he went back to the soil, taking his present farm of 260 acres of valuable land in section 25, Durand township, where he has since carried on general farming with profitable results. Mr. Patrow has made some important improvements on his farm, one of the buildings he has erected being a fine barn measuring 42 by 100 feet, with a nine-foot basement and 16-foot posts. His other improvements are on the same ample and complete scale. Mr. Patrow is also a stockholder in the Inter-County Telephone Company. In politics he is a Republican with independent proclivities and has served as road commissioner. The Methodist Episcopal church numbers him among its members. In September, 1889, Mr. Patrow was united in marriage with Mary Wright, a native of Ionia, Mich., and daughter of Emerson and Sarah Ann (Wray) Wright. The four children born to them are as follows: Myrtle Hazel, wife of William Rice, a conductor on the Northern Pacific Railroad residing at Staples, Minn.; Lillian Ethel, wife of Lafe Christ, a farmer of Hannibal, Wis.; Clesson Emerson, a farmer of Durand township, Pepin county, who married Annabell Pierson; and Edith May, residing at home. Mr. Patrow is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, now holding the office of vice grand; also of the Modern Woodmen of America, the Beavers and the F. R. A., while Mrs. Patrow belongs to the Ladies’ Circle of the G. A. R.


G. S. Peck, D. D. S.
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 836 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

G. S. PECK, D. D. S., who is successfully engaged in dental practice in Durand, Pepin county, was born at Hammond, Wis., May 24, 1875, son of F. F. and Sarah (Campbell) Peck. The parents were natives of New York State, and on coming west first located at Fond du Lac, Wis. The father died at Hammond, Wis., and his wife, who survived him, is now residing at Spooner, Wis. G. S. Peck, who was the youngest of a family of four children, left home when a lad of 14 years, coming to Durand, where he took up his residence with an uncle. He was graduated from the Durand school in the class of 1893, having spent his vacations in working out to help support himself. He was a member of the class of 1903 at the University of Illinois, and later a student for two years at the Milwaukee Medical College. After taking his degree he became associated with his uncle, Dr. A. A. Peck, and so continued in practice until 1914, since which time he has followed his profession independently. His offices are modern in equipment, and he has gained a wide reputation as a skilful dentist, which has led to a lucrative practice. In politics Dr. Peck is a Republican, but has hitherto declined public office when tendered him. On May 9, 1914, he was united in marriage with Martha Butler, who was born in Wisconsin, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. Butler. Her father, a native of Pennsylvania, was formerly engaged in business as a contractor and builder, and was also a land owner. He and his wife are now living retired in Mondovi, Buffalo county, this state. Their daughter Martha is an educated musician, having been graduated in Minneapolis. She was later a student of Sanger of New York City, and for a number of years was an instructor in music at Pillsbury Academy. Dr. and Mrs. Peck are the parents of one child, Sarah. The Doctor is affiliated with Marquette College, also with the Masonic Blue Lodge and Chapter at Durand, the Modern Woodmen of America and the Psi Omega college fraternity. Both socially and professionally he is a man of high standing and he and his wife are popular members of the community in which they reside.


Albert Peters
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919).page 893 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

ALBERT PETERS, owner and operator of a well equipped dairy farm of 200 acres in Pepin township, Pepin county, his residence being located in section 11, was born in this township, March 5, 1880, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Peters. The parents, natives of Germany, came to this township at an early date, taking; a considerable tract of land, which they developed into a large farm. John Peters is still living and resides with a daughter in the village of Pepin. His wife is now deceased. Albert Peters in his youth attended school in Pepin village, and also a country school at Lakeport. Brought up on his parents' farm, he became familiar from an early age with the various branches of agriculture until he developed into a practical farmer himself. He began independent operations on his present place in 1907 and has made good progress as a dairy farmer, breeding Holstein cattle. His barn is 120 feet long and is thoroughly equipped with all necessary apparatus for the purpose to which it is devoted, while his other buildings are neat and substantial. Mr. Peters is a member of the school board of his district, being a Republican in politics. His religious affiliations are with the Methodist church at Pepin. On June 18, 1906, Mr. Peters married Lizzie Ristow, whose parents were farmers in Lincoln township, Buffalo county, where she attended rural school. Her mother is now dead, but her father resides with her and Mr. Peters. To the subject of this sketch and his wife one child, Wallace, has been born.


Edward C. Peters
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 795 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

EDWARD C. PETERS, who is numbered among the thriving agriculturists of Pepin township, Pepin county, was born in this township Feb. 4, 1871, son of John and Amelia (Smith) Peters. His parents were natives of Germany who came to this country at an early date, settling on a farm in this location, which they cleared and improved. For a number of years John Peters was a member of the school board of district No. 2, Pepin township. He is now retired and is residing with his son-in-law in Pepin. Edward C. Peters acquired his education in the village school of Pepin and became industrially active on his father’s farm as soon as he had finished his studies. At the age of 28 years he began farming for himself, purchasing his present farm in section 21, Pepin township. It contains 240 acres of productive land and is well provided with all the necessary buildings and machinery. Mr. Peters carries on general farming successfully and on a profitable basis. He is a member of the Equitable Fraternal Union at Pepin and of the Methodist church in the same village. In politics he is a Republican. Mr. Peters was married in 1899 to Louisa Schruth, daughter of Ernest and Emma Schruth, farming people of Frankfort township, of which they were natives, and where Mrs. Peters attended district school. Of this union three children have been born: Victor, Sept. 6, 1900; Myrtle, Nov. 4, 1901; and Freda, Sept. 11, 1906. The mother, Mrs. Louisa Peters, died April 19, 1918, while undergoing an operation.


Rev. Alexander Peterson
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 859-860 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

REV. ALEXANDER PETERSON, pastor of the Swedish Lutheran church at Lund, Pepin township, Pepin county. Wis., was born in Vasterbotten, Sweden, Feb. 17, 1867. His parents were Per and Carolina (Johnsdotter) Pearson, natives of the same locality, the father born in 1839 and the mother in 1840. The latter is now dead, but the former, Per Pearson, is still living in Sweden. The subject of this sketch acquired his elementary education in the public schools of his native land. There he learned and followed the trades of painter and woodworker until he came to the United States in 1893. Locating in Duluth, he worked for awhile on the roads there, then on farms in the vicinity and later in the iron docks of Duluth. He also did some painting and carpenter work, and, having resolved to enter the ministry, saved as much of his money as possible, so that in 1899 he was able to enter the Gustavus Adolphus College at St. Peter, Minn. From that institution he was graduated in 1904, and in the same year was ordained a minister of the gospel by the Swedish Lutheran church, under the auspices of the Augustana Synod. His first pastorate was at Grantsburg, Wis., and his second at Minot, N. D. In the latter place he built a large church and a large, modern parsonage. His next charge was in Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, from which locality he came to his present congregation at Lund, Pepin county, on March 18, 1915. Here also he has done earnest and efficient work and has made a good impression on the people, by whom he is well liked. His congregation numbers 398 souls. In political opinion he is independent. On Dec. 8, 1904, Mr. Peterson was married to Ingrid Swenson, who was born in Hallery, Kronoberds Lan Smaland, Sweden, her parents, Sven and Petronila (Peterson) Swenson, being natives of the same place. Her father, who is now deceased, was a merchant tailor. Her mother is still living in Sweden. She herself came to the United States in 1889. Mr. and Mrs. Peterson have been the parents of six children: Alice, Ingeborg, Reuben, Hanna, Lennea, Edith and Merjan. Reuben is now deceased, but the others are living, all residing at home.


Gustaf Peterson
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 758 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

GUSTAF PETERSON, proprietor of the old Peterson homestead in section 28, Frankfort township, Pepin county, was born in this township, Jan. 24, 1892, son of Charles and Sophia Anderson. The father, born in Sweden, in 1845, on coming to the United States in 1867, settled on this farm, which he cleared and improved. His original tract consisted of 80 acres. After residing on the place for many years he died in 1916. His wife, who was born in Sweden, in 1848, is now living with her sons on the farm. Gustaf Peterson attended school at Little Plum, Pepin county. From early youth he was associated with his father in the work of the farm and at the latter's death purchased the property and began operating it on his own account. The war with Germany caused an interruption in his work, as in 1918 he entered the service of the United States, being one of the infantry who were stationed at Camp Hancock, Georgia. On November 15 he was honorably discharged and returned home. He owns 80 acres of land, and his brothers, Phillip, John and Hugo, reside with him, but are operating adjoining farms. Another brother. Gene, is living at Dakota, Minn. All are older than himself, he being the youngest member of his parents' family. In politics he is independent and he is a member of the Methodist church in Frankfort township.


Frank G. Pfeiffer
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 699-700 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

FRANK G. PFEIFFER, proprietor of the Pfeiffer Grain & Seed Company, of Durand, who has also other important business interests, was born in Wabasha, Minn., Nov. 18, 1864, son of Anton and Karolina (Kaiser) Pfeiffer. The father, Anton Pfeiffer, was a native of Germany, born in Dusseldorf in 1827. He came to the United States alone when a young man of 19 years, locating at St. Paul, Minn., and for several years worked on the river all the way from St. Paul to New Orleans. Those were the romantic days of steamboat navigation on the Mississippi, there being few railroads, and he doubtless had many interesting experiences. At the end of the time mentioned, however, he gave up the river, probably not finding the work profitable, and located at Wabasha, Minn., where he engaged in stone quarry work and well drilling. He remained in that occupation for a few years and then engaged in the transfer business, which he carried on there for thirty-five years or more. At the end of that time, having rounded out a long career of industry, he retired, and five years later he died, in the spring of 1897, being then in his seventieth year. His wife Karolina, who was born in Switzerland, January 2, 1841, is still living in Wabasha, being now in her seventy-sixth year. They had a family of nine children: Bertha, Frank, Charles, Ottilia, Anna, Joe, Caroline, Fred and Clara. Frank G. Pfeiffer was the second born of his parents' children. He attended school in Wabasha and also took a short course in a business college there. At the age of 16 years he engaged in the grain business at Wabasha, Minn., employed as corporation manager, in which occupation he continued for about three years. He was then transferred to the management of a grain house at Maxwell, where he remained one year, then going to an elevator at Downsville, where he worked until February, 1884, when he was transferred to Durand. About 1909 he bought out the corporation known as the Pfeiffer Grain & Seed Company and has since conducted the business independently, giving to it the greater part of his time. He also is co-partner in a general retail lumber business, under name of Pfeiffer Lumber Co., at Durand, he himself holding the office of vice president of the company. Aside from these interests Mr. Pfeiffer is a director of the First National Bank of Durand. He is now serving in his fourth year as mayor of Durand. In politics he is a Republican and in religion a Catholic. Mr. Pfeiffer was married April 12, 1898, to Anna May Meehan, who was born in Waterville township, Pepin county, daughter of William and Marian (Berry) Meehan. Her father was a farmer who became an early resident of Pepin county and a land owner here. He died about 1904, and his wife now resides at Arkansaw, this county. Their daughter Anna May, who was the third born in a family of five children, was educated in the schools of Pepin county. Mr. and Mrs. Pfeiffer have been the parents of six children: Marion, Frank, Jr., Karleen Otilla, Elvin Anita, Robert Joseph and Dorothy, the last mentioned of whom died in infancy. The others are all residing at home.


