Washington County, Wisconsin
Biographies

H. T. Adams
Town of Hartford
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 578, submitted by Mary Saggio.

H. T. ADAMS, stock-dealer; business established in 1862; handles from $25,000 to $30,000 worth of stock per month. Mr. Adams was born in Lancaster, Coos Co., N. H., March 31, 1835; is the son of Harvey and Nancy Adams; he learned the blacksmith's trade, in his native State, and followed that business several years; came to Wisconsin in 1860, and located in Hartford, and opened a blacksmith's shop; continued the business only one year, when he quit it to engage in the stock business; has followed this business successfully since that time. He was married in Vermont, in Guildhall, Essex Co., Sept. 20, 1857, to Miss Estelle L. Rodgers, daughter of Moses Rodgers; Mrs. Adams was born in Vermont.


Henry Ahlers
Town of Trenton
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 727, submitted by Mary Saggio.

HENRY AHLERS farmer, Sec. 30; P. O. West Bend. Has 132 acres of land lying partly in West Bond and partly in Trenton. Was born in Oldenburg, Germany, Sept. 8, 1818; came to the United States in 1852, and direct to Wisconsin; settled in the town of Trenton, Washington Co. He was married Feb. 26, 1853, at Cedarburg, to Miss Dorette Windler, daughter of Frederick Windler; Mrs. Ahlers was born in Hanover, Germany; they have had seven children, of whom only three are living — Frederick H., married to Miss Sophia Williams, and residing in Minnesota; Henry C. and John B. Mr. Ahlers has one of the best cultivated farms in his section of the county.


Mathias Altenhofen
Town of Kewaskum
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 728, submitted by Mary Saggio.

MATHIAS ALTENHOFEN (Kewaskum Village); son of John and Anna Altenhofen; was born Aug. 31,1831; came to America in June, 1847, with his parents, and located in the town of North Bend, Washington Co., Sec. 2 (now Kewaskum); shortly afterward, the subject of this sketch went to the village of Salisbury (now Barton), and engaged as an employe in the saw-mill of Barton Salisbury; continued this employment only one year, and then accepted a position as clerk in the store of Russel Holmes of the same place; after two years' service with Mr. Holmes, he engaged as clerk with Moses Weil, and continued that connection till 1855, when he came to Meyer's Mill, now Kewaskum Village, and, in company with Mazon Hirsch, opened a general store; carried on that business about eighteen months, and then sold out to Mr. Hirsch; six months later, Mr. Altenhofen, formed a partnership with Henry Backhause, and, buying Mr. Hirsch out, they continued the business till 1857, when Mr. A. sold out his interest in that establishment and began business in the same line alone. He was elected Chairman of the town of Kewaskum in 1857, and held that office, and that of Town Clerk alternately with James Carrell for twelve years; was a member of the Wisconsin Legislature in 1860, from the Northern District of Washington Co.; was appointed Deputy United States Marshal in 1860, to take the census in the north half of Washington Co. Mr. A. was married in the town of Kewaskum to Miss Theresa Weis, daughter of Anton Weis. Mrs. Altenhofen was born in Bavaria, Germany; four children were born to them—Anton, married to Louisa Schneider, and residing in Kewaskum; Charles, married to Hanna Boegel, and also a resident of Kewaskum; Nicholas, of Colorado, and Sophia. Mrs. Altenhofen died June 6, 1866. Mr. A. was married in Kewaskum Village, Sept. 15, 1867, to Miss Barbara Uelmer, daughter of John Uelmer. Mrs. Altenhofen was born in Prussia; they have five children—Albert N., Rosa, John, Susanna and Jacob. On the completion of the railroad through the village, Mr. Altenhofen built the first elevator, and began buying wheat for several years, he bought on an average 800,000 bushels of grain annually, while he was selling through his store about $40,000 worth of goods yearly. After operating a few years very successfully in wheat and amassing a very comfortable fortune, like many others who have trodden the same paths, he got caught at last, and saw his many thousands swept away in a few weeks. Dec. 7, 1878, he settled with his creditors, turning over everything he had left. Two years previously, he had rented the building which he now occupies, and established his son in the liquor business. On his closing up in the mercantile business, he took his son's place in the saloon, where he is doing a good business.


