Richland County, Wisconsin
Biographies

W. O. Allison
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

W. O. Allison settled in Richland county in 1865. He first purchased land on section 10, where he lived until 1872. He then bought land on section 16. In 1880 he purchased his present farm, which contains 240 acres, located on section 4. It is watered by Fancy creek. He was born in Belmont Co., Ohio. His father was a carpenter and lived in different places, working at his trade, until 1850, when he went to California and spent two years, then returned and purchased a farm in Belmont county. In I860 he disposed of this property and removed to the village of Fairview, where he resumed work at his trade. The subject of this sketch made his home with his parents until 1861, when, at the first call for troops, he became inspired with patriotism, and, his parents being unwilling, he ran away from home and enlisted in company K, 17th Ohio Volunteers. After serving four months and five days he was discharged with the regiment and returned home. The 4th of October, of the same year, he again enlisted in the 74th Ohio, company K, and immediately went to the front with the regiment and served until the close of the war. Among the many engagements in which he participated are the following: Fort Henry, Nealy's Bend, Stone River, Tullahoma, Hoover's Gap and Missionary Ridge, all in Tennessee. He was with Sherman on his ever memorable march through Georgia to the sea, thence through the Carolinas to Washington, participating in the many hard-fought battles of that exciting campaign. He had veteranized Feb. 4, 1864, and was soon after appointed corporal, serving until the close of the war. He was not sick a day of the time and was discharged July 10, 1865. On his way home an accident occurred on the railroad, he was caught between two cars and held there for one and a half hours. His leg was broken and he was otherwise badly bruised, and in consequence was laid up for several months. Mr. Allison has been twice married. His first wife was Sarah Penter, who was born in Jefferson Co., Ohio, and died in 1872, leaving two children—Ida and James. His second wife was Agnes Pippin, who was born in Tippecanoe Co., Ind. His parents were early settlers of the town of Bloom.


Edward M. Alwood
Source: History of Crawford & Richland Counties, Wisconsin; Illustrated (1881) Transcribed by: Richard Ramos 

Edward M. Alwood, one of the early settlers of Willow, was born in Morris Co., N. J., in 1821.  Here his younger days were spent in school and on the farm.  While yet quite young he took charge of a boat on the Morris canal and engaged in freighting between Lehigh coal mines and New York city and continued this business for some years.  In 1853 he came to Wisconsin and entered land in township 11, range 2 east, now known as the town of Willow.  However, he did not settle here until 1857, when he erected a log house and stables.  He has since built a large frame barn and in 1883 erected a two and one-half story frame house of commodious dimensions and good appearance.  His farm now contains 440 acres. He formerly engaged in raising hops, but of late years has turned his attention to grain and stock.  He was married in 1860 to Mary Stout.  They have two children--Henry and Sarah.


Abraham Anderson
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

Abraham Anderson was born in Carroll county Nov. 24, 1828, and was thirteen years old when his parents moved to Allen Co., Ind. In 1854 he was joined in marriage with Rebecca Blythe, who was born in Jefferson Co., Ohio, Feb. 9, 1836. They remained in Allen county until 1856, and then came to Richland county. They have had thirteen children, eleven of whom are now living—Jane, David G., Henry, Lina E., Ellen, Carrie, Mary F., Amanda, Eliza R., Charlotte and George E.


David Anderson
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

David Anderson, in 1856, with three brothers named Jacob, Abraham and William, natives of Ohio, came to Richland county from Allen Co., Ind., starting from there with five horse teams and driving twenty-six herd of cattle. They were twenty-six days on the road, and arrived in Richland Center October 18. David was born in Carroll Co., Ohio, Aug. 21, 1834, and was six years old when his parents moved to Indiana; here he grew to manhood, making his home with them until 1856, when he came to Wisconsin, he was a single man at that time and made his home with his brothers until 1860, when he went to Colorado and engaged in mining and farming, remaining until the fall of 1864, when he returned east and spent the winter visiting in Indiana, Ohio and Richland county. In the spring of 1865 he settled in Champaign Co., Ill., and rented land until 1866, when he made a purchase and settled thereon. He was married in 1867 to Jennie Blaker, who was born in Logan Co., Ind. They had five children—Annie, Belle, William, Mary L. and Charles. He remained in Champaign county until 1880, when he sold his farm there and returned to Richland county and purchased a farm of 160 acres on sections 17 and 20, town of Rockbridge, where he now lives, engaged in raising stock and grain.


Jacob Anderson
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

Jacob Anderson, one of the early settlers of Richland county, was born in Carroll Co., Ohio, Feb. 1, 1822. When he was eighteen years old his parents moved to Indiana and settled in Allen county, where they purchased timber land, cleared a farm of 120 acres, and his father died. The subject of this sketch assisted his father in clearing this farm, and made his home there until 1853. On the 1st day of September, that year, he was married to Elizabeth M. Kever, who was born in Jefferson Co., Ohio, Nov. 21, 1825. They remained in Allen county until 1856, then came to Richland county, bought a house and lot in Richland Center, and lived there until the spring of 1857, when he engaged in farming on rented land in the town of Ithaca. In 1859 he purchased timber land on section 36, town of Rockbridge, but did not settle on it until 1866, until which time he was in the employ of William Bowen. In 1866 he erected a good log house and commenced clearing his present farm. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson are the parents of four children—Hugh Wiley, Matilda C., Cyrus Newton and John M. Mr. Anderson has been a member of the town board, clerk of school district, and served a number of terms as school director.


John C. Anderson
Source: The Wisconsin Blue Book (1919) page 501; transcribed by FoFG mz

JOHN C. ANDERSON (Rep.), serving his second term in the assembly, is a farmer and banker of Cazenovia. Born Feb. 22, 1862 in Hadley, N. Y., he removed with his parents to Richland county when a small boy. He engaged in farming until 1896 when he removed to Cazenovia and engaged in the general mercantile business and served as postmaster for ten years. Disposing of his business he organized the State Bank of Cazenovia, of which he has been president ever since. He still owns his fine farm on which is one of the best herds of Holstein cattle in that part of the state; Mr. Anderson has been village treasurer for several terms. He was elected to the assembly in 1916 and was re-elected in 1918, receiving 1,462 votes to 705 for A. W. Gillingham (Pro.).


James Appleby
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio.

James Appleby, the present county surveyor, and pioneer settler of the town of Eagle, was born in county Durham, England, Nov. 27, 1828. At an unusual early age he was sent to the common school, which he attended until eleven years of age. He was then sent to Kirby Academy. When thirteen years old, he, in company with his parents, emigrated from Yorkshire, England, to America, coming directly to the territory of Wisconsin, and locating in that part of Iowa county now known as La Fayette county. His father made a claim on a tract of mineral land, at that time held in reserve by the Government. As soon as the land came into the market he purchased it. He erected his house nearly on the site, where a few years before the first lead furnace in that part of La Fayette county was built. Here the subject of our sketch, at the early age of fourteen, engaged in teaching as private tutor for the family of James Murphy, Esq., teaching for him two years, and again engaged for Capt. Matthew Williams during one winter, in the same capacity — in the intervening time attending the district schools in his neighborhood. He was married in 1846 to Susanna C. Palmer. She was born in Shelby Co., Ky. He went to Jo Daviess Co., Ill., and engaged as clerk in a general store, remaining there until the spring of 1849, when he came to Richland county and settled in what is now known as the town of Eagle. He made his home in that town until 1863, when he removed to Richwood, purchasing land on sections 4 and 5, town 8, range 2 west. He erected a good frame house on section 4, and still makes that his home. Mr. Appleby has been county surveyor for seventeen years. His first official survey was made in 1850, for the town of Richmond. It was for a road, and commenced in the middle of Commerce street, village of Monongahela, and extended north past Rodolf's mill and terminated at the quarter section corner stake, between sections 25 and 26 of town 9, range 1 west. He has been superintendent of schools for the town of Eagle, one year, and assessor for the town of Richwood, two years. Mr. Appleby is a member of the Church of the United Brethren in Christ, belonging thereto about twenty-six years, and has filled many important places in his Church, being granted license, by his quarterly conference to preach, being quarterly conference secretary for several years, was recommended to the annual conference, accepted, and given license by Bishop Glossbrenner, of Virginia, to preach, passed the several examinations required and ordained as an elder in said Church. He has filled the office of secretary of the Wisconsin Annual Conference. He has been appointed to and filled the most important committees of his conference, and was elected a delegate to the last general conference of his Church, of which privilege, however, he did not avail himself. Notwithstanding his many and arduous duties and labors, he can always find time to preach the unsearchable riches of Christ. It would almost seem unnecessary to add that Mr. Appleby is a strong temperance man, upon which he can truly say "I nurse my wrath to keep it warm." Mr. and Mrs. Appleby have nine children — Mary S., J. Marshall, Martha E., Arthur W., Laura I., Emma F., Luther L., Annie V. and Lelia F. Mr. Appleby is well known in all parts of the county, and enjoys, to the fullest extent, the respect and confidence of the people.


Carrie M. Atkins
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881); transcribed by Vicki Bryan

Mrs. Carrie M. Atkins, the proprietor of the Hotel at Cazenovia, was born in the town of Orleans, Jefferson Co., N. Y., Dec. 7, 1842. She was joined in marriage in 1858 to Sanford Collins. He was born in the town of Orleans in April, 1839. Eight children blessed this union, six of whom are now living — Sanford, Chloe L., Sturgis F., Birney A., Burton and Lula M. He was a machinist by trade, at which he worked in York State until 1867, when he came to Wisconsin and purchased a farm on section 7, town of Ironton, Sauk county. Here he made his home until the time of his death, which occurred Nov. 30, 1874. Her second husband, to whom she was married Oct. 11, 1877, was Thornton Lee Atkins. One child — Nellie May — was born. Mr. Atkins was born in the town of Garnavillo, Clayton Co., Iowa, in 1848. His father, whose name was Elial Atkins, was a native of Vermont, settled in Dubuque, Iowa, in 1845, and moved from there in 1848 to Garnavillo. In 1852 he went to California, and his wife, with her two children, returned to Vermont and lived there five years, then returned to Garnavillo, where the subject of our sketch grew to manhood. When he was sixteen years of age he engaged in the brick city machine shop at Claremont, Iowa, and there learned the trade. The past few years he has been engaged as engineer. In the summer of 1883 he run the engine of the steamer Red Star, at Minnetonka, in Hennepin Co., Minn.


L. E. Atkinson
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

L. E. Atkinson was born in Minnesota, Jan. 22, 1858, and came with his parents to this county in 1859. At the age of twelve years he commenced work at the blacksmith trade, which he followed most of the time, until 1883. In April of that year he leased the Excelsior House and engaged in hotel keeping. Oct. 6, 1882, Rebecca J. Whitcomb became his wife. She is a daughter of Myron Whitcomb. Mr. Atkinson is a member of the I. O. O. F.


E. P. Austin
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

E. P. Austin settled in Rockbridge in 1865. He is a brother of Hiram Austin, and was born in the town of Franklin, Franklin Co., Vt., Feb. 28, 1830. His education was obtained at the district school, and two terms at the Franklin academy. In 1852 he came to Wisconsin and located in that part of Marquette county, now known as Green Lake county, where he worked in a saw-mill and at farming until 1855, when he commenced driving stage and continued it until 1858. He then engaged to travel with a circus, which he followed till 1863, when he went to Dunleith, where he was employed by a transport company, engaged in transferring goods across the Mississippi river. He enlisted in 1864 in the 10th Illinois Cavalry, and joined the army of the southwest in Arkansas, serving until the close of the war. He was honorably discharged at New Orleans, in June, 1865, and returned to Dunleith, remained a short time and then came to Rockbridge. He was married in the fall of 1865 to Charlotte, daughter of Morris and Mary Freeman, who was a widow at this time. Her first husband, who was Loring Davis, had enlisted a few months after marriage, and died in the service. Mr. and Mrs. Austin are the parents of eight children—David Grant, Everett, Herbert, Hiram, Lena, Martha, Loring and Mary. At the time of their marriage they settled on the farm formerly occupied by Mr. Davis, on section 10. He has since bought and homesteaded other land, and his farm now contains 160 acres on sections 10 and 11. The frame house, in which they now live, was built in 1869.