Henry Pfeiffer
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 817-818 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

HENRY PFEIFFER, who is engaged in farming 160 acres of land in section 12, Waterville township, where he is making good headway on the road to prosperity, was born in Prussia, Germany, Feb. 9, 1869. His parents, John and Margaret (Bates) Pfeiffer, were also natives of Prussia, and never came to America. Henry, who was one of two children composing his parents' family, was educated in Germany, and came to this country when 22 years old, landing at New York City. In his native land he had learned the baker's trade, but instead of working at that in eastern cities, he came on to Ashland, Wis., and took up the rough work of a lumberman in the woods, also being employed a part of the time in a sawmill. After being occupied in this manner for some three years, in 1893, he engaged in farming, settling on his present place in the following year. He carries on general farming on a profitable basis, and is a stockholder in the creamery and telephone company. When he landed in this country he was unable to speak English, but soon overcame that difficulty. Independent in politics, he is now serving his third term as school treasurer. He is a Roman Catholic in religious faith, attending St. Joseph's Church at Arkansaw. Mr. Pfeiffer was married in June, 1894, to Theresa Youngman, who was born in Austria, daughter of Anton and Mary Youngman, who were natives of Austria, coming to this country in 1892. They located in Lima township, and later moved to Rock Falls, Dunn county, where his wife died in August, 1917. Since June, 1918, he has resided with his daughter, Mrs. Radle, in Waterville township. Mr. and Mrs. Pfeiffer are the parents of a large family, numbering 11 children: Anna, wife of Alexander Komro, of Lima township; Maggie, residing at home; Mary, wife of Joseph Pittman, of Eau Galle township, Dunn county; Rose, Lena, Henry, William, Gene and Charles (twins), Alexander and Lucy, who are all residing at home — a wide family circle, the older members of which are already taking active part in life's duties, and the younger giving ample promise of future usefulness.


Florian Pichler
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 692 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

FLORIAN PICHLER, a prominent representative of the agricultural industry in Albany township, Pepin county, is a man who is making his way in the world through enterprise, backed by a thorough practical knowledge of his vocation, and steady and persistent effort. He was born in Austria, April 25, 1866, son of Joseph and Anna (Schlosser) Pichler. The parents came to the United States with their family in 1881 and settled on a farm in Lima township, this county, which property they cleared and improved. Both are now deceased. Florian Pichler was 15 years old when he came to this country. He had attended school in Austria and after his arrival here he took his place in the ranks of industry, helping on his parents' farm for a while, and at the age of 18 obtaining employment on the railroad. All this, however, was but preliminary to his real work in life. In time he came into possession of the home farm in Lima township, on which he remained until about 1901. He then sold it and bought his present farm of 280 acres in section 9, Albany township. Since then, having full scope for his ability, he has devoted his time to improving the property, in which enterprise he has made big strides, having now an excellent and well paying farm. He has cleared up most of the land, and his buildings and machinery are of modern type and thoroughly adequate to all the purposes of profitable farming. In politics he is a Democrat and he attends the Catholic church at Rock Falls. October 24, 1893, Mr. Pichler married Lena Bauer, daughter of Paul Bauer. Her parents, who settled in Lima township many years ago on coming from Austria, are now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Pichler have a large family, numbering ten children. Thus, though but little past his prime, Mr. Pichler has attained a comfortable position in life and is privileged to see his children's children growing up around him.


Frank Pittman
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 803-804 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

FRANK PITTMAN, proprietor of a good-sized farm of 360 acres in section 3, Waterville township, where he is giving special attention to dairying, was born in Bohemia, Feb. 26, 1859, son of Joseph and Hannah (Cease) Pittman. The parents were also Bohemians, the father being a native of the same place. He was a farmer by occupation, and was for three years a soldier in the army, serving in the war of 1848. He and his wife came to the United States in 1864, landing at Baltimore and coming directly from that place to Watertown, Wis. There Joseph Pittman bought land and farmed for two years. In 1866 he came to Durand, Pepin county, and bought land that now forms a part of the farm of his son, Frank, his tract consisting of 80 acres. This he worked on and operated until 1888, making many improvements, and then turned it over to his son, with whom he resided a few years subsequently. After that, being now retired, he took up his residence in Durand, where he subsequently died at the age of 72 years. His wife died some years later. They had a family of four children, Frank being the third in order of birth. Frank Pittman was educated in district schoolhouse No. 3, Waterville township. He worked with his father on the home farm until he was 24 years old and then went to South Dakota, where he took a homestead in Clark county, residing there two years. While there he worked in the pineries during the winter. Then coming back to Pepin county, he took charge of the home farm, which he has since operated. The entire farm of 360 acres lies in Waterville township. In the spring of 1917 Mr. Pittman deeded 120 acres of his farm to his son, Edward. He is doing a good dairy business, breeding Holstein cattle, registered, and at the present time is milking 21 cows, being a stockholder in the creamery. He also raises Poland-China hogs and registered Oxford sheep. His other financial interests include those as a shareholder in the Telephone Company, Woodman Hall and the New Richmond Packing Company. In politics Mr. Pittman is independent. He is a member of the Roman Catholic church at Arkansaw. He has served as school director two years, but has not otherwise been active in local affairs. On Jan. 31, 1887, Mr. Pittman was united in marriage with Anna Lashinger, who was born in Bohemia, not far from the birthplace of her husband. Her parents were Frank and Theresa(Cease) Lashinger, natives of the same locality, who settled in Waterville township, where they died. She was one of six children and was educated in her native land. Mr. and Mrs. Pittman are the parents of eight children: Joseph, Thomas, Hannah, Edward, Jacob, Martha, Frank, Jr., and Laura. Joseph, who is a farmer in Eau Galle township, Dunn county, married Mary Pfeiffer, of Waterville township, Pepin county. Thomas, who was a manual training teacher residing in La Crosse, Wis., and is now in the United States service, married Lucile Spearse. Edward married Margaret Bates, of Waterville township. Martha is a teacher in the public schools of Pepin county. The others, as well as Edward, are residing on the home farm. Mr. Pittman belongs to the camp of Modern Woodmen of America. He has taken high rank among the farmers of his township for his industry, careful management of his farm and the successful results he has achieved.


Fred Francis Pittman
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919).pages 804-805 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

FRED FRANCIS PITTMAN, one of the leading citizens of Waterville township, which he has served repeatedly in official position and where for a number of years he has been engaged in farming in section 3, was born in the canton of Chrudim, Bohemia, Nov. 11, 1851. The parents, Joseph F. and Johanna (Suss) Pittman, were natives of the same country and locality, the father born Aug. 21, 1822, the mother June 16, 1823. Coming to the United States in September, 1864, they located first in Jefferson county, Wisconsin, where they remained about 18 months. The month of May, 1866, found them settled on the farm where their son, Fred F., now lives, and here Joseph F. Pittman lived and worked until about five years before his death, the last five years being spent in retirement at Durand, where he and his wife passed away. Of their four children the eldest was Fred Francis, the direct subject of this sketch.

Fred F. Pittman attended school in Rudelsdorf, Bohemia, and also one term in district No. 3, Waterville township. He began working for others at the age of about 13 years and was employed for 11 winters in the pineries and on log drives and lumber rafts, acting most of the time as cook. In the harvest season he also worked on farms, and these were his customary employments until he reached the age of 30 years, at which time he married and settled on his present farm. Starting with 120 acres, he improved the land and later bought 40 acres more, which latter tract, however, he has since deeded to one of his sons. He now owns a farm, therefore, equal in size to his original tract — a farm that is well improved and which he is operating in a general way, raising chiefly barley, wheat and oats, and breeding Durham and Jersey cattle, with good financial results. He is a stockholder in the Eau Galle Creamery Company and was secretary for four years of the Arkansaw Telephone Company, which he helped to organize. At various times Mr. Pittman has taken an active part in the affairs of local government. He was chairman of the township board for six years, finally resigning from that board, was chairman of the county board one term and assessor for two years. He also served one term on the school board and for 25 years held the position of statistical agent. For a number of years Mr. Pittman has been closely interested in important public improvements in Pepin county. He was chain bearer with the party of surveyors who surveyed Shell Lake, and helped to cut the road from Glidden to White Bear Lake. While serving as chairman of the county board he assisted in building more than 20 concrete bridges, besides putting through other useful work, with all of which his name is honorably associated. In politics he is independent. In religion a Catholic, he attends the church of that faith at Arkansaw. On April 13, 1881, Mr. Pittman was married to Anna Bauer, who was born in Austria, daughter of John and Theresa (Statelman) Bauer. Her parents came to America with their family about 1872, locating in Waterville township, this county, on a farm, which they made their permanent home. The mother was the first to die, passing away in 1909, Mr. Bauer’s death occurring in 1914. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Pittman has been blessed by the birth of seven children: John F., Ida B., Anna T., Margaret, Mary, William H. and Charles A. John F., who is a farmer in Waterville township, married Anna Hofaker, of this township, and they have a family of three children, Raymond, Martin and John. Ida B. is the wife of Louis Stellar, of Waterville township, and has two children, Ralph and Ronald. Anna T., now Mrs. Peter Riley, residing in Lima township, has two children, Ethel and Thomas. Margaret, who married Reuben Grumprey, resides at Rock Elm, Pierce county, and has two children, Harold and Walter. Mary, wife of Harold Smith, a carpenter, is at present living with her parents. She has one child, Paul. William H. and Charles A. are unmarried and living at home.


Eli Place
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 793-794 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

ELI PLACE, who previous to his death, on March 19, 1910, was a well-known and successful farmer of Waterville township, Pepin county, was born in Clearfield county, Pennsylvania, Oct. 5, 1852, son of Charles and Mary (Burns) Place. The mother dying in Pennsylvania, the father, with his five children, came west in 1863 and at once settled on the farm in this township, of which he afterwards became the owner. Eli, who was the youngest child, attended school in Pepin county and was reared on the home farm, on which he worked, assisting his father until his marriage. He then began farming in Big Cooley, remaining there two years, after which he came to the farm in Waterville township, on which he spent the rest of his life. This farm contained, as now, 40 acres, and here Mr. Place carried on quite an extensive stock business, the range for cattle in those days being free. From time to time he made improvements until he had a well-equipped place both as to buildings and machinery. Mr. Place was a man of quiet domestic taste, and though occasionally asked to accept public office, always declined. He aided, however, in organizing Big Cooley school district and also the Maple Ridge district. In politics during the latter part of his life he was independent. In 1872 Eli Place was united in marriage with Nancy Place, who was born in Clearfield county, Pennsylvania, daughter of Levi and Polly (Moorehouse) Place. Her father was a native of Ohio and her mother of New York State. They came west in 1863 with a party, including other members of the Place and Moorehouse families, Levi Place settling on a farm in Big Cooley, Waterville township, Pepin county. There he and his family resided for more than 25 years. He then moved to a smaller farm adjoining the Eli Place homestead, remained there some years and then moved to Augusta, Wis. Later he came to the home of his daughter, Mrs. Eli Place, residing with her until his death, at the advanced age of 86 years, in 1901. His wife, Polly Moorehouse Place, had died 40 years before, in 1861, at the age of 43. Their daughter, Nancy, was the twelfth born of their 15 children, and was educated partly in Pennsylvania and partly in Waterville township, Pepin county. Since her husband’s death Mrs. Place has continued to reside on the homestead. She is a lady highly respected and with numerous friends. At times she indulges her strong natural taste for poetry, and some of her most noteworthy productions of this kind have been issued from the press. One of these gives a vivid description of old-time days in and around Porcupine, depicting pioneer scenes and doings with close fidelity to historical facts.


