Vernon County Wisconsin
Biographies

Romanzo Adams
Source: "Men of Hawaii", vol 2, Edited by John William Siddell, 1921; tr. by Rhonda Hill

ADAMS, ROMANZO, university professor, Honolulu; born at Bloomingdale, Wis., March 22, 1868; son of Mighill D. and Catherine (Wolfe) Adams; married Nellie Cronk, Sept. 16, 1902, at Toledo, Iowa; one child, Katharine. University of Michigan, Ph. B. and Ph. M., 1897-1898; University of Chicago, Ph. D., 1904; professor economy and sociology, Western College, Toledo, Iowa, 1898-1900; professor at University of Nevada, 1902-20; published "Taxation in Nevada---a History," 1918; professor of economy and sociology, University of Hawaii, since 1920. Occasional contributor to periodicals; secretary of committee on tax revision, Nevada, 1912-13; president Nevada Educational Association, 1905-10.


Willam C. T. Adams
Source: Herringshaw's American blue-book of Biography: Prominent Americans of 1912- An Accurate Biographical Record of Prominent Citizens of All Walks of Life; submitted by Therman Kellar

Adams, William C T., president of Highland College, Kans., was born July 6, 1869, in Vernon County, Wis. He graduated from the Wisconsin State Normal school, the upper Iowa University, the Taylor University and the University of Michigan; and has received the degrees of M.A. and M.S. He was ordained a minister of the Presbyterian Church; has been principal of schools in Wisconsin and North Dakota; and filled professorships in upper Iowa University and in Bellevue college of Nebraska. Since 1909 he has been president of Highland college of Kansas.


Ferdinand Barta
Source: Progressive men of Minnesota. Published by The Minneapolis Journal (1897) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

Ferdinand Barta is a St. Paul attorney and prominent Republican politician of Ramsey County. He was born September 8, 1857, in the town of Union, Vernon County, Wisconsin. His father was Joseph M. Barta, who came to the United States from Bohemia in 1849, and later settled on a farm in Wisconsin and from 1865 devoted his attention to the invention and perfection of a twine binder, in which he was successful. His mother's maiden name was Mary Holak. Mr. Barta received his education in the public schools in the vicinity of his home. Like most western boys of the time he was obliged to do much for himself at an early age. From his seventeenth year he studied and taught alternately and in this way managed to keep up with his class and secure a full course in the high school at La Crosse. From 1870 to 1882 he studied law in the office of Howe & Tourtellotte, and held a clerkship under Leonard Lottridge for a year prior to his admission to the bar in November, 1882. In May, 1883, he decided to seek a new location in the west. Stopping in St. Paul, he determined to locate there, opened an office and has maintained a successful practice ever since. Mr. Barta has been a Republican ever since he attained his majority. Soon after coming to St. Paul he began to take an active part in the political affairs of the city and county and was for six years a member of the city and county Republican committees. His first candidacy for office was for the legislature from the Fifth ward of the city of St. Paul in the fall of 1894, for which office he was elected, although the district had a normal Democratic majority of five hundred. While in the legislature he devoted his time to hard and effective work in the interests of his constituents, being a member of several of the more important committees. He was renominated for the office without opposition in 1896 and was re-elected. Mr. Barta is a member of the Masonic fraternity. He was married in January, 1888, to Miss Lena Brings, daughter of Joseph and Lucy Brings, who were early settlers of St. Paul. They have one son, whose name is Joseph.


J. Henry Bennett
Source: The Wisconsin Blue Book (1919) page 472; submitted by FoFG mz

J. HENRY BENNETT (Rep.) is a lawyer and resides at Viroqua. He was born in Vernon county in 1874, educated in the public schools, and admitted to the bar in 1895. He was elected district attorney of Vernon county in 1898, re-elected and continued to serve as such for 15 years. He was elected to the senate in 1914, served on the judiciary committee, and became chairman of the committee in 1919. Was attorney for the University Legischairman of the committee on corporations and as member of the committee on legislative procedure in 1919. Was attorney for the University Legislative Investigating committee in 1906. Is a member of the national, state and local bar associations and is one of the five lawyers constituting the Council of the American Bar Association for Wisconsin.


Van S. Bennett
(Fourth District – Crawford and Vernon counties. Population 38,899.)
Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1882), page 530; transcribed by Mary Saggio

VAN S. BENNETT (Rep.), of Rockton, Vernon county, was born in Medina, Ohio, March 15, 1836; received an academic education; his parents removed from Ohio to Wisconsin in 1846, settling in Medina, Dane county, thence to Jefferson county in 1852, and to Richland county in 1855; located at Rockton, Vernon county, in 1866; is by occupation a lumberman; enlisted in Co. I, 12th Wisconsin infantry, in September, 1861, as lieutenant; was promoted to captaincy in May, 1862; participated in all the operations of the regiment until November, 1864, when his term of service expired; has been town clerk, chairman of town supervisors, etc., at various times and has three times been chairman of the county board of Vernon; was superintendent of schools of Richland county in 1865; was member of assembly in 1869 and 1870; was elected state senator for 1882 and 1883 receiving 2,166 votes against 1,719 votes for Chris. Ellefson, greenbacker, and 572 for J. A. Robb, democrat.

Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1883), page 474; transcribed by Vicki Bryan

VAN S. BENNETT, (Rep.), of Rockton, Vernon county, was born in Medina, Ohio, March 15, 1836; received and academic education; his parents removed from Ohio to Wisconsin in 1846, settling in Medina, Dane county, thence to Jefferson county in 1852, and to Richland county in 1855; located at Rockton, Vernon county, in 1856, is by occupation a lumberman; enlisted in Co. I, 12th Wisconsin Infantry, in September, 1861, as lieutenant; was promoted to captaincy in May, 1862; participated in all the operations of the regiment until November, 1864, when his term of service expired; has been town clerk, chairman of town supervisors, etc., at various times, and has three times been chairman of the county board of Vernon; was superintendent of schools of Richland county in 1865; was member of assembly in 1869 and 1870; was elected state senator for 1882 and 883, receiving 2,166 votes against 1,719 votes for Chris. Ellefson, greenbacker, and 572 for J. A. Robb, democrat.


C. M. Butt
Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin History and Biography, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Susan Geist

C. M. BUTT, Viroqua, was born in the town of Deerfield, Morgan county, Ohio, September 30, 1833, his parents being Edward and Hannah Roberts Butt. His education was obtained in the public schools and in the Wesleyan University, at Delaware, Ohio. Subsequently he entered upon the study of the law with Judge Evans & Wood, at McConnellsville, Ohio; was admitted to the bar at Viroqua, Wisconsin, in June, 1859, and commenced its practice at the same place immediately after. The fall thereafter he was elected district attorney for Vernon county, and on the expiration of his term, in 1861, he received a renomination, which he declined in order to accept the republican nomination for the senate, but was defeated by only eighty-seven votes at the ensuing, election by N. S. Cole, who ran on a Union ticket. During the war of the rebellion he entered the military service a first lieutenant in Company A, Twenty-fifth Regiment Wisconsin volunteers; was promoted to captain in March, 1864; to major of the Forty-eighty Wisconsin in March, 1865, and to lieutenant colonel in January, 1866. During the war he participated in two campaigns against the Indians in Minnesota and Kansas; also in the campaign at Vicksburg, Meridian, Chattanooga, Savannah, and Sherman’s Carolina campaign, ending at Goldsboro, North Carolina. Served seven months as ordnance officer of Fourth Division, Seventeenth Army Corps, J. Mower commanding. Was elected senator on the republican ticket in 1868 by a majority of 2, 573, and served in that body during the sessions of 1869 and 1870. Since that time he has been in the active practice of his profession at Viroqua. Was elected district attorney again in 1871 and 1873, serving four years; was elected county judge in 1877, and reelected in 1881. He is one of our large farmers, his farm consisting of six hundred acres, on which he resides, and takes personal supervision. After leaving the army and returning home, Colonel Butt was elected county treasurer of Vernon county, and served from June 1, 1866, until January 1, 1870.


Albert William Campbell
Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

ALBERT WILLIAM CAMPBELL, Viroqua, was born in Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, October 10, 1856, and was educated at the district school and the high school of Tomah. He studied law in the office of Smith & Rogers at Madison, also went through a course in the law class of Wisconsin State University, and was admitted to the bar in Madison on May 1, 1878. Subsequently, establishing himself in practice at Viroqua, he entered into partnership with Judge Carson Graham, and recently with Walter S. Field. Mr. Campbell is now court commissioner for Vernon county.


Clarence H. Carter
Source: The Wisconsin Blue Book (1919) page 504; submitted by FoFG mz

CLARENCE H. CARTER (Rep.), chairman of the committee on transportation and member of the committee on state affairs, was born in Vernon county, May 19, 1875. He was educated in the common school and high school and has devoted his time to the insurance business and the buying of leaf tobacco. He has filled all of the village offices of Readstown and was chairman of the county board for three terms. He was elected to the assembly in 1916 and re-elected in 1918 without opposition.

• Died May 1, 1919.


Lewis Stephen Cass
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Renae Donaldson

CASS Lewis Stephen, St Paul. Res 15 Sherburne av, office Metropolitan Opera House. Railroad man. Born May 6, 1865 in Vernon county Wis, son of Stephen F and Martha J (Wilcox) Cass. Married December 24, 1885 to Lillian Emmons. Attended district schools in Iowa; graded and high schools at Sumner Ia; Iowa State Normal School at Cedar Falls. Started in railway service as telegraph student at Sumner Ia in 1881; later became successively station agt, freight brakeman, pass brakeman, freight conductor, pass conductor and supt. Built the Waterloo, Cedar Falls & Northern Ry 1896; pres of same to date; asst gen mngr C G W Ry may 15 to Sept 7, 1905; third v pres 1905 to date.