Hiram Austin
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

Hiram Austin, one of the early settlers of Rockbridge, was born in Franklin, Vt., May 9, 1822, and there grew to manhood. When a young man he learned the trade of blacksmith, at which he worked in his native State until 1854, when he came west to seek a home. He came to Richland county and purchased land on sections 21 and 15, of township 11, range 1 east, now known as the town of Rockbridge, and immediately commenced to clear a farm, and made this his home until the time of his death, March. 14, 1869. He was a natural mechanic, and could do almost any kind of work. A great part of the time here he worked as carpenter and joiner. He met his death by accident. While teaming logs the chain broke and the logs were unloaded on him, crushing him in a frightful manner. He was conveyed to his home, and died a few hours later, surrounded by his family and friends. He was twice married. The first time, in 1842, to Laura Dassanse. She died March 3, 1849, leaving two children, —Herbert and Marietta. His second wife, to whom he was married Dec. 7, 1856, was Mary E., daughter of Michael and Catharine (Minnech) Statser. She was born in Washington Co., Va., April 12, 1831. When she was eighteen years of age her parents removed to Wisconsin and settled in Iowa county, where she married, at twenty-one years of age, William Ethridge. Her husband died after having been married three weeks. Eight children blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. Austin, seven of whom are now living—Charles L., Edward E., Irvin, Douglas, Florence, Minnie and Hiram. Mrs. Austin's mother lives with her. She has been so unfortunate as to lose her eyesight. She is now seventy-six years of age, and enjoys good health.


George H. Babb
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin; Illustrated (1881) Transcribed by: Richard Ramos

George H. Babb was born in 1815 in Clinton Co., Ohio, where he resided until the year 1840. He then moved to Delaware Co., Ind., where he engaged in farming and mill righting, and remained there until 1856. He came to Richland county in that year, and settled in the town of Sylvan. He entered 160 acres of land on section 11, which he has since increased to 183 ½ acres, where he now lives. Mr. Babb was married in Delaware Co., Ind., in 1841, to Elizabeth Jordan, who was born in Wayne county in 1823. They have eight children--Nancy J., Timothy S., Margaret A., William H., Elisha C., John H., James D. and Ida B. Nancy J is now the wife of David Smith; William H. is married to Laura Drake. Mr. Babb was one of the county commissioners, for three years; chairman of the town board, five years; assessor, one year; justice of the peace, one year; census taker in 1880. Besides farming, he has been a minister of the gospel for the past thirty years in the Christian Church. Timothy S., his son, was a member of the14th Army Corps. He enlisted in 1864 in company F, 3d regiment, Wisconsin Veterans, and was discharged in 1865. Mr. Babb was formerly a democrat, but has been identified with the republican party since its organization.


James Bachtenkircher
Source: History of Crawford & Richland Counties, Wisconsin Illustrated (1881) Transcribed by Richard Ramos

James Bachtenkircher, an early settler in the town of Sylvan, was born in Claremont Co., Ohio, April 15, 1835. When he was eleven years old, his parents emigrated to Clinton Co., Ind. His father was born in Germany, but was brought to America by his parents when only a year old. He grew to manhood’s estate in the city of Philadelphia, receiving a good education in both English and German, and became a teacher by profession. The people in that part of Clinton county in which he settled were mostly of German descent, and he here engaged at his profession. The subject of this sketch received a liberal education, and remained with his parents until 1855. He then came to Richland county and located in the town of Sylvan. He did not, however, settle permanently, being at that time unmarried, but engaged in hunting and amusing himself generally. He killed many deer and other smaller game. At the end of one year he returned to Indiana and engaged with a carpenter and joiner to learn the trade, with whom he served two years. He then returned to Sylvan and at his trade two years. In 1860, in company with Michael Snyder, he started for Pike’s Peak, traveling in a wagon drawn by a pair of oxen. At Council Bluffs they purchased a supply of provision for a year. After fifty-two days travel, they reached Central City, Co., where he worked at his trade until November. He then yoked his oxen and started on his return to Sylvan. He was united in marriage in the spring of 1864, with Sarah A., Daughter of Hezekiah and Hanah (Sayers) Slaback, early settlers of the town of Sylvan. She was born in Tippecanoe Co., Ind. In 1862 he bought land on section 30, of Sylvan, and was engaged in farming during the summer and in teaching school in the winter. In 1864 he sold his farm and purchased land on section 29, where he lived until 1869. Then becoming excited by the so-called western fever, sold his land and removed to Kansas. He made a claim in Wilson county and engaged in farming, also worked at his trade until 1872, when he returned to Richland county and rented land in the town of Akan, until 1877. He then purchased his present farm, which is located on section 8. Mrs. and Mrs. Bachtenkircher have four children living--Dolphus, Fred, Frank and Nettie. Mr. Bachtenkircher is a man who possesses the confidence and respect of the community. He has been, and is still prominent and influential in public affairs. He served as clerk, assessor and justice of the peace, in Sylvan, and has been justice of the peace in Akan, since his residence here, and is now chairman of the town board.


Dr. Bailey
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Tammy Clark

Dr. Bailey located at Sextonville, and Dr. L. Nichols at Richland City, and Dr. Sippy near Ithaca, during the year 1853. In 1854 Dr. LeRoy D. Gage came to Richland Center as the postmaster, but practiced the profession of medicine at the same time. He was the first physician in the village in point of time. He remained at that place until August, 1870, when he ended a useful and valuable life by commiting suicide.


Wm. A. Balsley
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

Wm. A. Balsley was born March 4, 1847, in Washington Co., Penn. When six months old his parents, John S. and Julian Balsley, removed to Fox township, Carroll Co., Ohio, in the year 1865. Mr. Balsley joined the Presbyterian Church of Mechanicstown and Jan. 3, 1872, was married to Annie K. Twaddle, by the Rev. H. Y. Seepeier, at the residence of Wm. Kelly, Jr., a resident of Jefferson Co., Ohio. His wife was a member of United Presbyterian Church, of Yellow Creek, Ohio, with which she united when fifteen years old. On March 24,1872, they boarded the cars at Salineville, Ohio, and on March 28, 1872, arrived at Lone Rock, Wis. On the 26th they took the stage to Richland Center, and in April, 1872, both united by letter with the Presbyterian Church of Fancy Creek. They removed to an old house on H. Marshall's land and lived there till June 17, 1872, and then moved into a cabin on land which Mr. Balsley had purchased. It was located on section 21. They lived there till May 18, 1883, then removed to their present residence. They are the parents of five sons, four living—John K., W. L., Addie J., and C. B. The second son, J, M., died at the age of two months, and is buried in the Fancy Creek grave yard.


J. C. Bancroft
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio.

J. C. Bancroft, general merchant at Lone Rock, is a settler of 1857, coming here in January of that year. He was born in Chenango Co., N. Y., Oct. 5, 1829. When fifteen years old he removed with his parents to the town of Willet, Cortland county. When a young man he learned the trade of carpenter and joiner, which business he followed for a number of years. He erected a number of the early buildings of Lone Rock including the present residence of A. H. Tyler, also rebuilt the store of G. W. Platt which was afterwards occupied by Platt brothers, merchants, who were in business at this place a number of years. They were formerly from Scranton, Vt., and are now in Iowa. Mr. Bancroft has been twice married; his first wife was a native of Marathon, Cortland Co., N. Y., and died in the village of Marathon, Cortland Co., N. Y. His present wife was Delia A. Reynolds, a daughter of F. C. Reynolds, who came to Wisconsin in 1846. They have one daughter, Grace Elvira, born in August, 1866. Mr. Bancroft has had considerable experience in the mercantile business, having engaged in that trade in 1862. For a number of years he was traveling salesman for Warren Hewett & Co., wholesale grocers of Milwaukee.


William M. Barnes
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Susan Geist

William M. Barnes, proprietor of Boaz mills, is a native of Indiana, born in Tippecanoe county in 1834. In 1849 in company with his parents he came to Richland county and settled at Richmond, as it was then called, now Orion. Here he engaged with an older brother to learn the trade of carpenter and joiner. He followed that trade until 1861. During that year he enlisted in the 5th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. He was mustered into the service on the 28th of June and served in Smith’s division, Army of the Potomac. He participated in the battle of Williamsburg and many other minor engagements. He was discharged on account of disability at Philadelphia, in October, 1862, and returned home. He was joined in marriage Nov. 1, 1863, to Ida M. Fries, daughter of Judge Fries, of Richland Center. He continued to work at his trade until 1873 when he engaged in mercantile trade at Boaz, and at the same time bought a one-fourth interest in the mill and fourteen months later bought another one-fourth interest in the mill and at the same time sold his interest in the store. He continued to operate the mill in company with his brother until January, 1882, when he bought the other one-half interest, making him sole proprietor. The flour mill has a capacity of 100 bushels per day. The saw-mill a capacity to saw 5,000 feet of lumber per day. These mills do a flourishing business. Mr. and Mrs. Barnes are the parents of six children—Grace, Lee, Carl, Minnie, Guy and Scott. In politics Mr. Barnes is a democrat of the conservative order. In religion he favors the United Brethren Church.


Alexander Barrett
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

Alexander Barrett came to Richland county in 1870 and purchased a farm on section 5, town of Eagle, lived there a short time and then moved to Dayton and purchased a farm on section 32, where he remained nine years; then went to Akan and purchased a farm. He remained there only a short time, when he returned to Dayton and purchased the McNally farm on section 28, where he lived until 1883, then purchased his present farm located on section 28, town of Eagle. It is pleasantly located in the richest belt of land in the county and is one of the best farms. It was formerly owned and improved by Alvin Pepein who built the frame house now on it. Mr. Barrett was born in Geauga Co., Ohio, in January, 1836, where he spent his younger days on the farm and attending school. He was married Nov. 22, 1856, to Jennett Manchester, also a native of Geauga county, where they lived three years, then came to Wisconsin and settled in LaCrosse Valley, LaCrosse county, where they were among the early settlers. He engaged in farming and lived there until 1863, then moved to Minnesota and lived in the town of Milton, Dodge county, until 1867, then went to Douglass county and took a homestead which he improved and sold three years afterward, and came to Richland county as before stated. Mr. and Mrs. Barrett have two children—Alanson and Walter.


D. W. Bear
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

D. W. Bear started a blacksmith shop near Rodolf's mill in 1876. At that time he erected a building 20x31 feet. Since that year he has built on additions, until he has quite an extensive shop. Horse shoeing at first formed a considerable part of his business, but he has since given up that branch, and attends to general repair work in all its branches in wood and iron, and manufactures buggies. His shop is furnished with all the tools and machinery for this class of work. In 1883 he added to his business a stock of hardware, and later a stock of groceries. He was born in that part of Marion, now known as Richland Co., Ohio, April 9, 1848. When he was but an infant his parents emigrated to Wisconsin and located in Spring Green, Sauk county, where they were pioneers. His father purchased 100 acres of land and improved a farm, and five years later died there, and his widow married again after fourteen years. The subject of this sketch lived with his mother until eleven years old, then returned to Ohio and made his home with an uncle three years, and then returned to Spring Green and engaged with a brother-in-law at carpentering a short time, then the two years following he was engaged in farming. He enlisted in February, 1865, in the 47th Wisconsin, company E, went south and served until the following October, then returned home and in company with his sister opened a photograph gallery in Richland Center. A few months later he embarked in the same business in Muscoda, where he continued a few months, then went to Spring Green, engaged in a harness-shop, where he worked one year, then went to Prairie du Sac and engaged to learn the blacksmith trade; there he worked for three years, then came to Richland county and opened a shop in Ithaca, remaining there until 1875, when he went to Richland Center and worked as journeyman for a time, then opened a shop and remained there until he went to the town of Eagle. He was married July 10, 1869, to Calinda Daniels. They have three children—Ulysses, Lillie May and Daisy May. In 1876 he erected a neat cottage house, to which he has since made an addition, and now has a pleasant home. He and his wife are members of the Pleasant Hill Presbyterian Church, of which he is an elder.


E. W. Beebe
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Tammy Clark

Dr. E. W. Beebe was a very prominent physician who made his appearance at the county seat during the year 1859. Here he remained until 1864 when he went to Evansville, and in 1879, removed to Milwaukee. He is now noted as one of the most eminent specialist physicians in the State, treating all diseases of the eye and ear.