Joseph C. Plett
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 682 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

JOSEPH C. PLETT, proprietor of a fine general stock farm of 320 acres in sections 29, 30, 31 and 32, Albany township, Pepin county, was born in Buffalo county, Wisconsin, near Gilmanton, Oct. 24, 1879. His parents were George and Theresa (Mattausch) Plett, the father being a native of Germany and the mother of Switzerland. They were married, however, in Wisconsin, George Plett coming to America when a young man and locating near Gilmanton, where he resided for about two years. Later he bought land in Buffalo county and was engaged in farming there until about 1900, when he moved to the farm in Albany township, Pepin county, now occupied by his son Joseph. He became quite a prosperous citizen, being the owner of several farms, but finally retired and is now living in Mondovi. Joseph C. Plett was the third born in his parents' family of nine children. He attended district school in Buffalo county, and lived with his father until 21 years old, helping him to operate his extensive farms. After his marriage he settled on the place where he now lives, which he is operating as a general stock farm, breeding Durham cattle, Shropshire sheep and other good stock. He devotes all his working hours to the farm and so far has taken no part in local government affairs. In 1918 Mr. Plett erected a fine residence of nine rooms, of modern construction, and installed with bath, hot and cold water, furnace heat and electric lights. He has also built a new barn, 24 by 46 feet in ground dimensions, with modern equipment. On June 30, 1909, Mr. Plett was united in marriage with Emma Schreiner, daughter of Fred and Theresa (Yahn) Schreiner, of Albany. He and his wife are the parents of one child, Lenora Medora, who was born July 13, 1911. Mrs. Plett's father, Frederick Schreiner, was born on the old Schreiner homestead in Albany township, Sept. 10, 1861, his parents being Charles and Dora Schreiner, well known and respected farming people of this township.


Arthur S. Plummer
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 761-762 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

ARTHUR S. PLUMMER, a well-to-do farmer of Waterville township, Pepin county, was born in Durand township, this county, Dec. 25, 1857, being a Christmas gift to his parents, Samuel L. and Eunice C. (Belknap) Plummer. The father, for many years county judge of Pepin county, was a man who had an interesting history, elsewhere narrated in this volume. Arthur S. Plummer began his school days in the Marble district, Waterville township, and later attended the Plummer school in Waterville township. He resided at home until reaching the age of 22 years and then went to North Dakota, where for awhile he was engaged in threshing and other agricultural occupations, to which he had served an apprenticeship on his father's farm. Having no notion of working for others all his life, however, he only awaited a favorable opportunity of beginning an independent career, and accordingly, in 1888, he purchased his present farm of 120 acres in section 35, Waterville township, where he has since made steady strides on the road to fortune, following general farming. His land is productive and-his buildings and equipment up to date, presenting a neat and thriving appearance—an index to the character of the owner, who inherited from his parents the qualities that make for success. Mr. Plummer devotes all his working hours to his farm, but is also a stockholder in the Arkansaw Creamery. In his political principles he is a Republican with independent proclivities, and although not ambitious of public distinction, he has performed useful service in local office, having been clerk of the school board one term, treasurer of the school district three terms and overseer of highways six terms. Mr. Plummer was united in marriage, Dec. 23,1897, to Anna Kuhn, who was born in Durand, this county, daughter of Jacob and Caroline (Miller) Kuhn. Her father was a native of Germany, who came to this country when a young man at a date not long subsequent to the close of the Civil war and followed the trade of stone mason in Durand, Nelson and other places in this part of Wisconsin, also for a year or two carrying on business as a lime burner at Durand. He died in Misha Mokwa, about 1912, having been the father of ten children, of whom Anna was the ninth born. The latter's mother died in Durand about 1877; Mr. Kuhn subsequently contracting a second marriage, by which union there were thirteen children. Mr. and Mrs. Plummer are the parents of three children—Thelma I., who was graduated from the Plummer school at the age of 13 years, in the class of 1917, and is now attending the high school at Arkansaw, and Vera P. and George F., all residing at home. Mr. and Mrs. Plummer also reared a boy, Leroy A., who takes the surname of Plummer, and who is at present in Minnesota, though making his foster parents' residence his home. The subject of this sketch and his wife belong to the Society of Beavers at Arkansaw. They are popular among a wide acquaintance in Waterville township and the vicinity.


Frank S. Plummer
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 747-748 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

FRANK S. PLUMMER, for a number of years a highly esteemed citizen of Waterville township, Pepin county, where, until his death, March 21, 1914, he was engaged in agricultural pursuits, was born at Broadhead, Green county. Wis., Oct. 30 ,1854, son of Samuel L. and Eunice C. (Belknap) Plummer. His parents locating in Waterville township, Pepin county, in 1861, he attended district school here and at an early age began working out. When 17 years old he became connected with the logging industry being employed in the woods in winter and on the river in spring, and continued to be thus occupied, with intervals of farm work, until his marriage in 1888. Then settling on a farm in Waterville township, he operated it for nine years, subsequently farmed at another location for a short time, then resided three months in Arkansaw village, and finally took the farm in section 35, Waterville township, on which his widow now resides. It consists of 160 acres, with 118 more separated from the .main body by Dead Lake. On this property he made many improvements, carrying on general farming with profitable results, and was recognized as one of Waterville township's progressive and reliable citizens. He was one of the first stockholders in the telephone company, but later sold his interests in that concern. At the time of his death he was a member of the county board, and had served on the school board for a number of years. In politics he was a Republican, while his fraternal connections were with the Odd Fellows. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. His tastes were strongly domestic and he found his greatest pleasure in the society of his wife and children. Frank S. Plummer was married, Sept. 9, 1888, to Lillian R. Tawye, who was born near Glencoe, McLeod county, Minn., daughter of Joseph L. and Rosabel (Demo) Tawye. Their domestic life was perfected by the birth of four children, Lillie C, Nettie R., Frank H. and William E. Lillie C. is now the wife of Harry W. Barton, a farmer of Wabasha county, Minn.; Nettie R., who is engaged in the dressmaking business in Durand married Ralph H. Kriss; Frank H., enlisted in the army July 12, 1917, and is now in service. William E., who married Agnes Brukner, of Durand, was in the employ of Richard Walters, of that place, until he joined the United States army in France. Since her husband's death Mrs. Plummer has resided on the home farm, but expects at no distant date to dispose of the property and retire to some other location.


Samuel L. Plummer
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 730-731 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

SAMUEL L. PLUMMER, in former years one of the best known and most highly esteemed citizens of Pepin county, a successful business man, representative of his district in the state assembly, and for twenty-three years county judge, was born at North Hampton, Rockingham county, New Hampshire, March 5, 1828, son of Samuel and Lydia (Cooley) Plummer. His paternal grandfather was Nathan Plummer and his maternal grandfather Daniel Cooley, both representing old New England families. Samuel and Lydia Plummer's children were Daniel, Jonathan, Hannah, Mary, Samuel L. and David. Samuel L. Plummer received but little schooling in his younger days. When 16 years old he began to learn the carpenter's trade, and later he worked in a sawmill and wagon shop. When 17 he left home and went to Lowell, and thence to Lawrence, Mass. In 1848 he made a trip to New Orleans, and in the following year came to Wisconsin, working his way along and walking some 600 miles until he reached Beloit on the Wisconsin-Illinois state line. There he remained a while, but later settled in Green county, where he was married to Eunice Belknap, whose father was also a native of New Hampshire. In 1854 Mr. Plummer came to Pepin county, camping in Bear Creek Valley. Being favorably impressed with the country, in the following year he located in Durand and built a saw-mill on Bear Creek, which was the first frame building in that valley; he also built the first grist-mill in the locality. In 1861 he purchased a farm in Waterville township, Pepin county, and for over twenty years gave his attention to its improvement and cultivation. Then, retaining the ownership of his 320 acres of land, he removed to Arkansaw and organized the Plummer Mercantile Company, in the conduct of which he was associated with his sons. The concern proved successful and was favored with a large patronage, Mr. Plummer remaining at its head until 1897. He also owned the Arkansaw creamery, which he and his sons carried on for some ten years. Appointed county judge in 1861, in place of Judge Bartlett, he served in that office by successive elections for twenty-three years, making a highly creditable record. His sound good sense and impartial judgment, united with a pleasing personality, caused him to be frequently consulted on matters of importance by people from many miles around, and he was often able to adjust personal difficulties and prevent needless and expensive litigation. Judge Plummer took an active or sympathetic interest in all commendable enterprises throughout his locality, and as long as he resided on his farm was a member of the school board. His great popularity resulted in his election for three terms to the State Assembly, where he served the interests of his constituents in a faithful and efficient manner. Politically he was a Republican. For thirty years or more he was chairman of the Waterville township board, and during much of that time was chairman of the county board. As a member of the Baptist church he identified himself with the cause of religion, and he remained a faithful member of it to the end of his life. His integrity and business ability were widely known and he and his family commanded the respect of all. Judge Plummer's death took place in March, 1897. His wife survived him less than three years, passing away in February, 1900. Nine children had blessed their union: Forrest S., Frank S., David, Arthur, Mary, William E., Carrie, Lillian and Lane L., all of whom are now living except William, Lillian and Frank.


