Township of Grover
 
A civil town in Taylor County, Wisconsin
at
latitude 451224N and longitude 0903705W
created
Nov. 21, 1885
The unincorporated community of Perkinstown is located in the township.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Grover is a large town - six miles by twelve. The town has a total area of 71.4 square miles, of which, 70.7 square miles is land and 0.7 square miles is water.
Much of Grover is hilly with little glacial lakes. It is part of the Perkinstown terminal moraine. 

The two six mile squares that would become Grover were first surveyed in the summer of 1847 by a crew working for the U.S. government. Then in the winter of 1857 and 1858 another crew marked all the section corners in the township, walking through the woods and over frozen swamps, measuring with chain and compass. When done, the deputy surveyor filed this general description of the six mile square north of Perkinstown:

This Township contains numerous small Tamarac and Cedar Swamps. These are generally unfit for cultivation. There are some few marshes that are very good for hay. The surface is generally rolling; Soil mostly second rate except on some of the Birch and Maple ridges it is first rate. Timber chiefly Hemlock, Birch, Maple, Pine, Tamarac and Cedar.
Yellow River runs through the North West corner of this Township in a South Westerly course. It is a deep narrow stream, flows in a gentle current, not good for forming motive power for mills. There are several small creek running in different directions, bank generally high and dry.

A Little Perkinstown History
According to Fred Westrich, in 1882 Jacob, Peter and Henry Maurer, George Bahn and Henry Richter took homesteads in the vicinity of what is now Perkinstown. Four years later, Fredrick Westrich, Jos. Lechner, John Kausse and John Spuhr joined the settlement. Fred who is now 77, tells of making a trip to Medford, and when the party again neared their home, a brother met them with the news that fire had destryed their log home and everything in it. Practically all that they possessed had burned, especially many things that the family had brought from the old country, which they prized very much. The neighbors, however, were very helpful and they soon had a new log house and everything necessary for comfortable living again.
 
1900 Federal Census 1910 Federal Census
1920 Federal Census 1930 Federal Census
1895 and 1905 Wisconsin State Census
1942 Draft Registration
 

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