Richland County, Wisconsin
Town History
Town of Akan
Source: History of Crawford & Richland Counties, Wisconsin Illustrated (1881) Transcribed by: Richard Ramos

The town of Akan is one of the western tier of Richland county’s towns, the second from the south, embracing congressional township 10 north, of range 2 west. It is bonded on the north by the town of Sylvan; on the east by Dayton; on the south by Richwood; and on the west by Crawford county. The surface of the town is well watered by Mill and Knapp’s creeks, and their numerous tributaries. The valleys are very fertile and in many cases the ridges furnish excellent farming land. Wherever an enterprising farmer has taken hold and cleared land, a good and profitable farm has rewarded him. As yet there is considerable unimproved land in the town, which will probably in the near future be cleared and brought under cultivation.

Early Settlement

The first settlement within the limits now comprising the town of Akan was effected in the spring of 1851 by Martin Munson, Ole Johnson and John Torgeson, a party of Norwegians, who came from Dodgeville. Martin Munson entered land on sections 20 and 27, where he erected a log cabin and commenced improvements. This was then on what might be called the extreme frontier, and many travelers on their way westward were entertained in Munson’s little log cabin. Mr. Munson was an industrious and thrifty man and accumulated considerable property. He remained here until the time of his death, and his widow now lives on section 27.

Ole Johnson entered the northwest quarter of the northwest of section 35. He died there on the 18th of March, 1855. His widow married Christian Jacobson and still resides in the town.

John Torgerson remained but a short time and then returned to Dodgeville. Two years later he came back and entered the southeast quarter of the southeast quarter of section 33, where he still lives.

Nels Hanson, who also came with this party, settled in the town of Richwood where he still lives.

B. C. Hallin, a native of Ireland, came here in 1852 and entered land on sections 17 and 18, but did not settle here until 1854. He now lives in the town of Richland.

William Elder, a Virginian, was an early settler in the southern part of Richland county. He made a business of showing the pioneers land, and did a great deal toward the settling up of this region. In 1855 he settled on section 3, in the town of Akan. He resided in the town for a few years, then went to Crawford county and later removed to Dakota territory where he died. He was with the government surveyors when they surveyed the town of Akan and was noted as a great hunter and an extra good marksman.

David Woodruff came here in 1854 and settled on the southeast quarter of section 3. In 1875 he sold out and moved to Dakota. He now lives in Otter Tail Co., Minn.

James Brady, a native of Ireland, came in 1854 and settled just over the line in Crawford county. In 1861 he purchased land on section 19, this town, where he has since resided.

Lewis Dieter, a native of Germany, came here in 1854 and settled on section 25, where he still lives. He was accompanied by his father and three brothers. For a time they all lived together, the father and one of the brothers dying here. The rest are still residents of the county.

George Hall, an Irishman, and a veteran of the Mexican War, came here in 1853 and entered 160 acres on sections 19 and 20. He remained about two years, then sold out and left. The locality in which he settled has since been called Hanson’s bottom.

William Anderson, a native of Indiana, came in 1854 and settled on the southwest quarter of section 30. He remained about three years and then returned to Indiana.

A Scotchman names Penny came in 1854 and settled on the northwest quarter of section 27. He improved a farm and remained for several years, when he went to Minnesota.

William Smith, an Englishman, came at the same time and located on section 21. He went to Minnesota with Penny.

Samuel Yager was an early settler in the town of Eagle. In 1854 he came to “Akan and located on the southwest quarter of section 21. He was a veteran of the Mexican War. He was a cabinet maker by trade and put up a shop, in which he manufactured chairs, bedsteads, etc. When the war broke out, he enlisted and served until its close. Having ruined his health in the service, soon after his return he sold out and removed to Excelsior, where he still lives.

Joseph Sunson came in 1854 and settled on section 23, where he cleared a farm and lived for some years. He afterwards removed to Richwood where he died.

Horace Waite, from Ohio, came here in 1855 and settled on the northwest quarter of section 3, He cleared a small tract of land and remained here about three years, when he sold out and went to Orion, where he engaged in the mercantile trade. During war times he went to Canada. He now lives at Muscoda.

Esee Spreig came from Illinois in the fall of 1854, and settled on the northeast quarter of section 4. Four or five years later he sold out and returned to Illinois.

Zenas W. Bevier, a native of New York State, came here in 1855, from Rock Co., Wis. He entered 120 acres of land on section 2, and lived here until the time of his death.

Frank Morningstar, a German, came here in the fall of 1855, and settled on section 2. He cleared a good farm and made this his home until he died.

Mathew Ryan, an Irishman, also came in 1855. He settled on section 3.

Jefferson Smith, came here from Illinois in 1855, and settled on the northeast quarter of section 6. He cleared a small tract of land and remained here about twelve years, when he removed to Richwood. He is now dead.

Julius Jenks also came from Illinois during the same year. He settled on the northeast quarter of section 8, where he remained for some years and then went to the mountains.

William Percy came in 1855 and claimed the northeast quarter of section 8. He afterwards sold his claim and left the country after a short stop.

Jacob Lawrence purchased Percy’s claim and improved it. He lived here until 1864, when he sold out and removed to the town of Eagle. He is now in the mercantile trade at Eagle Corners.

John Chitwood, a native of Tennessee, came from Indiana in 1855 and settled on the northeast quarter of section 5, where he lived until the time of his death. He raised fifteen children, and the widow and a number of children are still living in the county.

Patrick Hines, a native of Ireland, came in 1855 and settled on section 30, where he still lives.

William Dobbs, a native of Tennessee, came here from Lafayette Co., Wis., in the spring of 1855, and entered 350 acres of land on sections 5, 6, 7 and 8. He lived here for a number of years, and then went to the Black river country. He afterwards returned and settled in Richwood, where he died in 1876. Two of his sons are still living in the town.

Henry Bailey, a native of Rhode Island, came in 1855 and settled on section 7. He now lives in Nebraska. Two of his sons are still residents of this town.

David Claney, a native of Ireland, came in 1855 and entered land on section 15, where he still lives.

James Bachtenkiercher, a native of Ohio, came to this county from Indiana in 1855, and located in the town of Sylvan. In 1878 he moved into the town of Akan, and is still a resident.

Squire Shaffer, a native of Ohio, came here in 1850 and settled on the southwest quarter of section 1, where he still lives.

F. A. Harsha, a Kentuckian, came here from Iowa county in 1856, and settled on section 36, where he still lives.

John Kelly, a native of Ireland, came here from Madison in 1856 and settled on section 18, where he still lives.

William Core, native of New Jersey, came here from Orion in 1856, and purchased land on section 24. He was the first settler in the locality known as Core Hollow, it being named after him.

Educational

The first school in district No. 1 was taught, in 1856, by Martha A. Funson, at the residence of Zenas W. Bevier. In 1857 a temporary log school house was erected by the district, in which Sarah Wood was the first teacher. In 1868 this building was destroyed by fire, and the present house was erected upon the site.

The first school house in district No. 2 was erected in 1860, of hewn logs. The first term of school was taught by Charity Williams, on the subscription plan. She “boarded round.”

This school house was used until 1881, when the district erected a frame building on the northeast quarter of section 9, about forty rods west of the site of the old building. Nettie Harris was the first teacher in the new house.

The first school in district No. 3 was taught by George Watson, in the winter of 1856-7, in a house belonging to William Dobbs. A few years later a log school house was erected on the southwest quarter of section. In 1869 the present school house was erected on the southeast quarter of section 6, of hewn logs. Cordelia Daggett was the first teacher in this building.

The first school house in district No. 4 was built in 1859, of logs, and covered with shakes. It was located on the southeast quarter of section 18. J. J. Brown was the first teacher. This building was used until 1880, when the present school house was erected near the old site. Alice Hallin was the first teacher in this house.

The first school in district No. 5 was taught in a house belonging to D. F. Coates, which was located on the southwest quarter of section 22. Mary Ann Fay and T. J. Ellsworth were among the first teachers in the district. The first school house erected was a log one, which was located on D. F. Coates’ land. The present school house is located on the southwest quarter of section 15.

The school house in district No. 6 was erected in 1861. It is of logs, located on the northwest quarter of section 24. Amelia Van Alstine was the first teacher in this house. Belle Glass is the present teacher.
The first school in district No. 7 was taught by Annie Humbert, in D. D. Evans’ house on section 36. In 1866 a log school house was erected on the northwest quarter of section 36. This house was used but a few years on the same site.

The first school in district No. 8 was taught by Susanna Bolton, in a little log school house located on the southeast quarter of section 33. The school house is now located on the southwest quarter of section 27.

The first school house in district No. 9 was a log one erected on the northeast quarter of section 31, during the war. Maria Maroney was the first teacher. The first school house was destroyed by fire a few years after its erection, and the present frame house was built on the old site.

Religious

At an early day the Methodists held services in the northeastern part of the town, and a class was organized that flourished for several years. Prominent among the members were David Woodruff and wife, Mrs. Polly Crothers, Mrs. Esther Barnes, and Elijah Austin and wife. Rev. Prince was the first preacher, and after him, Revs. Hafus, Walker and Elihu Bailey at different times officiated. The class only remained in existence for a few years, and then, as some of the members moved away, it was dropped.

The United Brethren organized at the school house shortly after the discontinuance of the Methodist class. Most of its members had belonged to the M. E. class. Rev. Potts was the first minister for the United Brethren class. Among the ministers who have filled the pulpit since are Revs Young, Wright, Snell and Haskins. This class was continued for several years.

In 1873 the Christians organized a church in the school house of district No 3, under the management of Revs. Jacob Felton and Lewis Himes. Among the first members of this church were Albert S. Bailey and wife, Isaac Ferguson, William Fosnow and wife, John Beaman and Wilson Slayback and wife. John Beaman was elected the first class leader. This class met at the school house for about two years, and then merged with the Harmony Church. Revs. Himes. Felton and Packet were among the pastors of the church. A Sabbath school was organized at the same time as this church, with John Beaman as superintendent. It met weekly and had a good attendance.

Akan Postoffice

This post office was established in 1856, with Zenas W. Bevier as postmaster. The office was kept at his house on the northeast quarter of section 2, and was on the mail route from Muscoda to Viroqua. Mr. Bevier was postmaster until the time of his death in 1861. D. D. Woodruff was then appointed postmaster and the office was removed across the line to the town of Sylvan. He was succeeded by Perry Dayton, and then in order came Mrs. Zenas Bevier, Mrs. William Smith, Edgar Harvey and William M. Bevier, who was the last postmaster. He resigned in 1877 and the office was discontinued.