Andrew H. Dahl
One of the best known men in the public life of Wisconsin is the recent incumbent of the office of state treasurer, Andrew H. Dahl, who on December 31, 1912, closed three terms or six years of efficient service. Mr. Dahl is a resident of Westby, Vernon county, where he has long been prosperously identified with business and public affairs. In his public service as in his private business, his guiding principle has long been a square deal for all and special privileges to none, and the people of his home county and of the state at large have repeatedly placed the seal of their approval upon his manner of exemplifying this rule.

Mr. Dahl was born in Lewiston, Columbia county, Wisconsin, April 13, 1859, and is one of the leading representatives of the Norwegian-American citizenship of this state. His parents, Michael H. and Elizabeth (Asbjornsen) Dahl, were both natives of Moi, Norway. The father was born in 1801 and died in 1869, and the mother was born in 1815 and died in 1884. They were married in Moi, and of their children the two living are Andrew H. and his sister Sarah, the widow of Ole T. Westby. The mother subsequently married Jens A. Peterson, but there were no children from that union. The Dahl family, father and mother, emigrated to America in 1852, and spent thirteen weeks on the sailing vessel which finally landed them in New York City. Going up the Hudson, they continued their westward journey through the Erie Canal to Buffalo, and thence on a steamer through the Great Lakes until their arrival at Milwaukee. There the father bought a yoke of oxen and drove* overland to Lewiston in Columbia county. That was then a wilderness region, and Michael Dahl should be credited with the pioneer work of hewing a farm from the aboriginal conditions. After twelve years residence there he sold his place, and, again with ox teams, migrated on to Coon Prairie in Vernon county. There he bought a farm and spent the rest of his active career in general agriculture. He was one of the active members of the Norwegian Evangelical Lutheran church. During the first years of his American residence he voted the Whig principles, but later joined the Republican party.

Andrew H. Dahl was reared to manhood on the home farms in Columbia and Vernon counties, and had the inestimable advantage of living in a good home characterized by industry, thrift and fine principles. He learned to work, and during the winter seasons attended the common schools, and later the Viroqua high school and the Northwestern Business University at Madison.

At the age of twenty-two he began his career in merchandising as a clerk in a general store at Viroqua. After an experience of three and a half years, he began on his own account in 1884, under the firm name of Galstad & Dahl, the general merchandise and agricultural implement business. In 1888 Mr. Dahl bought out his partner, and has since conducted the business with increasing prosperity under the name of A. EL Dahl & Company.

Mr. Dahl has for many years interested himself in local government and has been an active factor in Republican polities, he was a member of the Vernon county board of supervisors in 1896-97 ; was trustee of the Vernon county asylum in 1897, serving nine years; was elected president of the village board at Westby in 1898 and by reelections served four successive terms until 1902. In 1898 Mr. Dahl became a member of the Wisconsin assembly from Vernon county. He was three times re-elected, each time getting the nomination without opposition, and it was his distinction to have first in the history of Vernon county broken the long-established custom of giving a representative but two terms in office. In the legislature he was on the committee on education, was chairman of the committee on charitable and penal institutions during 1905, and succeeded the late and revered A. E. Hall of Dunn county as chairman of the committee on assessments and collections of taxes. The culmination of his political honors came with his election to the office of state treasurer in 1906. He was re-elected in 1908 and 1910, and gave the state as capable an administration of this important office as it has ever had. In 1912 he was elected a delegate at large from Wisconsin to the National Republican Convention held in Chicago. He supported the candidacy of Senator Robert M. LaFollette for president.

Mr. Dahl is a member of the Lutheran church, and is affiliated with the Sons of Norway. He was married on October 10, 1882, to Miss Julia Vinje, who was born at Voss, Norway. Seven children have been born to their marriage : Harry J., who married Nellie Riege, is a member of the firm of A. H. Dahl & Company at Westby; Elnora E. is the wife of William F. Whitney, of Wenatchee, Washington; Chester T. is also a member of A. H. Dahl & Company, and he and his brother now have the entire management of this prosperous business; Lulu E., Alice I., Victor V., and Aad J. are the younger members of the home circle.
["Wisconsin Its Story And Biography 1848-1913" By Ellis Baker Usher, Volume 6 - 1914 - Transcribed and Submitted to Genealogy Trails by Friends for Free Genealogy]


Jacob Eckhardt Jr.
Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1880) transcribed by RuthAnne Wilke

JACOB ECKHARDT, Jr. (Rep.) of De Soto, Vernon county, was born in the village of Ingolshire, near Strasbourg, Elsasz, February 7, 18 5; educated in the common schools; is by occupation a farmer and machinist; came to Wisconsin in 1833, and settled in Milwaukee; removed to Vernon county in 1866; has held various local offices, including chairman of town board; was elected to the assembly for 1879, and re-elected for 1880, receiving 944 against 93 for Edward Schilling, Democrat, and 527 for P. J. Dale, Greenbacker.


Christen Ellefson
Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1883), page 505; transcribed by Susan Geist 

CHRISTEN ELLEFSON (Ind. Greenbacker), of Liberty Pole, was born in Lysteus, Bergens Stift, Norway, April 20, 1842; received a common school education; is a farmer; immigrated to America in 1860, and located in Dane county, Wis., removing soon after to Dakota and thence to Iowa where he lived until 1866 when he returned to Wisconsin and settled in the town of Franklin where he now lives; has been chairman, treasurer and assessor of his town; was member of assembly in 1878 and was elected assemblyman for 1883, receiving 915 votes against 628 for H. H. Morgan, republican.