Samuel Lane Plummer
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 746-747 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

SAMUEL LANE PLUMMER, formerly county judge of Pepin county, and one of its leading business men and agriculturists, was born at New Hampton, N. H., March 5, 1828, son of Samuel and Lydia Plummer. His schooling was limited, and when 16 years of age he began to learn the carpenter's trade. A year later he went to Massachusetts, working in Lowell, Lawrence and Boston until he was 20 years of age, when he sailed for New Orleans, earning his passage by mending sails during the voyage. A year later he went up the Mississippi river to Cairo, and thence on foot 600 miles to Beloit, Wis., where he arrived in 1849. The next year he returned to Massachusetts, renewing his acquaintance with Eunice Craig Belknap, and two years later he joined him in southern Wisconsin, and they were married at Spring Grove, Green county. May 29, 1852. She was born March 10, 1825, at Barnston, East Canada, and was the second child of Mitchel Belknap and Elsie Chartley Mosher, natives of New Hampshire, who had a family of 18 children. After residing several years at Spring Grove, Mr. and Mrs. Plummer removed in 1855 to Bear Creek Valley and soon after to the village of Durand. Mr. Plummer built a saw mill on Bear Creek, which was the first frame building erected in the valley. In 1861 he purchased of the Hon. M. D. Bartlett a farm on Dead Lake Prairie, Waterville township, to which he removed, operating it until 1890, when he took up his residence in the village of Arkansaw. He had already identified himself with the business life of the village, having in 1882 opened a general merchandise store there, which, with his sons, he conducted up to the time of his death. Mr. Plummer was elected county judge of Pepin county, in 1861, and held that office for 20 years. In 1874 he represented Dunn and Pepin counties in the legislature. He was chairman of the town of Waterville for over 20 years, during much of which time he was chairman of the county board. His integrity and ability were widely known and he held many positions of trust and responsibility. At three o'clock on Sunday morning, March 21, 1897, Judge Plummer died at his home in Arkansaw, surrounded by his entire family. He was one of the oldest as well as one of the most prominent settlers of the county and was held in high esteem by all classes of citizens. His wife and eight children survived him, the latter being Samuel F., Frank S., David, Arthur S., Mary H. (Mrs. Walter Anderson), William E., Carrie A. (Mrs. B. L. Milliren), and Lane L. One daughter, Lillian E., who was the wife of Frank L. Rounds, died June 22, 1892. Mrs. Eunice C. Belknap Plummer continued to reside at her home in Arkansaw until Feb. 23, 1900, when she passed from life's scenes to rejoin her husband. A consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal church, she was a prayerful and godly woman, and an exemplary wife and mother, who had made her life a blessing by counsel and example to her children and grandchildren. In seeing all her children well settled in life she had realized her chief earthly desire and the final summons found her fully prepared. Comforted by their presence in her final moments, and by faith in her Redeemer, she entered upon her heavenly reward.


William Edmunds Plummer
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919).page 870 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

WILLIAM EDMUNDS PLUMMER, who passed away at his home in Durand on Wednesday, July 10, 1918, was a highly esteemed citizen who had had a successful career, both as a business man and as one of the leading members of the Pepin county bar. He was born in Durand, April 10, 1861, son of Judge S. L. Plummer and Eunice Craig Belknap, who were descendants of early New England settlers. Soon after his birth his parents moved from Durand to a Dead Lake Prairie farm, where he grew up and attended the district school. Later he became a student at the Valparaiso University. With a natural talent for the law, he graduated easily from the Law Department of the State University. He then established an office in Durand, where for thirty years he enjoyed a good practice. In 1882, in company with his father, he engaged in the mercantile business in Arkansaw, retaining an interest in the same until 1904. His marked ability and agreeable personality made their due impress on his fellow citizens, who from time to time elected him to various offices of responsibility and trust, including those of clerk of the Circuit Court, county clerk, district attorney, county judge and member of assembly, in all of which he made a good record. The office of district attorney he held at the time of his death. Few citizens of the county had more loyal friends and admirers, and his demise at the comparatively early age of 57 years was an event that caused widespread sorrow. Mr. Plummer was married, June 24, 1890, to Rose Oesterreicher, of Durand, Wis., who survives him. To them were born five children: Winifred (Mrs. Nat Ward); a son who died in infancy; Harold, now serving with the American forces in France, being a member of the famous 32d division and in the first troop of American soldiers to fight on German soil; Clara, and Marguerite. The brothers and sisters of the subject of this sketch were: Forrest, of Arkansaw; Mary (Mrs. Walter Anderson), of Arkansaw; Frank, formerly of Arkansaw but now deceased; David, of Downing; Arthur, of Arkansaw; Carrie (Mrs. B. L. Milliren), of Pepin; Lillie (Mrs. Frank Rounds), now deceased; and Lane, of River Falls. The five first mentioned were older and the last three younger than the subject of this sketch.
 


William T. Plummer
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 745-746 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

WILLIAM T. PLUMMER, who was the youngest of his father's three children, attended school in Durand until he was ten years of age, and then became a pupil in the Wood school, afterwards attending Gale University, at Galesville, Wis. At the age of 17 years he began earning his own living working for others, and was thus engaged until his marriage in 1879, at which time he began farming on his own account, operating land on shares for about 11 years. He then bought what was known as the old Stewart farm, which he operated for 15 years, at the end of that time moving to his present place. The Stewart farm he sold two years later. At his present location he has 68 acres of valuable land on which he is carrying on general farming, having a well equipped place both with respect to buildings and machinery. Mr. Plummer is also a stockholder in the Home Telephone Company and owns city property in Durand, both residence property and vacant lots. He has made money by hard work and has invested it wisely, being now recognized as one of the prosperous citizens of his township. In addition to the above mentioned interests he is now serving in his eleventh year as a director in the Farmers' Mutual Fire Insurance Company. He has also had experience as a public official, having formerly for a number of years been a member of the township board and a director on the school board of his district. In politics he is a Republican. On April 2, 1879, Mr. Plummer was united in marriage with Gertrude Van Hoesen, daughter of John and Jeanette (James) Van Hoesen. Her parents were natives of New York State and came to Pepin county in the spring of 1867, settling on land that is now a part of Mr. Plummer's farm. Here Mr. Van Hoesen died in 1885 and his wife in September, 1901. They had two children, of whom their daughter Gertrude, was the younger. The other, Ella, died at Joplin, Mo., in March, 1918. Mr. and Mrs. Plummer have one child, Mary F., who is now the wife of William Van Hoesen, and resides on a farm in Durand township. She has two children, Marcel and Evelyn. Mr. Plummer is a member of several fraternal societies, including the Odd Fellows, Modern Woodmen of America and Beavers, in the last mentioned order belonging to the Worthy Council. Mrs. Plummer is a member of the Beavers and of the Red Cross society.


Louis Poeschl
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 789-790 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

LOUIS POESCHL, a farmer of section 1, Lima township, Pepin county, was born in this township, Aug. 14, 1882, son of Ambrose and Anna (Shaden) Poeschl. The parents, who were born in Austria, were married there in 1881 and came to this township and county. The father took land and engaged in farming, in which occupation he continued up to the present time. His wife is also living. Louis Poeschl was the oldest of his parents’ ten children. He attended school at Fall Creek, Lima township, and when 14 years of age had to take charge of the home farm on account of an accident which happened to his father. Remaining at home until he was 18, he then began working out at the carpenter’s trade, spending one year in Durand. He bought the Jonathan Moser farm before his marriage and after the latter event moved onto it, since which time he has been engaged in its active operation, doing general farming with profitable results. The farm contains 120 acres and is about one mile from his old home. Mr. Poeschl was married July 14, 1914, to Anna Anibas, whose parents, Michael and Theresa (Roessler) Anibas, natives of Austria, came to this country in 1880, and were farming people in Lima township. Anna was educated in the Fox school at Bear Creek. Mr. and Mrs. Poeschl have one child, Katherine Elizabeth, who is residing at home. Mr. Poeschl belongs to the Family Protective Association, and he and his family are members of the Catholic church.


Michael Poeschl
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 726-727 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

MICHAEL POESCHL, a well known farmer of section 2, Lima township, Pepin county, was born in Austria, September 10, 1881. His parents, Vinz and Josie (Zerhofer) Poeschl, came to the United States from Austria in 1883, locating in Durand, Pepin county, Wisconsin. Buying land in the vicinity the father engaged in farming and is still living on his farm, though now retired from active work. His wife is also living. Michael Poeschl was the third born of his parents' children. He attended school for a limited period in Lima township and when a lad of 15 years began working for farmers for wages of $9.50 a month. This occupation he followed, however, only for a part of his time, as he was also engaged for three years in railroad work and at intervals was employed as a carpenter. When he married, in 1907, he bought his present farm, which contains 120 acres of valuable land and where he is carrying on general farming successfully, realizing good returns for his work. Mr. Poeschl owns and operates a clover huller in his section, with profitable results. He is a member of the Catholic church at Lima and in politics is independent. In September, 1907, Mr. Poeschl was united in marriage with Mary Zeilinger, who was born in Lima township, Pepin county, daughter of Leo and Theresa (Fedie) Zeilinger, her parents being natives of Austria, though married in this country. They now reside in Dunn county, close to the Pepin county line, on a farm that they have occupied for many years. Mrs. Poeschl was the fourth born of their family of eleven children, and was educated in the school at Bear Creek. Mr. and Mrs. Poeschl have four children: Mary Matilda, Hubert William, Clarence Marcus and Willis Walter.


Corliece Poquett
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 827-828 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

CORLIECE POQUETT, who, after considerable agricultural experience in various locations, is now proprietor of a good 80-acre farm in section 16, Waterville township, Pepin county, was born in this township, Oct. 7, 1871, son of Corliece and Eliza Poquett. The parents were both natives of Vermont. The father, whose life-long vocation was that of farming, came to Pepin county about 1857, or 1858, locating near Arkansaw. The tract of land on which he settled was wild, and his first dwelling was a small log house. He continued there improving his place until about two years before his death, when he retired and took up his residence with his daughter, Mrs. Charles Thompson, at whose home he passed away in March, 1905. His wife had previously departed from this life, in 1900. Of their family of seven children their son Corliece was the youngest. Corliece Poquett, Jr., in his boyhood attended school on Dead Lake Prairie, Waterville township. He resided at home until his marriage, in 1894, and for one year operated the home farm. Then he rented a farm for two years, after which he came to the farm on which he now resides, which he conducted for three years. Returning to the old homestead, he again took up agricultural work there, but a year later moved to another farm in Waterville township, his removal being caused by the burning of his residence. Later, he came back to his present farm and remained here a year. Then he worked on the Taylor farm for two years, on the Weston farm for a year and a half, and on the Catura farm for a year. While working on the last mentioned place he was engaged in building up the home farm, to which at last he once more returned, and has made no further removals. He has well improved the place and has carried on modern farming with profitable results. He also for a while owned another farm, one of 45 acres, located a mile away, but has since sold it and bought 20 acres adjoining the home farm, which gives the latter an area of 80 acres. In politics Mr. Poquett is a Republican with independent tendencies. His fraternal affiliations are with the Modern Woodmen of America at Arkansaw. In November, 1894, Mr. Poquett was united in marriage with Margaret Supri, who was born in Menomonie, Wis., daughter of Charles and Ellen (Drinkwine) Supri. Her parents were born in Canada, the father Dec. 3, 1848, and the mother Sept. 11, 1849. Coming to Wisconsin they were married in Fond du Lac county, and removed to Menomonie in 1875. After a residence there of three years they came to Waterville township, Pepin county, locating on a farm at Forestvale. There Mr. Supri remained until his death, in April, 1917. He was a well known and respected citizen, and had served for a number of years as a member of the school board. His wife is still living on the farm. Of their six children their daughter Margaret was the third born. She attended school in Waterville township, and also the Catholic parochial school at Durand for part of one term. Mr. and Mrs. Poquett have been the parents of seven children, two of whom died in infancy, and one, Albert Lemmie, at the age of nine years. Their respective names, aside from those who died in infancy, are: Lena Belle, Albert Lemmie (deceased), Gladys Mary, Russell Joseph and Marie Ethel. The survivors are residing at home. Albert Lemmie, before his death, had attended the Forestvale school for three years. Mr. Poquett and the surviving members of his family are Catholics in religion, being members of St. Joseph's Catholic church of Arkansaw.