Brady’s Postoffice

This post office was established in 1868, James Brady was appointed first postmaster and has kept the office ever since at his residence on section 19. At first the office was on the route from Richland Center to De Soto, and mail was received once each week. At present it is on the mail route from Muscoda to Sugar Grove, and mail is received once a week from each way.

Saw Mills

In 1856 Isaac Miles erected a saw-mill on section 30. A dam was thrown across Knapp’s creek and the mill was equipped with an up and down saw. He ran the mill for a few years and then sold to A. Wright, of Muscoda, Grant county, who rented the mill to different parties. Anthony Tracy is the present owner of the property, but the dam has gone out and the mill is no longer in use. This mill was not a success.

About 1853 a man names Barnes settled on the southwest quarter of section 19. He here erected a saw-mill, deriving the power from Mill creek. It was furnished with an up and down saw. It was a small affair, and was only run for a few years. The old frame is still standing, a monument to an unsuccessful enterprise.

During the war, William Osborne erected a flouring mill on the west branch of Mill creek, being aided in the enterprise by the citizens in the neighborhood. This was shortly after the Boaz mill had been burned, and Rudolf’s was the nearest mill for this neighborhood. Mr. Osborne built a dam of brush and dirt, which set the water back and sent it through a race, which carried it to a spring under the bluffs. The outlet of the spring formed the tail race. A small frame building, boarded up and down with pine lumber was erected and one run of buhrs was put in. The mill did a good business until the mill at Boaz was rebuilt, soon after which Osborne traded the property to Edgar Harvey, of Richwood, for a farm. Mr. Harvey operated the mill for a time, and then disposed of it. Since that time it has changed hands frequently, and has not been running constantly, The present proprietor is William McRobbins, who has repaired the building and refurnished the mill. It still has one run of buhrs and the necessary machinery for doing good work. A saw-mill equipped with a rotary saw has recently been attached.

Stores

At an early day, J. J. Brown, a school teacher, opened a store on section 7. He purchased his stock of goods of Pease & Baker, at Richland Center. His means were limited, and for a time he worked under disadvantages. He did a credit business, often trusting parties whom other merchants refused; but he was a shrewd business man and a good collector, and made money rapidly. In a sort time he removed to Excelsior and opened a store there. He is still in trade there, and is one of the most substantial merchants in the county.

James Brady opened a store at his home, and for about ten years kept a general stock of goods and did a good business. At the end of this period he closed out, and has since devoted his time to farming.

Organic

The town of Akan was created by the county board of supervisors at the November session, 1855. It was organized at a town meeting held at the house of Martin Munson, April 1, 1856. The inspectors of the election were Zenas W. Bevier, Henry Miller and Julius C. Jenks. George Barnes was clerk. The following were the first town officers elected: Supervisors, Zenas W. Bevier, chairman, Rawley Crothers and Votany Butman; clerk, G. R. Barnes; superintendent of schools, Zenas W. Bevier; treasurer, William Anderson; justices of the peace, William Anderson and G. R. Barnes; constables, William Elder and Joseph Dunson; assessor, William Elder. There were twenty-eight votes polled at this election.

At the annual town meeting held at the Center school house April 3, 1883 there were 114 votes polled, and the following officers were elected: Supervisors, James Bachtenkircher, chairman; John Huffman, Levi Pierce; clerk, A. M. Turgasen; treasurer, George Armstrong (appointed); assessor, C. E. Clarson; justices, James Bachtenkircher, J. L. Puckitt, A. D. Denison and F. M. Shafer; constables, G. W. Hartman, Tim Kelly and W. H. Helm; health officer, Robert Webb.

Basswood
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin Illustrated (1881) Transcribed by: Richard Ramos

Robert W. Peters was the first to engage in mercantile trade at Basswood. In 1869 he put a stock of goods in the one room of his dwelling, opening a country general merchandise store. A few years later he put up a building 18x26 feet in size, and took in John Blickenstaff as a partner. Six months later he sold out to his partner, and a few weeks afterward bought the establishment again. He continued the business until 1873, when he closed out his stock.

The next to engage in business here were McIntire & Eleston. Mr. McIntire soon bought his partner’s interest. In 1883 Joseph S. Peters purchased an interest, and now runs the store, Mr. McIntire is in trade in Muscoda.

Norman W. Bennett established a blacksmith shop here in 1879, erecting a two story building. He has since done a flourishing business.

In 1884 R. C. Brown and C. F. Wallace put in operation a steam saw-mill, which is still running.

The United Brethren Church was organized at the Basswood school house in December, 1865, by Rev. George Kite. The following were among the members: James Willey and wife, Charles Johnson and wife, William Warren and wife, Mrs. Thomas Goff and Mrs. William Briggs. Charles Johnson was the first class leader. Among the preachers who have held services here are the following: Revs. Young, Potts, Day, Taylor, Bovee, Whitney and Hood. At present no regular services are held.

The Basswood cemetery was laid out in 1861, on section 16. The land was donated by Thomas Hardy and Mrs. Francis Keplogle, each giving half an acre. The first burial was of the remains of a child of Thomas Hardy. The ground has never been surveyed, and the cemetery is free to all citizens of the town. At a meeting held for the purpose, James Lucas, Charles Johnson and Thomas Rummery were elected trustees. Subscriptions were solicited and money raised to fence the grounds.

Basswood postoffice was established in 1869. Jacob Bear was appointed first postmaster, but before he got his commission he sold his farm and moved away. James Lucas was therefore appointed in his stead. Robert Peters was the next postmaster, keeping the office at his store. The next was Joseph Stanley, who kept the office at his house on section 9. Robert Peters succeeded Mr. Stanley. He has deputized his son Joseph, and the office is kept at his store.


BEAR CREEK VALLEY.
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin Illustrated, chapter 21 (1884) transcribed by RuthAnne Wilke

The eastern part of the town of Buena Vista includes Bear Creek valley, which is one of the finest sections of country to be found in the State of Wisconsin. From the point where Bear creek enters the town to its place of exit into the Wisconsin river, includes a distance of about six miles. The average width of the valley is about one mile. In the early history of the town wheat and other cereals were grown in great abundance; but for a number of years this valley has been devoted extensively to grazing and dairying.

There are two cheese factories in this valley, within the limits of the town of Buena Vista, which do an extensive business. L. G. Thomas is the pioneer in the cheese making business in the State of Wisconsin. He began in 1865, and for many years did an extensive business.

In 1867 George Carswell and his brothers, John H. and Nathaniel, began the manufacture of cheese, using that year the milk of about 100 cows. They ran a private dairy till 1873. The business was conducted for a number of years by George J. Carswell & Son, J. A. Carswell being associated with his father in the business. That is till the style of the firm, Fred E. Carswell being the junior member . The present factory was erected in 1882. This is one of the most complete factories to be found in the Stated. The size of the building is 24x45 feet; its full capacity of cheese is 1,500 pounds per day. It is furnished with all the modern improvements, and its facilities for rapid and excellent work is not excelled. During the year 1883 this factory manufactured into cheese the milk from 400 cows. The following is a statement of its product for three consecutive years:

1881---Cheese, 100,000 pounds, value $10,500; butter, 3,000, value $900; total, $11,400.
1882---Cheese, 120,000 pounds, value $12,800; butter, 4,000 pounds, value $1,200; total, $14,000.
1883---Cheese, 160,000 pounds, value $17,000; butter, 5,000 pounds, value $1.500; total, $18,500.

The Easton cheese factory was erected, in 1871, by H. L. Eaton. During the first year the factory used the milk of about 200 cows. The establishment now has a capacity of manufacturing 700 pounds per day. An unlimited amount of cold spring waters runs through the factory from a spring a few rods distant. In the spring of 1878 the factory was purchased by J. M. Thomas. During the years 1882 and 1883 the milk from about 500 cows was regularly consumed. At present the greatest number of cows furnished by any one patron is sixty. They are kept on the factory farm. There are nine patrons who furnish from twenty-five to forty cows each. These are Messrs. Brace, Fredrickson, Van Arnan, Burnham, Ellsworth, Winterburn, Greenback, Wade an-d Thomas. Five patrons furnish from fifteen to twenty-five cows each---Bunyan, Webley, Brainard, Dixon and Southard.

TOWN ORGANIZATION.

During the winter of 1848-49, the town of Buena Vista was organized by an act of the Legislature, and on the first Tuesday in April, 1849, the electors of the town met at the house of I. H. Wallace in Richland City, and organized by choosing J. W. Coffinberry moderator and C. W. Morris, clerk. The polls were opened and twenty votes were cast. The following officers were elected: Supervisors, J. W. Coffinberry, chairman, Israel Janney and Jonathan Ingram; clerk, C. W. Morris; assessor, Phineas Janney; treasurer, Samuel Long; justice of the Peace, N. Wheeler, J. W. Coffinberry, O. L. Britton and J. W. Briggs; inspector of Schools, E. B. Beason. The returns were taken to Mineral Point, Iowa county.

The town officers of Buena Vista in 1883 were as follows: Supervisors, J. Q. Black, chairman, William Krelmer and J. W. Southard; clerk, R. R. Eldred; treasurer, William Furguson; assessor, C. E. Brace; justice of the Peace, J. W. Fuller, L. D. Goodrich and W. E. Lewis; constable, A. S. Lee.


Town of Bloom
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin Illustrated (1881) Transcribed by: Richard Ramos

The town of Bloom embraces congressional township 12 north, of range 1 west, and is in the northern tier of Richland county’s civil sub-division. It is bounded on the north by Vernon county; on the east by the town of Henrietta; on the south by Marshall and on the west by Forest. The surface of the town is broken and hilly. One main ridge extends through the western portion of the town from north to south, while on each side of this are smaller, or connecting ridges, extending to the east and west. On the ridges the soil varies; in some places being a rich black loam, and again, a yellow clay; and all is very productive. In the valleys the soil is a rich dark loam. In seasons of high water the valleys are in places overflown, and farmers often lose a portion of their crops. The town is well watered, making it a desirable and profitable locality for stock raising. The most important stream is the West Branch of Pine river which rises on section 5. On its way through the eastern part of the town it is joined by six spring tributaries.