Walter S. Field
Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

WALTER S. FIELD, Viroqua, was born in Hillsborough, Wisconsin, October 19, 1856; was educated at the Wisconsin State University, graduating in the class of 1878, and in the law class of the university of 1880; was admitted to the bar at Madison, April 15, 1880, and has been in practice at Viroqua since December 1, 1880, with A. W. Campbell.


Henry C. Forsythe
Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

HENRY C. FORSYTHE, Viroqua, was born in the State of Ohio; was educated in the law at the law school of the Wisconsin State University, graduating in the class of 1879, having previously read law in the office of W. F. Turhune, at Viroqua; was admitted to the bar at Madison in 1879; has been in practice at Viroqua as a member of the firm of Turhune and Forsythe, and also that of Forsyth & Hattlestad, and has been justice of the peace.


Charles Waldo Graves
Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

CHARLES WALDO GRAVES, Viroqua, was born in East Aurora, Erie county, New York, November 29, 1854, and his father is Lewis W. Graves, who for forty-five years has been a member of the bar at Sparta, Wisconsin. He was educated in the public schools at Sparta, studied law three years with his father and one year with A. E. Bleekman, at Sparta, and was admitted to the bar at Sparta on January 4, 1876. Commencing practice at Sparta, he was in partnership one year, comprising that of 1876, with F. T. Condit – Graves & Condit; two years, 1877 and 1878, with A. E. Bleekman – Bleekman & Graves; three years. 1879, 1880, 1881, and continuing to the present year of 1882, with Colonel C. M. Butt, at Viroqua. In 1876 Mr. Graves, besides practicing his profession at the same time, was clerk of the town of Sparta.


Charles N. Harris
Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

CHARLES N. HARRIS, Viroqua, whose father was Mr. Joseph Harris, entered upon the study of the law with C. M. Butt at Viroqua, and attended the State University law school, graduating in the class of 1879, at which time he was admitted to the bar of the supreme court at Madison; has been in practice at Viroqua with H. L. Proctor, the firm being Proctor & Harris, subsequently alone, and has held the office of justice of the peace at Viroqua.


Torger O. Juve
(Vernon County – First District – The towns of Bergen, Coon, Christiana, Franklin, Genoa, Hamburg, Harmony, Jefferson, Sterling and Wheatland.  Population 11,341.)
Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1882), page 560; transcribed by Mary Saggio

TORGER O. JUVE (Rep.), P. O. address, Rising Sun, Crawford county, was born in Christiansands Stift, Norway, October 23, 1840; received a collegiate education, graduating in 1866 from Luther College, Decorah, Iowa, and in 1869 from Concordia College, St. Louis; is a clergyman; he immigrated to the United States in 1852 and resided at Koshkonong until 1857; removed to Vernon county in 1869; he was elected member of assembly for 1881 without opposition, and re-elected for 1882, receiving 782 votes against 557 for Henry Schlong, greenbacker and democrat.



Nelson Norman Lampert
Nelson Norman Lampert, vice president of the Port Dearborn National Bank of Chicago is a native of Wisconsin, and has had a Long and successful career as a Chicago banker. On the organization of the Wisconsin Society of Chicago he was honored with election as its first treasurer. Mr. Lampert was born at Newton in Vernon county, Wisconsin, March 19, 1872. His parents were Bartholomew and Mary (Stork) Lampert. The father, who was born at West Bend, in Washington county, Wisconsin, died at the age of sixty-two. The mother was also born at West Bend and is still living. On both sides the family were established in Wisconsin during the pioneer era. The Chicago banker was the oldest of six children, four of whom are living. Bartholomew Lampert became prominent in the Methodist ministry, having been educated in a theological seminary in Ohio. He held various charges in Wisconsin and Illinois and was a presiding elder in the Chicago district at the time of his death. In politics he was always a Republican.

Nelson Norman Lampert came to Chicago with his parents at the age of fourteen and was graduated from the Garfield grammar school. In May, 1887, when a little more than fifteen years of age, he entered the service of the Fort Dearborn National Bank as a messenger boy. By earnest and faithful work he was promoted through all the grades leading up to the vice presidency, to which office he was elected in 1904, when thirty-two years of age.

Mr. Lampert is a prominent figure in Chicago Masonic Circles. He is past master of Garden City Lodge, A. F. & A. M. ; past thrice illustrious master of Tyrian Council R. & S. M. ; past commander of Apollo Commandery No. 1 K. T., and in the Scottish Rite is a member of Oriental Consistory and an honorary thirty-third degree Mason. In December, 1907, he was unanimously elected illustrious potentate of Medinah Temple of the Mystic Shrine.

Mr. Lampert is a member of the Banker's Club; of the Mid-Day Club ; the Hamilton Club ; the Glen View Golf Club ; the Chicago Athletic Association, of which he has served as treasurer; the Columbia Yacht Club ; the Union League Club ; the South Shore Country Club. His politics is Republican.