Daniel Bender
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin Illustrated (1881) Transcribed by: Richard Ramos

Daniel Bender, one of the pioneer settlers of the town of Forest, was born in the year 1813, in Somerset Co., Penn., where he resided until 1842. In that year he was married to Sarah Barnt, who died in 1851, leaving three children--Hiram, William and Sarah. Mr. Bender, believing it “not good for man to be alone,” married again, in 1852, Elizabeth Wisner, who died in 1853, leaving one child--Mary J. His third wife was Margaret Reel. Her death occurred in May, 1954, and was the first death in the town of Forest. He was married to his present wife, Mary A. Fall, in 1855. Their union has been blessed with five children, three of whom are now living--Samuel, John and Elizabeth. Hiram is now married to Minnie Wood. Sarah is the wife of John Morrow, and Mary J. of David Austin. Mr. Bender, on coming to Forest, entered 240 acres of land on sections 32 and 33, where he now lives. He now has 230 acres besides giving three of his children farms of eighty acres each. He has been chairman of the town board three years. He came from Adams Co., Ind., coming by team to Sturgis, Mich., then by rail to Vernon, Ill., thence by team to Mascoda, then crossed the river to Orion where he rented a house until he could build a log house on his land, and which was the first in the town. In about six weeks he moved into it, and commenced pioneer life. They lived here about four years then built a hewed log house and live in it about three years; then built the commodious frame structure in which he now lives. Mr. Bender commenced pioneer life under difficulties. His wife died soon after his arrival, and he had considerable sickness in the family. He persevered, however. He could not get away, so went to work and has lived to see the county settled and developed. Mr. Bender adheres to the principles of the republican party, and votes with that organization. Mrs. Bender is a member of the United Brethren Church.


William Bender
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin Illustrated (1881) Transcribed by: Richard Ramos

William Bender, who, with his brother, was the first permanent settler in the town of Forest, was born in Somerset, Co., Penn., in 1824. He received a common school education, and at the age of thirty emigrated to Wisconsin and settled in Richland county, town of Forest, section 20. He and his brother, Daniel, built the first building in the town, which was a log house of small dimensions, and constituted the dwelling place for both families. Mr. Bender entered a farm of eighty acres, on section 20, where he now lives. He now owns 280 acres. He was married in 1848 to Mary Barnett, who was born in Somerset Co., Penn., in 1828. They have two children--Ephraim and Henry. The latter is now married to Rachel Taylor. Mr. Bender was a member of the 14th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. He enlisted in 1865 and was discharged the same year. Mr. Bender’s mother, Susan Bender, was born in 1795, and is now living in Forest. The family have experienced all the hardships and privations of pioneer life.


Jacob Bennett
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio.

Jacob Bennett resides on section 33, town 9, range 2 east. He has been a resident of Buena Vista since March 13, 1857. He was born in Dumfriesshire, Scotland, Nov. 29, 1836, and came to the United States with his father, John Bennett, in July, 1851. The family settled in Washington Co., Penn. In 1854 Mr. Bennett went to Ohio, and came to Richland county in 1857, as stated. His farm contains 110 acres. His father came here from Pennsylvania in 1858, and died in 1868. His mother died in Scotland. Mr. Bennett married Mercy Ann Moore, a daughter of James Moore. She was born in Dane Co., Wis., in 1846. They have six children—Albert Henry, John N., Hettie Ann, Jane E., Lillie May and George F.


George Benton
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

George Benton, son of Joseph and Janet (Davidson) Benton, pioneers of Richland county, was born in Jefferson Co., Ohio, Oct. 25, 1841, and was twelve years old when his parents emigrated to Richland county, and settled in township 11, range 1 west, now known as Marshall. Here he grew to manhood, assisting his father in clearing land, and attending the pioneer schools. He enlisted in February, 1864, in the 11th Wisconsin, company D, and joined the regiment near New Orleans. For a time this regiment was detailed to guard railroads, after which they entered active service, participating in many minor engagements and skirmishes. The most important battle was Fort Blakely. He served until after the close of the war, and was discharged with the regiment in September, 1865, when he returned to his home. He remained on the homestead until 1870, when he came to Rockbridge and settled on a farm which he had purchased in 1867, located on section 16. He lived in a log house until 1879, when he built the commodious frame house which he now occupies. He has since purchased adjoining land, and his farm now contains 170 acres, 100 of which is cleared. He has been twice married. The first time, Feb. 22, 1866, to Mary E. Dickason, of Ohio. She died in April, 1867. His second wife was Keziah Robbins, to whom he was married Oct. 2, 1868. She was born in Carroll Co., Ohio, and has also been twice married. Her first husband was Hamilton Davis. They lived in Belmont Co., Ohio, where he died Oct. 14, 1867. Mr. and Mrs. Benton have an adopted daughter—Mary E.


Joseph Benton, Jr.
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

Joseph Benton, Jr., was born in Elginshire, Scotland, Nov. 19, 1826, and came to America with his parents when in his eighth year. He grew to manhood in Jefferson Co., Ohio, obtaining his education in the public schools. In 1852 he came to Richland county and entered land on section 14, town 11, range 1 west, now known as Marshall. After entering this land he returned to Ohio, where he was married in 1854 to Jane Russell, a native of Jefferson county. In 1855 they started for their new home in the far west, traveling by rail as far as Warren, Ill., the nearest railroad station. The remainder of the journey was accomplished by team. He first built a log cabin, which by mistake was located on land that did not belong to him. Soon after he built a hewed log house upon his own land. In 1875 he erected the neat frame house in which he now lives. They have three children—Robert K., Rebecca J. (now the wife of Arthur Moon) and James, Mr. Benton is a man of sound judgment and has the respect and confidence of his fellowmen to a remarkable degree. He has been successful as a farmer, and now owns a good place in the fertile valley of Fancy creek.


Joseph Benton, Sr.
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

Joseph Benton, Sr., (deceased) one of the early settlers of Marshall, was a native of Scotland, born in Aberdeenshire, April 20, 1803. His wife, whose maiden name was Janet David¬ son, was a native of Banffshire, born in 1806. In 1834 they emigrated to America and settled in Jefferson Co., Ohio, where they bought and improved a farm, living there until 1854. They then came to Richland county and purchased timber land on section 13, town 11, range 1 west, now known as Marshall. Here he improved a farm and lived until the time of his death, which occurred July 14,1880. He left four children—Joseph, George, Robert and Margaret, now the wife of Olney Hoskins. His widow still occupies the homestead.


Philip Daniel Berger
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Susan Geist

Philip Daniel Berger, one of the early settlers of Orion, was born in West Baden, Germany, Aug. 24, 1815. He was united in marriage with Catharine Elizabeth Miller in the year 1828. In 1848 they emigrated to America, and first settled in Wyoming Co., N. Y., and bought a farm in the town of Bennington, where they remained two years and then decided to removed farther west, so he sold his farm and came to Wisconsin, locating on Rock prairie, in Rock county. In 1855 he decided to make another change, and coming to Orion purchased land on section 10. On this place there was a log cabin, constructed after the most approved back woods fashion. The roof covered with “shakes” fastened on with poles and withes, no nails being used. He cleared a farm and built a more substantial dwelling, and made this his home until his death, which occurred in 1871. Mrs. Berger died in 1867. They left seven children—William, Phebe, Christian, Sophia, Henry, Mary and Margaret. William was born in West Baden, June 14, 1829. He came to America with his parents and made his home with them until 1860. In that year he was married to Euphemia Laing, a native of Scotland, and settled on land that he had previously purchased and where he has since resided. He has good frame buildings, including house, barn and granary. Christian also was born in West Baden, May 22, 1829. He was sent to school in Germany four years, and at nine years of age came to America with his parents, with whom he lived till 1861, when he enlisted September 9th, in the 6th Wisconsin Battery, which was stationed at Racine until February, 1862, when it moved south. Among the more important engagements in which he participated are the following: Riddle’s Shop, Champion Hills, siege of Corinth and Vicksburg. At the siege of Corinth he was severely wounded in the knee and spent nearly six months in the hospital. He rejoined the regiment at Memphis. He was again wounded at Vicksburg, and in consequence suffered the amputation of his left arm and the thumb of his right hand. He was honorably discharged on the 29th of August, 1863, and returned home. In 1865 he was married to Elizabeth Brewer, a native of Highgate, Vt. Although unable to perform any manual labor, Mr. Berger has carefully and successfully managed the farm, and now has one of the finest improved places in the county. It is the homestead where his father first settled. He has built a nice frame house and a large frame barn. They have one child—Letha Annie. Christian Berger politically belongs to the democratic party.


J. H. Berryman
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio.

J. H. Berryman is a member of the law firm of Miner & Berryman. He was born in La-Fayette Co., Wis., March 31, 1854. His parents were John and Mary A. (Retallach) Berryman. His early life was spent upon a farm. When he was twelve years old, his parents removed to Jo Daviess Co., Ill. He was educated at the Normal school at Galena, and afterwards taught school. In 1876 he went to Madison, where he acted as assistant State librarian, and also read law; afterwards read law in the office of Lewis, Lewis & Hale, and in November, 1878, was admitted to the bar by the circuit court. In June, 1879, he graduated from the law department of the State University. His residence at Richland Centre, dates from November, 1878. Oct. 30, 1880, Berkie Miner became his wife. They have one daughter — Mary Edith. Mr. Berryman is a republican in politics, and village attorney. Himself and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church.


Zenas W. Bevier
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Susan Geist

Zenas W. Bevier, in 1855, settled in the town of Akan, where he was engaged in blacksmithing and farming until his death, which occurred in October, 1881. Mrs. Bevier now resides near Dell Rapids, Dak. She reared seven children—Henry, William M., Charles, Caroline, now Mrs. I. N. Neher; Norman, George and Enarcha. Mr. Bevier was a native of New York, where he learned his trade and in which he became a first-class workman. He was married to Mary Ann Austin, also of New York. About 1847 they came to Rock Co., Wis., from whence they came to this county. It was through his influence that the first postoffice was established at Akan, he receiving the appointment of postmaster, which position he held until his death. He was a member of the Church of United Brethren. W. M. Bevier was born in Rock county, July 27, 1848, and came with the family to this county. He was brought up on a farm. In 1874 he was married to Sarah Shafer, daughter of S. Shafer. They left the State in March, 1877, and were absent four years, then returned and resided in Crawford county until March, 1883. At that date he purchased the Boaz House, of which he is now proprietor. Mr. and Mrs. Bevier have four children—Gay M., Ida May, Floyd Z. and Carrie B. In February, 1864, Mr. Bevier enlisted in company B, of the 36th Wisconsin, and served until July, 1865, when the regiment was mustered out of service. He was wounded in the right arm at the battle of Coal Harbor. In politics he is a republican, and is a member of the I. O. O. F.


Moses Bible
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881); transcribed by Vicki Bryan

Moses Bible, one of the pioneers of Westford town, is a native of Tennessee, born in Green county, April 7, 1808. He was brought up on a farm. At twenty years of age he engaged with a blacksmith to learn the trade, with whom he remained five months, then followed that business one year with another party, when he resumed farming. In 1834 he erected a gristmill, doing the work himself, which he continued to operate until 1846, when he sold out and removed to Indiana, taking his family, and traveling with a four horse team. They located in Clinton county, rented land and there remained until 1855, when he again started to seek a new home in the northwest, came to Westford and settled on the site of his present farm. He was married in 1830 to Catharine Clary, who was born in Jefferson Co., Tenn., Dec. 14, 1812. She died June 8, 1873, leaving seven children — Martha, Rufus, George, Joshua, Newton, Moses and Sarah. Francis, Darius and Susanna were also born to them, but are now dead. Mr. and Mrs. Bible were both members of the United Brethren Church, and were consistent Christian people. He was a member of the first board of supervisors for the town of Westford.


A. W. Bickford
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Tammy Clark

Dr. A. W. Bickford, made his debut in the county at Richland Center in 1804 and has continued in constant practice ever since. The doctor is well known as a very public spirited citizen and has been a member of the village board and held other offices, and is now traveling in California for the benefit of his health, which has suffered by a too close application to the most arduous of professions.


