Sheboygan County Wisconsin
Biographies

Source: History of Sheboygan County, Wisconsin, past and present, Volume 2;
By Carl Zillier, S.J. Clarke Publishing Company; Publ. 1912 ;
Transcribed and donated by Andrea Stawski Pack.

WILLIAM H. LIMBERG.
A successful agriculturist of Plymouth township is William H. Limberg, who there owns eighty acres of highly cultivated land devoted to diversified farming and stock-raising. The greater part of his life has been passed in the immediate vicinity of his present home and he was born in Fond du Lac county, this state, his natal day being June 20, 1862. His father, Conrad Limberg, was born in Saxony, Germany, on the 21st of August, 1822, but in his early manhood he emigrated to the United States, settling in Fond du Lac county, Wisconsin. There he met and subsequently married Wilhelmina Fhlug, who was also a native of Saxony, her birth having occurred on March 9, 1832. She came to America in her early girlhood with her parents, who located on a farm in Fond du Lac county, where she married Mr. Limberg. They began their domestic life in that county but later bought a farm in the vicinity of Greenbush, and there passed the remainder of their lives. The father passed away in January, 1894, but the mother survived him until December 3, 1906. Ten children were born to them, all of whom are living; our subject being the eldest. In order of birth the others are as follows: Philip, who resides in Greenbush; Katie and Mary, twins, the former the wife of O. J. Bardon and the latter Mrs. H. Brockmann; John, who is living in Greenbush; Julia, the wife of P. M. Wolf, of Plymouth; Otto, who lives in Oshkosh, this state; Gusta, the wife of P. Schmidt, of this county; and Anna and Henry, twins, the former the wife of L. Peterson, of Iowa; and the latter a resident of Plymouth.

William H. Limberg, who was still in his infancy when his parents came to Sheboygan county, was reared to manhood on the home farm at Greenbush and educated in the district schools of that vicinity. He early began assisting his father with the work of the fields and care of the stock and after laying aside his schoolbooks he gave his entire attention to the operation of the home farm for a time, but later worked out by the month. As he was the eldest of a large family many duties devolved upon him and his earnings were largely used to assist in maintaining his younger brothers and sisters until they were old enough to become self-supporting. After relieved of this responsibility he saved his money until he had accumulated sufficient to buy his present place when he engaged in farming on his own account. Mr. Limberg labored tirelessly for many years bringing his land unto a high state of productivity and now reaps abundant harvests that amply repay him for his toil.

During the period of his ownership he has wrought many and extensive improvements on his farm, including the erection of substantial barns and outbuildings and an attractive and comfortable residence, equipped with all modern appointments. He takes great pride in his place, which stands as a monument to years of industry and perseverance, proving that enterprise and persistence are greater factors in a successful career than favorable circumstances. In connection with agricultural pursuits Mr. Limberg also engages in dairying and receives very satisfactory results from this undertaking. Mr. Limberg also builds and places on the market a patented silo and in all has erected over six hundred, putting up as many as two hundred and seventy-two during the last year and receiving gratifying financial results from the business. He has acquired a comfortable competence and beside his various interests owns a residence and lot in town which he rents.

On the 14th of March, 1894, Mr. Limberg was married to Lizzie Ossterhous. the eldest of the seven children of John and Jane Ossterhous. The others are as follows: Hannah, who married C. F. Bemis; Henry, who lives in Colorado; Alfred, principal of the high school at Grafton; Jennie, the wife of A. S. Parrish; Jacob, who lives in this county; and Ora, who is attending the university at Appleton. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Limberg: Leland John, whose birth occurred on the 4th of May, 1896; Wayne Conrad, who was born on the 9th of February, 1898; Beth Marion, born on February 28, 1901; and Florence Jane, whose natal day was the 16th of January, 1909.
Mr. Limberg is a member of the Equitable Fraternal Union, and in politics he is a republican. He is a man of many commendable qualities and is accorded the esteem and good will of his friends and neighbors in Plymouth township, where his long period of residence has given him ample opportunity to manifest his worth.

AUGUST LUTZE.
August Lutze is one of the prominent representatives of insurance interests in Sheboygan where he is conducting business as a partner in the firm of Ernest Lutze Sons Company. A loan department has also been established and both branches of the business are proving profitable owing to the careful direction, keen insight and indefatigable energy of the members of the company.

Of the city in which he makes his home, August Lutze is a native son, his birth having here occurred June 5, 1888. His father, Ernest Lutze was born in Ilsenburg, Hanover, Germany, November 1, 1851, and was about four years of age when brought to America by his parents, Christian and Sophia (Prinz) Lutze. On reaching American shores the journey was continued across the country to Sheboygan county. Christian Lutze was a millwright by trade and erected the first linseed oil mill in this section of the state. There were no nails or iron used and yet its joinings made a perfect construction. Christian Lutze continued a resident of Sheboygan county to the time of his death, which occurred in 1887 when he was eighty-five years of age. His son, Ernest Lutze was reared in this county amid the primitive conditions of pioneer life, for the work of development and improvement had scarcely been begun when the family home was established in Sheboygan county. He attended the public schools and after putting aside his text-books began learning the trades of carpentering and shipbuilding. He became an expert workman in those lines, and followed his occupation until 1887 when he withdrew from that connection and established an insurance business. He was one of the oldest insurance men of Sheboygan at the time of his demise, which occurred May 17, 1907. He was reared in the Lutheran church and his life, ever honorable and upright, was in harmony with his professions. His political allegiance was given to the democratic party, and he was one of its recognized local leaders. For seventeen terms he filled the office of supervisor and was serving as alderman of the city at the time of his death. He labored untiringly for the interests of his party and principles which constituted its platform and his practical efforts were an element in promoting its growth and establishing its influence.

Ernest Lutze was united in marriage to Anna Kleinhaus who was born in Westphalia, Germany, February 7, 1853, a daughter of William and Marianna (Grube) Kleinhaus. Mrs. Lutze came to America in 1870 when a young lady of seventeen years, making the trip to Sheboygan with friends. By her marriage she became the mother of eight children of whom five are yet living: Marie, at home; Charles F., a teacher in the public schools of Sheboygan, who married Alma Gerbing of Mosel township and has a daughter, Gertrude; Ernest who is acting secretary of the Winter Lumber Company and married Alma Ahlers, by whom he has one child, Margaret; August; and Sophia who is a high school pupil.

At the usual age, August Lutze entered the public schools, passing through the consecutive grades until he left the high school to enter upon business life. He was first employed at office work as bookkeeper and stenographer for two years and subsequently he succeeded his father in business, becoming a member of the firm of Ernest Lutze Sons Company in the conduct of a general fire insurance and loan business. This company writes a large amount of insurance annually and in the loan department its business is steadily increasing. Mr. Lutze recognizes the fact that close application and unfaltering energy are indispensable elements of success and upon those qualities as a basis he is building his prosperity. He resides with his mother and they attend the Lutheran church. The family from pioneer times has been a prominent and honored one in this county and the business record of August Lutze adds new lustre to an untarnished family name.

JOHN LUTZ.
John Lutz is a well known citizen throughout the county of Sheboygan, in which for many years he has been engaged in a successful merchandising business. He was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, on the 2d of May, 1868, and is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Lutz. With his parents he emigrated to America in 1881 and settled on a farm near Sheboygan, Wisconsin. His father later purchased a farm of fifteen acres and in addition to the care required in the cultivation of this land he also leased additional land on which he conducted a general farming business. To Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Lutz seven children were born, six of whom survive. Andrew is the owner of farm lands in Nebraska and at present is living a retired life in the city of Sheboygan. Martha, who resides in Sheboygan, is the wife of Charles Rohde, who is by occupation a farmer. Ager is the deceased wife of Charles Hildebrandt, who is engaged in the grocery business in Sheboygan. Five children were born to them. Annie became the wife of George Keller, of Sheboygan, and the mother of two children. Mr. Keller is by profession a moulder and at present is the foreman of the shop in which he is employed. Joseph, who is married and has four children, is engaged in factory contracting. John, the subject of this review, is the next member of the family. Martin, of Sheboygan, who is married and has four children, is employed in a chair factory.

John Lutz was reared in his father's home and educated in the public schools of Sheboygan, where he also attended the parochial schools, from which he was graduated upon the completion of his course of studies. Immediately following his graduation he was employed in various factories in Sheboygan and later entered into partnership with his brother-in-law, Charles Hildebrandt, and engaged in the general grocery and notion business. In this concern he remained for a period of twenty consecutive years, at the end of which time he disposed of his entire holdings in the establishment, selling his interest to Charles Hildebrandt, after which he became the proprietor of a saloon and dance hall one block south of the city limits on South Eighth street. He is a member of the Eagles and the Turnverein.

ARTHUR MALLMANN.
Arthur Mallmann, who is conducting a saloon at the corner of Indiana and Thirteenth streets, in the building known as Standard Hall, was born in Sheboygan on the 9th of November, 1888. He is a son of Frederick Mallmann, who was born in Germany in 1842 and there passed the first nine years of his life. In 1851, he emigrated to the United States with his parents, who located on a farm in Sheboygan county. There he was reared to manhood and assisted with the cultivation of the farm until 1861, when he enlisted as a private in Company H, Ninth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and went to the front, remaining in the service for four years and four months. When mustered out he returned to Sheboygan county and learned the shoemaker's trade, which he followed for many years and he was also employed in some of the local factories. About ten years prior to his death he withdrew from active work and lived retired. Mr. Mallmann was twice married. To him and his first wife there were born five children, three of whom are still living, as follows: William; Albert, a resident of Sheboygan and a painter by trade, who is married and has four children; and Minnie, the wife of Ernest Muhs, a cabinet maker of this city, by whom she has had four children. Mr. Mallmann chose for his second wife Miss Minnie Laese, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. Laese, both natives of Germany, and to them were born eight children, our subject being the fifth in order of birth. The others are as follows: Annie, who was a school teacher, now the wife of Julius Rosenthal of this city, by whom she has had two children; Emma, who married Earl Diehl, a machinist, living in Davenport, Iowa; Alfred, an employee in a brewery in Sheboygan, who is married and has one child; Edwin, a saloon keeper in Sheboygan, who is married and has two children; and Ella, Leona and Arnold, all of whom are living at home.

Arthur Mallmann attended the public and parochial schools of this city in the acquirement of an education and then learned the upholsterer's trade, which he followed for eight years. He gave this up in 1911, and on April 21 of that year engaged in the saloon business at his present stand.
In this city on the 3d of October, 1911, Mr. Mallmann was married to Miss Augusta Pease, a daughter of Charles and Hattie Pease. The father is deceased but the mother is still living and makes her home in Sheboygan. One child has been born to Mr. and Mrs. Mallmann, a daughter, whom they have named Hazel. Fraternally the connections of Mr. Mallmann are confined to his membership in the Rangers and he maintains relations with his trade through the medium of his affiliation with the Retail Liquor Dealers Association.

MICHAEL MARQUARDT.
Michael Marquardt is one of the enterprising and successful farmers, owning and operating a farm of one hundred and thirty-eight acres located two and a half miles northwest of Sheboygan Falls, where he is engaged in making a specialty of general farming and also of the breeding and raising of pure-bred draft horses. He was born in Germany, August 2, 1849, and is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Marquardt, both of whom were natives of Germany, and who died in their native land many years ago. They became the parents of six children of whom only one is living, Michael, the subject of this review.
Michael Marquardt was reared in his parents' home and received his education in the schools of the fatherland. He emigrated to America in 1872, settling in Sheboygan City, where he was engaged as an employee in one of the city's factories for five years. On February 24, 1877, he removed to a farm of one hundred and thirty-eight acres located two and a half miles northwest of Sheboygan Falls and has since been engaged in general farming and also in the raising of pure-bred draft horses, having sold many of his well matched teams at premium prices.
On February 23, 1877, Mr. Marquardt was united in marriage to Miss Matilda Meggers, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Claus Meggers, both of whom were natives of Germany, and who emigrated to America in 1854. The mother died in 1883 and the father in 1903. To Mr. and Mrs. Michael Marquardt sixteen children have been born, six of whom are now living. Emma, who is the wife of Fred Fitense, of Abbotsford, Wisconsin; Annie, who married Albert Zimbal, also a resident of Abbotsford, Wisconsin; Henry, a resident of Clair City, Minnesota; Richard, who is married and resides in Sheboygan Falls township; and Gustave and Hugo, both of whom are at home.
Mr. Marquardt is a democrat and is an adherent of the Lutheran faith, in which he has been raised. He is one of the successful men in his special line as farmer and stockman and is one of the well known and useful citizens of Sheboygan county, of which he has been a resident since 1872.

DAVID McINTYRE.
David Mclntyre, a well known and prosperous agriculturist of Lyndon township, was born on the farm of eighty acres on which he has spent practically his entire life and in the operation of which he is busily engaged at the present time. His birth occurred on the 12th of December, 1849. ms father being David S. Mclntyre, a sketch of whom appears on another page of this work'. He obtained his education in the schools of Cascade, this county, and after putting aside his text-books assisted his father in the operation of the home farm, whereon he has lived continuously with the exception of three years (from 1904 until 1907) spent on the Onion river. The property, comprising one hundred and ninety acres, was divided between our subject and his brother at the time of the father's demise. By dint of untiring industry and able management David Mclntyre has brought his land under a high state of cultivation and improved it until his labors are annually rewarded by bounteous harvests.

On the 11th of October, 1876, Mr. Mclntyre was united in marriage to Miss Julia A. Hatch, a daughter of Justin and Marilla (Putney) Hatch. Her father was born in Windsor county, Vermont, in 1798, while the mother's birth occurred in St. Lawrence county, New York, in 1816. Justin Hatch could recall having seen Marquis de Lafayette when that celebrated commander and statesman visited America in 1824-25, and his recollections also included Daniel Boone, the intrepid Kentucky pioneer, whose death occurred when Mr. Hatch was twenty-two years of age. The Putney family, of which the mother was a member, was descended from the Putneys, of Putney's Commons, near London, England. Mrs. McIntyre's parents were married in the east and came to this state in 1844, settling in Fond du Lac county, where Justin Hatch followed the occupation of farming. His demise occurred in 1888, while his wife was called to her final rest in 1884. Unto them were born nine children, four of whom still survive, as follows: Mrs. Julia A. Mclntyre, Mrs. H. W. Wheeler, Mrs. I. N. Crossby, and Mrs. Alice Adams. The Hatch family was one of the earliest in the east, having settled in that part of the country prior to the Revolutionary war. While still but a boy Justin Hatch did independent service in the War of 1812 and prior to his marriage entered the regular army. He did military duty for about five years and went down the Ohio to the Mississippi river and up the Missouri river to the headwaters of the Missouri when that part of the country was a wilderness. Before entering the military service of his country he carried mail between Vincennes, Indiana, and Louisville, Kentucky.

Mr. and Mrs. Mclntyre have four children. Mertie I., whose birth occurred on the 24th of August, 1877, is now the wife of G. W. Sharp and resides in Oregon. Orion G., who was born on the 1st of September, 1880, makes his home in Oregon. Josephine M., whose natal day was May 7, 1884, gave her hand in marriage to C. B. Connel. Georgie, who was born in the year 1886, is still at home.
In politics Mr. Mclntyre is a stanch republican, loyally supporting the men and measures of that party. He was the census taker for this district in the year 1880. He is well known and highly esteemed throughout the community in which almost his entire life has been spent, and that his- career has ever been upright and honorable is indicated by the fact that the associates of his boyhood and youth are still numbered among his stanch friends and admirers.

EUGENE McINTYRE.
Eugene Mclntyre, who is a native son of Sheboygan county and widely and favorably known within its borders, has for more than four decades been successfully engaged in the grain and lumber business at Waldo. It was in Lyndon township that his birth occurred, his natal day being May 29, 1847. His father, David Mclntyre, was born in New Berlin, Chenango county, New York, in 1819. being the youngest of the twelve children of Nathan and Margaret (Sears) Mclntyre. Both the father and father-in-law of Nathan Mclntyre participated in the Revolutionary war and were present at Burgoyne's surrender. The paternal grandfather of our subject was born in Vermont but eventually removed to the state of New York and in 1823 settled in Cayuga county, where David Mclntyre grew to manhood. The latter began earning his own livelihood when a youth of fourteen, following various occupations but working principally in the woods. On the 17th of March, 1845, he wedded Miss Paulina Stewart, who was born in New York in 1817, and who was a lady of Scotch descent. In the year of their marriage Mr. and Mrs. David Mclntyre made their way from the Empire state to Sheboygan, Wisconsin, where they remained for a few months. They then came to Lyndon township, Mr. Mclntyre taking up eighty acres of government land on section 20, about three miles west of the present site of the village of Waldo. After clearing the timber there from he began its improvement and cultivation and as time passed extended the boundaries of his place until it embraced two hundred acres. On that farm he continued to reside until about 1800, when he put aside the active work of the fields and took up his abode in Waldo, where he spent the remainder of his life in honorable retirement. In his passing the community lost one of its most respected and prominent pioneer settlers and one who had done his full share in the work of early development and upbuilding. Unto him and his wife were born four children, as follows: Josephine, who was the first white child born in Lyndon township and who is the deceased wife of D. B. Harmon of O'Brien county, Iowa; Eugene, of this review; David, who is living on the old homestead in Lyndon township; and Amelia, the deceased wife of J. C. Peck, of Lyndon township.