On June 28, 1910, Mr. Lampert married Miss Nettie Tuohy, who was born at Woodstock, in McHenry county, Illinois.
["Wisconsin Its Story And Biography 1848-1913" By Ellis Baker Usher, Volume 6 - 1914 - Transcribed and Submitted to Genealogy Trails by Friends for Free Genealogy]

George Davis McDill
Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1882), page 540; transcribed by Mary Saggio

GEORGE DAVIS McDILL (Rep.), of Osceola Mills, Polk county, was born in Wayne, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, on the 28th of July, 1838; received an academic education; is by profession a lawyer; came to Wisconsin in 1841, and settled at Beloit, removing later to Vernon county, and to Polk county in 1872; has been district attorney of Polk county for two terms, beginning January 1, 1874; was chairman of the county board for five consecutive years. Mr. McDill enlisted in the spring of 1861 in Co. I, 6th regiment, and served therein until March 24, 1864, when he was promoted as captain of Co. K, 37th regiment; was discharged on account of wounds November 3, 1864; participated in the battles of Gainesville, Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, and the siege of Petersburg; he was elected to the assembly of 1881, and re-elected for 1882, receiving 2,498 votes against 972 for Frank M. Angel, democrat.


Oliver G. Munson
Source: The Wisconsin Blue Book (1919) submitted by FoFG mz

CHIEF CLERK
OLIVER G. MUNSON (Rep.) has had more legislative experience than any other man in Wisconsin, having been connected with the legislature most of the time since 1881. He began as bookkeeper of the senate; was a member of the senate for 12 years 1896 to 1908; was elected chief clerk of the senate in 1915 without his knowledge and reelected ln 1917 and 1919. During Gov. James O. Davidson's five years encumbency in the executive office Mr. Munson was his private secretary. He was born March 2, 1856, in Howard county, Iowa, and came to Wisconsin in 1876, and published the Richland County Republican-Observer for 10 years. For the last 34 years he has been a resident of Viroqua as editor and publisher of the Vernon County Censor. In the campaign of 1916 he was chosen as one of Wisconsin's presidential electors on the republican ticket.


Marshall C. Nichols
Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1883), page 505; transcribed by Susan Geist

MARSHALL C. NICHOLS (Rep.), of Viroqua, was born near Wausau, Hancock county, Ill., January 17, 1838; received an academic education; is a merchant by occupation; came to Wisconsin in 1852 and settling at Viroqua has lived there ever since; enlisted in August, 1864 in 42d Reg’t Wis. Vol. Inf. and served as captain of Co. I till the close of the war; has held various local offices and was elected member of assembly for 1883, receiving 668 votes against 556 for W. N. Carter, democrat, 465 for Wm. Saudon, prohibitionist, 153 for J. C. Spellum, greenbacker.


James C. Officer
Source: The University of Wisconsin: its history and its alumni (1836 – 1900) Edited by Reuben Gold Thwaites -pages 732-736 (1900) transcribed by FoFG mz

JAMES C. OFFICER, A. B., LL. B.
Born at Springville, Vernon County, Wisconsin, January 23, 1859. Fitted at the Viroqua high school. Entered U. W. as a sub-freshman, in 1879 — at first in the scientific course, but soon changing to the ancient classical. He was not graduated until 1884, having been obliged to work his way through college. He graduated from U. W. Law School in 1886. He was, throughout his student career, a member of Athena. Since graduation, he has practiced law in Milwaukee. Mr. Officer has been State senator for the Fourth district; deputy clerk of courts, for Milwaukee County; and member of the Milwaukee County Republican committee. A biographical sketch of him can be found in the Wisconsin Blue Book for 1895.


Ole A. Olson
Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Janice Louie

OLE A. OLSON, the leading merchant of Glover, Dickey county, is a man of sterling business qualifications and is well known throughout that locality. He carries a complete stock of general merchandise and enjoys an extensive patronage. He is also interested in buying grain during the season and is a correct judge and is held in the highest esteem by all with whom he comes in contact.
Mr. Olson was born on a farm near the village of Little Hammar, Norway, November 15, 1846, and was a son of Ole and Randene (Peterson) Olson. His father was a farmer and carpenter and both parents lived and died in Norway, their native land.
Our subject remained at home until after he attained his majority, attending school and working at farm labor in the vicinity of his home. He turned his face toward the New World in 1867 and came to America to seek his fortune. He located in Chaseburg, Wisconsin, in Vernon county, and there worked in a saw mill and at carpenter work until 1870, when he removed to Trempeleau county and engaged in the mercantile business at Pigeon Falls, of which place he was the first postmaster. He purchased a farm in 1876, which he conducted in connection with his business until 1888, in which year he went to Dickey county, North Dakota, and settled in Glover, where he has since conducted a general merchandise business. He also buys grain for the Monarch Elevator Company. He has built up an extensive trade in that locality, and has met with success.