Miles Duran Prindle
Source: The History of Northern Wisconsin (1881) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

MILES DURAND PRINDLE, liveryman and railroad contractor, was born in Derby, New Haven Co., Conn., Sept. 16, 1835. He went to Northampton, Mass., at sixteen years of age, and learned the trade of tinner. In 1855, he came to Lyons, Iowa, then to Fulton, and June 27, 1856, came to the place where now is the village of Durand, where he has since resided. Pleased with the location, he bought a tract and laid it out into village lots, and had it recorded as the village of Durand, after his middle name.    He has been a member of the Village Board several times, and now is Chairman; also a member of the County Board. He is also a member of the Masonic fraternity, and of the United Workmen. He ran a very light draft steamer, the "Idell Prindie," between Eau Claire and La Crosse for some time, the lightest draft of any steamer on the Chippewa. He operated the first mail route from Alma to Eau Claire, and has been quite largely interested in mail routes in this section of the country most of the time since. He started in the mercantile business when he first came to Durand, in June, 1857. Then he engaged in the hardware trade and steamboating. He has just finished grading the first mile of railroad in Pepin County, on the Chippewa Valley Railroad, just below Durand. He was married, May 8, 1860, to Miss Ida M. Ide, daughter of F. J. Ide, Esq., of Naples, Buffalo Co., Wis. Have had one child, Idell, who died at five years of age.

Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 757-758 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

MILES DURAND PRINDLE, the founder of Durand, and for 47 years one of the prominent business men of the Chippewa Valley, was born in Derby, Conn. In 1855 he came west and after a sojourn in Iowa and Illinois, moved to Wisconsin. On June 27, 1856, he came to Durand, purchased land, platted the town, and on July 4 named it Durand. Mr. Prindle engaged in various lines of business, and, in fact, was identified with nearly every enterprising movement in the early history of the town, including the platting of several additions. For a number of years he was in business partnership with his brother-in-law, Rollin Smith. He had a general store, and purchased grain from the farmers, and at one time owned considerable property. In the sixties he had a steamboat built which plied in the river traffic for a number of years between Eau Claire and La Crosse. It was named the Idell Prindle, after his only child, who died of pneumonia on her fifth birthday. He owned several stage lines, branching out in every direction from Durand, and including a freight stage to La Crosse and Sparta, which was operated in the winter until the coming of the railroad. In 1882, just after the big fire in Durand, he and Mrs. Prindle opened to the public Prindle's Inn, a hostelry known far and wide, and over whose destinies Mrs. Prindle still presides. It was in this hotel in 1882 that the builders of the branch railroad leading up the Chippewa valley sold it to the Milwaukee road, in which system it has been incorporated ever since. The president of the Milwaukee presented Mr. and Mrs. Prindle with free passes to Milwaukee and return. It was Mr. Prindle who graded the first mile of roadbed constructed in Pepin county. He filled several village and city offices, and was a supervisor at the time of his death, which occurred May 25, 1903, when he was in his sixty-ninth year. He was then the oldest Mason in Durand, a member of both the Blue Lodge and Chapter, and of the Commandery at Eau Claire.


Andrew Prissel
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 648-649 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

ANDREW PRISSEL, a general farmer residing in section 25, Lima township, was born in this township Nov. 26, 1878, son of Leo and Josephine Prissel. The parents were born and married in Austria and came to America and to Lima township in 1870, settling on an unimproved farm and starting pioneer life in a log house and building also a log barn. For some time Leo Prissel worked out but in time succeeded in clearing and developing a farm which supported him and his family. In time also he acquired other property, becoming the owner of a number of farms and being generally recognized as an enterprising and prosperous citizen. He continued actively employed until his death in 1901. He had served as a member of the school board. His wife died in September, 1915. Andrew Prissel was the fifth born in a family of nine children. He attended school in Lima township and when a lad of 15 began working for others at intervals, but resided on the home farm until his marriage, helping his father when not otherwise employed. In October, 1903, he was united in marriage with Barbara Brunner, who was born in Lima township, daughter of Ferdinand and Josephine (Bauer) Brunner, her parents being natives of Austria who came to this country in 1869 and developed a fine farm in that township. There they resided until their death, the father dying in February, 1918, and the mother in 1908. At the time of his marriage Andrew Prissel took the farm on which he now resides and of which he is the owner. It contains 120 acres of excellent land, is provided with modern buildings and is thoroughly equipped with all necessary implements and machinery for general farming. Mr. Prissel is operating it successfully and is also a stockholder in the Inter-County Telephone Company and the Auditorium Company of Durand. He served for a short time on the school board, and in politics is independent. He is a member of the Catholic church and of the Catholic Knights of Wisconsin. Mr. and Mrs. Prissell have three children, Anna, John and Mary, all of whom are residing with their parents.


Charles Prissel
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 650 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

CHARLES PRISSEL, a thriving farmer operating 140 acres of land in section 26, Lima township, Pepin county, was born in this township, Nov. 18, 1883, son of Leo and Josephine Prissel. The parents came to this township from Austria in 1870, and taking unimproved land, spent a number of years as pioneer farmers, their residence and barn being constructed of logs. In time, however, they prospered, Leo Prissel becoming the owner of a number of farms and taking rank among the enterprising and successful agriculturists of the township. He was a member of the school board of his district and continued his active career until his death in 1901. His wife survived him, dying in 1915. They had a famly of nine children. Charles Prissel was brought up on his parents’ farm and attended school in the Bear Creek district. Until his marriage in 1909 he assisted his father and then located on his present farm and began an independent career. He is engaged in general farming with profitable results, his land being valuable and his buildings substantial and adequate in size and number, and aside from his regular business he is also a stockholder in the Inter-County Telephone Company. In politics he is a Democrat, but has hitherto taken no part in public affairs. In 1918 he was elected as secretary of the school board of District No. 8. He is a member of the Catholic church in Lima township, and also of the Catholic Knights of Wisconsin. Mr. Prissel was married in May, 1909, to Theresa Fugler, who was born at Red Cedar, Dunn county, Wisconsin, daughter of Joseph and Josephine Fugler. Her parents settled at Red Cedar at an early date, coming from Austria, and are still residing there, Mr. Fugler being engaged in farming. Mrs. Prissel was the youngest of their five children. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Prissel are Edward, Mary, Nora, Josie, Helen, Leo and Bruatine, all residing at home.


Earl W. Proue
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 809 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

EARL W. PROUE, who is operating the old Proue homestead in section 21, Waterville township, Pepin county, was born at Millville, Minn., Dec. 15, 1883, son of Joseph and Clara Anna Diehm Proue. He was brought up on the home farm and attended the school of his district. After graduating there he went to Huron, S. D., where he pursued further studies, residing with a maternal aunt. From the time he was 16 years of age until the year 1914 he has spent every winter in the northern woods, engaged in logging, and he has also made three different trips to Canada, visiting Alberta and Saskatchewan, but has always returned to the home place, which he regards as the most desirable location he has yet seen. Up to the present time he has been engaged in general farming, but has just recently engaged in the stock business and is breeding up in Shornhorn Durham cattle, besides raising a good grade of hogs. He is also a stockholder in the Waterville Creamery and the Farmers’ Telephone Company. Mr. Proue has thoroughly modernized his farm, having a first-class equipment for general stock raising, and in view of present national conditions he can scarcely fail to attain a high degree of prosperity. He is a member of the Odd Fellows’ Lodge at Arkansaw, being its present noble grand, and is serving as director of his school district. In politics he is a Republican.


Joseph Proue
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 808-809 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

JOSEPH PROUE, who is now living retired on a farm in section 21, Waterville township, Pepin county, is a man who has had a long and active career as farmer and lumberman. His birth took place in Quebec, Canada, in 1846, and at the age of 14 he went to New York State, where he remained about six years. He then came to Wisconsin, locating at Chippewa Falls, and as lumbering was then the most thriving industry in this section, and he was a strong and able-bodied youth, he easily found employment and followed that avocation, working at various places between Chippewa Falls and La Crosse, until his marriage in 1880. At intervals also, between the logging seasons, he conducted a broom factory at La Crosse, having previously learned that trade. At the time he married he was in the employ of the Knapp-Stout Company, for whom he worked two years as foreman. He then took up his residence at Arkansaw, Pepin county, but continued in the lumber business for seven years subseqently, at the end of which period he came to the farm in section 21, Waterville township, where he now lives and which is now operated by his son, Earl W. The place was then unimproved and a heavy task faced him in developing it into a good farm. After his many years of lumbering, however, hard work was a thing to which he was accustomed and had no terrors for him, so he pitched in stoutly and in time the results of his efforts were apparent in smiling fields of grain and modest but substantial buildings. After a career of agricultural activity, lasting many years, he gave up work, but still resides on his farm, where he is enjoying the fruits of his former industry. He has always taken an earnest interest in educational matters and all other enterprises of public utility, and has been from the first one of the progressive men of his township. In 1880 Joseph Proue was married to Clara Anna Diehm, who was born at Plainview, Minn., in 1859. They have been the parents of three children: Clyde A., who is now engaged in ranching at Bruce, Mont.; Earl W., who is farming the old homestead, and Paul J., born Aug. 10, 1895, who assisted Earl in carrying on the home farm. Paul enlisted in the service of the United States as a mechanic in March, 1918, and was stationed on Long Island, New York. He is now in the Aviation Signal Corps.