Eugene Mclntyre obtained his education in the public schools of his native township and also studied law in the office of Bentley & Seaman. He was admitted to the bar but has never been engaged in active practice. In 1871 he came to Waldo and embarked in the grain and lumber business in association with his father-in-law, Norman C. Harmon, who is now deceased, having passed away on the 21st of December, 1909. Mr. Mclntyre is now conducting his interests independently and has won a gratifying measure of success in his business undertakings. He assisted in the organization of the Waldo Canning Company and has long been numbered among the representative and valued citizens of his community.

In 1871 Mr. Mclntyre was united in marriage to Miss Rosabelle C. Harmon, a daughter of Norman C. Harmon, a sketch of whom appears on another page of 'his work. Mr. and Mrs. Mclntyre have five children. Alice E. is the wife of Rev. P. C. Wright, of Norwich, Connecticut, and the mother of four children, Charles Eugene, Burchard, Stuart and Harmon. Harmon L., who is a resident of Seattle, Washington, has been twice married, his first union being with Miss Ida Bundy, by whom he had one child, Cora May. After her demise he wedded Miss Annabelle Farries, by whom he has one child, Jean. Nina C. is the wife of Dr. Charles A. Wright, of Delavan, Wisconsin, and has two children, Miriam and Charles. Frank D. Mclntyre is a resident of Seattle, Washington. Eugene L. is an attorney in Milwaukee. He is married to Jessie Baldwin. Both sons on the coast are engaged in the wholesale hay and grain business.

In politics Mr. Mclntyre has always been a stanch republican. He has served as chairman of the board of supervisors in Lyndon township and in 1880 ably represented his district in the state legislature. In 1900 he was appointed supervisor of census for the fifth district of Wisconsin by William McKinley. His business and political records are equally commendable and in other lines of life he has displayed qualities which have insured him a warm place in the affection of his friends.

OTTO C. MENZ.
Otto C. Menz, who is conducting a wine and liquor business on the corner of Indiana avenue and Fifteenth street, Sheboygan, was born in Prenzlau, Germany, on the 5th of December, 1880, and is a son of Christian and Ernestine Menz. The parents were born, reared and married in the old country, whence they emigrated to the United States in 1883, settling in Sheboygan. For fourteen years prior to leaving Germany, Christian Menz engaged in the manufacture of wood alcohol, and he also followed farming in his native land. After becoming a resident of this city, however, he first worked in the brickyard, but later he was employed in the various local factories, leading an active life until his death on August 14, 1906. Six children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Menz, five of whom are still living, as follows: Anna, the wife of August Bindt, a pattern maker, by whom she had five children; William, a molder, who is married and has three children; Mary, the wife of William Ramus; Otto C., our subject; and Herman, who is living at home with his mother. They are all residents of this city.

Otto C. Menz, who was a child of only three years when he accompanied his parents on their removal to the United States, was educated in the public and German Lutheran parochial schools of this city. After laying aside his textbooks he worked in a shop for two years, but at the end of that time he accepted a position in the grocery store of G. W. Schmitt. He was an ambitious youth of earnest purpose and intelligently applied himself to acquiring not only a thorough knowledge of the grocery business but of commercial methods generally, with the expectation of later engaging in business for himself. He remained in the employ of Mr. Schmitt for eight years, then resigned his position and went to work in a coffee store. A year later he withdrew from this and went into business for himself. He has a good location and as his establishment is well conducted he has built up a lucrative trade.

On the 2nd of June, 1908, Mr. Menz was united in marriage to Miss Clara Hearbst. a native of this county and a daughter of August and Johanna Hearbst, who were born and reared in Germany, the father in Hanover and the mother in Schleswig. They emigrated to the United States during their early years, localing on a farm in Wilson township, this county. Mr. Menz is one of the active members of the United Aid Society and the Phoenix Labor Aid Society and has hosts of friends, being a man of generous impulses and genial nature, who is always ready to assist those who are unfortunate with his ready sympathy and aid.

ANDREW MEYER.
Andrew Meyer, who owns and operates a well improved farm of eighty acres on section 12, Lyndon Township, has long devoted his attention to general agricultural pursuits with excellent results. His birth occurred in Germantown township, Washington county, Wisconsin, on the 16th of December, 1853, his parents being Andrew and Annie (Schmidt) Meyer, both of whom were natives of Bavaria,- Germany. The father, who was born in 1821, crossed the Atlantic to the United States in 1846 and came direct to Wisconsin, taking up government land in Germantown township, Washington county. After clearing the place he began its cultivation and there carried on general farming for a period of eleven years. In 1857 he removed to Lyndon township, Sheboygan county, purchased a tract of one hundred and sixty acres on section 6, cleared and improved the property and thereon spent his remaining days. His death, which occurred in 1891, was the occasion of deep and widespread regret, for he had been a resident of this county for a third of a century and had gained the friendship and regard of all with whom he came in contact.

He was twice married, his first wife bearing the maiden name of Annie Schmidt, by whom he had ten children, eight sons and two daughters, as follows: George, who is a resident of Wibaux, Montana; Martin, living in Plymouth township, Sheboygan county; John, who makes his home in Wibaux, Montana; Elizabeth, the wife of August Moeller, of St. Cloud, Wisconsin; Andrew, of this review; Mary, the wife of Emil Doegnitz, of Fond du Lac; Philip, who passed away in Manitowoc county, this state; Henry, who is a resident of Plymouth, Wisconsin; Herman, who makes his home near Tuttle, Oklahoma; and Edward, of Greenbush township, Sheboygan county. The mother of these children was called to her final rest in 1863. For his second wife Mr. Meyer chose Mrs. Louisa Kirst, by whom he had three children, namely: Oscar, residing in Plymouth, Wisconsin; Louisa, the wife of William Draycot, of Clinton, Illinois; and August, of Plymouth township, this county.

Andrew Meyer, Jr., acquired his education in the public schools and when a youth of seventeen began learning the tinner's trade, at which he worked in Plymouth for two years, while subsequently he spent a year and a half at work in Chilton, this state. On attaining his majority he went to Houghton, Michigan, and for a time was engaged as a sailor on the lakes, later working on a farm near Oxford, Michigan. About 1877 he returned to this state and bought his father's farm on section 6, Lyndon township. In 1892 he sold that property and removed to Sheboygan, where he made his home until 1894, when he rented a farm in Lyndon township, being actively engaged in its operation for two years. On the expiration of that period he secured employment in the store of H. J. Goelzer at Plymouth. Next he purchased forty acres of land in Plymouth Township but disposed of the place in 1898 and bought his present farm of eighty acres on section 12, Lyndon Township. He raises the cereals best adapted to soil and climate and in his undertakings as an agriculturist has won a well merited and gratifying measure of prosperity.

Mr. Meyer has been married twice. His first wife bore the maiden name of Mary Habighorst and became the mother of one child, Mary, who is now the wife of Albert Gerling, of Bloomington, Illinois. In 1883 he wedded Miss Flora Schaekel, a daughter of Christian Schaekel, of whom more extended mention is made on another page of this work. Unto Andrew and Flora (Schaekel) Meyer have been born four children, as follows: Norma, who is the wife of Emil Juers, of Lyndon township, by whom she has one child, Ronald; Flora, who is the wife of John Wierman, of Waldo, Wisconsin, and the mother of one child, Bernice; Myrtle, who lives at home and follows the profession of school teaching; and Lona, who is also still under the parental roof. Mr. Meyer is a devoted and consistent member of the Evangelical Lutheran church, to which his wife and children also belong. Commendable principles have governed his life and shaped his conduct in his relations with his fellowmen. Free from ostentation and display, he is, however, favorably known because of his genuine worth which classes him with the representative citizens of the community.

REV. EDWARD J. MEYER.
One of the most prominent and influential citizens of Plymouth is the Rev. Edward J. Meyer, who for twelve years has been priest at St. John's and during that time has wrought many and extensive changes in the parish. He has worked tirelessly in the interest not only of his congregation but the whole community, and by his kindly, helpful spirit and the charitableness he has at all times manifested has greatly endeared himself to the people at large. He is a native of this state, having been born at Barton, Washington county, on the 28th of April, 1867, and is of German extraction as the name would suggest. His father was Lieutenant Joseph Meyer, the descendant of a family that has for many generations been prominently identified with the military circles of Germany. He was born in Treves, Germany, January 21, 1832. The father's brother was the burgomaster of Andernach, a well known and historic city in the Rhinelands. Lieutenant Meyer, the father, subsequently came to the United States and after a brief sojourn in Chicago went to Minnesota with his wife. There he enlisted in the army when the first call came for troops in the early days of the Civil war. Later he was transferred to an Illinois regiment, and was subsequently promoted to .the rank of second lieutenant of the Twelfth Louisiana Volunteer Infantry. He was honorably discharged on the 16th of March, 1864, and on the 20th of September, 1868, he passed away and was buried in the cemetery at Barton, Washington county, this state. The mother of our subject, whose maiden name was Barbara Thoma, was also of German birth. Her parents were natives of Treves, Germany, whence they emigrated to the United States, locating in Chicago during the early days. Later they removed to Washington county, Wisconsin, which thereafter was their home.

Practically the entire life of Father Meyer has been passed in this state. His early education was pursued in the parochial school at Barton, and later he entered St. Francis' Seminary at Milwaukee, beginning his studies there in 1883 and terminating them in 1891, upon the completion of his ecclesiastical course. During the succeeding two years he served as assistant priest at St. Michael's parish. Milwaukee. At the expiration of that time the Bishop assigned him to Dotyville, Fond du Lac county, Wisconsin, where for seven and a half years he was in charge of St. Michael's parish. During that time he erected a new church, school and parsonage and strengthened the parish in every way, leaving it in a much better condition because of his enthusiastic and diligent work among the people. In 1900, he was assigned his present post and during the twelve years of his pastorate here has achieved notable results. Soon after beginning his duties in St. John's parish he erected a new school building, and in 1906 he built the beautiful church they are now using. Not only has he promoted the material welfare of his parish but he has strengthened it spiritually, the congregation having largely increased under his ministrations. In addition to his work here. Father Meyer is in charge of St. Friedolin church at Glenbeulah, this state.

Father Meyer is unusually well qualified for the manifold duties of his profession, not the least of his gifts being a winning personality, strong, forceful character and kindly, helpful spirit, all of which unite in gaining him the confidence and esteem of those with whom he comes in contact. A fine mind, retentive memory and scholarly instincts united with good powers of organization and executive ability well endow him for the duties of spiritual advisor and business director in both of which he has manifested high efficiency. He is very popular not only among his parishioners but in the community generally, where he has won many stanch friends by reason of his progressive spirit and appreciative helpful nature.

HERMAN H. MILLER.
Herman H. Miller is the owner of a well cultivated farm in Plymouth Township, where he is successfully engaging in the breeding and raising of thoroughbred Holstein cattle and also in dairying. He is one of the efficient native sons of Sheboygan county, his birth having occurred in Plymouth township on December 6, 1864. His father, Henry Miller, was born in Germany on the 3rd of December, 1824, and there he was married in 1852, at the age of twenty-eight years, to Miss Dora Selk. They passed the early years of their domestic life in their native land, where their two eldest sons were born, but coming to the conclusion that America offered better opportunities, in 1857 they took passage for the United States.

Sheboygan county was their destination and upon their arrival here they located in Plymouth township, where the father acquired a tract of government land. He diligently applied himself to clearing and improving his farm and for six years thereafter devoted himself exclusively to its cultivation. At the expiration of that time he disposed of his holding and invested the proceeds in a farm adjoining the town of Plymouth, upon which he resided until his death in 1894. The mother is still living at the venerable age of eighty years and now makes her home with her daughter, Mrs. Thiedeman. The family of Mr. and Mrs. Miller numbered eleven, but two of their children died in infancy. Those who lived to attain maturity were as follows: John M. and Fred C, both residents of this county; Henry, who passed away on the 9th of March, 1912, in North Dakota, where he had lived for more than thirty years; Emma, the wife of A. J. Walters, of this county; Ida, who married William Thiedeman, also a resident of this county; Herman H., the subject of this review; Charles, who lives in Sheboygan county; Lena, the wife of John Kruger, of Clear Lake, Wisconsin; and William P., also of this county.

The boyhood and youth of Herman H. Miller were passed in the vicinity where he now resides, his education being obtained in the common schools. After laying aside his text-books he followed the carpenter's trade for three years, but subsequently engaged in the general mercantile business in Plymouth, as a member of the firm of Harrington & Miller. Two years later he purchased eighty acres of land opposite his present farm and turned his attention to agricultural pursuits. He was thoroughly qualified to make a success of this undertaking as he had been trained in the practical methods of tilling the fields and caring for the crops by his father, who was a capable agriculturist. After cultivating this place for three years, Mr. Miller purchased the farm where he now resides from his father-in-law, and here since 1900 he has engaged in dairying and stock-raising. In his methods he is practical and energetic and as he has used intelligence and foresight in the development of his interests has met with a corresponding measure of success.

In 1886, Mr. Miller was united in marriage to Miss Hattie Roehr, a daughter of Robert and Christina (Metzner) Roehr, natives of Germany who emigrated to the United States prior to their marriage. The father was born in Saxony on the 27th of March, 1819, and there he was likewise reared and educated. He emigrated to the United States in 1851, coming direct to Sheboygan county where he was married on April 29, of that year, to Miss Metzner. Eleven children were born of this marriage as follows: Carl B.; Theckla, the wife of A. Koellmer; Gustave, who is a resident of Plymouth; Ida, who married Adolph Horstman, of Illinois; Julius, of Louisville, Kentucky; Edmund, a resident of Canada; Agnes, the wife of Carl Greise, of Chicago; Mrs. Miller; Lena, who married Henry Wick; Oscar, of this county; and Amanda, the wife of Frank Hardy, of Chicago. To Mr. and Mrs. Miller there have been born three children: Alvin W., who was born on June 21, 1888, now engaged in stock-raising with his father; Ella, whose natal day was the 8th of May, 1891; and Laura, whose birth occurred on March 6, 1898. Alvin W. Miller, the son, owns four thoroughbred Holstein cattle, which are a present from his father and from which he intends to breed a herd to stock a farm of his own.

The family attend the Lutheran church, of which the parents are members, and the political allegiance of Mr. Miller is given to the Republican Party. He is a man who has utilized to the best of his ability every opportunity that has presented, itself and through close concentration and careful management has achieved a commendable measure of success.

CARL MOHS.
Carl Mohs, who is devoting his time and energies to general agricultural pursuits with excellent results, is the owner of a fine farm of one hundred and thirty acres in Plymouth township. He is numbered among the worthy native sons of Sheboygan county, his birth having occurred in Plymouth in January, 1862. His father, Henry Mohs, who was born in Germany in 1838, emigrated to the United States in 1850 and took up his abode in this county. Mr. Mohs of this review acquired his education in the place of his nativity and after putting aside his text-books was employed as a farm hand by the month for four years, on the expiration of which period he returned home. It was in 1876 that his father purchased the present family homestead, in the operation of which he has been busily engaged to the present time with the exception of six years, four years of which period he spent as a farm hand, while for two years he cultivated a place of his own south of Plymouth. Having purchased the home farm from his father, he returned to the same in 1890 and has since devoted his time and energies to its further cultivation and improvement. The place comprised eighty acres and in 1911 he extended its boundaries by an additional purchase of fifty acres. He makes a specialty of dairying and keeps from fifteen to twenty head of high grade cattle.

In April, 1887, Mr. Mohs was united in marriage to Miss Dora Fredick, a daughter of August Fredick, who was a native of Germany. Mrs. Mohs was one of a family of six daughters, five of whom still survive. Unto our subject and his wife have been born ten children, three of whom died in infancy. The others are as follows: Minnie, who was born in 1888 and who is now the wife of William Lindpw; Martin, whose birth occurred in 1889; Henry, whose natal year was 1891; Louis, born in 1895; Arthur; Selma, twin sister of Elsie (deceased), who was born in 1902; and Edgar, born in 1904.

Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Mr. Mohs has supported the men and measures of the democracy, believing firmly in the principles of that party. In religious faith he is a Lutheran. In the county in which his entire life has been spent he enjoys an enviable reputation as a substantial agriculturist and representative citizen.


ALVAH R. MUNGER.
Alvah R. Munger is one of the battle-travailed veterans of the Civil war. After many years of service in the employee of the government and succeeding years of toil as a farmer he is now able to enjoy a well deserved rest in his beautiful home at Waldo, this state, where he lives a retired life. He was born in Marseilles, La Salle county, Illinois, August 3, 1842, and is a son of Rufus and Amanda A. (Peck) Munger. Rufus Munger, Jr., the father, is of Scotch-English descent. His immediate ancestors, however, many years ago established their home in one of the New England states. He was born in Genesee county, New York, in 1812, and upon attaining his majority he was engaged in educational work as a teacher in the public schools for a period of seven years, after which he devoted his attention to agricultural pursuits. He removed from his native state to Huron county, Ohio, and later to Marsailles, La Salle county, Illinois, from which place he removed to Wisconsin, where he filed upon eighty acres of government land in the township of Scott in Sheboygan county. After completing the required number of years of residence upon this place he walked to Green Bay, Wisconsin, in order to obtain his patent from the government to his land.

He continued to live upon the farm which he made his original location during the remaining years of his life. He has the distinction of being the first assessor in the township, of Scott. Mr. and Mrs. Rufus Munger were united in wedlock in Huron county, Ohio,, of which to them five sons and three daughters were born, two of whom are still living; Alvah R., the subject of this review, and a sister. The parents of this family are both deceased, the mother having died in February, 1862, and the father, April 11, 1887.

Alvah R. Munger came with his parents to Wisconsin when a child of but four years of age. He was educated in the common schools. During the early years of his life he was engaged in teaching, a vocation which he pursued for a brief period only, during which he taught for three terms in the public schools. Before attaining his majority he heard the call of his government for help to save unsevered the nation's flag and he enlisted in August, 1862, in the Twenty seventh Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. His command was destined to follow the fortunes of the western army and his regiment engaged in the siege of Vicksburg. the battle of Jenkins' Ferry in Arkansas, and also did service on the borders of the gulf. During his army life he served as bugler of his regiment. He was mustered out of service on August 29, 1865, at Brownsville, Texas, where he received his honorable discharge, and with his regiment returned to Wisconsin.

Immediately after completing his services as a soldier he returned to his father's home and there took charge of the management of the place and looked after the welfare of his aged father. He continued to live upon the old homestead until I the 29th of March, 1902, at which time he disposed of the property and removed to Waldo, where he established his present residence.

Mr. Munger was united in marriage on the 22d of September, 1867, to Miss Jeannette Floyd. Mrs. Munger is a native of New York, her birth having occurred in the city of Albany. She is a daughter of Ezra and Mary (Hindman) Floyd. Her father was a native of Massachusetts and was descended from one of the old New England families. The parents of Mrs. Munger removed from the east to Wisconsin and settled in the town of Scott on a farm adjoining the old homestead of Rufus Munger, the father of her husband, in the year 1847. Mrs. Hunger's brother, Joseph, was the first white child born in the township of Scott in this county. Her father, Ezra Floyd, was twice married. Five children were born to the first Mrs. Floyd and to his second wife three children were born, Mrs. Munger being one of the latter number.

Mr. Munger is a loyal member of the republican party and during his active business life he served as supervisor and in various other offices in the township of Scott. For twelve years he served continuously as justice of the peace. He for one term sat in the lower house of the state legislature, namely, 1889-90 and 1890-91. He is a member of A. O. Heald Post, No. 192, G. A. R., and is now living in well earned rest in his home in Waldo, this county. He is also an Odd Fellow, but is not an active member now, although holding a card from the lodge, having joined in 1873. Mr., Munger is universally respected throughout the county and is one of the oldest among its pioneer citizens. He has always been deeply interested in all issues of a public nature effecting the advancement and well-being of the community in which he lives.

CARL J. NEHRLING.
Carl J. Nehrling, who is numbered among the worthy native sons of Sheboygan county, devotes his attention to general agricultural pursuits and is the owner of a valuable farm of one hundred and twenty acres on sections 1 and 12, Lyndon township. His birth occurred in Plymouth township on the 25th of June, 1866, his parents being Carl and Elizabeth (Ruge) Nehrling, both of whom were natives of Saxony, Germany. The father was born on the 19th of January, 1834, while the mother's birth occurred on the 6th of October, 1837. The Nehrlings were farmers and landowners of Saxony. Christian Nehrling, the paternal grandfather of our subject, was born on the 3d of January, 1803, and emigrated to America with his son Carl in 1855. He had another son, Heinrich, who remained in Saxony. Christian Nehrling made his way direct to Sheboygan county, locating in Herman township, where he purchased a tract of forty acres on section 28 which he cleared and improved. Subsequently he augmented his landed holdings by additional purchase and at the time of his demise owned an excellent farm of eighty acres. He was called to his final rest on the 7th of July, 1864, and thus the community lost one of its respected and honored pioneer settlers.

Carl Nehrling, the father of Mr. Nehrling of this review, emigrated to the United States in company with his parents and remained with his father until the latter's death, after which he continued to engage in farming. About 1864 he sold the home property and removed to Plymouth township, where he purchased land on section 23 and resided until 1874. In that year he disposed of the place and took up his abode on section 22, north of Plymouth, where he remained until about 1879, when he removed to section 1, Lyndon township. There he devoted his attention to the operation and improvement of a farm until 1900, when he sold out and retired from the work of the fields. Since that time he has lived with his children, making his home at present in Chicago. It was about 1855 that he wedded Miss Elizabeth Ruge, who is deceased, having passed away on the 25th of October, 1896. Mr. and Mrs. Carl Nehrling were the parents of four children. Henry, who is now an orange grower of Gotha, Orange county, Florida, was formerly custodian of the public museum of Milwaukee, and also served as deputy collector of customs of the port of Milwaukee. Caroline is the wife of Paul Appelt, of Chicago, Illinois. Amelia is the wife of August Kich and resides in Gary, Indiana. Carl J., of this review, is the youngest member of the family.

Carl J. Nehrling obtained his early education in a parochial school and also pursued a course of study in the Bryant & Stratton Business College of Chicago. After putting aside his text-books he began farming, first cultivating rented land. In 1900 he purchased a farm of one hundred and twenty acres on sections 1 and 12, Lyndon township, in the operation of which he has been engaged continuously since. He has remodeled the buildings thereon, and the property is now lacking in none of the improvements and equipments of a model farm. He devotes his attention to dairy farming but makes a specialty of raising pure bred Holsteins for the market and has a sire related to the world's record cows.

In 1890 Mr. Nehrling was united in marriage to Miss Philipena Schaekel, a daughter of Christian Shaekel, of whom more extended mention is made on another page of this work. Unto our subject and his wife have been born three children, Otto, Erich and Althea. All are still under the parental roof.

Mr. Nehrling gives his political allegiance to the republican party and has served as supervisor of Lyndon township and also in the capacity of school clerk. He and his family belong to the Evangelical Lutheran church. His entire life has been guided by the most honorable principles and his self-reliance and unfaltering industry, combined with his integrity, constitute the salient features in his success.

HENRY J. NEUENS.
The consensus of public opinion places Henry J. Neuens in a creditable and envious position in business circles in Sheboygan, and he is also known as one of the democratic leaders of the state. In the city where he resides he has long conducted a real-estate and insurance business, starting in that field in 1887, since which time he has labored persistently and energetically to build up a business that is now of gratifying proportions. He came to this city in 1886 and has always been a resident of Wisconsin, his birth having occurred at Port Washington, on the 23d of June, 1858, his parents being John and Margaretta Neuens. The father came from Luxemburg in 1851, and settled first in Ohio whence he removed to Port Washington in 1852. There he acted as superintendent of wood cutters in the employ of Burnham & Blake and later he started in business on his own account as proprietor of a hotel. He still makes his home at Port Washington where he is living retired at the advanced age of seventy-eight years. In politics he has been a democrat since becoming a naturalized American citizen, and he has been honored with various local offices, serving as county treasurer, as clerk and as alderman. In 1911 he was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife who passed away at the age of seventy-six years and was laid to rest in the Port Washington cemetery.

Henry J. Neuens attended public and private schools of his native town until he reached his eighteenth year but in the meantime had had considerable business experience through the assistance which he rendered his father. 'He then entered the Spencerian Business College at Milwaukee and was graduated therefrom in 1882, receiving a diploma attesting that he had completed the commercial course. In the meantime, from 1878 until 1882, he filled the position of bookkeeper in the McLaughlin & Butler wholesale wine and liquor house.

Following the completion of his commercial course Mr. Neuens returned to Sheboygan with the intention of becoming actively interested in the manufacture of chairs. For a year he served as bookkeeper and during that period carefully investigated the business situation in regard to chair manufacturing. In that time he became convinced that to place his money in such an enterprise would not prove a wise investment. He next went upon the road as a traveling salesman for the Phoenix Chair Company, and gradually he became interested in the real-estate, loan and insurance business until he concentrated his entire time and attention upon that business. He now annually negotiates many important property transfers, places many large loans and writes a gratifying amount of insurance, so that the different departments of his business are bringing to him substantial and well merited success. His clientage is large, and it is a well known fact that Mr. Neuens is to be depended upon in any business transaction, and that while he seeks legitimate success he is at the same time interested in the substantial welfare and upbuilding of his city, and in the field of real-estate dealings uses his opportunity to promote the best interests of Sheboygan.

In Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on the 26th of June, 1886, Mr. Neuens was married to Miss Alexie Ricdel, a daughter of Theodore and Margaretta Ricdel, her father a manufacturing and traveling salesman of Milwaukee. Mr. and Mrs. Neuens reside at No. 436 Park avenue in a pleasant and commodious home which he erected in 1891. In politics he is a democrat and is prominently known throughout the state. He has served as supervisor of his county and has received strong support for the position of insurance commissioner. He holds membership with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the Knights of Columbus, the Catholic Knights of Wisconsin and the Catholic Order of Foresters, and his religious faith is that of the Catholic church which claims him as a communicant. He is also connected with Concordia Turnverein and the Sheboygan Mutual Laborers' Benevolent Association. He is interested in vital problems and questions of the day relating to the welfare of county, state and nation, and also keeps well informed upon themes of significant interest to the public. He is a man of fine personal appearance, of splendid physique, large and well proportioned, and the outer man is but an indication of a broad mind and public spirit that place him with Sheboygan's foremost citizens.

JACOB NEUHAUS.
Jacob Neuhaus, the former president of The Sheboygan Fruit Box Company, who is now living retired in this city, was born at Newton, Manitowoc county, Wisconsin, on the 25th of March, 1852, and is a son of William and Eliza Neuhaus. The father was born on the Rhine and reared in Germany, whence he emigrated to the United States about 1837, locating in Manitowoc county. There he acquired some timber land that he cleared and improved and energetically applied himself to its cultivation during the remainder of his active life. He was one of the first agriculturists in this section of the state, and as the country was but sparsely settled at that time, the winters severe and the roads little more than blazed trails, he endured all of the hardships and privations incident to pioneering. He passed away in 1896 at the age of seventy-three years and was laid to rest in the cemetery at Newton, where the mother who died in 1892 at the age of sixty-four, is also buried. Mr. Neuhaus was a republican in his political views and gave his unqualified support to the men and measures of that party.

The boyhood and youth of Jacob Neuhaus were not unlike those of other farmer lads who were reared in Wisconsin during the pioneer days. He early began assisting his father about the farm, thus laying the foundation for an agricultural career, and pursued his studies in the public schools of Newton. After laying aside his text-books, at the age of fourteen, he gave his undivided attention to the farm work, remaining at home until he was eighteen. As the family was large and his father then had ample assistance he started out to make his own way in the world. For six years thereafter he worked out as a farm hand, but in 1876 he invested his savings in a tract of land that had formerly belonged to his father-in-law, and began farming on his own account. He assiduously applied himself to the further improvement and cultivation of this property for thirty-one years. In November, 1907, he withdrew from the work of the fields and came to Sheboygan and went to teaming for The Sheboygan Fruit Box Company. Later he purchased an interest in the business and in 1908 he became president of the company, retaining that office until October, 1911, when he retired.

Mr. Neuhaus was married on the 7th of April, 1876, to Miss Sophie Nagel, and to them were born three children: Lydia, who married Albert Martin, a farmer of Sheboygan county; Emma, who is the wife of Ferdinand Eick, who is engaged in farming at Herman, this county; and Albert, who is living on the old homestead. The mother passed away in 1883 and on the 2d of November, 1884, the father married Miss Maria Strassburger, who died on February 7, 1911, and is buried in Herman township. To Mr. Neuhaus and his second wife there were born four children, as follows: Laura, the wife of Fred Johanning, a fanner of Sheboygan Falls; Louis, who is employed at The Sheboygan Fruit Box Company; and Alma and Hilda, who are living with their father at the family home at 2233 North Fifteenth street.

Mr. Neuhaus is a member of Zion Reformed church and he also belongs to the Benevolent Association connected with the church, while his political support he gives to the republican party. For many years Mr. Neuhaus led a life of intense activity and diligence and is now able to pass his latter days in well earned peace and rest.

DE HAVE NORTON.
De Have Norton, an honored veteran of the Civil war, is numbered among the valued and representative citizens of Hingham, where he has made his home for more than a half century. He was born in Solon, Maine, on the 5th of June, 1839, and has therefore passed the seventy-third milestone on life's journey. The family comes of English descent and was established in Maine at a very early day. Elihu Norton, the father of our subject, was born in the Pine Tree state in 1814 and for many years was engaged in railroading in that state. In 1855 he brought his family to Wisconsin, locating in Sheboygan county, on a farm on section 30, Lima township, which he cleared and improved and upon which he resided until 1886. In that year he retired from active life and took up his abode in Hingham, where he spent his remaining days, his death occurring in 1899. For thirty years he had survived his wife, Mrs. Emily (Taylor) Norton, who was born in 1817 and passed away in 1869. In their family were two children, the younger sister of our subject being Mary, the widow of Frank Sisson, whose residence is in Akron, Colorado.

De Have Norton spent the first sixteen years of his life in the state of his nativity and to the public schools of Maine and of Wisconsin he is indebted for the educational advantages which he enjoyed. After coming to Wisconsin he assisted his father in the cultivation of the home fields, his time being thus engaged until 1861, when, responding to the call of the Union for troops to fight in the Civil war he enlisted in Company C, Fourth Wisconsin Infantry. This later became the Fourth Wisconsin Cavalry and was the first company to leave Sheboygan county. His entire service was characterized by loyalty to duty and courage in the face of danger, and he took part in all engagements in which his command participated, including the battles of Baton Rouge, Pleasant Hill, the siege of Port Hudson, and the engagement at Vicksburg, and after a service of four years and four months he was honorably discharged, leaving the field of battle with a most creditable military record.

After the close of hostilities Mr. Norton returned to Lima township and again took up the work of the farm, in which he continued until the year 1886, when he withdrew from agricultural pursuits and moved to Hingham, where he has since maintained his residence.

On the 20th of December, 1865, Mr. Norton was united in marriage to Miss .Mary M. Johnson, a native of Maine, where she was born in 1840. She was the third child in order of birth in the family of John and Belinda (Clough) Johnson, who were likewise natives of the Pine Tree state, where the father passed away in early life. Later the mother brought her family to Sheboygan county, Wisconsin, establishing her home in Lima township, and here her daughter gave her hand in marriage to Mr. Norton. Unto this union one son has been born, Frank I., who is connected with a chair factory in Port Washington, Wisconsin.

He married Miss Ava Wood, of Sheboygan Falls, and has two children, Vera and Dorothy. Mrs. Norton holds membership in the Methodist Episcopal church of Hingham while fraternally Mr. Norton belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America and the Royal Neighbors of America and holds pleasant relations with his old army comrades through his membership in the Grand Army of the Republic. He is deeply interested in all matters pertaining to the general welfare and for one year he served as supervisor of Lima township, is now a notary public and for the past twenty-two years has been justice of the peace, which office he still holds. His performance of the duties that devolve upon him in connection therewith has ever been capable and efficient, his decisions ever being strictly fair and impartial, and by his equitable rulings he has won the confidence and regard of his fellow citizens. His life record now spans a period of seventy-three years, more than a quarter of a century of which time has been passed in Hingham, and his long residence in this town has made him well known, while his many good traits of character have won for him the honor and respect of a large circle of warm friends.