Early Settlement

The first settlement within the limits now comprising the town of Bloom was made, in 1853, by Isaac McMahan, who, during that year, came and entered 120 acres of land on section 23. He was followed, the same year, by Daniel Householder, who entered 320 acres of land on section 35. He owned this land until the time of his death in 1879. He was ninety-nine years of age.

Edward Morris came during the same year and entered eighty acres on section 26.

John Rogers came in the spring of 1853 and entered land on section 18. He improved the land during the following summer, and then returned to Indiana, where he died shortly afterward.

Israel Cooper came at about the same time and entered 240 acres, part of which was on section 26. He erected his house on that section.

In 1854 Reuben Selby came and entered 160 acres on section 36. He now lives in Kansas.

Thomas Siers came at about the same time and entered 160 acres on section 25.

Isaac Pizer came in 1854 and bought land on section 26. He laid out the village of Spring Valley and remained a few years when he removed to Cerro Gordo Co., Iowa. In 1872 he sold out and started for Oregon; but when three miles from Sacramento City, he fell from the cars and was instantly killed. His wife went on to Oregon, married two years later, and now lives in California.

Thomas Borland came in 1854 and settled on section 2, where he still lives.

John Jewell came during the same year and located on section 1, where he still resides.

Josephus Downs came in 1854 and entered land on the northwest quarter of section 22. He was a lawyer. He remained here for several years, then moved to Dane county; but a few years later returned and died on the old homestead.

James E. Kidd, a son-in-law of Mr. Downs, came at the same time and entered the southeast quarter of section15. He improved the farm and made this his home until the time of his death, which occurred in 1881.

James A. Jones came in 1854 and settled on section 25. He now resides on section 35.

J. M. Hurless came at about the same time and entered 160 acres of land on section 5. He now resides on section 6. His brother, Henry, came the preceding spring and entered 160 acres on section 19.
Samuel Downs came in 1855 and bought land on the northwest quarter of section 14. He now lives in Kansas.

James A. Sellers came in 1855 and located on section 26. He erected the first mill in the town of Bloom. It is located near Spring Valley and is still owned by him.

Jonathan Jewell came in 1855 and settled on the northwest quarter of section 15, where he still lives.

David Griffin came from Indiana in 1855 and entered 182 acres of land on section 18. He still lives on the same section. His father, Ralph Griffin, came in 1856 and settled on section 18.

Friend Morrison came in 1855 and bought land on section 6. He now lives at Woodstock.

Nathan Ford, a native of New Jersey, came in 1855 and settled on the southeast quarter of section 10. He died Jan. 15, 1884.

Joseph Pippen came at an early day and settled on section 30, where he lived for a number of years. He is now a resident of the town of Forest.

M. R. Griffin came in 1855 and entered 120 acres of land on section 7. He has never been out of
The county since.

N. M. Trubaugh came during the same year and entered 160 acres on section 21.

Jesse Harness at about the same time entered eighty acres on section 17.

John E. Snyder came in 1855 and located on section 27, where he bought 120 acres of land, which he still occupies.

In the fall of the same year Charles Peckham and his sons, Charles and Alexander, came and settled on section 26. William Peckham came at the same time and located on section 31.

William Pizer came in the spring of 1855 and entered 160 acres of land on section 33.

The same year Henry De Hart and his two sons, J. L. and Daniel V., came. The father purchased land where the sons now reside.

Philip Almon came in 1856 and settled on section 7. He is now dead.

David Todd came in 1856 and bought land on section 6. In 1879 he sold out and went to California.

During the year 1856, and from that time until the war broke out, the settlement of the town was quite rapid, a great many of the incomers being from Ohio and Indiana.

First Things

The first house within the present limits of the town of Bloom was erected in 1853, by Isaac McMahan, on section 23.

The first school in the town was taught at the dwelling house of Isaac Pizer, in 1855, by William Barrett. There were two schools taught in 1855, in Rev. Crandall’s house, by Lucinda Rollins.

The first marriage in the town was that of John Miller to Anna Barts, in 1855. The ceremony was performed by Henry Hurless, justice of the peace.
The first birth in the town was that of James, a son of John and Rhoda Crandall, in February, 1854.

The first sermon in the town was preached by John Crandall, in 1854, at his residence.

Town Organization

The first town meeting was held at the residence of Isaac Pizer, in April, 1856. The following were the first officers elected: Josephus Downs, chairman, Isaac Pizer and James E. Kidd, board of supervisors; William Pizer, clerk; John H. Candall, assessor; Aaron Sutton, treasurer; Josephus Downs and L. M. Stewart, justices of the peace.

The following is a list of the officers chosen in April, 1883; Elijah Allbaugh, chairman, W. Dowell, Thomas Burt, supervisors; J. W. Renick, clerk; Henry Harless, treasurer; Timothy Spry, assessor; William Dowell, J. T. Cook and Jeff M. Hankins, justices; J. W. Allbaugh, A. T. Carter and William Jewell, constables.

Educational

The first schools taught in the town of Bloom have already been mentioned. In 1883 there were ten school districts in the town, all in successful operation and supplied with neat and comfortable buildings.

Religious

In 1868 a union church was built on the present site of the village of West Lima. It is a very neat frame building, and cost $1,450. There is now but one religious organization at West Lima--the Disciples.

In 1877 a church edifice was erected, on section 18, by the Christian denomination. It s a log building, and has always been known as the Sugar Tree House. Rev. Jacob Mark is the present pastor of the Christian Church. Services are held once each month.

Neefe’s Mill

Neefe’s mill was originally erected on section 26, in 1857, by James and Z. Jones. Then, as now, it was located on the west branch of Pine river. In 1879 Charles A. Neefe rebuilt the mill and still owns and operates it. It is equipped with an improved circular saw, planer, matcher, lath saw, ripper and cut-off saw. Its capacity is 7,000 feet per day. The mill does excellent work and is having a good business.

West Branch and Bon Postoffices

In 1855 a post office was established under the name of West Branch, with William Barrett as postmaster, and the office at his house on section 26. Mail was received once a week. David Barrett succeeded William Barrett as postmaster, and in turn was succeeded by William Pizer. T. K. Gray is the present postmaster, and keeps the office at his store. In 1883 the name of the office was changed to Bon, which it still bears. The office is on the mail route from Richland Center to West Lima, mail being received tri-weekly.


THE VILLAGE OF BOAZ.
This is the only village within the limits of the town of Dayton. It is located on sections 19 and 20, on Mill creek. The village is surrounded by an excellent agricultural and dairying conatry, and enjoys a good trade.

The village was platted in the winter of 1857-8 by R. and J. T. Barnes. The first store on the village site was started in 1857 by R. Barnes and M. Ripley. In 1861 Mr. Barnes purchased the store, and ran it until the time of his death in 1871. He was succeeded by J. W. Briggs and W. M. Barnes.

The first blacksmith shop at Boaz was opened in 1857 by Conrad Kierns, who remained about ten years. He was then succeeded by Stephen Bailey.

George H. Starr was the first harness maker to locate in the village. He established his shop in October, 1870, and is still in trade.

The first wagon maker in the village was Peter Kierns, who occupied the same building as his brother, Conrad.

The next wagon shop was established by W. J. Woodruff and E. S. Fessenden. They sold to Jerome Cross.

The first hotel at Boaz was opened by Lewis Berry in 1870. Charles Pierce was the second landlord.

The Boaz House was erected in 1859 by M. Ripley, who occupied it for a number of years as a store and dwelling. In 1874 the property was purchased by George H. Starr, and in connection with his harness shop he ran this as the Starr Hotel. In 1876 he was succeeded as landlord by D. J. Conklin. Then, in succession, came Ira Campbell, James Sheffield and W. M. Bevier.

The postoffice at Boaz was established in 1858 with M. Ripley as postmaster. The various postmasters have been as follows: M. Ripley, J. T. Barnes, John Ewers, J. T. Barnes, J. W. Briggs and F. O. Smith. Mr. Smith, the present postmaster, was appointed in 1881.

The first school in Boaz was a subscription school, taught in a building owned by Reason and James T. Barnes. In 1857 a log school house was erected, in which John Dunstan was the first teacher.

In 1883 a school house was erected at a cost of $1,400. It is a fine two story building, 28 X 78 feet. Kittie Delaney has the honor of being the first teacher in this house.

The Boaz mills is the most important establishment in the town. The land upon which the mills are located was entered, in 1854, by Reason Barnes and his son James T. In 1853 they commenced the erection of a saw-mill which was ready for operation in September, 1856. It was furnished with an “up and down saw.” In 1857 M. Ripley became a partner and in 1858 they added a grist-mill. In 1861 Mr. Ripley withdrew. In March, 1869, the mill was destroyed by fire, but was at once rebuilt. The saw mill has been furnished with circular saws and machinery for the manufacture of wagon stock. The flour mill has two run of buhrs and all other machinery for making first-class flour. It is run as a custom and merchant mill, and has a liberal patronage. The power is derived from Mill creek, which at this point furnishes eight feet head of water. In 1871 Reason Barnes died, and the firm changed to Barnes Bros. & Co., en personnel, J. T. and W. M. Barnes and J. W. Briggs. In 1874 J. W. Briggs withdrew and the firm became Barnes Brothers. Thus it continued until 1883 when W. M. Barnes became sole proprietor.

The following is a directory of the business of Boaz as it stood in January, 1884:

General merchandise, Briggs & Kepler, and Smith & Shaffer.
Mills, William Barnes.
Hotel, W. M. Bevier.
Millinery, Mrs. Henry Heidbrink.
Supervising Architect, James T. Barnes.
Wagon shop, Jerome Cross.
Blacksmiths, John Surrum and Frank Cosgrove.
Shoemakers, Alonzo Burnell and E. W. Bell.
Butcher, Lewis Cook.
Restaurant, William Howell.
Harness shop, G. H. Starr.
Physician, E. S. Garner.

In an early day preachers of different denominations paid frequent visits to Boaz. Among the number was Rev. Todd, a Presbyterian, from Sextonville. He did not organize a church here.

Elder Knapp, a Methodist preacher from Buena Vista, organized a class at the school house at an early day. He was well liked here, and the class flourished under his charge. Members moved away, however, and it was finally discontinued.