Our subject was married in Pigeon Falls, Wisconsin, in 1877, to Miss Ingeborg Olson, a native of Norway. Mrs. Olson was born in 1850, and came to the United States the same year as Mr. Olson. Seven children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Olson, as follows: Clara R., who is now a teacher in the public schools of Glover; John O., who is associated with his father in the mercantile business; Carl E.; .Anna L., who died August 20, 1890; Julia L.; Arthur H. and Odin L. Mr. Olson is prominent in public affairs, and has held the office of township treasurer, and has been chairman of the township board. Politically, he is a Republican, and firm in his convictions.


Charles D. Parker
PLEASANT VALLEY.
Source: The US Biographical Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Volume (1877) Transcribed by: RuthAnne Wilke

CHARLES D. PARKER, lieutenant-governor of Wisconsin, was born on the 27th of December, 1827, near Connecticut lake, Coos county, New Hampshire. His father was an early settler, a prominent man, on the border between Canada and New Hampshire, a farmer and merchant. In the spring of 1836 moved to Wisconsin and settled in Muskego, Waukesha county, making claim where the village of Muskego Centre now is. There were no white settlers within three miles. An Indian trail was the only pass way to Milwaukee. His father came by land with two-horse team; his family came by water; all poor financially. He was even then a prominent politician; was a member of the territorial legislature in 1846; was active and efficient in organizing Waukesha county. Charles worked on the farm in summers and attended the district school in the winter until he was twenty years of age, and then attended the academy at Waukesha; afterward the academy at New Ipswich, New Hampshire. Taught school in New Hampshire and Wisconsin. Married Angeline F. Southworth and went to farming. He was town clerk in Muskego in 1852. In 1856 he was elected chairman of the town board and member of the county board of supervisors of Waukesha county. In 1959, he moved to Pleasant Valley, St. Croix county; was elected town clerk three years, member of the county board five years, one year of which he was chairman of the county board. He was elected a member of the legislative assembly in 1869 and 1870; was elected lieutenant-governor in 1873, which office he still holds. He has five sons and two daughters. In politics was a free-soiler until the organization of the republican party; he is now a reformer. He is liberal and tolerant in his religious views, and believes the principles of the Christian religion necessary to good government. Governor Parker is a plain, practical, common sense man, with sufficient capacity and learning to discharge the duties of any state office with advantage to the State and honor to himself. His integrity is incorruptible, his conduct beyond reproach. Moral dignity and gentleness are most happily blended in him, which, together with his kind heart and affable manner, render him respected by all, beloved by his friends.


Atley Peterson
Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1882), page 543; transcribed by Mary Saggio

ATLEY PETERSON (Rep.), of Soldiers’ Grove, Crawford county, was born in Lerdal, Norway, February 21, 1847; received a common school education; is by occupation a lumber manufacturer and farmer; came to Wisconsin in 1852, and located in Vernon county, and moved to Crawford county in 1853; has been postmaster at Soldiers’ Grove since 1869; elected member of assembly for 1879, and re-elected for 1880, 1881 and 1882, receiving 818 votes against 634 for O. A. Caswell, democrat, and 300 for Leonard Hamerly, greenbacker.


H. W. Proctor
Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

H. W. Proctor, Viroqua, was born in Fairfax county, Vermont, January 25, 1843, his father being Henry Proctor. His education was acquired in both Vermont and Wisconsin; studied law with R. C. Bierce & Carson Graham, at Viroqua; was admitted at Viroqua, December 13, 1871, and has been in practice at Viroqua with Carson Graham, W. H. Carter and C. N. Harris. From January 1, 1876 to January 1, 1882, Mr. Proctor was district attorney for Vernon county, and president of the village of Viroqua for 1881 and 1882. During the war of the late rebellion he served as private in Company D, Forth-third regiment of Wisconsin volunteers, from the organization of the regiment until the close of the war.


K. S. Ramsett
Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Janice Louie

K. S. RAMSETT, junior member of the firm of Peterson & Ramsett, well-known merchants of Fingal, Barnes county, is a man of more than ordinary prominence in the business world and is deservedly popular among his fellow citizens. He first saw the light of day on a farm near Madison, Dane county, Wisconsin, April 29, 1854, and is a son of Sever K. and Britha (Johnson) Ramsett, both natives of Norway. At an early day the father crossed the Atlantic and took up his residence in Wisconsin, where he has followed the occupation of farming with good success for many years. He now makes his home in Vernon county, that state. The wife and mother died in 1874. In their family were eight children, our subject being the second in order of birth.
During his childhood Mr. Ramsett, of this sketch, accompanied his parents on their removal to Vernon county, Wisconsin, where his primary education was secured in the district schools. He then entered the Viroqua high school and after graduation from that institution was a student in the State University of Wisconsin for one year. He then came west and worked for the Great Northern Railroad Company in the Red River country for a short time. Returning to St. Paul, Minnesota, he entered the Curtis Commercial College, where he completed his education in 1882. The same year he same to Bismarck, North Dakota, and secured a position as clerk with the firm of Yerxa & Emerson, grocery merchants at that place, with whom he remained for two years. He then moved a short distance north of Bismarck and in partnership with his brother, Edward, under the firm name of Ramsett Brothers, opened a store at Washburn, where on a small scale they engaged in the mercantile business until 1892, since which time our subject has been a resident of Fingal and carried on his present business, first as a member of the firm of Peterson & Ramsett and on January 1, 1900, Mr. Ramsett became the sole proprietor. He has a large and well-selected stock of general merchandise — one of the largest in the county — and by fair and honorable dealing has built up an excellent trade, which is constantly increasing. In 1897 Mr. Ramsett purchased one-half of the town site of Fingal from the Soo Railroad Company.
Mr. Ramsett was married, in Washburn, North Dakota, in 1888, to Miss Bertha M. Cumberland, a native of Pennsylvania, born in 1860, and they have one child, Maurice L. Politically, he is an ardent Republican and socially is quite a prominent member of the Masonic order, the Ancient Order of United Workmen and American Yeomen. He started out in life with nothing but his own indomitable energy and his accumulation of this world's goods is attributable to his perseverance, industry and sound judgment in business affairs. Through his persistent efforts he succeeded in getting enough money to complete his education and the same energy and perseverance have marked his entire business career, enabling him to overcome all the difficulties and obstacles in the path to success. He is well-known among his fellow townsmen for his reliability in all trade transactions and justly merits their confidence and regard.