GEORGE B. OGLE.
George B. Ogle since 1899 has been engaged in the general merchandising business in Waldo, Sheboygan county, this state. He was born in Sheboygan county, February 19, 1860, a son of Samuel J. and Esther (Kennedy) Ogle, the father a native of Maryland. George B. Ogle was reared in his parents' home and educated in the public schools of Sheboygan. Immediately after leaving school he became an apprenticed blacksmith, continuing to work at that trade until he had acquired a complete knowledge of it, after which he engaged in the general blacksmithing business and continued so to be employed for a period of eighteen years, nearly all of that time being spent in this county. In 1884 he removed to Sheboygan Falls and soon after received the appointment from President Cleveland as postmaster of that city. He entered at once upon the duties of his office and continued in the discharge of the same for four and a half years. In 1899 he purchased his present merchandising business in Waldo and immediately removed to that place to look after the interests of his establishment, where he has since remained.

In August, 1890, Mr. Ogle was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth M. Mandle, a daughter of Thomas Mandle, who emigrated to the United States from England and settled in the county of Sheboygan at an early day, where he was engaged in general farming. To Mr. and Mrs. Ogle six children have been born: William T., born in 1892, now associated with his father in the store; Samuel E., whose birth occurred in 1894 and who is also employed in his father's store; Esther, born in 1899; George F., whose natal year was 1902; Cecilia H., born in 1905; and Elizabeth K., in 1910.

Mr. Ogle has always been an enthusiastic and loyal member of the democratic party, taking a very prominent part in the political interests of this state where he has for a number of years been regarded as a political leader. He is a member of the National Fraternal League and also belongs to Sheboygan Lodge of the Knights of Columbus. He is likewise a devoted communicant of the St. Rose Catholic church of Lima township. George B. Ogle is one of the best known men in the county of Sheboygan. He is a man of strictest integrity in all his business transactions and is understood to be a public-spirited, influential citizen, ready to give his aid and cooperation toward the success of public enterprises and movements for social betterment.

SAMUEL J. OGLE.
Samuel J. Ogle, the owner of an excellent farm of one hundred and twenty acres on section 22, Lyndon township, has lived in retirement since 1910 but in former years was actively identified with agricultural pursuits here and also followed the blacksmith's trade for a time. Having come to Sheboygan county in 1855, he has witnessed many changes as a pioneer region has been transformed into a highly developed and well populated district. His birth occurred in Frederick, Maryland, on the 18th of May, 1836. The Ogles come of an old Maryland family of English descent whose representatives were planters in the Old Line state. One of the name served as governor of Maryland under the royal government and another was governor under the proprietary government. William Ogle, the father of our subject, was born at Frederick, Maryland, in 1810, and there grew to manhood, learning the blacksmith's trade, which he followed after establishing his home in the west. In 1847 he took up his abode in Ohio and in 1855 came to Wisconsin, locating at Cascade, where he purchased land. In 1892 he abandoned the work of a blacksmith and retired, taking up his abode on the farm which his children were operating. Subsequently he went to Chicago where his demise occurred in 1896. His remains were interred at Cascade. He had been a resident of this county for four decades and had won many friends within its borders by reason of his upright and honorable life. He was twice married, choosing for his first wife Miss Mary Amig, a native of Maryland. Her father and brother enlisted in the War of 1812 and lost their lives in that struggle. Unto William and Mary (Amig) Ogle were born eight children, as follows: William, deceased, who served as a member of a Missouri regiment during the Civil war; Samuel J., of this review; Anne, the deceased wife of George Brickner; Clay, who was killed at Perryville, Kentucky, while loyally defending the Union as a member of the First Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry; George, who is a resident of Nebraska; Mary, the wife of Charles Kennedy, of Sheboygan Falls; and Flora and Charles, both of whom reside in Nebraska.

Samuel J. Ogle obtained his education in the public schools of Maryland and Ohio and came to this state with his parents when a youth of nineteen. He learned the blacksmith's trade and worked at that occupation at Cascade with his father and subsequently spent a year as a blacksmith at Sheboygan. In 1864 he journeyed overland to Virginia City, Montana (then Idaho), there working at his trade in the gold camps. In 1868 he returned to Cascade, Wisconsin, here continuing work at the blacksmith's trade until 1873. In that year he located on the farm which he had purchased on section 22, Lyndon township, and the following year opened a blacksmith shop at Waldo, conducting the same for about five years in connection with the cultivation of his fields. After disposing of his shop he devoted his time exclusively to the operation of his farm, on which he still resides. Since 1910, however, he has enjoyed retirement, leaving the active work of the fields to his son James. There were only log buildings on this farm of one hundred and twenty acres when Mr. Ogle first took possession thereof, but these he has since replaced by a handsome residence, a commodious barn and good outbuildings for the shelter of grain and stock. He originally gave his attention to the cultivation of grain, but in recent years his farm has been devoted to dairying. Mr. Ogle has full blooded and graded Holsteins and was one of the first to introduce full blooded cattle in the community.

On the 27th of December, 1859, Mr. Ogle was united in marriage to Miss Esther Kennedy, who was born in Augusta, Maine, in 1840, her parents being George and Margaret (Dempsey) Kennedy, both of whom were born near Dublin, Ireland. Leaving the Emerald isle, George Kennedy first made his way to Canada and later removed to Maine, working in the lumber mills at Augusta. In 1855 he came west, settling in Lima township, Sheboygan county, Wisconsin, where he devoted his attention to general agricultural pursuits until called to his final rest in 1883. Unto him and his wife were born eight children, of whom Mrs. Ogle was the fourth in order of birth. Our subject and his wife have also become the parents of eight children. George B., a sketch of whom appears on another page of this work, is a merchant of Waldo. Frank A., the secretary of the Brickner Woolen Mills, makes his home at Sheboygan Falls. William, a priest in the Catholic church, resides at St. Mary's Corners, near Swanton, Ohio. Esther makes her home with her brother William in Ohio. Margaret is the widow of William Long and resides at Plymouth, Wisconsin. Adelbert passed away at the age of twenty-five years. May, living in Sheboygan Falls, is the wife of W. L. Schumaker, a salesman of stationery. James, as above stated, devotes his attention to the operation of the home farm.

In politics Mr. Ogle is a stanch democrat. He served as treasurer of Lyndon township for one term and has also acted as clerk of the school board in Cascade. Religiously he is a devout communicant of St. Mary's Catholic church of Cascade, to which his wife and children also belong. He has now passed the seventy-sixth milestone on life's journey and enjoys the respect and veneration which should ever be accorded one who has traveled thus far on this earthly pilgrimage and whose career has been at all times upright and honorable.

PHILIP J. OTT.
One of the successful stockmen of Plymouth township is Philip J. Ott, who owns a valuable and highly improved farm of eighty acres. He was born in the vicinity of Cedar Grove, Holland township, on the 6th of June, 1868. The father, Carl Ott, was born in Nassau, Germany, July 3, 1829, and died on the 4th of April, 1911. The mother, Caroline (Rehm) Ott, was born in Lippe Detmold, Germany. The grandfather, Philip Ott, was also born in Nassau, Germany, where the family originated. He was engaged in merchandising in his native land and emigrated to America with his family in 1846. He proceeded at once to Milwaukee and in the same year purchased a tract of land eight miles north of Port Washington. He cleared and improved this farm but at the end of two years disposed of it and removed to Holland township, Sheboygan county, where he purchased eighty acres of land. Upon this farm he resided during the remainder of his life, passing away in 1860. He had been married twice. His first wife, Philopene (Schumacher) Ott, bore him five children, of whom Carl Ott, the father of our subject, was third in order of birth. By his second marriage to Luisa Schreiner he had four children.

Carl Ott, the father, was sixteen years of age when his father emigrated to America with his family. He remained at home working on his father's farm until he attained the age of thirty-two years, when he was married and removed to a farm which he purchased, two miles southwest of Cedar Grove. There he resided until 1870, when he took up his abode upon a farm northeast of Cedar Grove. In 1883 he disposed of that property and bought land on section 33, Plymouth township, upon which farm the remainder of his life was spent. In 1861 he married Miss Caroline Rehm, a daughter of Henry Rehm, a native of Lippe-Detmold, Germany. Caroline Rehm, after the death of her parents, came to America with an uncle, Herman Rehm, in 1859. By her marriage to Mr. Ott she became the mother of six children, four of whom died in infancy. Those who survive are Henry and Philip, who both reside in Plymouth township.

The education of Philip J. Ott was acquired in the public schools of Holland and the high school of Plymouth, which he attended for three years. After laying aside his text-books he assisted his father with the work of the farm for two years, but at the expiration of that time he went to Plymouth and engaged in teaming. He withdrew from this at the end of a year and became associated with W. F. Hueppchen in the livery business, under the firm name of Hueppchen & Ott. They had been in partnership for more than eight years when Mr. Hueppchen traded his interest to Ed Moore for a farm, and six months later Mr. Ott bought the interest of Mr. Moore. He continued operations alone during the succeeding eleven years and then withdrew from business activities and removed to his farm. During the period of his ownership Mr. Ott has wrought extensive improvements on this property, including the erection of a fine residence, thoroughly modern in all of its appointments, and a large, commodious barn. He is both practical and progressive in his methods and at various times he has installed such modern appliances and conveniences on his farm as he felt would lessen the labor connected with its operation. As a result he has an excellent equipment that contains everything essential to a dairy or stock farm. Mr. Ott is making a specialty of the breeding and raising of thoroughbred Holstein cattle for dairy purposes and is meeting with excellent success in his undertaking.

On May 18. 1890, Mr. Ott was married to Miss Amelia Haut, a daughter of Fred and Caroline Haut, natives of Germany. Mr. and Mrs. Ott have a daughter, Meta, who was born in 1894; and adopted son, Roy, whose birth occurred in 1907. The daughter married a farmer located across the road from the Ott homestead, and is the mother of one son, Raymond.

Fraternally Mr. Ott is a member of ..the. Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Royal Arcanum and the factional Fraternal League, and in politics he is a republican. He takes a helpful interest in all community affairs and while living in Plymouth represented his ward in the town council for two years. Mr. Ott has always led an active, energetic life and is meeting with the success that invariably crowns intelligently and persistently applied effort.

HENRY PANNIER.
The spirit of America typified in the qualities of energy, untiring activity, and sturdy determination to conquer an honorable destiny, is the basis of the history of settlement and clearing of the northwestern United States. The pioneers of that country were indomitable men, untiring in labor, unflagging in determination, full of the will to fight and the strength to conquer. These qualities of mind and character, the first generation of settlers transmitted to their sons, and they survive today in the characters and hearts of their descendants. The record of the settlement of Sheboygan and the townships immediately surrounding it is full of stories of hardy pioneer life. Mr. Henry Pannier, who was born October 7, 1850, in Mequon township, Ozaukee county, Wisconsin, is of the second generation. His father was John Gotthelf Pannier, who was born in Saxony, in 1804, and was one of the pioneer settlers of his county. He was a stone mason by trade and followed it as an occupation up to the time he left Germany for America on the 1st of May, 1847.

On the first of August of that same year, he arrived in Mequon township, Ozaukee county, where he bought forty acres of timber land, which he proceeded to clear for the purpose of farming. He built a little log house and barn, and remained in the district, farming, clearing the land and cultivating the soil for twenty years. In 1867 he sold out, and moved to Sherman township, where he bought eighty acres of land on section 33 and on this tract he remained for the remainder of his days. It was but partly cleared when he gained possession of it, and the work of getting it entirely ready for cultivation, involved much time and energy. But John Pannier believed in the efficacy of hard work, and he soon had his land prepared for farming-the second large tract in that section of the country to be cleared and in good condition for cultivation. He was the father of four children: Amelia, who is now the wife Justus Lauterbach, of Cedarburg, Wisconsin; Paulina, who married John Geidel, of South Dakota, and now resides in that state; Ernst, now in business in Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin; and Henry, the subject of this sketch.

Henry Pannier received such education as the public schools of the district afforded, and grew up on his father's farm amid scenes and struggles of pioneer life. His childhood was not an easy one, and many tasks incident to the clearing and cultivation of the land fell to the lot of the boy. When he attained his majority he was an expert farmer, and had a thorough mastery of the operations of clearing timberland and preparing it for cultivation. In 1872, after the family had removed to Sherman township, Henry Pannier purchased from his father his eighty acres of land on section 33, which he immediately cleared. When this task was completed he began the erection of a number of fine buildings upon his holdings, and when they were finished he had one of the finest and most efficiently equipped farms in this section of the country. He continually added to his acres by purchase and at one time held the title to two hundred and thirty-five acres of cleared and cultivated land. He was intensely interested in dairying, and this phase of agricultural life formed an important factor in his activities. He retired from active life in 1909, built himself a pleasant and comfortable home on one corner of his farm, where he intends to spend the remainder of his days. He has sold at various times parts of his land to his sons, and his holdings at the present time, although very large, are not quite so extensive as they were at one period of his career.

In 1873 Henry Pannier married Miss Mary Mueller, who was born in Altmark, Prussia, June 11, 1851, a daughter of Henry and Mary (Standou) Mueller, prominent residents of that city. Henry Mueller came to America in 1853, locating first in Buffalo, New York, but removing two years later to Ozaukee county, near Cedarburg. His residence in Sherman township, Sheboygan county, dated from 1857, and here he made his home until 1906, in which year his death occurred. He was the father of four children: Augusta, the wife of August Wirsig, of Colby, Marathon county, Wisconsin; Mary, the wife of Henry Pannier, the subject of this sketch; Louisa, who married Frederick Ferk, of Plymouth, Wisconsin, where she now resides; and Otto, now in business in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
Henry Pannier, although a quiet, unassuming gentleman, disinclined to put himself forward in any capacity, has yet attained a degree of prominence in his native county, inseparable from his worthy qualities of mind and heart. He has nine children, all of whom have followed their parents in devout allegiance to the Evangelical Lutheran church: Louisa, who is living at tome; Emma, who married Ernst Plautz, of Sherman township, and is the mother of three children; Augusta, the wife of John Wilk, residing at Random Lake, Wisconsin, and the mother of three children; Annie, the deceased wife of Herman Glaes, of Sherman township, and the mother of one child; Henry F., who resides in Sherman township and is married to Amelia Mueller by whom he has two children; William, also of Sherman township, who married Clara Eberhardt and is the father of two children; Otto, living on the old homestead with his wife, who was Elizabeth Mueller, and his two children; Amelia, the wife of John Zuengler, of Adell, Wisconsin, who has one child, and Clara, who married Herman Boehner and is now living in San Luis Obispo county, California.
Henry Pannier served for two terms as township treasurer, but has rather shunned public life than otherwise, preferring to spend his time peacefully and quietly on his home farm, surrounded by his children. The record of his career is the story of a life of energy and determination, of active and capable doing of that which his hand found to do, leavened by a kindly belief in the brotherhood of men and the overpowering providence of God.

WILLIAM PETERSEN, Sr.
William Petersen, Sr., a property holder and one of the substantial citizens of Lyndon Township, has been a resident of Wisconsin since his youth and here his years of activity have been crowned by a well merited success. He was born March 12, 1850, in Hanover, Germany, the son of Christopher and Magdalena (Fischer) Petersen, both representatives of respected Hanoverian families, the Petersen's especially having been identified with that state in which they had dwelt as landowners and farmers, as far back as the records show. The father was born in 1813 and spent his entire lifetime in his native land, dying in 1861. Their family numbered six children, as follows: Katrina, who died when twenty years of age; Henry, who died when eighteen years old; Paul, who died at the age of fourteen years; William, the subject of this sketch; Minnie, who died when nine years of age; and Claus, who died at the age of four. In June, 1861, the same year in which occurred his father's death, William Petersen lost his brothers and sisters, all of whom fell victims to an epidemic of diphtheria.

Prior to the death of the father William Petersen attended the excellent public schools in the vicinity of his home, wisely availing himself of the opportunity thus offered to acquire a thorough elementary education in all the essential branches of learning. After the fateful year of 1861 which so nearly witnessed the extinction of the family, he applied himself to the cultivation of the home farm and, lad though he was, became the support and comfort of his widowed and stricken mother.

In 1856 his uncle, Barthold Petersen, had left the fatherland and emigrated to the United States, locating his home in Sheboygan Falls, Wisconsin. Here he had prospered and his letters home were filled with descriptions of the opportunities which the new world offered to young men of energy and ambition who were not afraid of work. All about him he saw men who had come from different countries of the old world without capital or influence, who by their own unaided efforts had attained to positions of responsibility and had accumulated comfortable competencies. The stories of successes such as these were told in the letters which Barthold Petersen wrote to his family in Germany, and they turned the thoughts of his nephew, William Petersen, to look upon a future in the United States as highly desirable and advantageous to him.