At the present time there is only one religious organization at Boaz, the German Lutheran. This society was probably organized as early as 1858. Rev. Wachtel was one of the first preachers. The society met to worship in different private houses until 1871, when they erected a church edifice. The society new numbers about thirty members. The present pastor is Rev. William Endeward, of Muscoda.

The Dayton Lodge, No. 213, of the I. O. O. F., was organized Oct. 12, 1872, the charter bearing the date of Dec. 5, 1872. The following were the charter members of the lodge: David D. Woodruff, William J. Woodruff, Hiram Gardiner, Timothy W. Woodruff, Harlow O. Walker and J. G. Barnes. The first officers were: David D. Woodruff, N. G.; W. J. Woodruff, V. G.; J. T. Barnes, treasurer; H. O. Walker, recording secretary. The following named have served as noble grand of the lodge: D. D. Woodruff, W. J. Woodruff, J. T. Barnes, J. A. Sheffield, E. Davis, E. S. Fessenden, W. J. Woodruff, J. A. Sheffield, J. W. Briggs, E. S. Fessenden, Jay W. Griggs, J. A. Sheffield, F. O. Smith, Frank Cosgrove, D. W. Core, F. M. Shafer and C. M. C. Bailey. The vice-grands of the lodge have been as follows: W. J. Woodruff, J. T. Barnes, J. A. Sheffield, E. Davis, G. H. Starr, D. W. Manchester, H. B. Wood, S. Shafer, C. H. Pierce, W. J. Woodruff, J. J. Shafer, F. O. Smith, Frank Cosgrove, D. W. Core, F. Shafer, C. M. C. Bailey and M. G. Berry. The secretaries have been as follows: H. O. Walker, J. T. Barnes, C. H. Pierce, E. S. Fessenden, J. A. Sheffield, Jay W. Briggs, M. G. Berry and L. D. Bailey. The treasurers of the lodge have been: J. T. Barnes, E. Davis, G. H. Starr and H. B. Wood. The lodge is now in good working order, has a membership of forty, and meets every Saturday evening.


TOWN OF BUENA VISTA.
Source: History of Green County, Wisconsin Illustrated, chapter 21 (1884) transcribed by RuthAnne Wilke

This town forms the southeastern corner of Richland county and embraces portions of three congressional townships. Three whole and six fractional sections comprising this town, lie in township 8 north, of range 2 east; three whole, one-half and one fractional section of township 9, range 1 east; and twenty-four whole and six half sections of township 9, range 2 east. The town of Buena Vista is bounded on the north by the town of Ithaca; on the east by Sauk county; on the south by the Wisconsin river; and on the west by the town of Orion. The south and southwestern portions of the town, including in fact nearly one-fourth of the area, is made up of a level prairie. The soil is sandy and moderately productive. It is well adapted to growing Indian corn and sorghum. The soil being warm and light, melons grow in abundance here; and the production of water melons, particularly, has occupied a great deal of the farmer’s attention for a number of years. The first in the town to raise and ship melons upon an extensive scale was Ezekiel Elliott. He began in 1863 and followed the business for a number of years, shipping from $1,000 to $1,500 worth annually and one year the shipments amounted to $2,000. In 1872 J. W. Fuller engaged in the business and for four years his melon revenue was $400 annually. He still devotes a good deal of his attention to the cultivation of melons. Others who are now raising and shipping this product are: Harvey Layton, John Smith, Isaac Fan and Aaron Lee.

The valley of the Pine river, in the western part of the town, is very fertile and contains many fine farms. The northern part of the town is hilly but well adapted to grazing. The greater part of the eastern portion of the town is included in Bear creek valley, forms one of the finest farming regions in the State.

The principal streams that traverse the town are Pine river and Bear creek. The former rises in Vernon county. It enters the town of Buena Vista by way of section 7, town 9, range 2 east, and flowing nearly due south, makes confluence with the Wisconsin river on section 31. Pine river is the most important stream that flows through Richland county. In this town its average width is seventy feet. Bear creek rises in Sauk county. It enters the town of Buena Vista from Ithaca, by way of section 11, town 9, range 2 east, and flows nearly south to the center of section 35, thence southwesterly to enter the Wisconsin river on section 4, town 8. One of its tributaries, Little Bear creek, enters the town on section 24, from Sauk county, and flows west to join Bear creek on section 23.

The ridges in the northern part of the town were originally heavily timbered; the principal varieties were white and black oak. West of Pine river there was a heavy growth of timber consisting principally of elm, basswood, oak, black walnut, butternut and ash. The valley of Bear creek was also covered with timber of the varieties mentioned, but the growth was not as heavy as that west of Pine river.

Two lines of railway pass through this town, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul railroad and the branch to Richland Center.

The first settlement within the limits now comprising the town of Buena Vista, was made in the fall of 1845 by Robert and William McCloud. The emigrated to Wisconsin from Hardin Co., Ohio, in 1844, and stopped with their families in the village of Muscoda. In the fall of ‘1845 Robert McCloud located a farm on the east bank of Bear creek, the northeast quarter of section 35, now owned by Rev. S. B. Loomis. He began improvements at once. At the same time his brother, William McCloud, located a farm about one half mile further south. In the spring of 1846 they removed their families to the new homes, from Muscoda.

In the fall of 1846 Israel Janney and his brother Phineas came to this town. Israel Janney and his brother Phineas came to this town. Israel located on the west half of the northwest quarter of section 34 on land which is now owned by R. L. Moore, James Moore and Leonard Button. Phineas Janney located on the west half of the northeast quarter of section 28, town 9, range 2 east, land now owned by D. B. Young.

The following, from the pen of Israel Janney, graphically describes their settlement:

“In the fall of 1846 my brother Phineas and myself, with our families, left Logan Co., Ohio, for Wisconsin, and on the 27th day of September we crossed the Wisconsin river with our families in an Indian canoe, about one mile above the mouth of Bear creek, at a point since known as Hurst’s ferry. Before crossing the river, we found it necessary to sent our teams back by the way of Highland and Dodgeville to Helena. At this point there had been a shot tower erected, and the company operating this tower owned a flat boat for their own convenience, and they were engaged to ferry our teams across the river. We were landed on the north bank of the river near where Spring Green is now located, and traveled across the prairie to Bear creek. I mention these facts to show the inconvenience of traveling in the early settlement of the county.”

In the spring of 1847 William Janney, a brother of Israel, located on section 34, where J. W. Briggs now lives. The next settler in the town of Buena Vista was Amos Mercer, who also came in the spring of 1847, He was from southern Illinois. He settled on the west half of the southeast quarter of section 28, town 9, range 2 east, on the farm now owned by A Harter. Mr. Mercer is a prosperous farmer of Sauk county.

In the summer and fall of 1848 there were a number of locations made in this town. Delos Matteson, J. W. Briggs, Samuel Long, Jonathan Ingrum, E. B. Beason, Jonah Seaman, (Mr. Seaman came with the McClouds in 1845, but returned to Illinois, and came back again in 1848.) I. H. Wallace (proprietor of Richland city), C. W. Morris, George Reed, Nathaniel Wheeler, who bought out Phineas Janney; J. W. Coffinberry, who settled on section 20, but soon after removed to Richland City. William and Corns Kline settled on the northwest quarter of section 23, and the north half of the northwest quarter of section 22, town 9, range 2 east, on what is now known as the Eaton farm. John P. Smith settled this year on section 22, on the farm now owned by Charles Daley. Emanuel Wallace, a brother of John Wallace, of Lone Rock, also came in 1848 and settled on section 14, on the farm now owned by Susan Halsey. B. J. Hopkins located on sections 24 and 13, on land now owned by A. Davis and Levi Bunyan. Moses Brown and Sterling McKinney located this year on section 36, on land now owned by L. V. Loomis and Edmond Meade. Brown is in Chippewa county, this State; McKinney is dead. Other early settlers, George L. Dyke, Stroud, Luther Evans, Holland Allen, Elias Thomas, George Woodard, Holland Allen, Elias Thomas, George Woodard, Edmond Meade, on section 25, where he now lives, John Daley. A man named Perrine located on section 12, town 8, range 2 east, in 1851. He sold to the railroad company the plat of Lone Rock village. He has several grown sons, one of whom was Dr. Perrine. A singular fatality attended this family, five of whom died soon after coming here. The family removed to Minnesota.

HISTORICAL EVENTS.

The first marriage in this town was that of Edwin Erwin and Elizabeth McCloud, the latter a daughter of Robert McCloud. The ceremony was performed in 1850 by Rev. Nathaniel Wheeler. The couple now reside in Texas.

The first death in the town was that of Philip H. Miller, which occurred Nov. 19, 1846. He was twenty-seven years of age, a son of Isaac and Elizabeth (McCloud) Miller. He died of fever induced by exposure in hunting. The remains were buried on what is now the farm of Hon. L. G. Thomas, but were afterward removed to the cemetery at Sextonville.

The second death in the town was that of Mrs. Sarah J. (Miller) Janney, a sister of Philip Miller, which occurred March 21, 1847. She was the wife of Phineas Janney.

Another early death was that of Adelbert H. Briggs, son of J. W. and Melissa Briggs, which took place March 7, 1849. The child was three and a half years old.

The first school in Buena Vista was taught by Mrs. Emily Matteson, wife of Delos Matteson, in the summer of 1850. The school was kept at the residence of Mr. Matteson.

The first school house in the town was a log building erected on the northeast quarter of section 32, in 1849. Margaret Ingram was the first teacher here.

The first sermon was preached by Elder Nathaniel Wheeler, in the fall of 1848, at his residence.

POSTOFFICES.

There are four post offices in the town of Buena Vista. The first established was at Richland City and a history of it will be found elsewhere. The history of the Lone Rock post office is also given it its proper place.

The second post office in the town was established in 1854, with Moses Browns as postmaster and the office at his house on section 36. It was on the mail route from Sauk City to Prairie du Chien. This office was discontinued at about the time the post office at Lone Rock was established.

Dixon post office was established in June, 1880, with Mrs. Helen Eaton as postmistress. The office is located on section 22. It was named in honor of William Dixon.

Gotham post office is located at Richland City station. It was so named in honor of Capt. M. W. Gotham, who has been postmaster since the establishment of the office in July, 1882.

EDUCATIONAL MATTERS.

The town of Buena Vista is well supplied with schools, and educational facilities here are equal to any of the towns in Richland county. There are five districts and two joint districts. The total number of children of school age in the town is 340; of which the average attendance is 272.