Joseph Radle
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 816-817 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

JOSEPH RADLE, who is engaged in farming in section 11, Waterville township, Pepin county, having a good farm of 80 acres, was born in Austria, Feb. 14,1868, son of Joseph, Sr., and Elizabeth (Eltant) Radle. The parents were also born in Austria, the father in 1830 and the mother in 1838. Coming to the United States and to Waterville township, Pepin county, Wisconsin, in 1882, they bought land and engaged in agriculture, which was Joseph Radle, Sr.'s, original occupation. Having developed a farm here, he removed to Rock Falls, Dunn county, where he resided for nine years before his death, which event took place in 1913. His wife now resides with her daughter, Mrs. Frank B. Bauer, in Lima township, Pepin county. By her he had five children and was the father of two others by a previous marriage. Joseph Radle, Jr., attended school in Austria and resided with his parents until he was 20 years of age. He then began working out, being thus engaged for awhile in Minnesota, then in the lumber mills in Ashland, Wis., and at other places. Later he followed the carpenter's trade for five years in Pepin county, and then bought a farm near his present home, which he operated for two years. Then selling that place, he moved to Rock Falls, farmed there for eight or nine years, sold out again and came to his present farm in section 11, Waterville township. This consists of 80 acres of valuable land, on which he has made some important improvements in addition to those formerly on the property, so that everything is modern and in excellent condition. Mr. Radle keeps good stock, and is now breeding up in Guernsey cattle. He is also financially interested in the Waterville Creamery and the Arkansaw Telephone Company. He is a member of St. Joseph's Roman Catholic church, and in politics is independent. On Oct. 29, 1897, Mr. Radle was united in marriage with Mary Youngman, who was born in Austria, daughter of Anton and Hannah (Kines) Youngman. Her family came from their native land to Lima township, this county, in 1894, where Mr. Youngman engaged in farming. He now resides near Rock Falls, Dunn county, and is now preparing to retire from active work. His wife died Aug. 5, 1917. Mr. and Mrs. Radle have a family of five children: Emma, wife of Edward Nelson, a farmer of Eau Galle, Dunn county, and Paulina, Henry, Isabella and Arthur, who are residing at home.


Michael Radle
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919).page 878 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

MICHAEL RADLE, a well-known and popular citizen of Waterville township, was born in Austria. He learned the business of farming and was also a skilled musician, conducting an orchestra for a number of years. In addition to these occupations he learned the blacksmith's trade. Coming to the United States when a young man, he followed blacksmithing for awhile. Later engaged in farming in Waterville township, Pepin county, Wisconsin, buying a farm of 120 acres. Mr. Radle married Margaret Drier and they are now both residing on a farm in Waterville township. They had a large family, of whom their daughter, Edith R., is now the wife of Anton H. Brunner, of Durand, the present register of deeds of Pepin county.


Mike Radle
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919).pages 886-887 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

MIKE RADLE, proprietor of a small but excellent stock farm in section 11, Waterville township, Pepin county, was born in Austria, Sept. 29, 1862, son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Eltant) Radle. He attended school for a limited period in his native land and there learned the blacksmith's trade. Coming to the United States in 1881, a year before his parents, he was here married at the age of 21 and settled on a 20-acre tract one mile west of where he now resides. On that land, where he made his independent start in life, he cut the first tree and built a small log cabin, and in addition to improving his land did blacksmith work, residing there five years. He then traded that farm for another 20-acre tract in the vicinity, but was deprived of the latter property two years later. Building a blacksmith's shop on his father's farm, he bought another tract of wild land, this time of 40 acres, and made a new start. After residing on that property twenty- six years and making valuable improvements on it, he gave it to his son William and bought his present farm of 40 acres, which was his old home. He keeps good stock of all kinds and is breeding up in Holstein cattle. Aside from his immediate farm interests, he is a stockholder in the Waterville Creamery Company and in the Telephone Company. Religiously a member of the Roman Catholic church, in politics he is a Democrat with independent proclivities. Mr. Radle was married in 1883 to Margaret Dreier, who was born in Arkansaw, Pepin county, daughter of Lawrence and Mary Dreier, natives of Bohemia. Lawrence Dreier came to the United States on a sailing vessel, the voyage lasting sixty-two days, settled in Jefferson county, Wisconsin, where he resided a few years, afterwards going to Eau Galle, where he entered the employ of Carson & Rand. Later he settled on wild land in the vicinity of Arkansaw and was engaged in farming there until his death, which occurred in 1903. He served as school officer, but was not otherwise active in public affairs. His wife died in 1896. Their daughter Margaret, who was the sixth born in a family of eight children, was educated in the district school in Waterville township. Mr. and Mrs. Radle have reared a large family of children, whose record in part is as follows: Henry, who is a contractor and builder in Minneapolis, married Clara Lucas, of Durand, Wis. William, residing on the old homestead, married Barbara Youngwood, of Lima township. Ida is the wife of Henry Brunner. Mamie, wife of Thomas Upleidinger, resides at Conan, N. D. Lucy, unmarried, is a trained nurse living in St. Paul. Paul resides at home.


Christian Rageth
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 763 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

CHRISTIAN RAGETH, who is now living retired on his farm of 100 acres in section 20, Frankfort township, Pepin county, was born in Switzerland in 1857. While a young child, in 1861, he accompanied his parents to Buffalo county, Wisconsin, where as he grew up he engaged in farming, remaining there for a number of years. Later he moved to Bogus Creek Valley, Pepin township, Pepin county, and from the latter place to the farm he now owns in Frankfort township, which he cleared and improved, putting up new buildings. He was married in 1880 to Anna Mathis, who was born in Galena, Illinois, in 1863, and who died in 1912. Their children were: Emil, now engaged in managing the home farm for his father; George, who married Elda White and lives at Elmwood, Pierce county, Wisconsin; Peter, a farmer in Frankfort township, who married Ellen Bishop; Edwin, who married Kittie White and is a farmer in Pepin county; and Adolph and Benjamin, who are members of the machine-gun company attached to the Sixth Regiment of Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry.


Emil Rageth
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 763 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

EMIL RAGETH, who is engaged in managing the Christian Rageth farm in section 20, Frankfort township, Pepin county, was born in Pepin township, Pepin county, Nov. 2, 1883, son of Christian and Anna (Mathis) Rageth. He was educated in the district school in Frankfort, this township, and was brought up to agricultural pursuits on the home farm, which he has managed since his father's retirement. He keeps Holstein cattle, with other good stock, and the well improved place presents an appearance of neatness and thrift that show him to be a master of the business in which he is engaged, and which in these strenuous times yields good financial returns to the industrious.


Michael Resler
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919).page 886 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

MICHAEL RESLER, who is profitably carrying on general farming and dairying in section 25, Waterville township, Pepin county, was born in Austria, April 19, 1866, son of Michael and Mary (Frazel) Resler. The parents, natives of the same country, came to the United States about 1870, locating on a farm in Lima township, this county, on which they resided many years and where the father died in 1913. The mother is still living on the old homestead. Of their large family of eleven children, Michael, Jr., was the third born. He attended district school in Lima township and remained with his parents until 18 years old, after which he worked out until he was 26, giving his earnings to his father. He then married, and after that event was engaged in farming for a year on his own account. At the end of that time he took up carpenter work, which he followed in Durand as his regular occupation for ten years. Since the end of that period he has been operating the farm on which he now resides, though he still does carpenter work occasionally. He has 130 acres of good land with adequate buildings, and is carrying on his agricultural and dairying operations with satisfactory financial returns. He is a member of the Catholic church at Durand, and in politics is independent. Mr. Resler was married. May 23, 1893, to Rosa Boehm, who was born in Lima township, daughter of Dominic and Rosella (Bauer) Boehm. Her parents came to this country early, the father being a young man. He afterwards made four trips back to Austria, bringing immigrants with him on his return. Before his marriage he was a shoemaker, but he afterwards became an extensive land owner, and after an active life is now residing in Durand retired, his wife being also living. Their daughter Rosa, the eldest of their ten children, never attended school, as her father, being a well-educated man, taught all his children at home. Ten children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Resler: Frank and Henry, who died in infancy; Joseph, Felix and Elizabeth, residing at home; Mary, who died at the age of 8 years; and John, Andrew, Gertrude and Rosella, who are all living at home.


Horace Richards
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919).page 889 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

HORACE RICHARDS, at one time sheriff of Pepin county, but now deceased, was born in the western part of New York State, and in early life was a farmer. He was married in his native state to Mary Morgan, also a native of western New York, and in 1869 came with his wife and family to Pepin county, locating in the village of Pepin where he was engaged in mercantile business until 1874. Then, being elected sheriff of the county, he moved to Durand. After serving as sheriff for two years Mr. Richards went to Maiden Rock, Pierce county, and from that time until his death was engaged in the hotel business there. His wife survived him several years. They were the parents of six children.


Porter A. Richards
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919).pages 889-890 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

PORTER A. RICHARDS, an enterprising business man of Durand, Pepin county, was born in Wyoming county, New York, June 10, 1854, son of Horace and Mary (Morgan) Richards. His boyhood days were passed amid scenes fraught with historical associations pertaining to the revolutionary period, and he was about 15 years old when in 1869 he accompanied his parents to Pepin county, Wisconsin. He attended school for awhile in Pepin and also took a business course in La Crosse. For about five years, he was engaged in teaching school. After that he was for six years in the employ of a grain firm at Wabasha, Minn. Having by that time acquired a good knowledge of the business in all its details Mr. Richards engaged in the grain, flour and feed business for himself in Eau Claire, Wis., remaining there six years. In 1890 he came to Durand and engaged in the same business here, which he has followed up to the present time, also dealing in fuel. In addition to this he conducts a transfer business, for the last 27 years has been agent of the Standard Oil Company, and for 20 years also Mr. Richards has handled produce for a Chicago firm. He is conducting a successful business which he has built up to its present proportions through his own industry and enterprise, and has taken rank among the leading merchants of the place. In politics a Republican, he served one year as alderman of Durand and also one year as city clerk. Mr. Richards was married in April, 1880, to Maggie Dyer, who was born in southern Wisconsin, daughter of Wayne B. and Ursula (Bush) Dyer. Her parents, who came to Wisconsin from the eastern States, located in Durand, where Mr. Dyer served for some time as justice of the peace. Both are now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Richards have five children: Ralph H., now engaged in the lumber business at Brandon, N. D.; Blanche, wife of John Bauer, a traveling salesman residing in Watertown, S. D., and Alice, Helen and Mary, who were educated in Durand and at normal schools and are now teachers, Helen having also taken a drawing course at Detroit, Mich. Mr. Richards' fraternal affiliations are with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.