In 1868 he set out to make his way in the world, his first step being to take passage for America. His mother remained behind among friends for her son was unwilling to subject her to the trials and uncertainties which might await him, preferring rather to first establish a home for her reception before asking her to break the ties which bound her to the land of her birth. Arriving in New York city he turned his hand to the first honorable labor which was offered him, for he was ever industrious and earnest. He entered the employ of the Havemeyer company, sugar refiners of Brooklyn, New York, and during his spare time applied himself assiduously to the study of the language and customs of the land of his adoption. For several months he remained in this situation, but he chose to look upon it rather as a stepping stone to his ultimate independence and not as a permanent position.

His was not a nature to be satisfied with anything less than success and he lost no time in idleness about the city but within the year continued his journey. Arrived at Sheboygan Falls he at once secured a position on a farm, with the work of which he was well acquainted, having been trained during his youth in all the best methods known to successful German farmers. The next year he sent for his mother to join him, as by thrift and industry he had already provided means for her support. In 1870 he removed to Lyndon township, where he worked in a grist and sawmill situated on the Onion river. He continued to practice the same habits of economy which had so far helped him on the road to independence and in 1873 had accumulated the means to purchase a forty acre farm in the eastern part of Lyndon township. A part of this original purchase is included in his present estate. He set himself to the task of clearing and improving his land, giving thoughtful consideration to the crops for which it was best adapted and those for which the market offered most advantageous sale. That his judgment was sound and his methods good is proven by the fact that he steadily added to his acreage until he owned a quarter section. He continued to cultivate this tract successfully until 1888 when he sold a part and purchased the place known as the Hanford Hutchinson farm. He set about the improvement of this, remodeling the buildings as his taste dictated and his needs demanded. During the latter years he has specialized in dairy farming, and as has been his life-long practice, devotes to even the details his careful attention and consideration.

In 1873 Mr. Petersen married Mary Schaekel, a daughter of Christian and Dorothea (Busse) Schaekel, whose birth occurred September 11, 1852, in Sheboygan Falls township. The Schaekel family, like the Petersen family, has been identified with Hanover, Germany, through many generations, and the Busse family is one of the old houses of Lippe-Detmold. In 1844, twenty-ninth year, Christian Schaekel came to the United States, locating first in Indiana, where he was engaged in the construction of a canal, and then removing to Chicago. The city which was destined to be the second largest in America was then in an embryonic state, so much so that land was then valued at but a small part of what it costs today, and in 1845 large areas could be purchased for a sum equal to what is asked for a single front foot in 1912. Mr. Schaekel was employed on a farm which later was incorporated within the city limits and as an inducements for him to remain, his employer offered him a tract of forty acres which now lies in the heart of Chicago. Even the wisest of speculators did not at that early day foresee the wealth which Chicago real estate would eventually represent, and it is no discredit to Mr. Schaekel's judgment that he did not avail himself of an offer which, if accepted, would have rendered him and his family wealthy "beyond the dreams of avarice." Instead, he chose what was then thought to be the surer road to prosperity and in 1845 purchased one hundred and sixty acres of good land in Sheboygan Falls Township, on section 24. That event would prove differently none could then foretell, and Mr. Schaekel acted the part of a wise man in passing by an uncertainty and a mere speculative chance for that which his experience taught him would prove a sure financial success.

His land was covered with timber and directly he had consummated its purchase he set himself to the task of clearing it and preparing it for crops. Following this preparatory work he cultivated his farm until 1868, when he sold it, and, in partnership with his brother-in-law, Mr. H. Reysen, purchased the grist and sawmill at Onion river. In 1872 he bought a farm in Lyndon township, on section 13, where he made his home until his death which occurred in 1887. He married Dorothea Busse in 1850 and to them were born nine children, as follows: Mrs. Petersen; Dorothea, wife of Henry Habighorst, of Sheboygan Falls; Henry, who died at the age of eleven years; Flora, wife of Andrew Meyer, of Lyndon township; Frederick, living in Toledo, Ohio; Annie, wife of Nick Nagel, of Lyndon township; Philipena, wife of Carl J. Nehrling, also of Lyndon township; Ottila, who died at the age of twenty-one years; and Otto, who makes his home in Butternut, Ashland county, Wisconsin.

The family of Mr. and Mrs. William Petersen, Sr., numbered eight children. William, Jr., who married Jennie Martin, makes his home on the family homestead. Frederick passed away at the age of twenty-two years. Flora died in infancy. Myrtie is the wife of Otto Eichhorst, of Omaha, Nebraska, and the mother of three children, Marie, Madeline and Robert. Henry, a civil engineer in the employ of the Pennsylvania railroad, living in Cleveland, Ohio, is married to Leah Eberts and they are the parents of two sons, Frederick and Waldo. Marie and Dorothea died in infancy. Ottilia makes her home with her parents.

In Lyndon township Mr. Petersen is accorded the esteem to which he is so justly entitled. He has held the positions of township supervisor and treasurer and for fifteen years was a member of the school board. The family are members of the Evangelical Lutheran church. A gratifying measure of success has attended Mr. Petersen's labors, due solely to his habits of thrift and industry, and the position which he holds today as one of the foremost citizens of his community is the reward of a lifetime of well directed energies and conscientious conduct.

CARL PRANGE.
Carl Prange is one of the well known and successful farmers of Sheboygan County, his farm of one hundred and sixty acres being located in Sheboygan Falls township where he resides and is successfully engaged in general farming. He was born November 12, 1855, and is the son of William and Elinor (Ackermann) Prange, both of whom were natives of Germany, the former of Hanover, now a province of Prussia and the latter of Schaumburg. The father emigrated to the United States in 1848 and settled in Sheboygan township where he purchased one hundred and sixty acres of government land. He there established his home and continued to live during the remaining years of his life which ended April 25, 1865. Mr. Prange was united in marriage in 1849 to Miss Elinor Ackermann, who passed away September 5, 1887. To Mr. and Mrs. William Prange seven children were born: W. J., deceased; Caroline, the wife of Henry Kohl, of Herman township; Annie, a resident of Sheboygan City; Bertha, the wife of John Bitter, of Sheboygan City, who is employed by the H. C. Prange Company; Eliza, who is also employed by the H. C. Prange Company; H. C. Prange, who is a prominent dry-goods merchant in Sheboygan City, who married Miss Augusta Bodenstein; and Carl, the subject of this review.

Carl Prange was reared in his parents' home and received his elementary education in the public schools of Sheboygan township. In his early manhood he was engaged at work on his father's farm and later purchased that property which consists of one hundred and sixty acres of highly developed land on which he is now successfully engaged in general farming. He is also the owner of sixty-eight acres located on section 16, of Sheboygan township.

Mr. Prange was united in marriage April 23, 1882, to Miss Eliza Pieper, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Pieper, of Herman township, and to them six children have been born, all of whom are now living: Emma, who married Carl Denel and resides in Herman township; Minnie, the wife of Arthur Foster, of Sheboygan City; Otto and Adelia, both at home; Clara, who is engaged as a bookkeeper in Sheboygan City; and Henry, who resides at home.

Mr. Prange is one of the well known men of Sheboygan county and is highly respected for the integrity of his character and his devotion to the general welfare of the community in which he lives. He and his family are members of the Lutheran church of Sheboygan Falls.



HENRY PRANGE.
Henry Prange is an honored citizen, a veteran of the Civil war, and one of the successful farmers of Sheboygan county. He was born in Hanover, Germany, March 30, 1841, and is the son of John and Mary (Diers) Prange. His parents emigrated to America in 1846 and settled on a farm located on section 2 of Sheboygan Falls township, where they continued to reside with Frederick Diers, who emigrated to the United States in 1845, until the time of Mr. Prange's death, which occurred in 1849. Mrs. Prange passed out of this life in 1881. In the family were six children, two of whom are still living: William, who resides near Sheboygan Falls; and Henry of this review.

Henry Prange was educated in the district schools of Wisconsin and after his school years he learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed in connection with his farming for a number of years. On September 17, 1861, he enlisted in Company A, Ninth Wisconsin Regiment of Volunteer Infantry and served for a period of three years, receiving his discharge from the service on the 25th of October, 1864.

Mr. Prange was united in marriage on January 17, 1875, to Miss Barbara Speech, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Conrad Specht, both of whom were natives of Germany. To Mr. and Mrs. Prange four children were born, three of whom are now living. Arthur, the eldest, lives on the old homestead and is married and has two children, Viola and Leola. Theodore resides in Sheboygan and is married and has three children, Hubert, Lenora and Lester. Tonie, who completes the family, resides at home.
Mr. Prange has served two years as town clerk, for nine years filled the office of assessor of his township, and also served for three years as a member of the board of supervisors. For eleven years he filled the office of school treasurer and was clerk of his school district for three years. His political allegiance is given to the democratic party, and he is a member of Gustaf Wintermeier Post, No. 187, G. A. R., of Sheboygan. Mr. Prange is one of the industrious and highly respected citizens of Sheboygan county, with whose history he has been continuously associated since the early days of his childhood.

ERNST PRIETZEL.
Ernst Prietzel is one of the diligent and enterprising agriculturists of Sheboygan Falls township, where he owns a farm of seventy-four acres, located four and a half miles west of Sheboygan Falls. He is a native of this county, his birth having occurred in Herman township on the 22d of August, 1876, his parents being Ertmann and Christiana Prietzel. They were born and reared in Germany, whence they emigrated to the United States in 1868, settling in Sheboygan county. Here they were married on November 11, 1869, and to them were born eight children, five of whom are living, as follows: Hulda, the wife of William Granold, of Sheboygan Falls; Ernst, the subject of this sketch; Ida, who became the wife of Carl Steinart, of Plymouth; William, who is married and residing in Plymouth; and Gustave, who is also a resident of Plymouth. The parents continue to make their home on the old farm, which is now owned and operated by our subject.

No event of especial importance occurred to vary the routine of the early years of Ernst Prietzel, who was reared at home and educated in the district schools. He terminated his student days at the age of fifteen years, and subsequently started out to make his own way in the world. He had not learned a trade, but having assisted his father with the work of the fields and care of the crops from early boyhood, had a good practical understanding of the duties of an agriculturist, and for twelve years thereafter worked out as a farm hand. In 1905, he purchased the old homestead, and here he has ever since been engaged in diversified farming, stock-raising and dairying, the latter engrossing more and more of his attention annually.

Mr. Prietzel gives his support to the republican party and his family attend the German Lutheran church. His consideration for his family and his foresight is indicated by the fact that he carries a policy in the New York Mutual Life Insurance Company for the protection of those who are dear to him. He is practical and energetic and in the development of his interests is meeting- with success, and is becoming recognized as one of the efficient and prosperous agriculturists of his community.

FRANKLIN RISSE.
Franklin Risse, one of Sheboygan county's native sons, within whose borders he has spent his entire life, is now successfully operating an excellent farm of one hundred and ninety acres located in Sherman township and is meeting with gratifying success in his agricultural enterprise. He was born on the farm which is yet his home on the 25th of April, 1856, a son of Henry and Christina (Junge) Risse, both natives of Germany. The father's birth occurred in Saxony on the 10th of March, 1817, and in 1847 he came to the United States, locating in Sheboygan county, where he entered a tract of eighty acres which became the nucleus of the present fine property of his son Franklin.

Later he added another eighty acre tract, becoming the owner of one hundred and sixty acres of land within the first two years of his residence in this county. Fie continued to make that his place of residence, subsequently adding to it from time to time until he owned about two hundred acres. Later he sold lots for a schoolhouse and a cemetery, and at the time of his death his farm consisted of one hundred and ninety acres. He passed away on the 10th of February, 1904. He had come to the new world alone, his parents always remaining residents of Germany, but after his settlement here he had been joined by his half-brother, who continued to make his home with him. In Wisconsin Henry Risse had married Miss Christina Junge, who was born in the fatherland on March 25, 1825, and with her parents had come to the United States in 1849.

The family home was established in Ozaukee county, Wisconsin, and there the daughter gave her hand in marriage to Mr. Risse. She passed away on May 8, 1905. In their family were fourteen children but only four are now living: Morris, residing in Grinnell, Iowa; Franklin, of this review; Max. of Appleton. Wisconsin; and Oswald, who resides on the old homestead with his brother Franklin.

In the home of his parents Franklin Risse spent the period of his boyhood and youth, and with the exception of one year his entire life has been passed upon the old home farm. He acquired his education in the schools of Sherman, while his practical training which was thorough and comprehensive, was received under the direction of his father. After putting aside his text-books he devoted his entire attention to agricultural pursuits and when his father withdrew from active life he took charge of the homestead, which he has since continued to operate. It consists of one hundred and ninety acres of finely cultivated land and in addition to his general farming pursuits he engages in the dairying business, keeping in his pastures an excellent herd of cattle. Both branches of his business, have proved very profitable for he has directed his affairs with great care, at all times manifesting keen sagacity and sound judgment, and utilizing modern and up-to-date methods.
Mr. Risse was married, April 11, 1880, to Miss Alvina Gessner, a daughter of William and Rosa (Bittner) Gessner, natives of Germany. The father, whose birth occurred in Saxony April 5, 1822, was a shoemaker by trade, and after coming to the United States in 1851 followed that pursuit and also engaged in farming to a limited extent, owning a farm of about twenty acres. He died on September 26, 1900, while his wife survived until 1911, passing away on the 18th of March of that year. Mrs. Risse was one of seven children, of whom six now survive, the others being: Emil, William, Fred, Frank and Paulina, all of this county.

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Risse have been born the following children: Louis, who was born on the 27th of August, 1881, and married Margaret Wolf, now making his home across from his father's farm; William, born September 16, 1883; Charles,-May 11, 1886; Theodore, December 25, 1888; Otto, June 7, 1891; Tilly, August 31, 1893; Selma, February 11, 1897; and Walter, March 13, 1899. The parents are members of the German Evangelical church of Silver Creek, in the work of which they are deeply interested, and are held in high esteem in the community in which they reside. Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Mr. Risse has given his political allegiance to the republican party and at one time served as treasurer of Sherman township, proving a faithful custodian of the financial interests of the town. He is progressive in his citizenship, giving his influence to those projects which have for their object the upbuilding and development of the community. He possesses also those sterling qualities of manhood that win confidence and esteem, and many of his best friends are those who have known him from childhood, an indication of his genial nature and high principles

ALBERT ROHWER.
Albert Rohwer is one of the well known and popular young farmers of Wilson township, operating the old homestead of his father, which is the property of the heirs. It is situated on section 2 and contains seventy-three acres. The mother, who is eighty years of age, is making her home on the old place and is being cared for by her son, the subject of this review. He was born in Sheboygan, March 5, 1871, the son of Casson and Christina (Holling) Rohwer, both natives of Germany. The father, who was born in Schleswig, emigrated to the new world in early manhood, making the journey alone. He settled in Holland township, Sheboygan county, and was first engaged as a fisherman, an occupation which he followed for some years. He married Christina Holling in Sheboygan and they took up their abode there where they conducted the Lafayette House, and then removed to a farm of seventy-three acres on section 2 of Wilson township. There the father resided until his death, which occurred in 1886. Accompanied by her brother the mother emigrated to this country in early womanhood and is now living at the age of eighty years. To Mr. and Mrs. Rohwer eleven children were born, six of whom are living: Katharine, the widow of William Kletzine, of Sheboygan; Margaret, the wife of Lawrence Gross, also of Sheboygan; John, of Colorado; Emma, the wife of George Sievers, of Clintonville, Wisconsin; Albert, of this review; and Annie at home.

Albert Rohwer was educated in the public schools of Sheboygan and assisted his father with the farm work until the latter's death. For the past ten years he has had charge of the home place, in which he owns an interest. He is conducting a general farming business, raises stock, and is meeting with success in his operations.

Mr. Rohwer is non-partisan in politics, preferring to support for public office such candidates as appeal to him as being best fitted for the positions to which they aspire. He is an active and aggressive young farmer, well known and popular in the community, and has a large number of friends who hold him in high regard.

WILBUR M. ROOT.
Prominent in Grand Army circles, Wilbur M. Root is now serving as commander of the local post at Sheboygan and was vice commander of the state in 1901. He is, furthermore, Widely known through his commercial connections, having been engaged in the marble and monument business in Sheboygan since 1874. He was also at one time engaged in the grain and agricultural implement business and conducted a livery in connection. He has at different times rilled the office of justice of the peace and in these various connections has ever stood as a man among men, honored by reason of the sterling worth of his character. He was born in Cleveland, Ohio, December 27, 1844, a son of Augustus and Marcia (Hanchet) Root, who in 1849 came with their family to Sheboygan county, settling in Plymouth where the father conducted a cooperage business until after the outbreak of the Civil war, when he enlisted in Company E, Eighth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, as a musician. He died in the service at Jackson, near Vicksburg, Mississippi, in 1863.