District No. 1 includes Richland City. It has fifty-eight children of school age. The building is a frame one in good condition.

District No. 2 is usually called “Young’s district,” and has thirty-four pupils. The building is a frame structure located on the southeast quarter of section 29, which was built many years ago. In early days this was known as the “Friendship school house.”

District No. 3 includes the village of Lone Rock.

District No. 5 has a building located on the northeast quarter of section 19, and has a school population of thirty-seven. The building is an old frame edifice, which was erected a number of years ago.

No. 6 is a joint district; including territory in the town of Orion. The school house is a neat frame building located on section 28. That part of the district in Buena Vista has a school population of twenty-eight.

District No. 8 has twenty-five pupils. The school house is a small red frame building located on section 23.

District No. 10 has a neat frame building located on section 35. The number of pupils in the district is thirty-four.

No. 1 joint embraces but little territory in Buena Vista, only four pupils belonging to this town. The school house is located in the town of Ithaca.

CEMETERIES.

There are two public burial places now in use in the town of Buena Vista. One is located on the northwest quarter of section 34. This cemetery was laid out in the fall of 1853. The first burial was that of Lucius Tracy, who died April 6, 1854. There are others buried here who died in the town at an earlier date and were removed here from other burial places. Among the latter is Eliza, wife of John Seaman, who died Oct. 15, 1853. She was accidentally shot by William McCloud. The other public burial place is known as Lone Rock Cemetery, and is situated on the northwest quarter of section 12.

The first burial place in this town was on the farm of Robert McCloud, and the first burial was that of Philip H. Miller. This was used as a public burial place for some years, but most of the bodies have been removed to the two cemeteries mentioned. Another early place for the burial of the dead was at Richland City; but burials at this place have also been discontinued. Another place of burial was on the farm of Abuja Davis on the northwest quarter of section 3. L. G. Thomas has also a family burial place on his farm.

THE NAME OF THE TOWN.

The town of Buena Vista was so named at the suggestion of Mrs. J. W. Briggs. The name, Buena, had been suggested, it is said, by a returned Mexican solider, who had probably become somewhat familiar with Spanish names during his army experience in Mexico. Mrs. Briggs suggested that the name would be incomplete simply as Buena, and thought that Vista should be added. Her suggestion was followed, hence the present name of the town.


CAZENOVIA VILLAGE
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881); transcribed by Vicki Bryan

The land upon which the village of Cazenovia is now located was entered in 1848 by Allen Perkins. The village was surveyed in February, 1855, by Solon Rushmore, for Mr. Perkins. The first frame house upon the site was erected by Samuel Colby, in 1854. The first log house was erected by the Lincoln brothers the same year. In this building they opened the first store in the village. They remained in trade but a few years.

Richard Mann was the next to engage in trade here. He remained but a short time, when he sold out and removed to Sauk county.

Alois Ficks bought out Mann and carried on the business alone for one year, when he sold a half interest to Sebastian Wenker. They continued in trade five months, when Wenker bought the Stowe property. This was in 1866. Mr. Wenker took his share of the stock and set up the business on his newly acquired premises. In 1877 he erected a building, 22x46 feet in size, two stories high.

The first blacksmith in the village was Cyrus Stowe, who opened a shop here in 1855. He remained here but a few years, when he removed to Sun Prairie. Allen Tinker was the next blacksmith. He opened a shop here in the spring of 1858, and is still in business.

For many years Cazenovia was without a hotel, and the traveling public were taken care of very satisfactorily by Allen Tinker. In 1875 J. W. Thompson opened the first hotel. He was landlord until March, 1876, when he sold to Mrs. Carrie M. Atkins, who is still the proprietor.

Andrew J. Stibbins was the first shoemaker to locate in Cazenovia, opening a shop here in 1855. He remained but a few years. Henry Bushman, the present shoemaker, commenced business in 1868.

The first millinery establishment here was opened in 1867 by Addie Boyd, at the house of Allen Tinker. She ran the shop but a short time. This branch of trade is now represented by Ida Nuss, who opened her shop in 1881.

Dr. J. J. Worthy, was the first resident physician at Cazenovia, locating here during the war. He remained a number of years.

INDUSTRIAL ENTERPRISES
Allen Perkins erected a saw-mill in 1853, the power being derived from the south branch of the Little Baraboo river. The mill was equipped with an "up and down saw," and for several years did a good business. The dam was built with log cribs, filled with dirt and stone. The first dam was washed out before
the war. It was replaced by another dam, which soon followed the first dam down the stream. Mr. Perkins then sold the power and mill to George Jarvis.

In 1854 Allen Perkins started a grist-mill, erecting a large building and equipping it with one run of stone. Mr. Jarvis bought this mill with the other property. While Mr. Jarvis owned the mills the dam went out once; but he quickly repaired it. In 1866 Mr. Jarvis completed the present mill. The building is 30x50 feet in size, two stories high. It is furnished with two run of stone, and all the necessary machinery for the manufacture of first-class flour, while the water power is one of the best in the Slate. B. M. Jarvis is the present proprietor.

CAZENOVIA POSTOFFICE
The postoffice at this place was established in 1856, with Cyrus Stowe as postmaster. He kept the office at his house. It was then a special office, and the mail carrier was paid by subscription from the citizens. Mail was received once a week from Sextonville, and later from Ironton. In 1883 mail was received three times each week from Richland Center and daily from Le Valle. Allen Tinker succeeded Mr. Stowe as postmaster. Then in succession came: M. O. Tracy, George Jarvis, Edward Kimber, J. C. Spencer, B. M. Jarvis and Wenzel J. Hanzlik. Mr. Hanzlik is the present postmaster, and keeps the office at his store. He was appointed June 28, 1883.

RELIGIOUS
Religious meetings were held at the house of N. R. Kline as early as 1856. Rev. Wood, a Wesleyan Methodist, was the first minister, but he did not organize.

The first Methodist Episcopal preacher was Rev. Augustus Hall, who, in 1857, preached at Lincoln's store. He organized a class there with twenty-six members. Among the members were — Ludger Phoenix and wife, Allen Tinker and wife, Andrew Tinker, John Russell, Mrs. Henry Fuller, Nathaniel Camp and wife, George Perkins, George Montgomery and wife, William V. Barron and wife, Mary J. Russell, Mary J. Tinker, W. C. Osborne and wife, Sarah J. Low, N. R. Kline and wife, Clara Perkins, Levi Lincoln and wife, and James Kinney and wife. Allen Tinker was the first class leader. Rev. Augustus Hall was the first pastor. He lived in Sauk county and had several charges in this region. The following named ministers have at different times preached for the class at Cazenovia, since Rev. Hall: Rev. E. Yocum, the first presiding elder; Revs. S. D. Bassinger, W. D. Atwater, R. M. De Lap, Mathew Bennett, M. F. Chester, W. W. Wheaton, J. T. Bryan, Mr. Conway, J. J. Walker, Mr. Dudley, George Tyacke, R. W. Nicholas and H. D. Jencks. Rev. Jencks, the present pastor, resides at Ironton and has charge of four classes: Ironton, Cazenovia, Sandusky and Washington. He holds services at Cazenovia once every two weeks. The Cazenovia class met at the school house for worship until 1878, when they erected a frame church on the southeast quarter of section 12. Rev. George Tyacke was the first minister to hold services in this building. Allen Tinker was the first leader of the class, and held that position for many years. Ludger Phoenix is the present leader. The class now has fourteen numbers. A Sabbath school was organized at about the same time as the class, with Allen Tinker as superintendent. The school meets every Sunday. Frank Phoenix is the present superintendent.

In 1857 a Wesleyan Methodist class was organized, at Lincoln's store, by the Rev. Mr. Wood. It had about twenty members, among whom were — Jonathan Wright and wife, Cyrus Stowe, Henry Fuller and wife, and Daniel Carr and wife. As none of the members of this class are now living in the town, a full history of it cannot be collected. The class only continued in existence a few years.

IRON INTERESTS
In 1874 Joseph Culver, from Madison, came to Westford, secured the services of Joseph Moll, and leased land from him and also Joseph Dresen and John Cobbledick, on sections 2 and 3. Mr. Moll was employed to prospect for iron ore, commencing first on the northwest quarter of section 2. They soon found ore sixteen feet below the surface of the earth. In the fall of 1875 a shaft was sunk on section 2, about forty-eight feet deep, and afterward several other shafts were sunk near by. In 1876 a company was formed, consisting of Joseph Culver, Gen. Lund and James Gunn. The company continued operating the mines, and piled up the ore upon the ground. The vein became larger as they progressed, and finally Culver, Lund & Gunn sold out their interests to the Iron Ridge Iron Company, of which Leonard Bean was president. This company built a furnace at Cazenovia, and during the summer of 1877 erected a foundry. Numerous shafts were sunk on sections 2, 3, and 4, and large quantities of good ore were taken from these shafts. The Iron Ridge Iron Company carried on the business until 1879, when they stopped work, and about one year later sold the buildings to C. E. Bohn, of Ironton, who converted it into a stave factory, for which purpose the buildings are
still used.

CAZENOVIA CEMETERY
The cemetery at Cazenovia was laid out in July, 1862, by Josiah McCaskey, surveyor. It was laid out under the supervision of the town board of supervisors. The land was donated to the town by Allen Perkins. Mrs. Gad Pomeroy was the first person buried here.


Town of Dayton
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin Illustrated (1881) Transcribed by Susan Geist

The town of Dayton embraces congressional township 10 north, of range 1 west. Although this was not the first settled town in Richland county, it contains some of the best farming land in this region. Mucho of the land is heavily timbered, except where cleared by the energy and industry of the settlers, and the surface contour of this town, like the balance of the county, is hilly and broken. There are many farms here under a high state of cultivation, and there are many good and substantial farm buildings. The soil here is a rich dark loam, except on some of the ridges where a tendency to clayeyness is visible. The ridges raise the best wheat. It is all well adapted to raising the cereals common to this latitude, and vegetables grow in abundance. The surface of the town is well watered by Mill creek, Fox branch, Horse creek and their tributaries. The first mentioned, Mill creek, is the most important stream in the town, and furnishes good water power.

There is only one village within the limits of the town, Boaz, which is located on sections 19 and 20.

EARLY SETTLEMENT.