James A. Bills
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio.

James A. Bills resides on the northeast corner of section 30, where he settled in 1853. He came to Richland City the previous autumn, where he resided with his family the following winter. He purchased eighty acres of his farm from Jonah Seaman; eighty acres from A. C. Daley, and forty acres from C. C. Woodman. His farm now contains 210 acres. He was born in Berkshire Co., Mass., in 1819. When a boy, he removed with his parents to Genesee Co., N. Y., and thence to the State of Pennsylvania. He was married in Erie county, of the latter State, to Permelia Emerson. After his marriage, he removed with his family to Kane Co., Ill., where he lived seven years, coming here from that county. Like many other settlers, Mr. Bills came into the county a poor man, but by industry and economy, has secured a pleasant home and a competency. Mr. and Mrs. Bills have had twelve children, four sons and eight daughters. One son and seven daughters are still living—Alonzo, born in Illinois in 1846; Mary, wife of Wesley Southard; Emma, wife of Foster Teeples; Jane, wife of Philip Bixler; Clarissa, wife of William Gewald; Ellen, wife of E. Davis, in Colorado; Etta and Hattie. They lost one son, William, in the army during the War of the Rebellion. He was born Feb. 28, 1848. He enlisted in company A, 36th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and was killed at Cold Harbor, Va. He was but sixteen years old at the time of his death, and although so young had already proved himself a brave soldier on the field of battle. He was killed by a confederate sharp-shooter, while conveying water to his comrades.


Alexander Black
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio.

Alexander Black was born in Montgomery Co., Va., Feb. 17, 1800. His early life was spent on a farm, and through his own efforts he succeeded in obtaining a good education. He was married at the age of twenty-five, to Elizabeth McDonald, who was of Scotch descent, but born in Virginia. Mr. Black held the office of county surveyor in his native State for many years. Mr. and Mrs. Black reared a family of twelve children. The oldest son, Harvey, was a soldier in the Mexican War, and subsequently graduated in the medical department of the University of Virginia. He then, in 1849 or 1850, went to Chicago, purchased a horse, and on horseback went to Green Bay; thence to Mineral Point; purchased land in Richland county, and went to St. Joseph, Mo.; then returned through the southwestern States to Virginia. The entire trip from Chicago was made on horseback. In 1854, Mr. Black, accompanied by his son, Oscar F., came to Wisconsin to see the land which Harvey Black had purchased. They were, however, intending to go to Texas, but on arriving at Richland county they were so well pleased with the location that Mr. Black purchased a large tract of land on Willow creek, and soon after moved his family from Virginia, and here engaged in farming until his death, which occurred Sep. 17, 1872. His wife died May 27, 1880. The children living are - Harvey, a physician in Blacksburg, Va.; Ellen, wife of James Spickard; Margaret, unmarried; Elizabeth, wife of George Krouskop; Amanda, wife of William Krouskop; James A., Oscar F. and J. Q. Scott Black came with his parents to this county and educated himself for the legal profession. He married a daughter of D. L. Downs. His death took place March 22, 1876. Charles Black died in August, 1856, aged sixteen years.


O. F. Black
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio.

O. F. Black was born in Virginia, June 1, 1840. He came with his father to Wisconsin in 1854, and the first season broke land and raised a crop of corn. During the next five years, assisted by his brother, he broke 400 acres with ox teams. He was educated at the academy at Richland City, at Albion, and at the University at Madison. In the fall of 1861 he commenced to read law, with John S. Wilson as preceptor, and afterwards with J. H. Miner. In 1863 he was admitted to the bar. He then read law with H. W. & D. K. Tinney, of Madison, one year, then taught school six months at Muscoda. In the fall of 1864, he stumped the county for Gen. George B. McClellan for the Presidency, in joint debate against D. L. Downs and others. He then clerked in the quartermaster's department at Memphis, Tenn., until the following spring, and since 1866 has given his attention to the legal profession. He now has a good practice. Mr. Black is fond of traveling. He has crossed the plains four times, and has visited nearly all portions of the United States. His politics are democratic. He has served two terms as district attorney, and is a member of the F. & A. M. June 16, 1875, Mr. Black was married to Ida Burnham, daughter of Dr. S. Burnham. They have one daughter—Virginia.


Winfield Scott Black
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio.

Winfield Scott Black was born in Montgomery Co., Va., in 1848. He came to Richland county with his parents in 1854, and settled on Willow creek. He received a good education, taking a commercial course at the Chicago Mercantile College, and attending the State University at Madison. In the spring of 1869 he began reading law with his brother, O. F. Black, of Richland Centre, and was admitted to the bar in the fall of 1870. He at once began the practice of law in partnership with his brother, and this relation was maintained until the fall of 1875, when W. S. went to Minneapolis as collecting agent for O. P. Baker & Co. In 1872, Mr. Black was stricken with paralysis, but partly recovered and was soon able to attend to business again. In January, 1876, he returned to Richland Centre, from Minneapolis, and died March 22, 1876, from pleuro pneumonia, the effects of the stroke of paralysis he had received. In 1870, Mr. Black had been married to Alla L. Downs, and one son, Buford, blessed this union. The widow and child are still residents of Richland Centre. W. Scott Black was a young man of more than ordinary promise, and had the prospect of becoming an honor to the profession. He was bright and keen, a good speaker, and a well read lawyer. He was unusually energetic in everything he undertook.


Simon S. Blake
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Susan Geist

Simon S. Blake, an early settler in the town of Orion, is a native of the Keystone State, having been born in that part of Bedford now known as Blair county. Until he was fourteen years old, his time was spent in school and on the farm. He then engaged with a merchant tailor to learn the trade, here he served three months, then part of the time went to school and part of the time worked with his brother at the blacksmith business until about seventeen, then enlisted in the service of the United States for the Mexican war. His parents was opposed to this and as their consent could not be obtained be was sent back. He then engaged with his cousin to learn the trade of ax-making and was thus employed until twenty-one years old, when he engaged in teaching. In the fall of 1852 he went to Ohio and spent the winter in Ironton and vicinity, then went to Arkansas and engaged in the lumbering business for seven months, and then returned to Pennsylvania, and taught a four months term of school during the winter. In the spring of 1854 he came to Richland county and entered 120 acres of land on sections 17 and 18 of the town of Orion, and went to the village of Orion where he engaged as clerk in a store. He was married Jan. 18, 1855, to Mary Ambrose. She was born in Westmoreland Co., Penn. He left the store in the fall of 1855, teaching a three months school at Pleasant Hill, town of Eagle. The following spring they settled on his land and commenced to clear a farm. He early paid attention to fruit culture and now has a fine apple orchard, consisting of Tolman sweets, Golden russets, Snow apples and Red Astrachan. His farm is pleasantly located on Oak Ridge, and is will improved. He was a soldier in the Union army, having enlisted Aug. 20, 1862, in the 25th Wisconsin, company B, and going south spent his time in different places until May, 1864, when they joined Sherman at Resaca, Ga., and fought their way on to Atlanta. He was severely wounded at Decatur, Ga., the 22d of July 1864, was sent to the field hospital and later to the Harvey hospital at Madison. He was discharged March 20, 1865, and returned home. He has been elected to offices of trust and honor, at different times; has been chairman of the board, justice of the peace and was once elected assessor but refused to serve. He was United States census enumerator for the town of Orion in 1880.


Hugo M. Bock
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio.

Hugo M. Bock, wholesale dealer in foreign and domestic liquors, established business at Richland City in the fall of 1869, where he has quite an extensive trade, amounting to upwards of $30,000 annually. Of the stock sold, about two thirds is shipped from his store in Richland City, and the balance including principally the cheaper grades of goods are shipped to his customers directly from the distillers. He keeps constantly on hand a large stock of the best class of liquors, and handles a large amount of California wines. He also manufactures a very fine wine from the common wild grape. So extensive is his trade in this particular line of goods, that the amount manufactured depends only upon the amount of supply of grapes. When the season is favorable, he obtains a sufficiency to make from 1,500 to 3,000 gallons annually. This wine, on account of its actual intrinsic worth and purity, is obtaining quite a reputation, and is unquestionably a very fine article, and compares favorably with the very best California productions. Mr. Bock is making improvements in his business facilities as the growth of his trade demands. He has a fine residence, erected in 1879 at a cost of $3,500. He is a lover of fine horses and has some excellent specimens of the Hamiltonian breed, of which family he makes a specialty. He is a native of the city of New York. When a young man, he went to the city of New Orleans, where he was engaged as a bookkeeper. His experience in his present business began in the south. He had charge for a time of a distillery at New Orleans and also at Mobile. His father was a tobacconist in the city of New York, and in early life, Mr. Bock learned that business, but going south he finally drifted into the liquor trade. His wife is a native of Mobile, Ala. They have five children—Edward, who is in Colorado; Joseph, at home ; Hugo, a student at Prairie du Chien College; Sidney, at home, and one daughter, Mary, at home.


Curtis E. Brace
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio.

Curtis E. Brace resides on section 23, where he settled in 1868. His present farm is on sections 23 and 24. He purchased eighty acres of Harry Eaton and 120 of Horatio Giles, and forty of Mr. Bacon. His farm now contains 300 acres. Mr. Brace was born in Herkimer Co., N. Y., in 1831, where his youth was spent. He is the only son of his father's family who settled in this county. His father, Eleazer, is dead. Curtis Brace was married in the State of New York, to Maria Thomas, of the town of Columbia, Herkimer county. She died in July, 1870. His present wife was Mrs. Susan (Brace) Rork. He has one son by his first wife—Henry, born in the State of New York. Mrs. Brace has one son by her former marriage—Henry J. Mr. Brace has made many improvements on his farm since he purchased it. Like most farmers of Bear valley, he is engaged in dairying, and has a herd of the grade Holstein breed of cows.


Jay W. Briggs
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Susan Geist

Jay W. Briggs, of the firm of Briggs & Kepler, merchants at Boaz, was the son of I. Oscar and Mary (Frink) Briggs. He was born in Sauk county, in October 1847. In 1851 his parents came to Richland county and settled at Sextonville. Here his father died one year later. The subject of our sketch made his home here with his mother, receiving his education in the Sextonville school. When he was fifteen years of age he engaged as clerk in A. H. Kronskop’s store, remaining with him one and one-half years; then he engaged as clerk for McCorkle & Thomas two years. Then he went to Richland Center and clerked for A. H. Krouskop six months. He then went to the home farm at Sextonville and tried farming one season, then returned to Richland Center and engaged with Baker & Pease as clerk. In 1873 he came to Boaz and engaged in the mercantile business in the company with William Barnes buying the store of the late R. Barnes. He also bought a one-fourth interest in the flouring mill fourteen months later. He sold his interest in the mill while Barnes sold his interest in the store to A. H. Krouskop. The firm of Briggs & Krouskop continued in business about six months when Mr. Briggs sold to his partner and engaged to clerk for him in his store at Richland Center. At the same time he had started a small store in the company with F. O. Smith. He remained with Krouskop one year, then returned to Boaz, and engaged in the store with Mr. Smith. In 1882 they dissolved partnership and he continued alone until January, 1884, when he sold one-half interest to William F. Kepler, his present partner. They are doing an extensive business and carry a stock valued at $6,000. He was joined in marriage May 2, 1872, to Emma, daughter of Henry W. and Margaret (Wolf) Fries. Four children blessed this union—Ada Belle, Lelia Louise, Jennie Laura and Fay.


Benjamin F. Brimer
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Tammy Clark

Dr. Benjamin F. Brimer is a son of Dr. Jacob Brimer and he was born in Boone Co., Ind., Jan. 20, 1849. He came with the family to this county, and at an early age commenced the study of medicine with Ids father as preceptor. He also attended medical lectures at the Bennett College of Chicago, and since 1872 has given his entire attention to his profession. He has principally an office practice and makes a specialty of treating chronic diseases. Dr. Brimer is also interested as partner in the drug business of Dr. J. Brimer & Sons. In November, 1878, he married Anna M. Humbart. She is a daughter of William Humbart. Dr. Brimer is a member of the Masonic fraternity.