W. M. Root was largely reared in Plymouth and attended the public schools there. He was but seventeen years of age when hostilities commenced between the north and south, but years are no criterion of patriotism and the same spirit of loyalty that actuated his father was manifest in the son who in April, 1861, offered his services to the Union and became a member of Company C, Fourth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, enlisting as a private. This regiment was afterward made a cavalry command, with which he served until honorably discharged at Morganza Bend, Louisiana, July 14, 1864. The regiment was connected with the Department of the Gulf and he participated in a number of important engagements chiefly in the lower Mississippi valley, but was never injured.

On the expiration of his term of service Mr. Root returned to Plymouth and purchased the cooperage business of his father, who had laid down his life on the altar of his country during the war.

Subsequently he removed from Plymouth to Greenbush and was there elected justice of the peace. A year and a half later he resigned and in 1870 was elected sheriff of his county on the republican ticket, at which time he removed to Sheboygan. He filled the office for the regular term of two years and was then again called to that office by popular suffrage in 1882. In the meantime-in 1874-he established the marble and monument business in which he has since continued. He has done much fine work of that character and is accorded a liberal patronage.

In 1865 he was married to Miss Amanda A. Gardner, of Plymouth, a daughter of Horace Gardner, who was a farmer but is now deceased. He was a native of Jefferson county, New York, and came to Wisconsin about 1855. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Root has been born a son, Ned M., who is now associated with the Daily Evening Press of Sheboygan. W. M. Root was also at one time identified with journalistic interests, having in January, 1895, purchased the Sheboygan Daily Journal which he owned until 1904. He has long been recognized as a leader of public thought and action. He exerted much influence over public affairs during his newspaper career and has also done much to further public progress and improvement in other ways. His fellow townsmen, appreciative of his worth and his loyalty to the best interests of the community, elected him as their representative to the state legislature in which he served for four terms, leaving the impress of his individuality upon many acts which were passed during that period. He served for four years, or for two terms, as state insurance commissioner, nor has he been neglectful of local interests for he has filled the office of alderman and also was the first chief of police of Sheboygan. He has likewise taken active part in political management, having been chairman of both the city and county democratic committees. While he was first elected sheriff on the republican ticket at his second election he was the candidate of the democratic party. He has always been most fearless in defense of his honest convictions nor has he hesitated to announce his views on matters relative to the general welfare.


C. M. SAPH.
Mr. Saph is the owner and popular proprietor of the Lake View Park Hotel of Sheboygan. He was born in St. Clair county, Michigan, July 25, 1853, and is the son of Valentine Arnold and Mary Louisa (Drewland) Saph. The father was born in Salisbury, England, and emigrated from that country to the United States at the age of twelve years. On reaching the American shores he continued his journey westward and settled at St. Joseph, Michigan, at a time when that town was but a settlement surrounded by the unbroken wilderness. He was educated in the public schools of St. Clair county, after which he engaged in the study of law, and after completing the necessary preparation he was admitted to the bar and continued to practice his profession during the remainder of his life. He was united in marriage to Miss Mary Louisa Drewland in 1850 and to them ten children were born, the five of whom survive being as follows: C. M., of this review; Caius, who is married and resides in Marine City, Michigan, being a prominent man of that place; Stella, who is the widow of James Ticknor and resides in Marine City, Michigan; J. P., who is married and resides in Loraine, Ohio; and Mary L., who married George P. Willis and resides in Loraine, Ohio. The parents of these children are both deceased, their deaths having occurred many years ago.

C. M. Saph began life for himself at the early age of fifteen. In June, 1868, he shipped as a sailor and continued to follow that occupation during all the early years of his life. He proved to be a competent and trustworthy seaman and steadily won promotion until he at length became captain and master of his ship. He sailed on the Great Lakes as captain for a period of twenty-four years, retiring in 1906. He then engaged in the hotel business at Waukegan, Illinois, where he remained for two years and then disposed of his interests and removed to Green Bay, Wisconsin, where he operated the Cook Hotel for a period of two years. He then removed to Sheboygan and purchased the Lake View Park Hotel, which is situated south of the city limits, on the bank of Lake Michigan, and is a commodious and well appointed two story building containing thirty-five guest rooms. Mr. Saph is a member of the Elks Lodge of Sheboygan. He is well known and popular throughout Sheboygan county and is recognized as one of the practical and successful hotel men of his state.

GEORGE SCHAEFER.
George Schaefer, a well known and representative agriculturist of Sheboygan County, resides on section 7, Plymouth Township, where he owns one hundred acres of valuable land and devotes his attention to dairy farming. He is numbered among the worthy native sons of this county, his birth having occurred in Plymouth township on the 15th of June, 1868. His parents, George and Sophia (Iserloth) Schaefer, were both natives of Waldeck, Germany, the former born on the 6th of November, 1829, and the latter on the 4th of December, 1832. It was about 1857 that George Schaefer, Sr., emigrated to the United States, first taking up his abode in Greenbush Township, Sheboygan County, Wisconsin. Subsequently he removed to Plymouth township and purchased forty-six acres of land on section 7. He cleared the property and erected the necessary buildings, his first house and barn being constructed of logs but being later replaced by frame structures.

He resided on that place until 1887 and then put aside the active work of the fields and removed to Glenbeulah, where he lived until 1906. The last four years of his life were spent in the home of his son George, his demise occurring on the 29th of March, 1910. His wife was called to her final rest on the 5th of April, 1909. George Schaefer, Sr., was a resident of this county for more than a half century and was well known and highly esteemed as a worthy pioneer and representative citizen. His children were six in number, as follows: Katharine, the wife of Richard Bruns, of Elk hart Lake, Wisconsin; William, who is a resident of Clark county, Wisconsin; Sophia, the wife of Newt Johnson, of Sheboygan, this state; Hermina, who is the wife of Charles Grunert and resides in Escanaba, Michigan; George, Jr., of this review; and Louisa, the wife of Tom Johnson, of Lyndon township, Sheboygan county.

George Schaefer, Jr., acquired his education in the public schools of this county and grew to manhood on his father's farm, early becoming familiar with the duties and labors that fall to the lot of the agriculturist. About 1892 he rented the home place and eight years later purchased the property, continuing to operate the same until 1902. In that year he sold the farm and subsequently spent two years at work in the city of Sheboygan. In 1904 he purchased the farm of his brother William on section 7, Plymouth township, which has since remained in his possession and which embraces one hundred acres of rich and productive land. He has brought the place under a high state of cultivation and improvement and devotes his attention to dairy farming, his cattle being graded Holsteins.

In 1910 Mr. Schaefer was united in marriage to Miss Lottie Miller, a daughter of George and Katharine (Jacquilliard) Miller, who reside on a farm in Alsace, Germany. Mrs. Lottie Schaefer, who is a native of the fatherland^ emigrated to the United States in 1907. Her brother and sister, George and Lena, still reside in Alsace. Unto our subject and his wife has been born one child, Erna, whose natal day was February 9, 1911. Mr. and Mrs. Schaefer are members of the Lutheran church at Glenbeulah, in -the week of which they take an active and helpful interest. They have an extensile -circle of friends throughout the community in which they reside, having ever those sterling traits of character which in every land and clime win confidence and regard.


WILLIAM H. SCHROEDER.
Agricultural pursuits have always engaged the attention of William H. Schroeder, who engages in general farming and stock-raising in Plymouth township, where he owns one hundred and fourteen acres of highly improved land. His birth occurred on a farm in the vicinity of Sheboygan Falls on the 26th of September, 1855, his parents being John and Amelia (Pachtmann) Schroeder.

The father was born in the province of Pomerania, Germany, in 1810, and there he was also reared and educated, and learned the trade of furniture making. He emigrated to the United States in 1837, locating in the city of New York, where for ten years he worked at his trade. From there he came to Sheboygan county in 1847, and invested his savings in a farm of one hundred and eleven acres located in the vicinity of Sheboygan Falls. He cultivated this land until 1893, when advanced age compelled his withdrawal from active work and he thereafter lived retired until his death in 1895. The mother, who was born in Germany in 1812 and was married to Mr. Schroeder in Sheboygan county, passed away in 1881. Two children, a daughter and a son were born to Mr. and .Mrs. Schroeder, the former being Alvina, who is living with her brother.

The only son and the younger child of his parents, William H. Schroeder was reared at home and educated in the public schools of Sheboygan Falls. In common with other country youths he early began to assist with the work of the home farm, assuming more and more of the responsibility connected with its operation as his strength developed with the passing years. In 1893, he bought his present homestead, which contains one hundred and fourteen acres of fertile land. When he first came into possession of the property, the residence was an old-fashioned brick structure that was destroyed by fire in 1905. Immediately thereafter Mr. Schroeder erected his present dwelling, which is very attractive and comfortable and is thoroughly modern. He is renting out the old home farm, and gives his undivided attention to the cultivation of his own place, on which he lives. He is meeting with success in both farming and stock-raising and is numbered among the substantial agriculturists of Plymouth township.

In 1883, Mr. Schroeder was married to Miss Hulda Truttschel, a daughter of August Truttschel, a native of Germany, who came to Wisconsin about 1848. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Schroeder: Elsie, whose birth occurred in 1885; Louise and Emilia, twins, who were born on March 22, 1890, and died in June, 1891, six hours apart; Cora, who was born in 1893; and Edgar, whose natal year was 1898. The surviving children are all at home.

The family attend the Congregational church, in which the parents hold membership, and fraternally Mr. Schroeder is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America and Equitable Fraternal Union. He is a republican in politics and for eleven years has been a member of the local school board. Mr. Schroeder is widely known in Sheboygan, where he has passed his entire life, and enjoys the esteem and high regard of a large circle of acquaintances many of whom have been stanch friends from his boyhood days.

GUSTAVE A. SCHULZ.
The fertile farm lands of Sheboygan county, the rich fields and the productive dairies are one of the most prominent sources of the wealth and progress of that section of the country. The farms which are now planted to wheat, corn and other grains, and which stretch out in all directions over a prosperous country, have been wrested from a wilderness by the sturdy pioneers who cleared the timber and spent their lives in preparing the land for cultivation. Gustave A. Schulz is a prominent example of the rewards which come to the intelligent farmer. He was born on March 9, 1862, a son of John M. Schulz, a native of Wurttemberg, Germany, and of Christina (Gabel) Schulz, who was born in Bavaria, that country. The former was born on May 28, 1819, and the latter on May 4, 1824.

The father of the subject of this sketch came to the United States in 1848 and in New York pursued his trade of clothes brush manufacturing until he had acquired a small amount of money. He then came to the town of Sherman, Wisconsin, which was then called Abbott, and bought land just adjoining the town. Christina Gabel, the mother of our subject, left Bavaria when she was still a young girl, coming to the United States with an uncle of Gustave Schulz. She was married in the town of 'Sherman, some years after her arrival in America, and upon her death, August 7, 1885, left nine children: Mary, the wife of Samuel Rothlisberger, of 'Worthington, Minnesota; Henry, of Unity, Wisconsin; Edward C., a farmer at "Pauckwaukee, Wisconsin; Wesley G., now living in South Dakota; Emma, who married Edward Fricker, of Milwaukee; Lena, the wife of Herman Yunge, a native of this county; Gustave A., of this sketch; William J., deceased; and Carrie, the wife of John Noble, of Milwaukee. Another child, Anna, passed away in infancy.

Gustave A. Schulz was born in Sherman, Wisconsin, and was educated in the public schools of the district. His school life was interrupted for two winters when he worked in the woods and in a wagon shop, resuming his education in the district schools. He rented the farm upon which the family was then living for five years, working at various occupations during this time until he was able to save a sum of money sufficient to buy the homestead. He acquired by purchase at this time the family residence and one hundred and thirty-five acres of land surrounding it. Year by year he added to the buildings upon the tract, erecting many fine barns and out-structures and progressing in this line of activity until he was one of the most prominent farmers of the county.

In 1898 he built the present fine home in which he lives, making it modern and luxurious in every detail. He is the proprietor of one of the model farms of Sherman township and his equipment has been kept up-to-date and thoroughly new by frequent additions during the years. He makes a specialty of dairying, keeping about twenty-five cows of whom six are registered and the remainder of his stock, which is very large, is kept up to a very high grade. At one time in his career Gustave A. Schulz purchased and operated a farm of three hundred and twenty acres in North Dakota but has since sold it and devotes his entire time and attention to the home place. Mr. Schulz is also a stockholder and director of the Adel State Bank. He has been prominent for many years in republican politics of his district, in which line of activity his progressive ideas have gained for him a local reputation and have been rewarded by several public offices. He served in the capacity of supervisor of the school board, in which he did efficient and prominent work. He was town treasurer for a number of years and committeeman at several republican conventions, serving as treasurer of the republican county progressive committee for some time.

On October 7, 1887, Mr. Schulz married Miss Anna M. Hammen, a daughter of Phillip Hammen, a native of Germany. To Mr. and Mrs. Schulz were born eight children, of whom two died in infancy. The rest are living with their parents on the home farm and are as follows: Carmen, born August 20, 1890; Lawrence, born December 12, 1892; Minerva, born March 8, 1896; Chester, born June 12, 1898; Mabel, born February 16, 1904; and Kermit, born January 25, 1910. Gustave Schulz and wife are members of the Evangelical Associated church of Batavia and he is a trustee of the church and of the church building for this district. Fraternally he is prominent in the Modern Woodmen camp. He is thoroughly versed in all the many details of the occupation of farming and takes a great pride in keeping his model farm and his splendid dairy in an up-to-date condition. He is a prominent citizen of his district where he is esteemed and honored for the many qualities of mind and heart which have made him in the course of his career a successful and prosperous man.


MAX SCHURRER.
Max Schurrer was born in Stuttgart, Wurtemberg, Germany, on the 12th of December, 1862. His paternal grandfather, Anton Schurrer, was also a native of that country and a shoemaker by trade and occupation. Anton Schurrer, Jr., the father of our subject, was born in Germany on the 2d of February, 1831. He was a weaver by trade and also a merchant in his native land. For a period of fourteen years he served as a sergeant in the German army. His demise occurred in 1880. He was the father of fifteen children, of whom but three are living: Hugo, who is a resident of Cleveland, Wisconsin; Oscar, living in Milwaukee; and Max, of this review.

The last named was reared at home and received his education in the common and high schools of Germany. At the conclusion of his school life he accepted a position as bookkeeper for a wholesale firm, maintaining his relation with this company for a period of four and half years. At the age of twenty-two years he emigrated to America, settling in Mosel township, Sheboygan county, where he followed the occupation of a farmer. Later he removed to Centerville, where he remained for two and a half years and from there moved to Kaukauna, Wisconsin, where he lived for a short time and returned to Centerville, Wisconsin, where he engaged in the lumber and grain business for a period of about three years and subsequently returned to Kaukauna. In 1892 he came to Sheboygan and here embarked in the saloon and cafe business, which he has conducted continuously since.

On the 26th of August, 1890, Mr. Schurrer was married to Miss Margaret Fox, a daughter of John and Anna Fox, of Mosel township, who celebrated their golden wedding on the 29th of January, 1912. Mr. Fox is a veteran of the Civil war. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Schurrer have been born three children, Anton, Anna and Peter, all at home. Both he and his wife are devout communicants of the Holy Name Catholic church. Mr. Schurrer is a member of the Catholic Knights of Wisconsin and the secretary and treasurer of the Catholic Family Protective Association of Wisconsin. Politically he supports the democratic party and is prominent in its local councils. He has been a delegate to the state convention a number of times and has served for five years on the county board. His social inclinations are indicated by his membership in the Concordia Singing Society. He is greatly respected as a business man of high standing among his fellow citizens and enjoys a wide and favorable acquaintance.


THOMAS SELLINGER.
The manufacturing interests of Sheboygan find an able representative in the person of Thomas Sellinger, vice president of The Ross-Sellinger Company, one of the city's foremost industrial enterprises, which has now been in operation for ten years. He was born at Rochester, New York, on the 6th of March, 1863, and is a son of Lawrence and Rose Sellinger. The parents were both natives of Germany, whence they emigrated to the United States about 1840, locating in the state of New York, where the father subsequently engaged in the foundry business and the manufacture of stoves. The father passed away in 1906 at the age of seventy-five years, but the mother was sixty-five at the time of her death, which occurred in 1898. They are both buried in the cemetery at Le Roy, New York, of which town they were residents for many years.