The first settlement in the town of Dayton seems to have been made as early as 1852. During that year John Messingil and his two sons, Thomas and Benjamin, and John and George Mathews came and selected homes within the present limits of this town.

John Messingil entered the northwest quarter of the northwest quarter of section 23. His son Thomas entered the southwest quarter of the southwest quarter of section 14. Benjamin made a claim of the southeast quarter of the southeast quarter of section 15. In 1855 they all sold out and and moved away.

John and George Mathews were brother; natives of Illinois. They were here as early as the Messingils and settled on the northwest quarter of section 25, where they erected a double log cabin and made a small clearing. They remained about one year. John was the first sheriff of Richland county; he now lives in Arkansas. George is dead.

From 1852 until 1856 the settlement of the town progressed rapidly. The following named came during that period: John H. Rizer, A. J. Parish, John H. Noble, Edmund Davis, Reason Barnes and his son James T., William Akan, William Robinson, Henry Robinson, Levi Hart, L. M. Keepers, Archibald Benjamin, John Purcell, Lorenzo Woodman, Comfort C. Walker, Lyman Wood, Peter Fall, Benjamin B. Norris, Jacob Dix, Jacob Berger, Martin Shumaker, Charles Hurless, Valentine Groh, John and Henry Wolf, Christian Tappy, C. C. Nevil, George Marsh, Alfred Durnford, Andrew J. Campbell, Levi Leslie, Martin Smith, G. W. Oglevie, Henry McNelly, Jacob Reed and Joel Berry.

John H. Rizer was a native of Maryland. He entered land on section 20. His home is now in the town of Akan.
A. J. Parish entered the southwest quarter of section 19. He has since removed to Oregon.

John Noble was a native of Ohio. He came here in 1853, and located upon the west half of the northwest quarter of section 29, where he lived until the time of his death.

Seth Miller settled on the north half of the northeast quarter of section 29. He remained there about twelve years when he removed to Missouri.

William Akan was a native of New York city. He came here from St. Louis, Mo., in 1854, and entered land on section 14, which remained his home until the time of his death, Jan. 3, 1881. Mr. Akan was born in the city of New York, June 19, 1803. In 1805 the family removed to Philadelphia, and in 1814 to Pittsburg. Here he learned the stone-cutter’s trade, and afterward worked on the construction of the first railroad in the United States. In 1830 he was married to Mrs. Catharine Gillmore, nee Hamel, and reared seven children. He was the third settler on Brush creek. Although he lived upon his farm, he spent the most of his time at his trade. At his death he left a wife and three children to mourn his loss. Mr. Akan was a member of the Masonic fraternity for many years, and his funeral was conducted under the auspices of the lodge at Richland Center. His wife and daughter now live at Nashville, Tenn.

William Robinson, a native of Kentucky, came here from Indiana in 1853, and bought forty acres of land in town 9, range 2 east. He lived there one year, and in 1854 came to Dayton and entered the southeast quarter of the northwest quarter of section 34. In 1866 he bought land on section 26, where he improved a farm and lived until the time of his death. His widow lives with her sons on section 35.

Mr. Barnes was a native of Maryland. He had come to the county as early as 1848, and entered land in the southern part of the county. In 1849 he moved to the county and settled at Richmond (now Orion). In 1854 Mr. Barnes and his son, J. T., entered the present site of the village of Boaz. The father lived to see a flourishing village grow up here. James T. is still a resident.

Edmund Davis was a native of the State of New York. He entered the southwest quarter of section 29, and the east half of the southeast quarter of section 30. He was a resident of the town until 1877, when he sold out and removed to Hancock Co., Iowa, where he still lives.

Henry Robinson, a Kentuckian, came to Richland county from Indiana in 1854, and spent the first winter at Pleasant Hill, in the town of Eagle. In the spring of 1855 he came to the town of Dayton and entered the south half of the southeast quarter of section 28. He cleared a farm and lived here until 1871, when he sold out and removed to Boone Co., Neb., where he, his wife and two sons have since died.

Comfort C. Walker, a native of the State of New York, came to the town of Dayton in 1854 and settled on the northeast quarter of section 25, where he erected a log house and kept travelers. In 1857 he removed to Dayton Corners, and there erected a large house which he opened as a tavern. When the war broke out he went into the army and died in the service. His widow kept the tavern for some time, and still lives in Dayton Corners.

Lorenzo Woodman was a native of the State of New York. He settled on the southwest quarter of section 14, where he died in 1858. His widow and several of the children still occupy the old homestead.

Lyman Wood, a native of the State of New York, came here from Ohio, in 1856 and located on section 6. He lived there until the time of his death, and the family still occupy the old homestead.

Levi Hart, a native of New York State, came here from Ohio, and entered the north half of the southeast quarter of section 28, where he still resides.

L. M. Keepers came here from Ohio in company with Levi Hart, and entered the west half of the northeast quarter and the east half of the northwest quarter of section 32. He cleared a portion of the place and erected a small log house. When the war broke out he enlisted, and died in the service. His widow afterward married a Mr. Marsh. She is now dead, while most of the children live in Nebraska.

Archibald Benjamin, a native of the State of New York, came here from the southern part of the county and entered the northwest quarter and the northeast quarter of the southwest quarter of section 28. He remained here five or six years and then removed to Richland Center, and engaged in trade. A few years later he went to Sparta, Wis., where he died.

John Purcell came to Richland county from Indiana, and located for a time at Orion, where he followed his trade, blacksmithing. In the spring of 1855 he came to Dayton and entered land on section 32. He lived there until 1883, when he sold out and removed to Missouri.

Peter Fall was a native of Virginia. He settled on section 13, where he cleared a portion of his land and worked at blacksmithing, remaining several years.

Benjamin B. Norris was a native of Ohio. He settled on the north half of the southeast quarter of section 14. He was a cabinet maker, and erected a shop in which he manufactured chairs, tables and other articles of household furniture. In 1860 he sold out to remove to the northeast quarter of section 14. When the war broke out he enlisted and died in the service. His widow still occupies the old homestead.

Jacob Dix settled on section 11, where he improved a farm. He is now dead and the family are scattered.

Jacob Berger, Martin Shumaker, Charles Hurless, Valentine Groh, John and Henry Wolf and Christian Tappy were Germans. Mr. Berger was a cabinet maker, and had been in the United States, since his twelfth year. He entered land on section 15, where he still lives. Mr. Shumaker first settled on section 23, but now lives on section 18. Mr. Hurless settled on section 5, where he still lives. Mr. Groh located on section 21, and now lives on section 7. The Wolf brothers settled on section 22. The remaining one now lives on section 16. John sold out a few years ago and moved to Dakota, settling in Turner county, where he has since died. Mr. Tappy settled on section 10, where he still lives.

C. C. Nevil was a native of Pennsylvania. He settled on section 10, and is still a resident of the town.

Andrew J. Campbell was a native of Indiana. He entered land on sections 12 and 13, which place remained his home until 1881. He now lives in the town of Richland.

George Marsh settled on section 11. His home is now in Minnesota.

A. Durnford was a native of England. He located on section 1, where he improved a farm and lived for many years. He is still a resident of the county.

Levi Leslie first settled on section 6. He lived in several parts of the town for a number of years and finally settled in Marshall, where he died.

Martin Smith was a native of Ohio. He settled on the northwest quarter of the northeast quarter of section 20. He is now living in Nebraska.

G. W. Oglevie came here from the southern part of the county and settled on section 22. He was a miller by trade and worked on different mills in the county. He remained here a few years, then moved away and is now dead.

Henry McNelly was a practicing physician—the first to locate in the town. He settled on section 28. He sold his land a few years later.

Joel Berry settled on section 23 and improved a farm which he occupied for several years. He is now in Kansas.

Jacob Reed was a native of Pennsylvania. He settled on section 10. He sold out several years later and moved away.

ORGANIZATION.
Prior to its organization the territory now comprising the town of Dayton was annexed to the civil town of Eagle. In 1857 Dayton was organized. The first election was held on the 7th of April of that year, at the house of Henry McNelly. Archibald Benjamin and John H. Rizer were chosen inspectors, and J. S. Robinson and Alfred Durnford, clerks of the election. The town officers elected at this time were as follows: Supervisors, G. W. Oglevie, chairman, Lorenzo Woodman and L. L. Leslie; town clerk, James S. Robinson; superintendent of school, Archibald Benjamin; treasurer, Edmund Davis; assessor, C. C. Walker; justices of the peace, Lorenzo Woodman, Collins P. Pratt, John Noble and Lyman Wood; constables, Elward F. Wait, Martin Smith, J. Wood and S. Gravatt.

In 1883 a town house was erected on the northeast quarter on the northeast quarter of section 21, which cost $400.

At the annual town meeting held at the Dayton Corner’s school house April 3, 1883, the following town officers were elected: Supervisors, C. A. Burghagan, chairman, John Akan, W. Flamme; clerk, W. H. Miller; treasurer, Tom J. Hallin; assessor, John Bowen; justices, J. M. Adair, J. Vanderpool and Henry Bannister; constables, W. Smart, Noah McKy and Joe Brogan.


VILLAGE OF DAYTON CORNERS.

In 1857 Lorenzo Woodman and James Hafus, laid out some lots and blocks on the southwestern part of section 14, and the northwestern part of section 23, to which they gave the name of Dayton Corners. During the same year a postoffice was established here under the name of Ripley Postoffice, with Lorenzo Woodman as postmaster. Mr. Woodman served until the time of his death, and then C. C. Walker became postmaster. He was succeeded by James Hafus and the office was finally discontinued after an existence of about two years.

At an early day Peter Fall opened a blacksmith shop on the southeast corner of the northwest quarter of section 13. During the war he sold out and moved away. He did general repair work, mostly sharpening plows and grub hoes. His son Samuel opened a shop soon after the old gentleman had sold out, on the northeast quarter of section 13, and remained for several years.

Edward Bassett came to Dayton Corners in 1857, and bought a lot of Lorenzo Woodman on the southwest quarter of section 14. He erected a frame building 20 X 30 feet in size, and put in a stock of general merchandise. He remained in trade about four years, when he closed out and moved to Ohio.

The first school at Dayton Corners was taught in 1857 by Eliza Bevier, in a house owned by C. C. Walker. During the summer of the same year a school house was erected in that village, which was used until 1881, when a frame house was built on section 15.