J. N. Brimer
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Tammy Clark

J. N. Brimer, druggist, of the firm of Dr. J. Brimer & Sons, was born in Boone Co., Ind., Feb. 23, 1841. He came with his parents to Richland county, helped till the soil and for about nine years worked in the Ash creek woolen mills. In 1873 he became a member of the above named firm, and since 1874 has had charge of the business. In October, 1863, he married Anna Miller, daughter of Campbell Miller. They have two daughters—Edith and Maggie. Mr. Brimer is a member of the I. O. O. F.


Jacob Brimer
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Tammy Clark

Dr. Jacob Brimer came to the county during the year 1850, locating at Orion, where he remained until the fall of 1873, when he removed to Richland Center, and has continued to reside there ever since, in the practice of his profession.

Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Tammy Clark

Jacob Brimer, M. D., located on section 21, Orion, in the spring of 1850, and as he has given his attention to the practice of medicine since that date, he is now the oldest resident physician in the county. He now resides on section 2, Orion, but has an office at Richland Center where he can be consulted each day. Dr. Brimer is a native of the State of New York, born in Rensselaer county on the 15th day of August, 1815. He was left motherless when but a small child, and he then resided with Elisha Bovee, with whom he removed to Cayuga county and ten years later to Erie county where he helped till the soil. A few years subsequently he removed with the family to Boone Co., Ind.

He there prepared himself for the medical profession, and in 1850 came to Wisconsin. He was elected county treasurer in 1852, serving four years, and at various different intervals has held local offices. Dr. Brimer is plain and unassuming in his manners, has a large office practice, and is highly respected. His wife was formerly Elizabeth McMannis. They have reared seven children—John N., Sarah Ann, William M., Benjamin F., Jacob B., M.ary E. and Harvey B.


Orrin L. Britton
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

Orrin L. Britton, the pioneer settler of Sextonville, was born in Westmoreland, N. H., in 1811. When he was twelve years old, his parents moved to Jefferson Co., N. Y. where they were pioneers. There the subject of this sketch spent his youth and was married in 1830 to Annie Pratt, who was born in Jefferson county in 1811. They continued to live in that county until 1844, then moved to Wisconsin, making the journey overland with a pair of horses and wagon. They were six weeks on the road, after which they arrived at the village of Jefferson, Jefferson county. He first rented land a few miles out of town. In the spring of 1845 he bought timber land in the Rock river woods, moved there and cleared a few acres, then sold and hired to E. M. Sexton to drive a peddler's wagon from near Fort Atkinson, which he continued until 1848, at which date he came to Richland county. His wife died in 1857, leaving eight children. He was married again two or three years later to Mary J. Rice. They have one child, and now reside a few miles from Black River Falls, in Jackson county.


Benjamin B. Brownell
Source: History of Crawford & Richland Counties, Wisconsin; Illustrated (1881) Transcribed by: Richard Ramos

Benjamin B. Brownell first came to Richland county in 1855, and entered land on section 3, town 11, range 2 east, now known as the town of Willow. He, however, did not settle here until 1872. He has since cleared thirty-five acres of land, built a two-story hewed-log house, a good stable and other out buildings. He was born in Monroe Co., N. Y., Feb. 24, 1834. When he was two years old his parents moved to Wyoming county, where his father died when he was eight years old. He remained with his mother four years, and then went to live with a neighbor, who agreed to board, clothe and school him in consideration of the work he could do. He remained there four years, and then came to Wisconsin with a friend who lived in Green county. He had no money but his friend paid his expenses, he agreeing to work for him to pay it back. The second summer he worked at farming for $10.25 per month, and out of is wages saved enough to enter forty acres of land. He remained in the west four years, three of which were spent in Wisconsin and one in Illinois. He then returned to New York, remained two years, after which he returned to Green county and rented his brother’s farm one year. He next went to the pineries and engaged in lumbering two winters, and building rafts on the river in the summer. In 1859 he started for Pike’s Peak, but was taken sick at Leavenworth, Kansas, and came back to Green county and resumed farming. In August 1862, he enlisted in the 31st Wisconsin, company F. The regiment went to Kentucky, where they performed garrison duty at Fort Halleck. In July, 1863, they were sent to Tennessee, to guard the railroad from Nashville to Tullahoma, where they remained till July, 1864, then joined Sherman at Marietta Ga., and were with him on his grand march to the sea and through the Carolinas participating in the many important battles of that noted campaign.

He was discharged with the regiment in July, 1865, and returned to Green county, rented land and lived until 1872, when he came to Willow. He was married, Jan. 6, 1860, to Sallie Brayton, who was born in La Porte Co., Ind. Two children have been born to them--Frank E. and Mary P.


Robert Buchanan
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

Robert Buchanan is a native of Ireland, born Sept. 2, 1809. He emigrated to Canada in 1832, on account of cholera in the old country. He did not remain long in Canada, but went to Otsego Co., N. Y., and in 1835 to New York city, where he served an apprenticeship to learn the trade of mason, which he followed in the cities of New York and Brooklyn about twenty years. In 1855 he moved to Schoharie county, and three years -later to McHenry Co., Ill., where he engaged in farming. In 1864 he came to Wisconsin and became a resident of Richland county, settling on section 8, of Richwood, where he accumulated 400 acres of land. Mr. Buchanan is a republican in politics; has served as chairman four years, and treasurer two years, of his town. He was a member of the fraternity of Odd Fellows over forty years, always taking an active interest in the work of the society. He was married in 1838. His wife, formerly Mary Shannon, was a native of the north of Ireland. They reared nine children—William M., Mary A., Robert Jr., Sarah J., James T., Samuel M., John, George W. and Edward H.


Robert Buchanan, Jr.
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

Robert Buchanan, Jr., the first man to engage in the harness trade in Excelsior, was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., Sept. 6, 1843. He resided with his parents until 1862, when he enlisted in company C, 95th Illinois. He was wounded at the battle of Vicksburg by a piece of shell striking him on the forhead, and also one year later at the battle of Yellow Bayou, where he received a gun-shot wound in the right arm. He served, however, until the regiment was mustered out of service. After the war he learned the harness maker's trade, and in 1869 established business at Excelsior. He was united in marriage in 1873 with Belle Hawkins. Their children are—Ella B., Frank and Albert. Mr. Buchanan is a member of the I. O. O. F., A. O. U, W. and I. O. G. T.


F. W. Burnham
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio.

F. W. Burnham, of the law firm of Black & Burnham, is a son of H. L. and Susan (Lowell) Burnham. He was born in Addison Co., Vt., June 25, 1853; came with his parents to Wisconsin in 1856. He helped till the soil until eighteen years of age, then took a course at the La Crosse Business College. In the fall of 1875, he commenced to read law with O. F. Black, a preceptor, and in 1877, was admitted to the bar, and has since been a member of the above named firm. Politically he is a republican. He is a member of the A. F. & A. M. and the I. O. O. F.


Christian Burwitz
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Susan Geist

Christian Burwitz is a native of Germany, born in Mecklenburg Swerin, May 20, 1829. He spent the time until the age of fourteen in attending school, and then assisted his father in herding his large flocks of cattle and sheep, which he continued to do until the year 1857, when he left his native home and came to America, landed at New York and came directly to Wisconsin and engaged in farming in Waukesha county for two years. He then moved to Milwaukee and bought stock two years, then returned to Waukesha and resumed farming. In March, 1865, he enlisted in company I, 48th Wisconsin Volunteers and went south. He was discharged in February, 1866, returned home and remained in Waukesha until the following April, when he came to Richland county. He was married in 1858 to Mary Niles, also a native of Mecklenburg. They have one child—Richard. Mr. Burwitz’s farm is pleasantly located in Ash creek valley. He has comfortable buildings and altogether a pleasant home.


Leonard Button
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio.

Leonard Button is one of the early settlers of this town, the date of settlement being July, 1849. He located on section 34, his present home. By energy and industry he has secured a good home.


Dr. Byers
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Tammy Clark

Dr. Byers also made his appearance in the county during 1854, locating at the county seat, where he remained until 1858, when he, thinking to better his condition, moved to Baraboo.


Dr. Carpenter
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Tammy Clark

In the same year (1858) a Dr. Carpenter settled at the town of Rockbridge.


Silas L. Carpenter
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

Silas L. Carpenter, son of Halsey and Sarah (Vannetter) Carpenter, was born in Chautauqua Co., N. Y., April 8, 1839. He made his home with his parents in York State and the eastern part of Wisconsin, and came to Rockbridge with them in 1856. He was then but seventeen years old and started out for himself, and by energy, industry and economy has secured a good home. He first went to Lone Rock and engaged in farming. He was married to Clarissa E., daughter of Stephen and Sarah (Glazier) Smith. She was born in Windham Co., Vt. They spent the winter in Rockbridge. In the fall of 1864 he enlisted in the 16th Wisconsin, company H, went south and joined the regiment at Marietta, was with Sherman on his march to the sea and through the Carolinas to Washington, where he was discharged with the regiment in June, 1865. In the fall he bought land on section 10, town of Rockbridge, joining the village plat. He built a log house, in which he lived until 1869, when he erected the frame house in which he now lives. His farm contains seventy acres, sixty of which are cleared and in a good state of cultivation. His wife died Sept. 29, 1879, leaving six children—Leroy, Alice, Fred, Elma, Nellie and Edith. His second wife, to whom he was married March 29, 1880, was Delia, daughter of Tilas and Hannah (McCann) Knapp, early settlers of Marshall.


Alonzo Carson
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

Alonzo Carson, deceased, became a resident of Wisconsin about 1845. He lived about two years on the south side of the river, then came with his father to Richland county and purchased land, but soon returned to Indiana. In 1850 he came back to Wisconsin and settled on section 34, Richwood. In 1851 Eliza J. Armstrong became his wife. In 1855 he purchased a water-power on Knapp's creek and built a saw-mill which he operated about five years; he then leased the property. The mill was afterwards washed away by the floods, but Mr. Carson at once rebuilt and sold it to Mr. Langdon. He then returned to his farm, but two years later moved to Boscobel, where he died in 1876. Mr. Carson was born in Ohio, Dec. 6, 1822. When five years old he moved with his parents, Lott and Margaret Carson, to Indiana, and resided in Tippecanoe county, from whence he came to Wisconsin. Mrs. Carson was a daughter of John and Elizabeth Armstrong. She was born in Muscoda, Grant Co., Wis., April 1, 1832, and came to Richland county in 1848. Mr. and Mrs. Carson were the parents of seven children—Carrie C, wife of Lysander Matthews; Maggie E, who died at the age of twenty-six years; Sarah, the wife of John Stoddard; Rebecca I., George L., Addie M. and Hubert K. Soon after Mr. Carson's death, the family returned to the homestead, where they now reside. Mr. Carson was a good citizen, enterprising, honest in his dealings, and respected by his neighbors. He left his family in good circumstances.


George J. Carswell
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio.

George J. Carswell has been a resident of the town of Buena Vista since 1853. In March of that year he bought of E. M. Sexton 160 acres of land on section 26, town 9, range 2 east, where he settled with his family the following September. Mr. Carswell was born in the town of Exeter, Otsego Co., N. Y., Dec. 5, 1823. He was a resident of the State of New York until he came to Richland county. His father, Benjamin Carswell, was a native of Massachusetts and died when his son was four years of age. Mr. Carswell married Louisa Matteson, born in Otsego Co., N. Y. She is-a sister of Delos Matteson, one of the well known pioneers of Richland county. He settled in the town Buena Vista in 1848 and died in 1857. His widow now lives at Lone Rock. Few among the pioneers of Richland county have been more successful than Mr. Carswell. He began life poor, and by energy and industry has secured a competence. His farm contains 400 acres of excellent land, and his improvements are not excelled in the town of Buena Vista. Socially he is a genial, intelligent gentleman; he has an excellent memory and is well informed on the early and later history of Richland county. Mr. Carswell was elected town supervisor in the spring of 1855; he assessed the town at an early day; was chairman of the board for the years 1866-7 and again in 1879. For a number of years Mr. Carswell has given much attention to the subject of draining. For the past twenty years he has been engaged in raising the Devon breed of cattle. He has now a herd of 100 cows, sixty of which are thoroughbred Devons. Probably a finer herd of cows cannot be found in the State than is possessed by Mr. Carswell. Mr. and Mrs. Carswell have three children, all of whom were born in this town—John A., born Oct. 29, 1854, Fred. E., born February, 1861, and George A., born March, 1867.