Thomas Sellinger received his education in the public schools of Rochester and Le Roy, New York, terminating his student days upon his graduation from the high school in 1879. Immediately thereafter he began his business career as an employee in a glove factory at Rochester, New York, where he thoroughly mastered every detail of the industry. In 1884, he acquired stock in the Eisendrath Glove Company of Chicago, where for fifteen years he held the office of secretary.

At the expiration of that time he disposed of his interest in this company and later became associated with Hall Ross, and in 1902 they came to this city and established The Ross-Sellinger Company. This is the only enterprise of the kind in Sheboygan and in its development they have met with a gratifying measure of success. They are both thoroughly familiar with the industry and are business men of more than average perspicacity as has been manifested in their progress. The workmanship and material of the products of their factory, as well as the price, commend them to jobbers all over the country, and their sales department has developed until it now requires the service of between five and six hundred employees to fill the orders. Their plant, which is located at South Ninth and South Water streets is equipped with all modern appliances and machinery essential to the successful operation of a factory of this kind, and is in every way a credit to the community.

Mr. Sellinger was married at Rochester, New York, on the 14th of April, 1884, to Miss Frances Marchand, and to them have been born two children: Francis J., who is a traveling salesman for The Ross-Sellinger Company, and Jeannette F., who married Robert Kross, a merchant of this city. The family home, the hospitality of which is graciously extended to a large circle of friends and acquaintances, is located at No. 1018 North Sixth street.

Mr. Sellinger fraternally belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and he is also a member of the Country Club. In matters politic he is independent, giving his support to those candidates he deems best qualified for the offices, regardless of party affiliation. Mr. Sellinger is held in high esteem in the community, as he is not only a business man of more than average efficiency but is public-spirited and progressive in matters of citizenship, and takes an active interest in all things affecting the welfare of the municipality.

JOHN STAPLES.
John Staples is one of the recent acquisitions to the business circles of Sheboygan, where he has been conducting a grocery store since January, 1912, at Indiana avenue and the city line. He is a native of this state, his birth having occurred at Marshfield on the 23d of January, 1883, and the eldest son of Wenzel and Katherine Staples. The parents are both natives of Germany, whence the father emigrated to the United States in 1868. He was trained to agricultural pursuits and during the early years of his manhood devoted his energies to farming, but for the past eighteen years he has been foreman of a veneer factory. The family of Mr. and Mrs. Staples numbered four, those beside our subject being as follows: Frances, the wife of Joseph Kaeser, of Sheboygan, and the mother of one daughter; Katherine, the wife of William Lane, of Sparta, Wisconsin, and the mother of one daughter; and Margaret, who is at home.

The boyhood and youth of John Staples were passed in his native town in whose public schools he obtained his education. In 1898, he left home and went to Fond du Lac, this state, where he engaged in the hotel and saloon business as proprietor of the Fountain City hotel. He conducted this hostelry for eighteen months, and at the expiration of that time engaged in the grocery business in Fond du Lac. Two and a half years later he disposed of his store and took a position as bar tender. He continued to follow this occupation for seven years, and at the expiration of that time resigned his position and came to Sheboygan. In January, 1912, he purchased the store he is now conducting on Indiana avenue, and although he has been identified with this enterprise for only a few months is building up an excellent trade. Mr. Staples is a man of much sagacity and foresight and makes a careful and systematic study of the needs and requirements of his business and promotes its development along well defined, positive lines. He carries a well assorted stock of staple and fancy groceries of good brand and quality which he offers at reasonable prices, and as it is his policy to accord his patrons the most courteous and considerate treatment he is building up a fine trade and has every reason to feel assured of the success of his enterprise.

On the 28th of February, 1905, Mr. Staples was united in marriage to Miss Anna Mohr, the event being celebrated in Fond du Lac. She is a daughter of Jacob and Magdalene (Klapperich) Mohr. The father was for many years engaged in the tailoring business in the latter city where he passed away in 1897, but the mother is still living and continues to reside in Fond du Lac. Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Staples: Elnora Marie, who is four years of age; and one who died in infancy. Mr. Staples is diligent and enterprising and is concentrating his entire energies upon his business, which he is promoting with a goodly measure of success.



JOHN STEPHANI.
John Stephani is one of the enterprising citizens of Sheboygan, where he holds the responsible position of general manager and superintendent of the Cudahy branch meat stores located in that city. He was born July 12, 1863, in the township of Marshfield, Fond du Lac county, and is a son of Frederick and Maria Anna (Schneider) Stephani, both of whom were natives of Coblenz, in the Rhine province of Prussia. The father with his wife emigrated to America in 1856 and settled in Marshfield township, Fond du Lac county, where he was engaged in farming during the remaining years of his life. He had a family of seven children, as follows: Nicholas, an agriculturist of Minnesota; Christian, who is a resident of Jericho. Wisconsin; Mary, who is the wife of Theodore Esser and lives in Minnesota; John, of this review; Anna, living in Duluth; Margaret, the wife of Henry Fuhrman, of Marshfield, Wisconsin; and Peter, a farmer living in St. Cloud, Wisconsin.

John Stephani was reared in his parents' home and received his early education in the public schools in Marshfield township. He remained under the parental roof until he was eighteen years of age and then was engaged as a blacksmith for two years and later took up work as a molder in the J. M. Kohler Sons Company works at Sheboygan and in that occupation he continued for nine years. He then engaged in the butcher business and in 1900 he accepted the responsible position as general manager and superintendent of the Cudahy branch meat markets in Sheboygan and in that position he has since continued.

Mr. Stephani was united in marriage to Miss Maria Kunesch, who is a native of Bohemia, Austria, and emigrated with her people to America when she was a young child. She is the daughter of John and Aloysia (Schieffler) Kunesch, who came to America in 1882 and settled in Sheboygan, where the father was employed in one of the factories in that city. He was by trade a stonecutter in the old country and died many years ago in Sheboygan. To Mr. and Mrs. Stephani nine children have been born, as follows: Aloysia, twenty-two years of age, who is a sister in St. Francis Convent at St. Francis, Wisconsin; Roman, twenty years of age, who is a student in Marquette University at Milwaukee; Regina, who is eighteen years old and is attending St. Francis Academy; Maria, a maiden of sixteen, who is at home; John, Rosa, Irene and Elinora, who are fourteen, twelve, ten and seven years of age, respectively, and are all attending school; and Isabelle. Mr. and Mrs. Stephani are members of St. Peter's Catholic church of Sheboygan. Mr. Stephani is a member of the Knights of Columbus and also a member of the St. Peter Claver Aid Society, and Mrs. Stephani is a member of the Christian Mothers' Society, of which she is a past president. Mr. Stephani is numbered among the reliable and progressive business men of the city in which he lives and a man whose well known integrity in business matters entitles him to be numbered among the trustworthy and useful citizens of this part of the state.

HERMAN C. STOLPER.
Herman C. Stolper, treasurer of Sherman township, was born July 30, 1864, on the farm where he still makes his home. He is the son of Fred and Helen (Matchke) Stolper, the former born in 1828 in Silesia, Germany. The mother, who was also a native of Germany, was born two years earlier. The parents were married in the fatherland and two of their children, Anse and William, were born before their departure for America, when the father was a young man of twenty-five years.

The family first settled in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where they remained for a year before removing to Sheboygan county on the farm where Herman C. Stolper now resides. The father bought eighty acres to which he added further purchases of land until at the time of his death, on the 15th of March, 1896, he was the owner of five hundred and fifty-two acres. His sons grew up on the home place, assisting their father in its cultivation, and at his death they each inherited a farm, the homestead being the share of Herman C. Stolper. The father was one of the prominent men of his day and locality and the property which he divided among his heirs was proof that his years had been well spent and that his energies had been wisely directed. His wife passed away on the 7th of May, 1898.

In the family of Mr. and Mrs. Stolper were the following children: Anse, who was before his death a prosperous and influential farmer of this county; William, who died at the age of eight; Caroline, who married John Goetsch, of Sherman; August, living in Adell; Bertha, who married E. D. Schelling, of Scott township, this county; Robert, living in this township; Herman, who is the subject of this sketch; Amelia, who married Emil Janke, of this township; Elizabeth, who married John Plautz, also of this township; Otto, living in this township; Anna, deceased; and two who died in infancy.

Herman C. Stolper received his education in the schools of Sherman township and assisted his father and brothers in the task of clearing their land and in the general farm work. The standing timber at first had to be hewed down, the stumps extracted and the logs cut into cord wood, and in this work, whereby three tracts of eighty acres each were rendered fit for cultivation, Herman Stolper bore a large share. Since he has come into possession of the homestead he has wrought many improvements among which may be counted the erection of new buildings. His farm is equipped with implements and appliances of the most approved pattern and is stocked with full-blooded Holstein and other high grade cattle. He keeps about thirty milk cows and has specialized on the conduct of his dairy, the products of which command the highest market price.

In 1889 Mr. Stolper was united in marriage to Anna Arntz, whose father, August Arntz, came to Wisconsin from Germany when twenty years of age. They were the parents of seven children, as follows: Fred, who was born February 26, 1890; Helen and Charles, twins, who were born February 6, 1892, the latter of whom died in infancy; Edna, who was born March 25, 1898; Edgar and Sadie, twins, who were born November 6, 1899; and Walter, who was born January 2, 1901. The children all remain in their father's home, their mother having passed away in October, 1901. On November 13, 1902, Mr. Stolper was married to Anna Nicholaus, a daughter of William Nicholaus. In their family are two children: Ida, born December 19, 1906; and Gertrude, born October 3, 1910.
Mr. Stolper gives his support to the republican party, the platform of which embodies his political views. He holds the office of town treasurer and has been road overseer since his father's death. He is a member of the local Lutheran church, in the faith of which denomination his family has been reared. He stands high in the community of which he has been a lifelong member, and at all times is actuated by a public-spirited desire for the general good that none questions. The measure of success which he has attained is the result of his carefully formulated plans which have had their roots in good judgment and earnestness.

HORATIO N. TIFFANY.
Horatio N. Tiffany, who is now living retired in Cascade, was for many years actively identified with agricultural pursuits, his well directed efforts in connection therewith proving potent forces in the acquirement of a most gratifying competence. He has already passed the Psalmist's allotted span of three score years and ten, his birth having occurred in Darlington, Canada, on the 30th of January, 1841. The Tiffany family was originally founded in the Mohawk valley, but the grandfather of Horatio N. Tiffany subsequently went to Canada, to which country his son Charles, the father of our subject, also removed. Charles Tiffany was born in the state of New York, in 1807, and in 1855 returned to the United States after a residence of a number of years in the Dominion of Canada. He came to Wisconsin, locating in Mitchell township, Sheboygan county and here took up eighty acres of timber land which he at once began to clear and improve. He continued to make his home upon that place until the time of his death, which occurred in 1872. In early manhood he had married Miriam Hills, who was born on August 26, 1806, and her death occurred in 1878. In their family were four children, namely: Samuel, deceased, who served as a member of Company E, Thirty-sixth Wisconsin Infantry, being killed in the battle of the Wilderness; Lucretia, the wife of Charles Champine, of Martin county, Minnesota; John, deceased, who also served in the Civil war as a member of Company E, First Iowa Cavalry, passing away at Little Rock, Arkansas, during the period of hostilities; and Horatio N., of this review.

The last named spent the period of his boyhood and youth upon the home farm and acquired his education in the public schools. He early became familiar with the various phases of farm work under the direction of his father, whom he assisted until he attained the age of twenty-four years. He then left the farm to accept employment in a sawmill, with which business he was identified for several years, when he returned to agricultural pursuits to which he gave his entire time and attention until 1902. He engaged in general farming, cultivating the crops best adapted to soil and climate, was progressive in his methods and diligent and enterprising in the management of his affairs, and that success came to him in substantial measure is indicated by the fact that in the year mentioned he had accumulated a competence sufficient to permit of his laying down the active cares of life and enjoying in well earned retirement the fruits of his former years of labor. He left the farm and removed to Cascade, where he has since made his home with J. W. Harnden, extensive mention of whom appears on another page of this volume.

Mr. Tiffany was married, in 1866, to Miss Mary S. Maryett, who was born May 25, 1843, in Jefferson county, New York, a daughter of James and Wealthy (Hutchinson) Maryett. That family originally came from Jefferson county, New York, James Maryett locating in Wisconsin in 1848, settling in Lyndon township, where he bought eighty acres of timber land. After clearing that land he devoted his remaining days to its cultivation. His daughter Mary, who was the youngest in a family of five children, passed away December 29, 1901, her loss being mourned by a large number of warm personal friends. A residence in Sheboygan county of more than a half century has gained for Mr. Tiffany an extensive circle of friends which is constantly increasing as the circle of his acquaintance has expanded, for he has ever manifested those sterling traits of character which not only win but also hold esteem and regard and which have commended him to the confidence and good will of all with whom he has come in contact.

GOTTLIEB TORKE.
Gottlieb Torke, who lives retired upon his farm in Sherman township, Sheboygan county, was born in Germany, February 14, 1835, a son of Gottlieb and Rosena (Knecht) Torke, natives of Germany. The father, who was a farmer, left his native land on the 27th of March, 1855, and with his family set out for the United States upon a sailing vessel which completed the voyage to New York in thirty-four days after a rough passage. The journey to Sheboygan county was continued by way of the Hudson river to Albany, down the Erie canal to Buffalo and then by way of the Great Lakes to Chicago. From that point the travelers proceeded to Sheboygan county, where they arrived on the 29th of September, 1855. The father purchased a farm of eighty acres upon which a brush house, thirty feet by twelve feet was erected for immediate occupancy until a log house of more commodious proportions could be constructed by the combined efforts of the father and his son Gottlieb. The next task was that of clearing the land and breaking and planting it, and to all of this labor Gottlieb Torke applied himself unremittingly. The father passed away in 1887, at the age of eighty-seven years. Gottlieb Torke is one of five children born to his parents and his brother William resides on a farm adjoining his.

Following his marriage in 1860 Gottlieb Torke purchased for the sum of eight hundred dollars a farm of eighty acres upon which he erected a log cabin having but one door and one window, and in this house the family lived for seven years. During this period, in 1864, Gottlieb Torke enlisted in Company E, Sixth Wisconsin Regiment, under Captain H. T. Garfield, whose command proceeded to the south at once to join Grant's army which was confronting Lee's army in the battle of Hatchie's Run, in which engagement the object for which the Union army was fighting was attained. Mr. Torke was wounded in the head by a bullet and was retired from service for a month being laid up in the hospital. He was able, however, to participate in the Grand Review held in Washington at the close of the war, after which he went to Louisville, Kentucky, where for a month he was in the hospital. Later he went to Madison, Wisconsin, and on July 14, 1865, was mustered out of the service, hostilities having ceased and the nation's need for her soldiers having ended. As soon as he was able to accomplish the journey Mr. Torke returned to his home but some time elapsed before he was sufficiently restored to health to resume the active work of his farm. He added more land to his original property and at one time owned two hundred and forty acres. He has since sold forty acres of this and the remaining tract of two hundred acres comprises what may well be termed a model farm, on which he has resided for more than fifty-two years, and is cultivated by his three sons, Herman, Emil and Ernest.

On October 7, 1860, Mr. Torke was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Gotter, whose birth occurred in Germany on February 17, 1843. She was one of the seven children of Frederick and Hannah (Schoepke) Gotter, and with her parents came to the United States in 1859. Mr. and Mrs. Torke have been the parents of eleven children, all but two of whom are living. They are as follows: Amelia, who married Fred Harmon and passed away October 10, 1896; William F.. who died March 21, 1897, at the age of twenty-six years; Elizabeth, who married Robert Stolper, of this county; Martha, who married Herman Kruschke, also of this county; John, a farmer of Lyndon township; Anna, who married George Gersmehl, of Sheboygan; Herman, living in Plymouth; and Emil, Ernest, Bertha and Emma, who reside at home. Mr. and Mrs. Torke are also the grandparents of twenty-eight children of the third generation and the great-grandparents of five children of the fourth generation. They are numbered among the few remaining old settlers of the county and their memories are storehouses of interesting reminiscences. Mr. Torke is seventy-seven and his wife nearly seventy years of age.

To the republican party Mr. Torke gives his support, a comprehensive knowledge of its policies and history convincing him that it stands for what he deems to be the best interests of the country. Since their marriage he and his wife have been members of St. John's Lutheran church and their honesty of purpose and sincerity in their faith commend them to the confidence and high regard of all. During Mr. Torke's long residence in Sheboygan county he has been a witness of many events which to the younger generation are matters of history, and his labors have brought him the substantial reward and rest which he has so well earned and richly deserves.'