The Dayton Corner’s Methodist Episcopal Church started with the organization of a class in 1856 at the house of Lorenzo Woodman, by Rev. John Walker, who was then located at Sextonville. Among the members of the class at its organization were the following: Lorenzo Woodman and wife; Simeon Gravatt and wife; Joseph Wheaton and wife, and Joel Berry and wife. Lorenzo Woodman was the first class leader.

A United Brethren class was organized at an early day at the house of Peter Fall, on section 13. The class met for worship at the residence of Mr. Fall for a number of years. At present there is an organization that has a partially completed church edifice on section 23. Thomas Ewing is class leader.


Town of Eagle
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin, Illustrated (1881) transcribed by: Richard Ramos

The town of Eagle embraces nearly all of congressional township 9 north, range 1 west. It is bounded on the north by the town of Dayton, on the east by Orion, on the west by Richwood, and on the south by the Wisconsin river. This is about the finest agricultural town in Richland county. While some portions of it are upon the rich bottoms of the Wisconsin river, much of it is broken and hilly; bluffs, interspersed with rich lowlands and valleys; the home of luxuriant grasses and golden grain. The surface of the town is well watered by Eagle creek and its numerous tributaries, making this an excellent stock raising region. Many of the farmers devote a good deal of attention to this branch, and the result is highly gratifying. The only village in the town is Eagle Corners.

Early Settlement

The first permanent settler in the territory now comprising the town of Eagle was Mathew Alexander, a native of Kentucky. He had been a sailor on the Great lakes, and came from that region to this county in 1840. He entered lots 1 and 2, on section 33, and lot 4, on section 34, where he made some improvements, and remained until 1852, when he sold out and removed to Brownsville, Minn. The greater portion of the time which he spent here he was engaged in lumbering and rafting.

It is believed that the first claim in the town of Eagle was made, in 1839, by Robert Boyd and Monroe Fleming. During this year they came from Iowa county and claimed the southwest quarter of section 26, covering the excellent mill privilege on what is now called Mill creek. They made no improvements except to cut four poles and lay them “claim fashion.” They did not attend to their claim close enough and it was jumped in 1844 by Thomas J. Parish.

In 1841 Hardin Moore, a native of Kentucky, came here from Grant county and made a claim of the southwest quarter of section 34. He was a single man; did not enter his land, but erected a log cabin and make a little clearing. A few years later he sold his claim, and boarded with Mathew Alexander for a time. He was a natural mechanic, and would often shoe horses for the settlers. He received attention in the general chapters of this volume.

Thomas Palmer and his sons, Loreman and William, came here in 1848. The father entered the east half of the northwest quarter of section 32, where he lived until the time of his death. Loreman entered the east half of the northwest quarter of section 32, and lived there until he died. William entered the east half of the northeast quarter of section 32. He lived there for some years; then sold out and removed to Missouri; but returned after a short stop, and has since died.

George Goff, a native of Virginia, came from Missouri in 1848, and settled in the town of Orion. In 1853 he settled on the southeast quarter of section 26, where he died Jan. 4, 1858. His widow died in December, 1863. They were both buried in the Orion cemetery. Thomas Goff, a son, came with his parents and lived for a time in the town of Orion. In 1855 he entered the southwest quarter of section 15, in the town of Eagle, and made this his home until the time of his death.

Stephen Tinnell, a native fo Kentucky, came from Highland, in 1849, and claimed the northwest quarter of section 33. He remained here about three years and then removed to Missouri.

William Pickering, with his brother John, natives of England, came from Racine county in 1849 and entered 320 acres on sections 8 and 9. William located here in 1853 and is still a resident.

William Cooper, a native of Pennsylvania, came here from Indiana in 1849 and entered the east half of the northwest quarter of section 11. In the spring of 1850 he settled on section 26. He now lives on section 28.

Cyrus McGill, a native of Virginia, came here in 1849 and located on section 25. He lived there until after the war, when he removed to Kansas.

The first move toward a settlement in what is known as Hoosier Hollow was made in 1849, when William Miller, George D. Sharp and Preston Say came from Indiana and located here. Miller entered three quarter sections of land on sections 13 and 23; Sharp entered 160 acres on sections 14, 21, and 22; and Say selected 160 acres on sections 23 and 24. Miller and Sharp both erected log cabins, after which the party returned to Indiana for their families. In September, 1849, they again came, accompanied by their families. Mr. Miller settled on the southeast quarter of section 23. His son John, with his family, came at this time and settled on section 13, afterwards removing to section 23. Sharp located on the southeast quarter of section 14, where his widow still resides. In October, 1849, James and Andrew Miller, brothers of William, came to Richland county and located in the town of Orion. James was a bachelor. He bought land on section 29, which is now owned by Henry Hurless. He did not improve the land, selling out a few years later. Until the death of his sister he remained in Orion, after which he made his home with William until he died. Andrew owned land on sections 29 and 30, now known as the Kite farm. He died in Orion and his widow now makes her home with her sister, Mrs. Abraham Beard.

William Robinson came with the Miller brothers to assist in moving their goods. He entered land on section 24, but did not settle at that time returning to Indiana. In 1851 he came back and settled on his land.

Mrs. Sarah Perrin, a native of Kentucky, came here at the same time and bought land on section 35. She is now the wife of J. D. Fazel.

In 1850, George Slater, Abraham Beard and Joseph Hays came here from Indiana. Slater first settled on section 23; but a few years later moved to section 34. Beard settled on section 23, and made this his home until the time of his death. Hays settled on section 13. A few years later his wife died, and for some time he lived with his son-in-law; after which he returned to Indiana and died at the home of his son.

John Thompson, a native of Ohio, came here from Indiana in 1850 and settled on section 22, where he died in 1854. His widow still lives on the old homestead.

Charles G. Rodolf, a native of Switzerland, came from Iowa county in 1850 and first located in Orion, where he engaged in the mercantile trade. In 1852 he came to the town of Eagle and bought the mill property on section 26. He now lives in Muscoda.

Josiah Newburn, a native of Pennsylvania came here in 1851 and settled on section 22. He lived there for several years, then removed to Nebraska. He died in Missouri in 1882.

Jeremiah B. Newburn, a native of Pennsylvania, came from Illinois in 1852 and entered the north-east quarter of section 33. The following year he settled there and is still a resident.

Josiah and Richard Willey, natives of England, came here in 1852 and settled on sections 17 and 20. They remained but a short time then returned to Grant county, where Richard died in 1883, and Josiah still lives.

Abraham Dillon, a native of Missouri, came here from Grant county in 1852 and entered land on sections 7 and 8. He still occupies the place.

Newton Wells, a native of Virginia, came here from Orion in 1854 and located on section 10, where he still lives.

Martin Smith came from Indiana during the same year and entered land. When the war broke out, he enlisted and died in the service. The family are now scattered.

Holliday Peters, a native of Indiana, came here in 854 and entered land on section 4. He cleared a small tract of land, then sold out and returned to Indiana. A few years later he came back and settled on sections 27 and 28. He now lives in Knox Co., Neb.

James H. Robinson, a native of Indiana, came here in 1854 and settled on section 4. He was a single man at the time, but married soon after. He lived here a number of years, then sold out and removed to Nebraska, where he holds the office of postmaster of his town.

Hubert Matthews, a native of France, came here from Ohio in 1854 and entered land on section 13. In 1859 he settled on section 22. When the Rebellion broke out, he enlisted in the army and died in the service. His widow still occupies the old homestead.

James Willey, a native of England, came from Iowa county in 1854 and settled on sections 17 and 20. He has since lived on section 20.

Thomas Hardy, a native of Virginia, came from Indiana in 1855 and settled on section 16, where he has lived until the time of his death.

James Lucas, a native of Ohio, came here from Indiana in 1855 and purchased 320 acres of land on sections 4 and 9. He settled on section 9, where he still lives.

Samuel B. Goff, a native fo Pennsylvania, came from Indiana in 1855 and entered land on on section 6, where he lived until the time of his death.

In 1856 William Briggs, a native of Massachusetts, came from Illinois and bought the southwest quarter of section 3.

Historical Events

The first birth in the town was that of Rosanna, daughter of Delila (Alling) Hesler, born Feb. 18, 1847. She is now the wife of Albert Brenaman, and lives on Bird’s creek.

Another early birth was that of Joseph, a son of Joel and Susanna (Bradbury) Doughhetee, born July 5, 1850. He is now living in Missouri.

The first child in the town born of Norwegian parents was Jennie, a daughter of George and Annie Shelbern born Jan. 4, 1854.

The first marriage in the town was that of Mark Bird to Lucinda Alexander, in 1848. They settled in Oregon, where she died and he still lives.

Another early marriage was that of Daniel Bird to Maria Alexander, in 1850. The ceremony was performed by T. H. Doughhetee, justice of the peace, at the residence of the bride’s parents on section 33. They settled in Oregon, where they were still living when last heard from.

The first death in the town--or one of the first, at least--was that of John Richardson, in 1850. He was attempting to cross the millpond about a mile north of the mill, in search of deer, and was caught in the brush and drowned. His body was recovered in a short time, and buried on section 27. He was a single man, and had come from Massachusetts, in company with a man named La Rue, he had a claim on section 27.

The first election in the town, and some claim in the county, was held at the house of Mathew Alexander, in the southeast quarter of section 33, in the fall of 1848. There were nineteen votes polled.

Organic

The town of Eagle was organized in 1853. The first town meeting was held in April of that year, when the following named were elected officers: Supervisors, C. G. Rodolf, chairman, Josiah Newburn and Thomas E. Hesler; clerk, L. B. Palmer; treasurer, James Appleby; school superintendent, G. D. Sharp; justices of the peace, Thomas Palmer and Josiah Newburn; constable, William Sharp; assessor, L. B. Palmer; overseers of highway, David D. Miller and John Thompson.

At the annual election held at the Basswood school house, April l3, 1883, the following were chosen as town officers for the succeeding year: Supervisors, J. M. Craigo, chairman, Theodore Wheaton and William Hall; clerk, Horatio Cornwall; treasurer, Thomas Rummery; assessor, D. C. Doughhetee; justices, J. M. Craigo, Horatio Cornwall, Frank Ward and John Bovee; constables, H. M. Hardy and John Dillon.