John A. Carswell
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio.

John A. Carswell is the son of George J. Carswell, and was born at the homestead in this town Nov. 29, 1854. He resides on section 26. Forty acres of his farm was entered by E. M. Sexton and purchased by G. J. Carswell. He purchased eighty acres of his farm from N. Carswell, and 100 acres from Harry Pier, having, altogether, 220 acres. Like a number of successful farmers of Bear river valley, Mr. Carswell is giving his attention to dairying, and like his father, possesses a fine herd of Devon cows. He is a practical dairyman, having learned thoroughly the business of cheese manufacture. He was educated at the high school at Lone Rock, which, for a number of years, was an institution of high merit. After leaving school he had charge of his father's farm for five years. He settled on his present place in 1878. He was married to Abigail, daughter of V. Brainard. She was born in Virginia. Her father formerly resided on section 26 of this town, but has returned to Virginia.


John H. Carswell
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio.

John H. Carswell has been a permanent resident of Buena Vista since the spring of 1864, but was in the county as early as Christmas, 1853. He is a native of Otsego Co., N. Y., where he was born in October, 1815. He was reared, in his native State, to agricultural pursuits. Mr. Carswell is one of the solid men of the town of Buena Vista. He was for four years president of the agricultural society of Richland county, and has done much toward promoting the interests of agriculture by his advocacy and support of advanced methods in farming. Mr. Cars- well is a man of positive opinions, and is al¬ ways found on the side which he believes to be right. Politically, he was an abolitionist, of the Gerrett Smith school, and knew well that advocate of universal freedom. He was also personally acquainted with John Brown, and was at the convention at Syracuse, in 1859; where, with Gerrett Smith and others, he contributed to a fund for the purchase of arms for John Brown and his sons to enable them to defend themselves against the border ruffians of Kansas. He has lived to see the extreme views he advocated on the slavery question, prevail. He is as strong a foe to intemperance as he was to the institution of human slavery. His father died when he was twelve years of age, and he resided for many years with his mother and the younger children of the family; marrying quite late in life, Mary Lutin, a native of Germany. They have two children—Nathaniel and Elizabeth. Mr. Carswell's farm contains 240 acres.


John H. Case
Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1880) transcribed by RuthAnne Wilke

JOHN H. CASE, (Rep.), of Eagle Corners, Richland county, was born September 26, 1817, in Franklin county, Indiana; had a common school education; is a farmer; came to Wisconsin in 1855; has held local offices; was elected assemblymen for 1880, by 747 votes against 2 6 for D. Morrison, Democrat, and 234 for Jay Briggs, Greenbacker.


F. P. Casey
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Tammy Clark

F. P. Casey, M. D., located at Richland Center, in April, 1882. He is a graduate of the University of Buffalo, N. Y., and consequently entitled to the confidence granted him by the public. He was born in Sandusky City, Ohio, April 29, 1857, and early in life commenced the study of medicine. Dr. Casey is a member of the Masonic fraternity.


George W. Cass
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

George W. Cass, son of James M. and Mary (Taplin) Cass, was born in Ohio, Feb. 19, 1836, and was fifteen years old when his parents settled in Richland county. He was married in 1859 to Margaret J. Beaver, daughter of Christian and Catharine Beaver, and a native of Mifflin Co., Penn. He then went to Spring Green and purchased a farm, lived there one year, after which he returned to this county, and settled in the valley of Little Willow, on section 7, land that he had bought in 1856. It was then in its natural state, mostly covered with brush. He now has 120 acres of the 160 under cultivation; has erected good frame buildings and has altogether a pleasant home. Mr. and Mrs. Cass are the parents of six children—Mary, Charles, Jennie, Frank, Nellie and Lucy. Jennie died March 7, 1883, of diptheria.


James M. Cass
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

James M. Cass, a pioneer of Richland county, was born in the town of Stanstead, province of Quebec, Canada, March 24, 1808. His grandfather was a native of New Hampshire, and had emigrated, in company with eight others, to Stanstead, then a wilderness. Here the subject of this sketch grew to manhood, obtaining his education in the common schools. He was married Feb. 19, 1829, to Mary Taplin, who was born in Stanstead county, Feb. 12, 1809. He built a house near his old home, where he lived two years, then moved to the homestead and remained till 1835, when he came to the States, located in Ohio, near the Pennsylvania line and there formed a partnership with a mill owner and operated a flouring mill three years, then moved to Wellsburg, where he engaged in the same business. From there he went to Crawford county, and in company with a cousin built a mill, which they operated about three years, successfully. He then sold his interest. In 1847, accompanied by his family, he started with teams, overland, for the territory of Wisconsin. After thirty days travel they arrived in Sauk county, and settled in what is now the town of Spring Green. He was chairman of the first board of supervisors of that town, and gave the town its name. In 1851 he came to Richland county and purchased a claim on section 3, town 10 north, range 1 east, now in the town of Richland. He entered this land and then returned for his family. They started with two teams loaded with their household goods. There was no regularly traveled road in those days, and their progress was necessarily slow. They reached Beemer's Tavern in time for dinner, after which they again started, but had gone only a little distance when one load of their goods tipped over. They quickly re-loaded and started on, but before reaching their destination, the other load capsized causing another delay. They reached their cabin after dark, much fatigued by the day's journey. In one of the loads was some honey which, when the load tipped over, was spilled, rendering a number of household articles very sticky and sweet. The next day the wild bees scented the honey and came swarming around to gather it. I. S. Freeborn, who had come with the family, noticed them, and knowing something of the habits of bees, made up his mind that their abiding place was not far distant. He persuaded Mr. Cass to start with him in search of it. They soon found two swarms from which they gathered 150 pounds of honey. Not long after this, Mr. Freeborn started out in search of a shoat that had been missing for several days. He had not proceeded far, before he discovered a bear. He raised his gun and fired, but it was nearly dark and the bear was partly concealed in the brush. He hurried back for lights and assistance. On returning, they found the bear dead. A team was procured and the bear drawn to the house. As soon as Mr. Cass got fairly settled, he commenced building a saw-mill on Pine river. He constructed a stone and brush dam, procuring a fall of six and a half feet. The mill was furnished with an up and down saw. He operated it successfully four years, then sold to William Bowen, came to Ithaca and purchased his present farm, located on the northwest quarter of section 21. The place was first occupied by William Butler, an Indian, who had built a log house upon it. They lived in that a few months, when they replaced it by the frame house they now occupy. Mrs. Cass died in 1840, in Pennsylvania, leaving four children—Osman, Almina, George W. and Walter T. Mr. Cass was married again in June, 1840, to Esther A. Freeborn, who was born in Niagara Co., N. Y., March 28, 1821. Mr. Cass is an enterprising intelligent man, and has filled offices of trust in the town.


Osman Cass
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Tammy Clark

Osman Cass, M. D., was born in the town of Stanstead, Province of Quebec, Canada, June 26, 1826. He was the son of a farmer and his younger days were spent in assisting his father and going to school. At the age of nineteen, he went to Lowell, Mass., and engaged in a woolen mill, the Middlesex corporation. He remained there but a few months and returned to Canada. He purchased land and improved a farm in the town of Clifton, where he resided until 1854. He started, in the spring of that year, for Richland county to visit his brothers who had preceded him here. Being pleased with the country, he concluded to make it his home. He spent the summer with his brother, Colby. In the fall he went to Pine river and worked with his brother James in his mill, and in the spring of the year following, moved with him to Ithaca. He soon after entered land on section 21, on which he lived one year, then sold out and purchased land in section 20, where he remained about a year. He then again sold out and bought his present farm, which is pleasantly located on section 19, town of Ithaca. It is well watered by Willow creek. He has erected good frame buildings and has a pleasant home. He has been twice married—first to Julia Cass, March 11, 1846. She was born in Stanstead county. Province of Quebec, Canada, Aug. 18, 1827, and died June 6, 1846. His second wife was Harriet Hicks, a native of Sherbrooke county, born June 8, 1830. They are the parents of three children—Emma, Ella and Lydia. Dr. Cass has always been an extensive reader and careful student. In selecting reading matter, he has chosen those books which would give him the greatest amount of useful information, making a specialty of medical works. About 1870, his health failing, he employed a number of physicians, but they failed to relieve him. He then decided to begin the practice of medicine, with himself for a patient. He was successful in recovering his health, and since that time has continued to practice that profession and been generally successful. As a citizen he enjoys the confidence and respect of all good citizens.


H. W. Cate
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

H. W. Cate settled in Rockbridge in 1870, and purchased land on section 22, a small part of which was cleared. He has since cleared quite a tract, built a neat frame house and other buildings and now has a pleasant home. He is a native of the Green Mountain State, born in Orange county in July, 1833, and was there brought up on a dairy farm. When he was eighteen years old he engaged with a carpenter and joiner to learn the trade. In 1854 he came west and spent three and one half years in Cleveland, Ohio, working at his trade, and on board boats on the lake. He came from there to Dane county and purchased land in the town of Verona which he improved and where he lived until 1870 when he came to Rockbridge as before stated. Mr. Cate was married in 1853 to Violette Annis, born in Orleans Co., Vt., Jan. 7, 1836. They have one child—Benjamin Freddie, born March 5, 1876.


Stephen W. Chesemore
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

Stephen W. Chesemore, (deceased) an early settler of Rockbridge, was born in Rhode Island, May 10, 1799. When he was but ten years old his parents removed to Vermont, and became pioneers in Orleans county. His father purchased wild land in what is now the town of Troy, cleared a farm and made this his home until the time of his death. The subject of this sketch was here brought up, and married Betsy Colburn, who was born in Rhode Island. Her parents were early settlers in the town of Glover, Orleans county. Twelve children blessed this union. They lived in Orleans county until 1854, then came to Wisconsin and located in Johnstown, Rock county. That same year he came to Rockbridge and purchased the south half of the southeast quarter of section 9. In 1856 he commenced to make improvements and built a house, into which, in January, 1857, he moved his family. Here he made his home until the time of his death, which occurred Sept. 4, 1877. His widow died in April, 1881. His son, Newton, was born in the town of Troy, Orleans Co., Vt., April 5, 1836. He was brought up on the farm, receiving his education in the common schools. He came to Wisconsin with his parents in 1854, and to Rockbridge with them in 1857, where he remained a few months, then went back to Rock county, remained until 1859, then came back to Rockbridge. He enlisted in August, 1862, in the 25th Wisconsin, company B, and went to Fort Snelling, spent a few months in Minnesota, then went south and was with Sherman on his grand march to the sea, through the Carolinas, and thence to Washington, participating in many of the important battles of that remarkable campaign. He was discharged with the regiment in June, 1865, and returned to Rockbridge. He then purchased the south one-half of the southwest quarter of section 10, and commenced clearing his present farm. He was married in 1866 to Mary Fogo, widow of John Tippin. They have two children—Genie F. and John Stephen Wheeler. His son, Dighton was also born in the town of Troy, Orleans Co., Vt., in December, 1837. He came to Wisconsin with his parents in 1854, and that year he visited Richland county, made a short stay, and returned to Rock county. In the fall of 1855 he went into the pineries and spent the winter lumbering. The following summer he was employed rafting down the river and also each succeeding summer until 1861, when he enlisted in the 11th Wisconsin, company D, and went south. Among the many battles in which he participated, are mentioned the following: Siege of Vicksburg, Cotton Plantation, Jackson, Mobile, Fort Blakely and Montgomery. He re-enlisted in 1864, and served until after the close of the war, and was discharged in September, 1865, then came to Rockbridge. He was married in 1868 to Delia Hazeltine. He first purchased land on section 4, town of Rockbridge, cleared a small portion of it, and traded it for land on sections 4 and 5, where he cleared a farm and made his home until 1881. His wife died the 9th of September of that year, leaving three children—Lee, Guly and Pearl. He has rented his farm and now makes his home in Rockbridge.