Charles Richardson
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 840-842 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

CHARLES RICHARDSON, who is now residing in the village of Pepin after a long and successful career as an agriculturalist, was born in Bedfordshire, England, Jan. 15, 1843, son of Samuel and Ann (Rands) Richardson, who were natives of the same place. The father died when the subject of this sketch was eight years old, and about seven years later, in the fall of 1857, the mother and children emigrated to the United States, settling on what is now Dead Lake Prairie, in Waterville township, Pepin county, Wis., where she had relations with whom she resided. Her children found employment in the vicinity. Subsequently Mrs. Richardson contracted a second marriage to Levi McCourtie, and resided in this county until her death in 1897. By her marriage with Mr. Richardson she had four children: Thomas, Charles, Susan and Elizabeth. Of her marriage to Mr. McCourtie one child, Ada, was born. Charles Richardson first attended school in Bedfordshire, England, and later in Pepin county, Wis., his attendance in this county being limited to two winters. At an early age he had to work out to aid in supporting the family, one of his earliest employers being a farmer on Plum Creek, with whom he remained for two years. In the spring of 1861 he entered the employ of Knapp, Stout & Co., who hired him to run lumber down the Chippewa river to their mill at Menominie. For this work, at which he was engaged until the end of the summer, he received $16 a month, which he carefully saved. He then returned home and resumed school attendance, but after three weeks enlisted for military service in the Civil War, becoming a private in Company G, 16th Wisconsin Infantry. In this organization he was later promoted to the rank of sergeant and later to color sergeant. His enlistment had been for three years, but at the end of that time he re-enlisted and served in all three years and ten months. At the battle of Corinth, early in October, 1862, he received a gunshot wound in his right arm, and was taken to the field hospital. This hospital was located in the railway depot, and was then full of wounded soldiers. The doctors considered his wound so serious that they wished to amputate the arm, but being young and full of hope, he refused to have the operation performed and the doctors, therefore, treated it as well as they could and left him to attend to other cases. He remained there but a short time, however, as towards daylight a shell tore through the roof and was later followed by another. Regarding the location as too perilous, Mr. Richardson seized a blanket and made a hurried exit, returning to his command, with which he remained, resuming service as soon as he was fit for duty, his wound having gradually healed. Shortly before his time expired he suffered a sunstroke at Louisville, Ky., which incapacitated him for a while. At the same place he was mustered out July 12, 1865, and returned to Madison, Wis., and from there to Pepin county. Here he resumed work on the river and was thus occupied for three months in the spring of 1866. At the end of that time his mother's stepson, E. Y. McCourtie, who was operating the farm, died, and Mr. Richardson then returned home and took charge of it. In the following summer he bought the farm, together with 40 acres more adjoining it, which gave him a farm of 80 acres, and on that place he resided for 47 years, carrying on general agriculture, stock raising and dairying. He was also for a number of years a stockholder in the co-operative creamery at Arkansaw and a member and director of the co-operative store there. While living on his farm Mr. Richardson served for twenty years as chairman of the town board, by virtue of that office being also a member of the county board, of which he was chairman for one term. He also served on the board of education for over forty years, and was a member of the Soldiers' Relief Commission for twenty-three years, also belonging to the G. A. R. post at Arkansaw, of which he was commander for a number of years. For one term he served as under sheriff of Pepin county. In 1913 he retired and took up his residence in Pepin village, where he and his family have a comfortable home. Mr. Richardson was married Nov. 2, 1866, to Mary Carrington, who was born in Atwater, Portage county, Ohio, March 8, 1846, daughter of Jarvis and Margaret (Robinson) Carrington. He and his wife have had a family of twelve children, Thomas Ira, Frank H., Margaret, Albert Clark, Courtland (deceased), Jesse (deceased), William, Charles Walter, Etta, Lillie, Flora and Roy. Their record in brief is as follows: Thomas I., who keeps a hotel at Arkansaw, Pepin county, married Luella Tulip, who was born in Waterville township, this county. He and his wife have eight children: Ethel, Florence, Clara, Blanche, Arthur, Helen, Lucile and Elva. Frank H. resides at Dead Lake Prairie, near Arkansaw. He married Josephine Martin and has eleven children: Mamie, Charles, Jr., Bessie, Archie, Frank, Mabel, Jay, Ralph, Martha, Warren and Lee. Margaret is the wife of William Serene, a drayman of Pepin, and has two children: Merrill and Vera. Albert Clark, who lives at Dead Lake Prairie, married Rose Tulip. William, residing at Arkansaw, this county, is now county clerk. He married Clara Taylor of Arkansaw, and has three children: Pearl, Clinton and Leona. Charles Walter, residing on the home farm, married Beryl Close and has seven children: Blair, Gerald, Elwood, Frederick, Marion, Neil and Opal. Etta is the wife of Albert Schruth, who is engaged in the auto and hardware business at Pepin. She has had four children, of whom but one, Vivian, is now living. Lillie, the wife of Edward Schruth, has two children, Glenn and Elwin. Flora, who married Roy Dickson, express messenger on the Great Northern Railroad, residing at Havre, Mont., has two children, Starr and Kenneth. Roy, who resides in Waubeek township, Pepin county, who was engaged in state street and and road work, is now in the United States service. He married Ina Stewart of that township, and has one child, Rosemond. Mr. and Mrs. Richardson have thirty-eight grandchildren and fourteen great-grandchildren. In November, 1916, they celebrated their golden wedding, the occasion being a very enjoyable one. Mr. Richardson is a member of Ben Allen Post No. 127, G. A. R., of Arkansaw. As an early settler in Pepin county he has witnessed the development of the county from a wilderness into a highly civilized and prosperous section of the state, a change which he, himself, has helped to bring about. He and his wife are spending their declining years in comfortable circumstances and have many friends and acquaintances in Pepin and neighboring counties.


Charles Walter Richardson
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 818-819 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

CHARLES WALTER RICHARDSON, agriculturist and stock raiser, operating the old Richardson farm of 80 acres in section 34, Waterville township, Pepin county, was born on this farm, May 4,1882, son of Charles and Mary (Carrington) Richardson. The father was born in England, in 1843, son of Samuel and Ann (Rands) Richardson, and came to America with his widowed mother, and her other children, in 1857, the family taking up their residence with relations on Dead Lake Prairie, Frankfort township, this county. Charles Richardson subsequently worked at lumbering, running timber down the Chippewa river for Knapp, Stout & Co., beginning this work in the spring of 1861. In the fall of the same year he enlisted in the 16th Wisconsin Infantry, and served three years and ten months. After his return from the war he worked three months on the river, and then took charge of his mother's farm, buying it the following summer (1867), with some adjoining land, and here he lived for 47 years, engaged in general farming. He then retired and is now living in Pepin. More detailed mention of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Richardson and their children may be found in his own personal biography. Charles Walter Richardson acquired his education in the Barber schoolhouse in Frankfort townishp, Pepin county. He was brought up to agricultural pursuits, and when 18 years of age took charge of the home farm, which he managed for three or four years. The next twelve years he spent in working for others, being engaged in teaming and other occupations. He then resumed farming, and in 1914 moved back to the old homestead, where he has 80 acres of valuable land, which he is operating in a general way, breeding up in Guernsey cattle and raising other good stock in addition to crops. In politics he is a Republican with independent proclivities. He and his wife belong to the order of Beavers. On Sept. 9, 1907, Mr. Richardson was united in marriage with Beryl Close, who was born in Eau Claire, the elder of the two children of Newton and Minnie (Blair) Close. Mrs. Richardson attended school at Red Cedar, in Dunn county. When she was a young child her mother died, but her father, who was in early life a railroad man, is now living near Elk Mound, Wis., and is still industrially active. Mr. and Mrs. Richardson are the parents of seven children: Blair, Gerald, Elwood, Frederick, Marion, Neal and Opal, all residing at home.


William C. Richardson
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 824-825 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

WILLIAM C. RICHARDSON, now serving in his seventh year as county clerk of Pepin county, was born in Waterville township, this county, May 18, 1877, son of Charles and Mary (Carington) Richardson, being the fifth born in a family of 12 children. He acquired his education in the district school and at the Pepin high school, beginning attendance at the latter when 16 years of age. During the summers he worked at farming and also did such work as he could in winter to pay for his schooling. After completing his literary education he worked for others for a year and then rented his father's farm for four years. At the end of that time he engaged in the meat business at Elmwood, in which, however, he continued but a short time there, going to Pepin for a short period of business activity and then to Arkansaw, this county, where he was engaged in the meat business for 18 months. He then sold out, having been elected to his first term of office as register of deeds, which office he held for four years, until elected as county clerk. Mr. Richardson is a stockholder in the Farmers' Co-operative Telephone Company. He belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America and to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. In politics he is a Republican. In addition to the offices already mentioned, Mr. Richardson was deputy clerk of the circuit court for ten years. In the camp of Modern Woodmen, to which he belongs, he served as clerk seven years. He was also chairman of the Soldiers' Relief Committee of the county for three years, and was census enumerator in Waterville township in 1900.

Mr. Richardson was married Jan. 7, 1904, to Clara Taylor, who was born in Waterville township, Pepin county, daughter of Peter J. and Rosella (Martin) Taylor. Her parents, both natives of Vermont, were early settlers in Pepin county, where Mr. Taylor was engaged in farming. The latter died in January, 1917, and his wife in the following month of the same year. They had resided on their farm until their death. Mr. Taylor had served on the township board for a number of years until taken sick, and had also been for a long time a member of the school board. He and his wife had six children, of whom their daughter, Clara, was the fifth in order of birth. She was educated in the schools of Pepin county. Mr. and Mrs. Richardson have three children: Pearl Verene, born May 25, 1905; Clinton Clark, born March 10, 1907; and Leona May, born May 22, 1910. All three are residing at home.


Alexander Risler
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 754 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

ALEXANDER RISLER, an enterprising and successful farmer of Albany township, Pepin county, where he is operating a good farm of 200 acres, was born in Lima township, this county, Feb. 26, 1879, son of Michael and Mary Risler. His parents were early settlers in Lima township, locating there about 50 years ago, on coming to this country from Austria. They were farmers by occupation and had eleven children, of whom Alex was the youngest. In his boyhood he attended rural school in Lima township and resided on the home farm until he was 21 years old. After that he worked for neighboring farmers until 1901, when he bought his present place and engaged in agriculture on his own account. His 200 acres of fertile land is provided with good buildings which he has erected, and he is carrying on general farming on a profitable basis, giving his whole attention to his business. Mr. Risler is independent in politics and is a member of the Catholic church at Lima. September 16, 1902, he was married to Mary Weisinger, daughter of Sylvester and Mary Weisinger, natives of Austria, who came to the United States 36 years ago, but are now deceased. They were both born in 1854, and after coming to this country settled in Waterville township, this county, where they spent the rest of their lives, and where their daughter Mary attended rural school. Mr. and Mrs. Risler are the parents of five children: Henry, Josie, Frank, Leopold and Charles, all of whom are residing at home. Mr. Risler is a man of industrious habits and progressive ideas, and has attained to a prosperous condition in life through his own exertions. He and his family are well known and respected throughout this part of Pepin county.


Michael Risler
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 642 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

MICHAEL RISLER, an early settler in Lima township, Pepin county, was a native of Austria and was there married to Mary Frazel. With his wife and family he came to America in 1864 and located in the western part of Lima township, where he engaged in farming. His original trade was that of carpenter, and after coming here he followed it more or less as a contractor, besides carrying on agriculture. About 1887 his health began to fail and for the last 25 years of his life he was an invalid, his death occurring in or about the year 1912. It was Mr. Risler who built the Lima church, which now stands as a monument to his mechanical ability. His wife is still living, being now 82 years old, and resides with her brother John on the old homestead. They were the parents of eleven children.