Educational

The first school house in district No. 1 was erected in 1856. It was built of hewn logs, and located on section 10. The first school was taught by Newton Wells, the term commencing Jan. 1, 1857. About 1868 the school house was burned and a temporary building was erected on the northeast quarter of section 9 which was used until 1876. At that time the present neat frame building was erected at a cost of $450. Mary Hamilton was the first teacher in the present building. Lillie Wood ws the teacher in 1883.

The first school house in district No. 2 was erected in 1857--a frame building on the northwest quarter of section 32. Harriet Hunger was the first teacher. In 1870 the building was sold and is now used as a stable. During the same year the present school house was erected on the south-west quarter of section 29, the site having been donated to the district by George Kite for a term of ninety-nine years. Olive Craigo is the present teacher. This is known as the Kite district.

No. 3 is known as the “Eagle Corner’s district.” The first school house in this district was a log one located on section 28, erected in 1858. Frances Prevett was the first teacher. The school house was afterwards moved to Eagle Corners and was in use until 1868, when a frame building was erected in which Alexander Breneman was the first to teach. Frank Giles is the present teacher.

The first school house in district No. 4 was erected on the northeast quarter of the southeast quarter of section 6, in 1858. Francis Gault was the first teacher. The old school house was used until 1882, when the present house was completed. Katie Dorgan was the first teacher in this building and Ida Allison is the present teacher. This is usually called the “Gault district.”

The first school in district No. 5 was taught by L. M. Thorpe in a log building, erected by the neigh-borhood for the purpose, on section 23. The building was in use until after the war, when the present school building was erected on the southwest quarter fo the northwest quarter fo section 24. Mary Edwards was the first teacher in the present building. This is generally known as the “Pleasant Hill school house.”

The first school house in district No. 6 was erected on the southeast quarter of section 11, in 1857. Frances Prevett, now Mrs. James Sharp, was the first teacher in this building. The present school house was erected in 1880. It is a neat frame building located on the southwest quarter of section 12. Martha Potts was the first teacher in this building.

The first school house in district No. 8 was erected in 1856 [or 1857] on the northwest quarter of section 35. John Hendricks was one of the first teachers in this house. This building was afterward removed to Rodolf’s Mill where it was used until 1880, when it was destroyed by fire, and the present house was erected near the old site. Miss I. Rhodes was the first teacher in this building, and Henry Brenaman , the present.

The first school in district No. 9 was taught by Wilson Crandall in the winter of 1861-2 in a vacant log house located on section 21. In 1862 a school house was erected on the northeast quarter of the northwest quarter of section 21. It was erected on Basswood logs, and it was from this fact that this locality took the name “Basswood.” Enos Cornwall was the first teacher. The present school building was erected in 1867, and Alexander Brenaman taught the first school within its walls. Charles Cronwall is the present teacher.

Mills

In 1839 Robert Boyd and Monroe Fleming came here from Iowa county and made a claim of the southwest quarter of section 26, including the excellent mill site on what is now called Mill creek. This was probably the first claim taken within the limits now comprising the town of Eagle. They made but little improvements, and in 1841 the claim was jumped by Thomas J. Parrish. Boyd and Fleming were lumberman and raftmen. Boyd afterward settled in Crawford county, where he laid out the village of Boydstown.

In 1841 and 1842, Thomas J. Parrish, in company with a Mr. Estes, erected a saw-mill upon the site--the first in the county. An old fashioned “up and down saw,” together with one run of stone for grinding corn, was put into the mill. In January, 1848, the mill was destroyed by fire. Mr. Parrish had died a short time previous to this, and the property was sold to Henry Moore. He rebuilt the mill and furnished it like its predecessor with an “up and down saw’ and one run of stone. In 1852 C. G. Rodolf purchased a half interest, and shortly afterward a rotary saw was put in. Mr. Rodolf bought Mr. Moore’s interest and in 1857 and 1858 erected a substantial building, 30x40 feet in size, putting in two run of stone. It was run as a custom and merchant mill, flour being shipped to Milwaukee and other large markets. In January, 1869, the mill was destroyed by fire. Mr. Rodolf rebuilt immediately, erecting a building 30x40 feet in size, and two stories in height. Two run of buhrs were put into the mill, and all other machinery in use in that day. In February, 1874, this mill was burned. The interesting litigation which grew from this is treated at length in the chapter upon “courts.” In 1877 Frank G. Rodolf, a son of Charles G., purchased a half interest in the property, and they erected the present mill, which is 34x46 feet in size, three stories in height, and stone basement. The mill is equipped with four run of buhrs, and all other necessary machinery for the manufacture fo first-class flour.

In 1852 Simon Sharp and Henry Miller erected a saw-mill on section 13, and equipped it with an “up and down saw.” The power was derived from Hoosier creek, a dam of brush and earth being constructed. In 1853 Sharp and Miller sold to Oliver Miller. He operated the mill until 1867, when he sold to Isaac Thompson and John McCormack. Mr. Thompson purchased McCormack’s interest in 1870, and ran the mill until 1876, when he abandoned that mill, and, in company with S. C. McClintock, purchased a steam mill and set it up near the old water power. MR. McClintock purchased his partner’s interest in 1882.

Religious

In 1854 John Crandall, a Baptist preacher, held services at John Thompson’s house on section 23. He was a pioneer in the northern part of the county, and was instrumental in the establishment of a number of religious organizations in this region; but he did not organize a society here.

The first Methodist class was organized at the house of Josephus Cooper, on section 28, by Rev. Hyatt [or Rev. Schoonover, as some claim]. The following were among the members: Josephus Cooper and wife, Henry Miller and wife, Mrs. C. Thompson and William Cooper. Josephus Cooper was the first class leader. The class was in existence but a few years.

Preachers of different denominations have preached at the school house in district No. 6. Rev. Mathers the pioneer Presbyterian, was among the first to preach here.

In 1857 a Methodist Episcopal class was organized here by Rev. John Walker. The following were among the members of this class: Gideon Miller and wife, James Lewis and wife, and Mrs. M. Young. Gideon Miller was the class leader. This class flourished for some time, holding meetings in the school house. During the war it suspended, as some of the members moved away. Revs. Knapp, Blackhurst and Burlingame were among the pastors who served this class.

Pleasant Valley Christian Church was organized at the Basswood school house in the winter of 1866-7. Rev. Jacob Mark was the preacher. The following were among the first members: Horatio Cornwall and wife, W. H. Cooper, Mrs. Keplogle and two daughters, William Briggs and wife, and son Marvin. During the summer of 1866 a successful protracted meeting was held at which fourteen were baptized. The society met at the school house for some years. In 1874 they erected a neat frame church at Eagle Corners, at a cost of $650. The church now has about twenty members. J. B. Newburn is the present clerk. Rev. James Keeper is the present pastor.

The Pleasant Valley Presbyterian Church was organized in 1851 by Rev. William Smith, from Sextonville, at the old log school house on section 23. The following were among the early member: George D. Sharp and wife, Cyrus Sharp and wife, Mrs. Mary Sharp, William Robinson and wife, William Miller and two sons, George and John Miller and wives, Mrs. Sarah Perrine, Mrs. Abraham Beard and Henry Dawson and wife. The following were elected elders--George D. Sharp, William Robinson and Cyrus Sharp. Rev. Smith preached for the society one year. Among those who have filled the pulpit since that time are Revs. Overton, Laughlin, Conley, Smith, Pinkerton, Francois, Sherwin and Sparrow. Rev. Thomas Murphy is the present pastor. The society met for worship in the school house until 1854, when they erected a frame church on the southwest quarter of the northwest quarter of section 24. The society has flourished and now has about ninety members. The present elders are: William Robinson, William Irving McCoy, Monroe Robinson, Thomas M. Miller and D. W. Bear. Monroe Robinson is the clerk.

A sabbath school was organized in connection with the Pleasant Hill Presbyterian Church at an early day, with George D. Sharp as first superintendent. He was followed by D. A. Hurlbert, who held the position until the time of his death. Monroe Robinson is the present superintendent; the school meets every Sunday.

United Brethren Church Humility Chapel. This class was organized by Rev. George Kite soon after the war. The following were among the first members: Alexander Shannon and wife, Clarissa Shannon, Sarah Evans, Sarah Endicott and Susan Dillon. Alexander Shannon was the first class leader. The following are among the pastors who have filled the pulpit here: Revs. Mebbit, Potts, Young, Whitney, Pound, Day, Taylor, Bovee and Giffen. Rev. Wood is the present pastor. In 1882 the society commenced the erection of a church edifice which was dedicated Sept. 9, 1883, by Bishop Weaver, of Toledo.

Cemeteries

Dawson’s cemetery was surveyed by James Appleby in September 1881. It is located on the southeast corner of the northeast quarter of section 26, and contains eighty-eight blocks, eighty of which contain ten lots each, and eight five lots each. The first burial here was of the remains of Mrs. Henry Dawson, who selected the spot before she died.

Pleasant Hill cemetery, on section 23, is under the control of the Presbyterian Church. The land was donated by William Robinson and set aside for this purpose in 1851. The first burial here was of the remains of George W. Miller, who died Aug. 30, 1855.


Eagle Corners
Source: History of Crawford and Richland Counties, Wisconsin Illustrated (1881) Transcribed by: Richard Ramos

James Harvey was the first to engage in mercantile trade at Eagle Corners. He opened his establishment in 1879.

J. Lawrence and son opened their stock of goods in 1882.

C. C. Taylor was the first blacksmith, opening a shop in 1878-9. This branch is now represented by Jacob Stetler and William Ware.

William Smith was the first wagon maker, opening here in 1876. This was the first business established at the “Corners.”

Eagle Corners postoffice was established in February, 1870, with J. B. Newburn as postmaster, and the office at his house. It was on the route from Muscoda to Excelsior, mail then being received each week. John A. Lawrence is the present postmaster, keeping the office at his store.

Eagle Lodge No. 31, I. O. O. F., at Eagle Corners, was organized on April l18, 1883. The following were the charter members: James Richardson, Horatio Cornwall, James Lewis, Oliver Shepard, Cassius M. Collins, Jacob Stetler, James Tisdale, John M. Craigo, John Goff, William Ware and Lewis Craigo. The first officers elected were: James Richardson, N. G.; John Goff, V. G.; Oliver Shepard, secretary; Horatio Cornwall, warden; James Lewis, conductor; C. M. Collins, treasurer. The lodge meets at Lawrence’s hall, Eagle Corners.



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