HENRY TRAUTMANN.
Henry Trautmann, who is successfully engaged in general farming and dairying in Wilson township, is a worthy representative of a well known pioneer family, his people having been identified with the agricultural development of Sheboygan county for sixty-five years. He was born on a farm in Mosel township on the 9th of February, 1874, and is a son of Fred Trautmann, a native of Saxe-Weimar, Germany, his birth having occurred on April 20, 1836. In his early childhood he emigrated to the United States with his parents, Carl and Maria Trautmann, who first located in Manitowoc county, Wisconsin. In September, 1847, they removed to Sheboygan, and two years later they went to Mosel township, where the father bought a farm which he cultivated until after the war. Disposing of his homestead he then removed to Sheboygan, where he passed the remainder of his life. He passed away in 1890, at the venerable age of eighty-three years, having survived his wife for about twelve years. Fred Trautmann continued to live on the home place for several years after his father retired, following which he bought a farm in Mosel township. He disposed of it in 1879, and invested the proceeds in a. farm in Herman township which he cultivated until 1887. In the latter year he likewise sold it and removed to Wilson county, where he bought one hundred and fifty-six acres of land to which he subsequently added another tract of ten acres. He energetically applied himself to the further improvement and cultivation of this place until 1908, when he retired from active work, but he still lives on the farm and enjoys good health, despite the fact that he has attained the venerable age of seventy-six years. For his wife and helpmate Mr. Trautmann chose Miss Lena Von Loh, a native of Germany, who died in 1902, at the age of sixty four years. The family of Mr. and Mrs. Trautmann numbered five, our subject being the fourth in order of birth. The others are as follows: Charles, who died when he was thirty-nine years of age; Frank, a farmer of Lima township; Emma, the wife of William Bollmann, of Sheboygan; and Fred, Jr., who is associated with our subject in the cultivation of the home farm.

The entire life of Henry Trautmann has been passed in this county, his education having been acquired in the district schools of Mosel and Wilson townships and the high school of Sheboygan Falls, which he attended for three years. After laying aside his text-books he diligently applied himself to assisting his father in the cultivation of the home farm until the latter retired in 1908, when he and his brother, Fred, Jr., bought the place. They are both enterprising young men of progressive ideas and systematic methods and are meeting with success in their undertaking. Their fields are devoted to diversified farming and under their capable supervision are annually yielding abundant harvests. In connection with their agricultural pursuits they also engage in dairying and milk twenty-four cows on an average the year around.

In Wilson township on the 29th of February, 1908, Mr. Trautmann was married to Mrs. Clara (Kessel) Row, the widow of Frank Row and a daughter of Ferdinand Kessel, of Sherman township. In his political views Mr. Trautmann is a republican, but he is not an aspirant to public office, although he takes an active and helpful interest in all matters pertaining to the development of the public utilities and assists in forwarding every movement that he feels will pro-. mote the community's welfare.

ISAAC VERHULST.
Isaac Verhulst, engaged in the cultivation of eighty acres of rich farm land two miles west of Sheboygan Falls, has been well known in agricultural circles of this district for many years. He is a native of Holland, his birth having occurred in Zeeland, that country, August 11, 1858. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Verhulst, were married in Zeeland and crossed the Atlantic to America in April, 1883. They settled in Greenbush township where the father rented a tract of land and followed the occupation of farming for twenty-one years. In 1907 he removed to Plymouth where he is now living in retirement. John Verhulst was twice married. His first wife was Catherine Flips, the mother of the subject of this sketch, who died in 1876. John Verhulst was married the second time to Miss Jennie Baumann. By his first marriage he was the father of eight children, seven of whom are still living: Leonard, who makes his home in Holland; Isaac, the subject of this review; Lena, the wife of James DesWart, of Sheboygan Falls township; Jacob, who lives in Wood county, Wisconsin; Cornelius, now a resident of Sheboygan Falls township; John, who is married and lives in Dorchester, Clark county, Wisconsin; Mary, the wife of Louis Cotton, of Chicago; and Cora, who died at the age of nineteen.

Isaac Verhulst was reared at home and secured his early education in the public schools of Zeeland. He was married in his native country and later came to the United States. After reaching this country he worked as a laborer for some time and was a teamster in Sheboygan in the employ of the Riese Coal Company for two years. By much economy and strict attention to business he was able to save enough money to buy a farm of eighty acres in Sheboygan Falls township. His holdings are located two miles west of Sheboygan Falls and here he now lives and cultivates his land.
On the 21st of January, 1880, Mr. Verhulst was married to Miss Mary Stack, and they became the parents of three children: John, who is married and follows the contracting trade in Sheboygan; Harry, who is also a contractor in the same city; and Leonard, who is married and engaged in general farming in this district. Mr. Verhulst has been very successful since he engaged in the occupation of farming. He is an expert agriculturist and learned the details of the business assisting his father. He is an active, able and industrious man and well known throughout Sheboygan county as a public-spirited and progressive agriculturist.

WILLIAM R. VELDBOOM.
William R. Veldboom is one of the successful and enterprising farmers of Sheboygan county, his farm being located on Section 32, Wilson township. He was born in Cedar Grove, Holland township, November 30, 1871, and is the son of J. H. Roerdink and Janna (Ros) Veldboom, both of whom were natives of Holland, born on September, 1841, and on July 11, 1839, respectively. Mr. and Mrs. Veldboom were united in marriage in their native land and emigrated to America in 1868 and settled in Holland township. For some years Mr. Veldboom was employed as a laborer and later he purchased a farm in Lima township, two and one half miles northwest of Gibbsville, where he established his home and continued to live until the time of his death which occurred at the age of forty-four. The demise of his wife occurred in Lima township, November 24, 1894. They were both active and influential members of the Dutch Reform church of Gibbsville and to them eight children were born, five of whom are still living: William, who is the subject of this review; Minnie, who is the wife of Peter W. Daane, of Fairwater, this state; Gerrit, who was born in Lima township, April 22, 1877, and was united in marriage to Miss Jennie Vervelde, and to them one son has been born, who is now three years of age; John, who resides in Hingham, Lima township; and Henry, born April 18, 1881, who was united in wedlock to Miss Elizabeth Klumpenhauer, and to them three children have been born, Herbert, Ida and Alice.

William R. Veldboom was reared in his father's home and educated in the public schools of Gibbsville. He was engaged in work on his father's farm until he was eighteen years of age and at that time he learned the carpenter's trade, in which occupation he has since continued to be engaged. He is also a stone mason and in addition to his business as a carpenter and builder is engaged in the business of moving buildings and in the conduct of general farming. In 1896 he purchased a farm of forty acres in Lima township near Gibbsville upon which he established his home the following spring and where he continued to reside for three years. In 1900 he sold that property and removed to Wilson township where he purchased twenty acres of land on section 32, where he now resides. At the time when he purchased that property no building improvements of any kind had been made upon it. He has since moved a large barn upon the property and has also erected a new and comfortable dwelling house in which he now resides.

Mr. Veldboom was united in marriage on December 16, 1896, in Wilson township, on the Hartman homestead, to Miss Cena Hartman, a daughter of Derrick J. Hartman, of whom a more extended review is published in another part of this work. Mr. Veldboom is affiliated with the republican party and he and his wife are active members of the Christian Reform church of Oostburg, of which he has for several years served in the office of deacon. Mrs. Veldboom has always been very active in church work and for many years has been a teacher in the Sunday school. Mr. Veldboom is an enterprising and successful and highly respected citizen of Wilson township and his influence and assistance are always to be relied upon in the advancement of any measure seeking the betterment of mankind.

GERRIT VERVELDE.
Mr. Vervelde is successfully engaged in farming in Wilson township and is a man universally esteemed and respected by the people of the community in which he lives. He is a native of Sheboygan county, his birth having occurred in the township of Wilson on October 17, 1852, and is the son of Henry B. and Jennie Gertrude (Renskers) Vervelde, both natives of the Netherlands. The father was born at Alten, near the German border. He was married in his native land and emigrated to America in 1846. After reaching the new world he spent a short time at Baltimore, Maryland, and later removed to Hanover, Ohio, where he remained for a period of six years. At the end of that time he removed to Sheboygan and while looking for a suitable place to establish his home and engage in farming, he met the Hartman family and several other families, all of whom he had known in Holland and who were already engaged in farming in Wilson township.

He therefore decided to purchase land in that township and settle among his old-time friends of Holland. Accordingly, in company with his two brothers-in-law, he purchased forty acres of land and for some time their three families resided upon that property and devoted their attention to its cultivation. Later Mr. Vervelde sold his interest in the property and purchased forty acres of his own on section 31, where he established his home and continued to live until his death, which occurred at his home farm, at the age of sixty-two. He was united in marriage to Miss Jennie Gertrude Renskers, a native of Holland, who also passed away at the home place in Wilson township. To Mr. and Mrs. Vervelde five children were born: John, who until the time of his death lived on his father's farm in Wilson township; Gerrit, of this review; Angeline, who is the wife of Gerrit Grotenhaus, of Oostburg; G. W., who died after reaching his majority; and Henry, Jr., who died at the age of twenty-four.

Gerrit Vervelde was reared in his parents' home and educated in the public schools of Wilson township, remaining with his parents until he was thirty years of age. Previously, however, he had purchased thirteen acres of land and later added to his holdings by purchasing twenty acres adjoining it, making in all thirty-three acres of land upon which he engaged in farming for himself. He was very successful in the conduct of his agricultural interests and later he purchased forty-two acres additional, his farm now consisting of seventy-five acres of highly developed land located in Wilson township.

Mr. Vervelde has been twice married. On May 30, 1883, he wedded Miss Bertha Heinen and to that union was born one child, Betty, who resides at home with her father. On August 20, 1895, Mr. Vervelde married Miss Hattie Jentink, of Holland township, and to them the following children have been born: Henry, Bernet, Jennie, John, William, Harry, Louis, Alice, Gerrit, Edward and Angeline, all of whom are at home.

Mr. Vervelde is affiliated with the republican party, and he and his family are members of the Christian Reformed church of Oostburg. Mr. Vervelde is one of the successful and universally respected citizens of Sheboygan county. He is known to be a man ready at all times to lend his assistance to any public measure having for its object the educational, religious and material advancement of the people of the community in which he lives.

HENRY WATERMAN.
Henry Waterman, who for the past three years has lived retired in Plymouth, was long and successfully identified with general agricultural pursuits in Sheboygan county, within the borders of which he has resided for fifty-seven years. His birth occurred in Somersetshire, England, on the 26th of April, 1847, his parents being Charles and Leah (Stokes) Waterman, who were likewise natives of that place, the former born on the 9th of October, 1821, and the latter in the year 1815. Both the Waterman and Stokes families are old English lines. The paternal grandfather of our subject died in early manhood. His wife, a Miss Wolfe, was related to General Wolfe, who fell at Quebec in the French and Indian war.

Charles Waterman, the father of Henry Waterman, is a blacksmith by trade. In 1854 he set sail for America with his wife and two children, landing at New York in the month' of May after six weeks spent on the ocean in a sailing vessel. Making his way to Poughkeepsie, he there worked in the iron furnaces for a period of one year. In 1855 he came to Wisconsin, locating in Plymouth, and in the fall of that year purchased a small tract of thirty acres of timber land. He cleared the property and built a log house thereon, establishing his home on section 36, Plymouth township. As time passed and his financial resources increased, owing to his untiring industry and capable management, he augmented his landed holdings by additional purchase until he owned one hundred and thirty acres. At the present time he is living in honorable retirement, making his home with his son William, who resides on section 25, Plymouth township. At the time of the Civil war he enlisted for service in the Twenty-seventh Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry but at the second examination was rejected because of physical disability. Unto him and his wife, who was called to her final rest in 1897, were born three children, as follows: Henry, of this review; George, who is a resident of Superior, Wisconsin; and William Wolfe, of Plymouth township, this county.

Henry Waterman, who was a lad of seven years when he accompanied his parents on their emigration to the new world, obtained his education in the public schools of Sheboygan county. After attaining his majority he began teaching school and successfully followed that profession in this county for a period of fourteen years, imparting clearly and readily to others the knowledge that he himself has acquired. In 1882 he turned his attention to general agricultural pursuits, cultivating rented land until about 1898, when he acquired sixty acres of the old homestead and subsequently added a tract of twenty acres on section 36, Plymouth township. He remodeled the buildings on the place and also erected others until his was a model property, lacking in none of the improvements and equipments of an up-to-date and modern farm. He made a specialty of dairy farming and raised sufficient stock to replenish his herd of graded Holsteins. In 1909 he retired from active work as an agriculturist and sold his farm the following year, taking up his abode in Plymouth, where he purchased a commodious and attractive residence on Eastern avenue. For the past five years he has served as president of the Farmers Insurance Company.

Mr. Waterman has been married twice. In 1871 he wedded Miss Dora Miller, by whom he had one child. Both the mother and child died during an epidemic of smallpox in 1878. In 1880 Mr. Waterman was again married, his second union being with Miss Anna E. Menne, who was born on the 31st of May, 1857, her parents being Jacob and Freda (Reis) Menne, the former a native of Prussia and the latter of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. Jacob Menne emigrated to America in the '50s and took up his abode in Rhine township, Sheboygan county, where he followed farming until the time of his demise. His wife was a maiden of thirteen years when she came to this country with her parents, who were members of the first German colony in Rhine township. Mrs. Waterman was the oldest in a family of seven children. By her marriage she has become the mother of three children, namely: William Henry, who resides on the old homestead in Plymouth township and who wedded Miss Lydia Kaestner, by whom he has one child, Ilene; Emma M., the wife of D. C. Brown, of Plymouth township; and Robert G., who married Miss Euphemia Peebles and who makes his home in Plymouth, Wisconsin.

Mr. Waterman gives his political allegiance to the republican party and for several years has served as chairman of town supervisors in Plymouth township. His religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Episcopal church, to which his wife and children also belong. He well deserves the somewhat hackneyed but altogether expressive title of a self-made man, for the prosperity which he now enjoys has come as the reward of earnest, persistent effort and unfaltering perseverance. Both Mr. and Mrs. Waterman are well and favorably known throughout Sheboygan county and have gained the warm regard and esteem of all with whom they have come in contact.

ADAM WINTER.
Adam Winter is one of the well known and successful farmers of Sheboygan county. He was born in Meeme Township, Manitowoc County, Wisconsin, July 24, 1867, and is the son of Charles and Marguerite (Hemp) Winter, both of whom were natives of Germany. The father emigrated to America in 1848 and settled on a farm in Manitowoc county, Wisconsin, near Two Rivers. He later returned to Germany and after spending some time in his native land he returned to this country and established his home on the farm where he had first settled in Manitowoc county. In 1865 he was united in marriage to Miss Marguerite Hemp, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Hemp. Her parents were both natives of Germany and emigrated to the United States, settling in Manitowoc county. In 1876 Mr. Winter sold his farm in Manitowoc county and moved to Rhine township, where he continued to live until the time of his death, which occurred June 6, 1911. His wife now resides with her daughter Augusta. To Mr. and Mrs. Winter six children were born: William, who is married and is engaged in farming on the old homestead in Rhine township; Adam, of this review; Minnie, who is the wife of Thomas Leahey and resides in Sheboygan; Augusta, the widow of Philip Eimermann, who passed away at Rhine, February 17, 1910; Charles, who is married and is employed in a lumber yard at Kiel, Wisconsin; and Lydia, who is the wife of August Roehr, of Plymouth.

Adam Winter was reared in his parents' home and received his early education in the public schools of Manitowoc county. He remained under the parental roof, engaged in work on his father's farm until he was seventeen years of age, at which time he learned the stonemason's trade, and for eighteen years was engaged in the contracting and building business in the vicinity of Elkhart Lake, Wisconsin. He later purchased a farm of forty acres located in the township of Plymouth, upon which he maintained his residence for one year and then exchanged that place for a farm of one hundred and thirty-five acres located two miles north of Sheboygan Falls, where he is now successfully engaged in raising high-grade dairy stock for his own use and also for the market.

Mr. Winter was united in marriage on April 30, 1893, to Miss Catharine Damrow, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Godfrey Damrow, both of whom were natives of Germany, and to them ten children were born: Esther, who is a graduate of the Elkhart high school; Nelda, who was graduated from the Plymouth high school; Erving, who died at the age of three years, and Herbert, Viola, Elenora, Malitta, Adelia, Catharine and Elmer, all of whom are at home.

Mr. Winter is affiliated with the democratic party and while residing at Elkhart Lake served as city marshal for several years. He is one of the enterprising and highly respected citizens of Sheboygan county and can always be relied upon to give his help to the promotion of any measure intended to improve the condition of the people in his county and state.



Source: History of Sheboygan County, Wisconsin, past and present, Volume 2; By Carl Zillier, S.J. Clarke Publishing Company; Publ. 1912; Transcribed and donated by Andrea Stawski Pack.


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