Alexander Chisholm
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

Alexander Chisholm, (deceased) settled in Rockbridge in 1864. He purchased land on Fancy creek, on sections 19 and 30, in the town of Rockbridge, and adjoining land on sections 24 and 25 in the town of Marshall. He built a frame house on section 19, and unfortunately, located it too near the creek, so that when the water was high it was surrounded, and the family were obliged to leave in a boat. The house was moved to its present location on higher ground. Mr. Chisholm cleared a large tract of land and made this his home until the time of his death, Sept. 8, 1876. He was a native of Columbiana Co., Ohio, born in January, 1827. When a young man he learned the trade of stone mason, at which he worked some years. He was married in May, 1859, to Marjory McBane, who was born in Columbiana Co., Ohio, Aug. 14, 1835. Two children blessed this union—Daniel Alexander and Elizabeth Jennett. Mrs. Chisholm and the children now live at the homestead.


E. D. Clark
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

E. D. Clark was born in Sullivan Co., N. Y., Oct. 12, 1813, and the winter following removed with his parents to Berkshire Co., Mass., where he lived until he was sixteen years old, when he moved to Steuben Co., N. Y. He was a natural mechanic and always performed his own carpenter work. Dec. 28, 1834, Mary Ann Clark became his wife. He came to Wisconsin in 1855 and soon purchased land on section 38, Richwood town, and turned his attention to farming, in which he met with moderate success. He is a man with many friends. Mr. and Mrs. Clark had three sons—Ansel H., who died at the age of twenty-seven years; George and Joseph S.


Edmund Clark
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

Edmund Clark came to Richland county in the fall of 1856, and in the spring of 1857 settled on section 34, where he had purchased eighty acres of land. He was industrious, and soon his log cabin gave way to a large frame residence, and he increased his real estate to several hundred acres. He gave his entire attention to farming, and thus made a success of life. He is a native of Massachusetts, born May 12, 1817. When fourteen years of age he moved with his parents to Schuyler Co., N. Y., where, on Oct. 11, 1845, he was married to Sally Benson. They reared three children, one of whom is living—Homer J. His wife died, and in 1854 he was married to Rosetta Ann Benson. By this union one child was born, but died in infancy. Mr. Clark is unpretentious in his appearance, honorable in his dealings, hospitable to strangers, and highly esteemed.


Homer J. Clark
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio.

In the county clerk's office at this time may be found Homer J. Clark, who was elected to this position in the fall of 1882, and entered upon his duties January 1, 1883. Mr. Clark is a genial, whole-souled gentleman, affable and accommodating, ever ready to serve any one who may have business in his office, and the people of Richland county certainly exercised good judg- in their selection of an officer to this position. As a public man he has proved himself a satisfactory officer, having served several years as town clerk of Richwood, and one term as clerk of circuit court, and was assistant enrolling clerk, General Assembly, 1882. He is a Royal Arch mason, and in politics a republican. Mr. Clark is the only son of Edmund and Sally (Benson) Clark; was born in Schuyler Co., N. Y., on the 20th day of April, 1848. He was left motherless when four years old, but subsequently his father married again, and in 1856 the family came to Wisconsin and settled in the town of Richwood, Richland county, and engaged in farming. Homer received a good common school education, and afterwards taught a number of terms. He made farming a business, and at this time, in connection with his father, owns about 350 acres of land. On the 23d day of October, 1873, he was married to Ada McNelly, daughter of Dr. Henry McNelly. They have two children — Nora and Hattie.


J. S. Clark
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

J. S. Clark was born in Steuben Co., N. Y., Sept. 17, 1848, and and in the year 1855 removed with his parents to Richland Co., Wis., where he was raised on a farm, receiving a common school education. He is a natural mechanic, having inherited it from his father. March 28, 1868, he was married to Ellen S. Elliott, and in the following winter gave up farming entirely, and commenced learning the jeweler's trade in the village of Excelsior, but found that the man he was learning from was not thoroughly posted in all the intricacies of this trade, so the following winter went to St. Paul, Minn., and there took a thorough course of instruction in watch repairing, and the manufacturing of jewelry. After leaving St. Paul Mr. Clark went to Lansing, Iowa, and there took more thorough instruction in the art of making jewelry, and Oct. 12, 1871, he moved back to Richland county, where he now lives, and has established a business second to none in the county, for the repairing of watches, and manufacture of jewelry. He has all the work he can do, orders coming from from a circuit of twenty-five miles around. Mr. and Mrs. Clark had seven children, five boys and two girls, four of which are now living— Emory J., Roy E., Myrtle E. and Glen; the other three died when quite small. Mr. Clark's social standing is good, having a wide circle of friends, and he has been frequently honored with the small local offices, and is a member of De Molai Commandery, No. 15, Knights Templars, Boscobel, Wis.


P. M. Clark
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

P. M. Clark, the first postmaster of Buck Creek postoffice, was born in Lewis Co., N. Y., April 5, 1819. When he was fifteen years old he went to Canada and there learned the carpenter trade; remained a few years, returned to York State where he worked at his trade until 1844, when he returned to Canada. He was married there in 1846 to Ann Kinney, who was born in Sidney Co., Nova Scotia, Aug. 3, 1829. They remained in Canada until 1863, then moved to Lockport, N. Y., where he engaged in his trade until 1865, when he came to Richland Center. There his health failed him, and in the spring of 1878, he moved to the town of Ithaca, where he died July 5 of that year. He left a widow and nine children to mourn his loss. The children are—Charles T., George M., Sarah M., Albert, James Victor, Hattie M., Lillian, Emma F. and Minnie. In the fall of 1878 Mrs. Clark with the family returned to Richland Center and lived until 1881, when they returned to Rockbridge, settled on section 22, and opened a store where she now keeps a good assortment of articles in general use. She is postmistress of Buck Creek postoffice.


John Clarson
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

John Clarson first came to Rockbridge in 1858 and purchased land on section 14. At that time he was without a family and boarded with Hiram Austin a few months. In November of that year he went to England and there was married to Anna Cook. In February, 1859, he returned with his wife to their new home where he has cleared quite a tract of land, built a comfortable log house, and yet remains. He was born in Tamworth, Staffordshire, England, Dec. 6, 1836. When sixteen years old he entered the employ of a draper and learned that trade, which in this country would be called the dry goods trade. He served until twenty-one years old and then came to America. He landed in New York and immediately came to Wisconsin, spent a few months in Waukesha county and then came to Richland as before stated. Mrs. Clarson was born in Weitheystaky, Staffordshire, England, Jan. 17, 1839, and died in Rockbridge, Richland Co., Oct. 27, 1876, leaving five children—John Sidney, Robert Henry, Annie May, John and Charles Arthur.


Samuel Cline
Source: History of Crawford & Richland Counties, Wisconsin; Illustrated (1881) Transcribed by: Richard Ramos

Samuel Cline, one of the early settlers of Willow, was born in Marion Co., Ohio, May 22, 1825. When he was eleven years of age, his parents moved to Indiana when they were early settlers of Cass county. Here the subject of this sketch began his pioneer life. The family remained in Cass county four years, then moved to Illinois and settled in Coles county where they were again among the pioneers. He remained with his parents for a short time, then returned to Indiana, and was there married, in 1847, to Celia A. Gates, a native of Ohio, Darke county. They remained in Indiana until 1854, when they came to Wisconsin and spent two years in La Fayette county, coming to Richland county in 1856. He purchased land on section 6, of township 11, range 2 east, in the present town of Willow, and immediately began clearing a farm. He lived in a log house until 1870, when he built the frame house he now occupies. Eleven children have been born to them, of whom three are living--Edward, Henry and Stephen.


C. E. Closson
Source: History of Crawford & Richland Counties, Wisconsin Illustrated (1881) Transcribed by Richard Ramos           

C. E. Closson, the present assessor of the town of Akan, is a native of Sweden, born June 9, 1822.  He attended school as soon as old enough, until fifteen years of age, then engaged to learn the trade of dyer, at which he worked until 1849, then came to America, landed at New York, and immediately started for Chicago, going up the Hudson river by steamboat to Chicago, where e remained two and one half years, then went to Kane Col., Ill., and remained until 1855, when he started with an ox team, accompanied by his family, for Wisconsin.  They took household goods and provisions with them, camping out in true emigrant style. After three weeks of travel they arrived in Crawford county.  He entered land on section 3, of town 9, range 3 west, now known as the town of Scott.  The family lived with a neighbor until he could build a log cabin.  He continued clearing land and farming until 1862.  He enlisted in August of that year in company G, 33d Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and went south, served until after the close of the war, and was then discharged with the regiment.  Among the battles in which he participated are Nashville and siege of Vicksburg.  He was with Banks on his Red river expedition, and engaged in the battles of Pleasant Hill, Tupelo and Spanish Fort.  While in the army he received a sunstroke, from the effects of which he never fully recovered.  He was promoted to rank of corporal in 1863, and to sergeant soon after.  Upon returning, he resumed farming in Crawford county until 1866, then sold out and purchased his present farm on section 33, where he has since lived.  He was married in 1848 to Martha Linsten, also a native of Sweden, born Jan. 19, 1822.  They have had six children, five of whom are now living--Frank, William, Lizzie, Maggie and Andrew.  The first child, called Elizabeth, was born on the ocean, Sept. 22, 1849.   She died in Chicago Sept. 22, 1850.  Mr. Closson is educated in English as well as Swede, and has held offices of the town board, and is now serving his fourth term as assessor, twelfth term as district treasurer, and has always performed the duties thus imposed upon him to the satisfaction of the people.


H. F. Coates
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

H. F. Coates was born in Canada, Jan. 1, 1835, moved with his parents to Ohio in 1837, and to Grant Co., Wis., in 1851, from whence in 1856 he came to Richland county, and for thirteen years spent most of his time operating saw-mills. In 1859 he was married to Nancy Connor, daughter of Hon. Henry Connor. In 1860 he settled on section 18, where he at first purchased eighty acres, but has since made additions, until his farm now contains over 400 acres. He is engaged in raising stock. Mr. and Mrs. Coates have reared the following named children—Vellorus, Frank, Adny, Elmer, Nora, Myrtie, Clara and Lester. Mr. Coates acts with the republican party, has held local offices, and for a number of years was postmaster at Excelsior. He is a member of the I. O, O. F. W. H. Coates, in 1855^ formed a partnership with S. W. Knowlton and purchased the water power and mill property of William Haskins. They soon erected a grist-mill, and on the day they raised the mill Mr. Coates named the place ''Excelsior," a full history of which appears elsewhere. He was instrumental in having the postoffice established, an active temperance worker, and an enterprising and influential citizen. In 1864 he sold out, moved to Iowa, and engaged in hardware and agricultural implement trade. Mr. Coates was a brother of Dr. J. T. Coates. He was born in Canada. His wife was a daughter of S. W. Knowlton.


J. T. Coates, M. D.
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

J. T. Coates, M. D., is a native of Trumbull Co., Ohio, born June 18, 1840. His father, Francis Coates, was a native of England, and his mother, Eunice E. (Harvey) Coates, was born in Canada. In 1854 the family came to Wisconsin and settled in Grant county, where the father died in 1858. J. T. Coates first came to Richland county in 1857, and for some time had charge of the postoffice, also assisted his brother, W. H. Coates, about the mill. In 1861 he enlisted in the 1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry and served three months. He then re- enlisted and was mustered into service with the 2d Minnesota Sharp Shooters. He was wounded at the battle of Antietam, which disabled him so that he was discharged in February, 1863. He afterwards served as first lieutenant of a company stationed in the northwest to ward off the Indians, but resigned his commission and returned to Excelsior. He soon went to Iowa and engaged in mercantile trade, which did not seem congenial to his tastes, he having from early boyhood had a desire to study medicine. He first entered the university at Iowa City, and afterwards graduated in the College of Physicians and Surgeons, at Keokuk. He commenced practice in 1871 at Excelsior, was afterwards at Muscoda and Montfort, but in 1883 returned to Excelsior. In 1876 Sarah S. Kite became his wife. They have one son—J. Floyd. Dr. Coates is a democrat in politics, a member of the I. O. O. F., the I. O. G. T., the G. A. R., the State Medical Society and the Southwestern Wisconsin Medical Association.