Brevet Brigadier General Jeremiah M. Rusk
Source: "The Military History of Wisconsin: a record of the civil and military"; By Edwin Bentley Quiner; Publ. 1866; Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack.

Was born in Morgan County, Ohio, in 1830, and removed to Bad Ax County, Wisconsin in the year 1853. In 1855, he was elected Sheriff of that county for two years, at the expiration of which period he was appointed under Sheriff, and served till 1859. In 1861, he was elected to the Legislative Assembly, serving one term, and was commissioned Major of the Twenty-fifth Regiment in July, 1862.
He accompanied his regiment in the Indian Campaign into Minnesota. Returning to Wisconsin, he proceeded with the regiment to Columbus, Ky. thence down the Mississippi, and up the Yazoo River to Satartia, from which place they marched under a scorching sun, thirty miles to Haines' Bluff, the exposures and hardships of which march will long be remembered. Subsequently the regiment was stationed at Helena, where on the death of Lieutenant Colonel Nasmith, Major Rusk was commissioned Lieutenant Colonel. In the Meridian expedition the regiment was under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Rusk, and returned to Vicksburg without losing a man. In the subsequent campaigns, he commanded the Twenty-fifth the greatest portion of the time. In the Atlanta campaign, the Lieutenant Colonel repeatedly led his men into action, and at Decatur, came near being captured. With the subsequent history of the Twenty-fifth, that of Lieutenant Colonel Rusk is identified, and it is not necessary for us to repeat it here. He successfully led his brave regiment through the march to Savannah, and up through the Carolinas, and thence home, where they were disbanded. The testimonials of commanding officers, which we have seen, speak highly of his efficiency, ability and bravery.
In the fall of 1865, he was nominated as the candidate of the Union party for Bank Comptroller, and was triumphantly elected by a large majority.
He was brevetted Colonel, and subsequently Brigadier General, for meritorious services.

Source: Blue Book of the State of Wisconsin for (1882) page 525; transcribed by Tammy Clark

GOVERNOR
JEREMIAH M. RUSK, of Viroqua, Vernon county, was born in Morgan county, Ohio, June 17, 1830; removed to Wisconsin and settled in Bad Axe (now Vernon) county in 1853; held several county offices; was a member of the assembly in 1852; was commissioned Major of the 25th Wisconsin volunteer Infantry in July, 1862; was soon after promoted to the colonelcy. Served with General Sherman from the siege of Vicksburg until mustered out at the close of the war, and was brevetted brigadier general for bravery at the battle of Salkehatchic; was elected bank comptroller of Wisconsin for 1866 and 1867, and re-elected for 1868-9; represented the sixth congressional district in the 42d congress, and the seventh district in the 43d and 44th congresses; was a member of the congressional republican committee for several years; was a delegate to the national republican convention at Chicago, in 1880; was appointed by President Garfield and confirmed by the senate, as minister of Paraguay and Uruguay, which appointment he declined; was also tendered by President Garfield the mission to Denmark , and the position of chief of the bureau of engraving and printing, both of which he declined. Was elected governor at the annual election in 1881, as a republican, receiving 81,754 votes against 69,797 for N.D. Fratt, democrat, and 13,225 votes for T. D. Kanouse, prohibitionist, and 7,002 for E. P. Allis, greenbacker.   

Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1883) Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

GOVERNOR.
JEREMIAH M. RUSK, of Viroqua, Vernon county, was born in Morgan county, Ohio, June 17, 1830; removed to Wisconsin and settled in Bad Axe (now Vernon) county in 1853; held several county offices; was a member of the assembly in 1862; was commissioned Major of the 25th Wisconsin volunteer Infantry in July, 1862; was soon after promoted to the colonelcy. Served with General Sherman from the siege of Vicksburg until mustered out at the close of the war, and was brevetted brigadier general for bravery at the battle of Salkehatchie; was elected bank comptroller of Wisconsin for 1866 and 1867, and re-elected for 1868-9; represented the sixth congressional district in the 42d congress, and the seventh district in the 43d and 44th congresses; was chairman of the committee on invalid pensions in the 43d congress; was a member of the congressional republican committee for several years; was a delegate to the national republican convention at Chicago, in 1880; was appointed by President Garfield and confirmed by the senate, as minister to Paraguay and Uruguay, which appointment he declined; was also tendered by President Garfield the mission to Denmark, and the position of chief of the bureau of engraving and printing, both of which he declined. Was elected governor at the annual election in 1881, as a republican, receiving 81,754 votes against 69,797 for N. D. Fratt, democrat, and 13,225 votes for T. D. Kanouse, prohibitionist, and 7,002 for E. P. Allis, greenbacker.


Lycurgus J. Rusk
Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

LYCURGUS J. RUSK, Viroqua, was born in Morgan county, Ohio, March 13, 1852. His father is Jeremiah M. Rusk, formerly member of the United States house of representatives, and at this time is Governor of Wisconsin. His mother was Mary E. Rusk. His literary education was completed at the Wisconsin State University, and his law studies at Dane law school of Harvard College; read law with Cameron & Losey, La Crosse; was admitted to the bar at La Crosse in 1874, and has since been in practice at Viroqua. His firm was at first Rusk & Vinge, and is now Rusk & Wyman. Colonel Rusk is the governor’s private and military secretary and aid-de-camp with the rank of colonel, residing in Madison during the term of his official duties, in the performance of which he is courteous, able and popular.


Thomas J. Shear
(Vernon County – Second District – The towns of Clinton, Forest, Greenwood, Hillsborough, Kickapoo, Liberty, Stark, Union, Viroqua, Webster and Whitestown. Population, 11,894.)
Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1882), page 561; transcribed by Mary Saggio

THOMAS J. SHEAR (Rep.), of Hillsborough, was born in Concord, Erie county, New York, September 25, 1836; he received an academic education; is a merchant; came from New York in 1858 to Hillsborough, where he has continued to reside; enlisted as a private in Co. C, 17th Regt. Wis. Vol. Inf., in 1865; has been town clerk since 1860, with the exception of three years; was elected county superintendent of schools in 1867; was elected member of assembly for 1882, receiving 1,149 votes against 311 for J. L. Joseph, democrat.


William F. Terhune
Source:  The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Nancy Overlander.

WILLIAM F. TERHUNE, Viroqua, was a native of Northumberland, New York, born July 10, 1821.  His grandfather was a soldier in the war of the revolution, and his father an officer in that of 1812.  Until seventeen years of age he was employed upon his father’s farm in summer, and attended the district school in the winter.  He then commenced teaching, which he pursued while dividing his time in attendance at the Troy conference and Castleton academies, Vermont, and Schuylerville and Amsterdam academies, New York.  During his academic course he was selected to deliver three valedictory addresses.  In 1843 he entered Union College, but want of means prevented his graduating.  He then resumed teaching, which he pursued until 1846, when he commenced the study of the law in the office of P.H. Sylvester, Coxsackie, New York, and was enabled to complete his course, by means derived from filling the office of county superintendent of schools for Green county, to which he was chosen in 1846.  He was admitted to the bar of the supreme court at Albany in 1848, and commenced practice at Athens.  He superintended taking the census of 1850 for the southern district of New York.  On August 5, 1851, Judge Terhune landed in Wisconsin, and became a pioneer at Viroqua, where he has since resided, in the practice of his profession.  He has been county judge, member of the assembly, court commissioner, chairman of the board of supervisors, and filled various other offices in the county.


Louis Tollefron
Source:  The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Nancy Overlander.

LOUIS TOLLEFRON, Viroqua, was born in Norway, June 28, 1851; was educated in Iowa and Wisconsin; attended the La Crosse Business College in 1872 and 1873; read law with H. P. Proctor at Viroqua; was admitted to the bar at Viroqua, October 26, 1881, and is in practice with H. P. Proctor at Viroqua.


Ovis B. Wyman
Source:  The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Nancy Overlander.

OVIS B. WYMAN, Viroqua, was born in the State of Vermont, was educated at Wisconsin State University; read law at Viroqua; was admitted to the bar at Viroqua in 1878; is in practice with Colonel L. J. Rusk at Viroqua, the firm being Rusk & Wyman; has filled the office of county superintendent of schools, and that of district attorney for the county of Vernon.


David C. Yakey
Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1880) transcribed by RuthAnne Wilke

DAVID C. YAKEY (Rep.),---Post office address, Bloomingdale, Brown county, was born May 31, 1830, in Loudon county, Virginia; had a common school education; is a farmer; came to Wisconsin in 1836; held various local offices; volunteered August 14. 18 2, in Co. A., 25th Wis. Vol. Inf.; was in the seige of Vicksburg; with Sherman on the Meridian March, and through the Atlanta campaign, and till the war closed.  Was elected assemblyman for 1880 by 977 votes against 1 9 for Henry O'Connell, Democrat, and 287 for G. W. Gregory, Greenbacker.


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