Emil Roetter
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 767-768 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

EMIL ROETTER, who is engaged in general farming in section 29, Albany township, Pepin county, having 280 acres of land, is one of the most successful and thriving agriculturists of this township. He was born near Arfard, Germany, Sept. 1, 1863, son of Ernest and Louise Roetter. The family came to the United States in 1864, settling first near Red Wing, Minn., where they remained one year, subsequently removing to Albany township. Here he settled on a tract of wild land, which had a small log cabin on it, and went to work to clear a farm. Later he took an adjoining homestead and continued farming there until his death, about 1883, during the earlier years using an ox team. His wife passed away some five years before him. They had eight children, of whom Emil was the fourth in order of birth. Emil Roetter had very limited opportunities for obtaining an education, attending school but a short time. He was a lad of 18 when he began working in the sawmill at old Meriden, and was thus employed for three summers. He then spent a summer in Washington and afterwards settled on his present farm, starting with 80 acres of land, which he cleared and improved. While doing this he worked at intervals for others. In time by additional purchases he brought his farm up to its present dimensions of 280 acres. He is breeding up in Durham cattle, and is also a stockholder in the Mondovi Creamery and elevator, and in the La Crosse Packing Company. In the fall of 1917 he bought a farm of 200 acres in Albany township, known as the William Dreyssee farm. He also owns 400 acres of land in Hale county, Texas, which, however, he is not operating. Mr. Roetter has a creditable industrial career, as he has attained his present prosperity solely through hard work and perseverance, having nothing when he started. He is a member of the Lutheran church and a Republican in politics. Mr. Roetter was married, July 24, 1890, to Maggie Breiter, who was born near Heidelberg, Germany, daughter of Michael and Elizabeth (Axel) Breiter, both natives of the same locality. Coming to America about 1868, they settled in this township on a farm. Here they resided many years, Mr. Breiter dying about 1910 and his wife about six months later. They had a family of twelve children, of whom Maggie was the fourth born. She was educated in Albany township, attending district school here. Mr. and Mrs. Roetter have had eight children, two of whom died in infancy. The six living are: Heinrich, Mary, Ernest, Emelia, Ottille and Hilga.


Andrew Rohrscheib
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 716-717 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

ANDREW ROHRSCHEIB, an early settler of Albany township, Pepin county, now deceased, was born in Eppelheim, Baden, Germany, Feb. 23, 1852. His parents died when he was quite young, but he attended common school in Germany until 14 years of age, then entered a drawing school there, and also learned the mason's trade. His only other schooling was comprised within a few weeks' attendance after coming to this country. It was on Oct. 18, 1869, that he said good-bye to his native land and on November 11 he was among the immigrants who landed at Castle Garden, New York City. With the whole North American continent before him, he made choice of Albany township, Pepin county, Wisconsin, as the scene of his future activities and lost no time in reaching it. Here he homesteaded four forties of land and purchased three forties, which gave him a farm of 280 acres, which he afterwards developed and Improved into a high state of cultivation, also erecting good buildings. For a number of years, however, he continued to work at intervals at the trades of mason and plasterer. He was also one of the first stockholders in the Mondovi Creamery. In politics he was a Republican, and as he was a man of much force of character, he naturally became more or less prominent in local affairs, serving four years as chairman of the township board, as town clerk, as constable, and as clerk of the committee on state affairs—an appointment that he received in 1889. His death, which took place March 4, 1911, deprived Albany township of one of its most useful and respected citizens, and his loss was deeply deplored. The Lutheran church in the vicinity also lost one of its leading and most consistent members, and the M. W. A. camp an active worker. Mr. Rohrscheib was married in 1873 to Christina Machmeier, who was born in Milwaukee, Wis., April 2, 1853, daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth (Breiter) Machmeier. She was the eldest of her parents' seven children and attended district school in Albany township. Eight children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Rohrscheib, as follows: George, April 26, 1874, who married Anna Sharf, and now resides in the state of Washington, where he is engaged in lumbering; Elizabeth, born July 13,1875, who is the wife of Daniel Madia and resides in Chicago; Frank, born Sept. 17, 1877, who died Nov. 14, 1882; Otto, born July 23, 1881, now a resident of Durand; Lena, born Nov. 21, 1883, wife of William Yochom, a machinist in the paper mill at Eau Claire; Walter, born June 24, 1885, who is engaged in the garage and automobile business at Mondovi; Franz, born Oct. 12, 1888, and Curtis, July 30, 1890, who are residing at home and operating the farm; Ella, born May 7, 1892, a school teacher, living at home, and Emma, born July 26, 1892, who is a trained nurse and resides at St. Paul, Minn. With the assistance of her sons Mrs. Rohrscheib has operated the farm since her husband's death. She is a lady widely known and highly esteemed, and the family, including all the children have a high standing in the community.


Walter P. Ruggles
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 854 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

WALTER P. RUGGLES, who is now living retired on his farm of 190 acres in section 23, Pepin township, Pepin county, after a successful career as an agriculturist, was born in Byron, Ogle county, Ill., March 6, 1854. His parents were Liberty and Katherine (Ripley) Ruggles, the father a native of Ohio and the mother of Massachusetts. Coming west, they settled in Faribault, Minn., where Liberty Ruggles followed the carpenter's trade for a number of years. Both he and his wife are now deceased. Walter P. Ruggles was educated in the public and high schools of Faribault, Minn. He began working out for farmers at the age of 18 years, and on attaining his majority took a homestead in Minnesota, where he remained until 1900, in which year he came to Pepin township and settled on his present farm of 190 acres. Here he is now living retired, other men doing the work on the place. He is a shareholder in the Pepin Co-operative Creamery. While a resident of Faribault he was engaged in farm work and carpentry. He served on the town board of Sidesvold township, Lyon county, identifying himself closely with public affairs and doing his full duty as a public-spirited citizen. In politics he is an adherent of the Prohibition party. Mr. Ruggles was married. May 24, 1881, to Sarah Ballard, daughter of Asiel and Nancy (Newcomb) Ballard, who came from the eastern states and settled in Pepin township, this county. Both are now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Ruggles are the parents of eight children: Alice, who homesteaded land and taught school at Rainybutte, N. D., but is now deceased; Arthur, employed in an auto-truck factory at Clintonville, Wis., who married Bernice Sheard, and has one daughter, Ruth; Anna, wife of Peter Davis, who is an engineer in a coal mine at Dickinson, N. D.; Isaac, a farmer of Rainybutte, N. D., who married Iris Evans, of Pierce, N. D.; Katherine, who is the wife of Everett Lewis, of Calgary, Canada, and has two children, George and Donald; Lou, a farmer of Rainybutte, N. D.; Louise, a twin sister of Lou, who is engaged in teaching near Steele, N. D.; and Bessie, who is at home.


Elmer H. Rushenberg
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919).page 648 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

ELMER H. RUSHENBERG, who is engaged in operating the old Rushenberg homestead in Lima township, a good farm of 80 acres, was born at Martell, Pierce county, Wisconsin, Aug. 15, 1867, son of John and Julia (McGee) Rushenberg. The parents were natives of Pennsylvania, the father born in Pittsburgh and the mother in Warren county. Coming to Wisconsin in 1866, they located at El Paso, Pierce county, where John Rushenberg engaged in mill work for a short time. Afterward he took up farming and also spent a number of winters in the woods as a lumberman. In 1877 he came with his family to Pepin county, locating one mile from the farm on which his son Elmer now lives, to which latter he removed later. Here his death took place in 1898. He was a veteran of the Civil War, having served as a private in the 111th Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers. He was discharged before the expiration of his term of service on account of disability. His wife is now living on the farm with her son, Elmer H., who was the first born of their four children. Two of those children are now dead, and the other survivor is John L., who resides at Fond du Lac, St. Louis county, Minnesota. Elmer H. Rushenberg in his boyhood attended district school in Lima township and also spent one winter at the Durand high school. He began working away from home when 16 years old and subsequently went to Ashland, Wis., where he was in the employ of a wholesale meat firm. On his father’s death, being 31 years old, he returned home to manage the farm and care for his mother, and has since remained here. He is carrying on general farming successfully, raising both grain and stock, and is also interested as a stockholder in the Inter-County Telephone Company. He belongs to the camp of Modern Woodmen of America at Durand. In politics he is a Republican, but has not hitherto served in public office.


Edmund J. Ryan
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) pages 646-647 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

EDMUND J. RYAN, a prominent representative of the agricultural interests of Lima township, Pepin county, was born on the farm in section 32 where he now lives, Dec. 26, 1873, son of Patrick J. and Emma E. (Calvert) Ryan. Here he was reared and acquired a knowledge of agriculture through assisting his father. When he was 23 years of age he took over the farm and has continued to operate it on a profitable basis. It is known as Hedgewold Farm and contains 320 acres of valuable land, its situation being on the Durand-Mondovi road, five miles from Durand. Mr. Ryan breeds Holstein cattle, also good grades of horses, sheep and hogs. His buildings are substantial and well equipped with all useful accessories and implements. Mr. Ryan for the last ten years has been manager of the Bear Creek Co-operative Creamery and for 13 years has been chairman of the township board. In politics he is a Democrat. He was married April 19, 1899, to Blanche C. Butler, who was born in Modena, Buffalo county, Wisconsin, daughter of Ephraim and Elizabeth (White) Butler. Her father was a native of Philadelphia and is now living retired with his wife at Mondovi, Buffalo county. Mr. and Mrs. Ryan have three children, Patrick J., Elizabeth E. and Edmund J., Jr., all residing at home. Mr. Ryan’s fraternal affiliations are with the Modern Woodmen of America, he belonging to the camp at Durand. One of the leading citizens of his township, he and his wife have a large acquaintance, and are active in the social life of Lima township.


Patrick J. Ryan
Source: History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin, Volume 2 Illustrated; compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, published by H. C. Cooper, Jr. & Co., Winona, Minn. (1919) page 646 transcribed by Mary Saggio.

PATRICK J. RYAN, in early days a prominent citizen of Durand, Pepin county, was a native of New York State, and when a young man learned the carpenter’s trade. He was still quite young when the gold excitement of 1849 broke out, and, thinking to make an easy fortune, he joined a party traveling west with saddle ponies and oxen. The trip was long and hazardous, and long before they had reached the promised land, all or most of the other members of the party had become discouraged and returned east. He, however, persevered and reached California. There he found that “all is not gold that glitters,” and that for the great majority riches were just as hard to obtain in the land that was called the new El Dorado as in other states apparently less favored. After a while, accordingly, he returned east, locating in Dane county, Wisconsin, richer in experience if not in material wealth, and went to work at the carpenter’s trade, working for others for a year or two. He then came to Pepin county, continuing to follow carpentry, but also being engaged for two or three winters at scaling in the north woods. Then he became foreman and scaler in the lumber yards at Durand and was thus occupied for a number of years. Later he bought land and engaged in farming, in which occupation he continued until after the second election of President Cleveland, when, being appointed postmaster at Durand, he performed the duties of that office until his death, which occurred near the end of his term. At different times he also held various local and township offices, including that of chairman of the township board in which he served 23 years. Mr. Ryan married Emma E. Calvert, a native of England, who is still living and resides with her son, Edmund J. Ryan, in section 23, Lima township.


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