J. W. Coffinberry
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio.

J. W. Coffinberry came to Richland county in 1849, from Michigan, and settled with his family at Richland City. He was elected the first county judge of the county, but resigned in 1852. During 1852 and 1853 he kept a hotel and real estate office in Richland City, and was quite a prominent man in public affairs. In 1856 he had his name changed by the board of supervisors from "J. W. Coffinberry" to "C. Bre." It was always a mystery why he took this step. The only reason he offered the board for the change was, that the sound of the name "Coffinberry" when simmered down was really nothing more than "C. Bre." He remained in the county until just before the war broke out when he moved to Kansas, he and his wife having separated. His sons having got into the stock business pretty extensively, he now lives with them. Mr. Coffinberry, or perhaps, more properly Mr. Bre, did not engage in active practice when he first came to the county, but after resigning the office of county judge, and having his name changed he devoted a good deal, if not all, of his time to the profession. He was a man of a good deal more than ordinary education for those days, and a man of much ability. He was affable and pleasant in his manners, and held the respect of the early settlers.


Hon. Henry Conner
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

Hon. Henry Conner was the first man elected to represent Richland county in the State Assembly. He was the candidate of the democratic party; and his opponent was Sexton. He served the people one term and gave good satisfaction, but has since had but little to do with politics. He has, however, held the office of justice of the peace almost continually for thirty years, also served as chairman of the town board. Mr. Conner was born in Virginia in 1798, learned the tanner's trade, and in 1827 united in marriage with Jane Colton. In 1832 he moved to Ohio and one year later to Johnston Co., Ind., from whence he came to Wisconsin and has since been engaged in farming in the town of Richwood. He is a Presbyterian in his religious views, and a man who has the esteem of all who know him. His wife died Oct. 23, 1878. She had given birth to nine children, five of whom survived her in life—William H., Mary E., Margaret S., Rebecca C. and Nancy A.


William Cooper
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

William Cooper, one of the pioneers of Richland county, was born in Butler Co, Penn., March 21, 1801, where his youth was spent. He was married in 1823 to Martha Clark, also a native of Butler county and born in April, 1802. He purchased a tract of land and cleared a farm, living on the same for six years, when he sold out and engaged in selling goods on the road for two years. He then worked on the Chenango canal three years, when he went to Ohio and was employed on the Maumee canal one year, then went to Indiana and engaged in farming one year in Clinton county. In 1849 he made his first visit to Richland county and purchased the east half of the northwest quarter of section 11. After a short time he returned to Indiana and remained until 1850. Then with a team, accompanied by his family, and taking their household goods along with them, started for their new home. At that time there was no settlement in the neighborhood of his land, and he purchased another tract on section 26, cleared a portion of the same and remained there until 1869, then sold out and moved to Muscoda, and made a contract with the Government to carry the mail between Muscoda, Readstown and Viroqua, and was thus employed four years. For the past few years he has made his home with his son William. He is now eighty-three years old and retains his faculties to a remarkable degree. His wife died in June, 1857, leaving twelve children, six sons and six daughters. Three of the sons served in the Union army — John Wesley enlisted in the fall of 1862, in the 20th Wisconsin, company H, and went south, and died while in the service, at Springfield, Mo., March 23, 1863. William H. was born in Mercer Co., Penn., June 25, 1836, and came to Richland county with his parents. He was married July 9, 1857, to Amy Eliot, who was born in Darke Co., Ohio, Oct. 17, 1840. In 1863 he settled on his present farm. He enlisted in February, 1864, in the 14th Wisconsin, company K, went south and joined Sherman at Big Shantie, Ga. He served until Oct. 9, 1865, when he was discharged at Mobile, Ala. The following are among the important battles in which he participated: Big Shantie, Baker's Ridge, Atlanta, Ezra Church, Jonesboro, Lovejoy Station, Nashville and Spanish Fort. While in the service he lost his health, and has never fully recovered, but has devoted his time since his return in improving his land. He has three children—Isaiah L., Thomas W. and Lucy A, His brother, Thomas M., enlisted in 1861 in the 5th Wisconsin, company H. He was sixteen years old at the time, served sixteen months and was discharged on account of disability. He re-enlisted in December, 1863, in the 3d Wisconsin, company H, joined Sherman's command, and was with him on his march to the sea, through the Carolinas and thence to Washington where he was discharged in August, 1865.


Horace Cornwall
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

Horace Cornwall, (deceased) was born in the State of New York, April 21, 1813, and there attained his majority, obtaining his education in the public schools. He was married in 1836 to to Diantha Burrington, who was born in Colerain, Franklin Co., Mass., July 18, 1818. Soon after marriage they emigrated to Ohio and settled at Doane's Corner, which is now a part of the city of Cleveland. He there engaged in teaming about a year and then moved to the town of Royalton, where he purchased a farm, remaining there until 1863. He came to Richland county in that year and purchased land of James Appleby on section 34 of the town of Eagle. Here with the assistance of his sons, he cleared a farm of nearly 100 acres and made this his home until the time of his death which occurred Dec. 6, 1883. Mrs. Cornwall occupies the homestead. She has nine children living—Horatio, Matilda, Axsa, Horace, Irena, Albert, Mary, Martha and John. Their second son, Enos, was born in Royalton, Ohio, June 13, 1840. He lived with his parents in Ohio until 1860, when he came to Wisconsin and spent three years in Dane county, then came to Richland, and taught school in the Basswood school house, in the winter of 1863-4. In January, 1865, he enlisted in the 49th Wisconsin, company B, and went south. He died while in the service, at Rolla, Mo., July 28, 1865. Horatio, the eldest son, is the present town clerk. He was born in Cleveland, Ohio, March 6, 1838. He grew to manhood in the town of Royalton, Ohio, obtaining his education in the public schools. In 1862 he came to Wisconsin and rented a farm in Dane county, where he was married, Jan. 18, 1863, to Sophrona Johnson, who was born in Huron Co., Ohio. He came to Richland county in 1864. On Feb. 8, 1865, he enlisted in the 44th Wisconsin, company H, and went south, and was taken sick at Paducah, Ky., in April, and in June was discharged from the hospital at Jeffersonville, Ind., and returned home. He was unable to do any work until the following spring when he settled on the farm which is now his home. It is located on section 16. He was first elected town clerk in 1877, and has held the office continuously except in 1878, when he was chairman of the board. He has held the office of justice of the peace for several years. Mr. and Mrs. Cornwall have two children living—Charles and Ella. Charles is a teacher in the public schools.


William Coulter
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

William Coulter, one of the early settlers of the town of Marshall, is a native of Ohio. He was born in Clinton county, Sept. 27, 1815. His father was a soldier in the War of 1812 and died while in the United States service, in 1815, four months previous to the birth of the subject of this sketch. When he was two years of age his mother was married to Amos Wilson, and continued to reside in Clinton county where he grew to manhood, obtaining his education in the district school. At twenty-two years of age he left home and went to Indiana and located in Delaware county. He was married there to Barbara Babb, who was born in Clinton county, March 4, 1817. He purchased land in Delaware county and improved a farm. In 1855 he came to Richland county and entered land on section 7, town of Marshall. He then returned to Indiana and remained until August, 1856, then, in company with his family, started with a pair of oxen and a span of horses for their new home, taking their household goods and cooking utensils with them. They camped out upon the way and arrived at their destination after three weeks of travel. They first moved into a log cabin in Sylvan, while he could erect one on his land. The following winter, while Mr. Coulter was absent from home, one of the children informed Mrs. Coulter that there was a deer near by. She armed herself with the rifle and went out and shot it. When her husband returned he found her and the children engaged in skinning the animal. Mr. Coulter has since cleared a large farm and the log cabin has been replaced by the neat frame dwelling, which they now occupy. Mr. and Mrs. Coulter have four children—Calvin W., John B., Smith G. and Eli S. John B. is still living at home with his parents and he is the present town treasurer.


J. Robert Coumbe
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

J. Robert Coumbe, of the firm of Logan & Coumbe, is a son of John Coumbe. He was born in 1855. He received a common school education and helped till the soil until 1878, when he engaged in the general merchandise business. On Oct. 31, 1883, he was married to a daughter of George Krouskop.


William Cratsenberg
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

William Cratsenberg, one of the earliest settlers of Richland county, was born in Lewis county, town of Denmark, State of New York, in August, 1821. His father, Nicholas Cratsenberg, was a native of Montgomery county, York State, and one of the early settlers of Lewis county. The subject of this sketch was here brought up, receiving a liberal education in the public schools. When quite young he commenced to work in his father's tannery, learned that trade, and a few years later the trade of boot and shoe making. He was married in 1843 to Catharine Rich, also a native of Lewis county, where he purchased a farm of 100 acres, and engaged in dairying. In 1861 he sold out and started west to seek a home. He came on the lakes to Milwaukee, and then with one horse and a wagon started for Richland county, coming directly to the town now known as Ithaca, and entered land on Willow creek, on section 18, where he commenced building a log house. He harvested wheat on the shares and that same fall had to haul his grain to Iowa county to find a mill for grinding. The following spring moved into his new house, and raised his first crop of corn in 1852. In the fall of this year (1852) he went to mill at Black Earth, Dane county. The year following he sold this place and moved to Sextonville, where he purchased town property and engaged in the boot and shoe trade. Two years afterward he purchased the tavern well known as The Ark, conducting the same until 1858, then sold out and bought timber land on section 28, town of Henrietta; here he built a log house and stables and immediately commenced to clear a farm. In 1880 his stables were struck by lightning and destroyed, together with, stock and farming utensils. The frame house in which he now lives was built in 1879. His first wife died in February, 1849, leaving two children—Deett and Dowite. His second wife, to whom he was married April 10, 1851, was Louisa Burdick, a native of Lincoln, Chenango Co., N. Y., born June 15, 1827. By this union there were five children—Nicholas Leroy, Celinda E., James B., Adam A. J. and Eugene S. Mr. Cratsenberg assisted in the organization of the town of Ithaca, and proposed the name which it still bears.


William Crawford
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by Mary Saggio.

William Crawford came to Richland county in 1855, and settled upon a farm in the town of Ithaca. In 1856 he moved into Richland Centre, and began the practice of law, becoming a partner of lawyer Frost, of Mineral Point. He had never read very much law, but was a man of much more than ordinary intelligence and information, and had very good success at the bar, before the circuit court.


M. H. B. Cunningham
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881), transcribed by Mary Saggio.

M. H. B. Cunningham, a merchant at Rockbridge, was born in Huntingdon Co., Penn., April 11, 1842. When he was but an infant his parents removed to Illinois, and lived in Adams county four years, then came to Wisconsin, and lived in Potosi, Grant county, five years, and in Wingville, eighteen months, then moved to Iowa county, where his father purchased a farm. Here the subject of this sketch grew up, making his home with his parents until nineteen years old. Then in December, 1861, he enlisted in the 18th Wisconsin, company B, and immediately went to the front. He was engaged in the battle of Shiloh, and taken prisoner. He was confined in the prisons at Tuscaloosa, Mobile, Montgomery and Macon, Ga. He was paroled from Libby prison after a confinement of six months, and thirteen days. He joined the regiment in April, 1863, in Louisiana. Among the more important battles in which he participated the following are mentioned: Raymond, Miss., Jackson, Miss., Champion Hills and siege of Vicksburg. During this siege his regiment went to Mechanicsburg and participated in the battle there. After the fall of Vicksburg he was detailed to do guard duty at the depot two months. The regiment then went to Dixon's Station to repair the railroad; thence west to Chattanooga, taking part in the battle of Missionary Ridge and Allatoona Pass; joined Sherman at Atlanta, and was with him on his march to the sea. He was relieved from duty at Savannah in March, 1865, after having served three months more than his time. He returned to Madison and was there discharged. He then went to Blanchardville, Lafayette county, and worked at farming a few months, then opened a restaurant in Blanchardville, remaining there until 1867, when he came to Rockbridge, as before stated, where he has since conducted a successful mercantile trade. In 1883 he bought a steam saw-mill, which he put up at Rockbridge, and has been engaged in the lumber trade. He has been twice married. The first time, in 1865, to Hannah Cline. They had six children, four living—William, John, Frank and Fred. Two daughters died in 1877. Mrs. Cunningham died Oct. 24, 1877. His second wife was Luela Lieurance. They have one child—Bernie.
 


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