C. G. Amidon
Town of Hartford
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 578, submitted by Mary Saggio.

C. G. AMIDON, manufacturer of and dealer in gloves and mittens, and tanner of deer skins and furs, Hartford; business established in the fall of 1879; manufactures about 300 dozens of pairs of gloves and mittens annually; has tanned since commencing about 5,000 skins. The subject of this sketch was born in Hartford April 22, 1850; is the son of Elisha and Augustine (Butler) Amidon; learned the cabinet-maker's trade in Clark Co., Wis. Was married at Monterey, Dodge Co., April 15, 1873, to Miss Eliza Cook, daughter of Henry Cook; Mrs. Amidon was born in Mayville, Wis. The winter following his marriage, he started in the pump business with Frank Fox, at Plymouth, and shortly afterward they took in Mr. Dockstader as partner, the firm being Dockstader, Fox & Co. In about two years he sold out, and went into the same business with Mr. Miller in the same town; continued that business two years; next went to Beloit in February, 1879, and engaged to run a tannery, for the tanning of deer skins and furs; eight months later he returned to Hartford and opened in his present business. In the winter 1880-81, he opened a glove and mitten store at Milwaukee, which he ran that winter.


Willard R. Amidon
Town of Hartford
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 578, submitted by Mary Saggio.

WILLARD R. AMIDON, jeweler and watchmaker, Hartford; business established August, 1876; average value of stock and fixtures, $2,000. Mr. Amidon is a native of the town of Hartford; is the son of Elisha and Augustine (Butler) Amidon, and was born April 18, 1856; in 1874, he learned the watchmaker's trade, and in August, 1876, opened his present store.


E. M. Anderson
Town of Hartford
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 578, submitted by Mary Saggio.

E. M. ANDERSON, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Hartford; has 61 acres of land; is the son of Samuel and Betsey Anderson; he was born in the town of Hartford, Washington Co., Oct. 21, 1849; spent his early years on his father's farm, and in 1872 began teaching school; has taught nine years, three of which were devoted to the graded school of Hartford Village. He was married, Dec. 27, 1876, in Chicago, to Rosine Bertie, daughter of D. S. and Matilda Bertie; Mrs. Anderson was born in Dodge Co.; they have two children—Bertie S. and Guy.


Samuel Anderson
Town of Hartford
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 578, submitted by Mary Saggio.

SAMUEL ANDERSON, farmer, Sec. 5; P. O. Hartford; has 80 acres; was born in Rome, Oneida Co., N. Y., November, 1817; son of Jacob P. and Catharine Anderson. He was married in 1838 to Miss Betsey Hoard; six children were born to them; the eldest, Eugene M., married Rosine Bertie, and lives in the town of Hartford; Mary died when 5 years of age; Albert was a member of Capt. Bissel's Company, 29th W. V. I., and served in the late war; his death occurred in hospital at Vicksburg, in 1862. Hannah is now Mrs. Charles Amidon, of Clark Co., Wis.; Ellen is the wife of Alden Moffatt, also of Clark Co.; Alvira is Mrs. Andrew Jones; Theresa is the wife of James Mallory, of Trempealeau Co. Mr. Anderson has been a member of the Town Board of Hartford six terms.


Louis A. Arnold
Source: The Wisconsin Blue Book (1919) page 463; submitted by FoFG mz

LOUIS A. ARNOLD (Soc.) is secretary of the Socialist party of Wisconsin. He was born in Booneville, Ind., July 13, 1872, and four months later his parents moved to Newbury, Washington county, Wis., where he attended the common schools. He was graduated from the West Bend high school and taught school one year and then entered the employ of the Vilter Manufacturing Co., Milwaukee and was engaged in erecting ice and refrigerating plants. He was alderman of the 17th ward, Milwaukee, 1908 to 1911 and tax commissioner 1912 to 1916. He was elected to the senate in 1914 and reelected in 1918, receiving 4,730 votes to 4,532 for David Love (Rep.).


Dr. M. L. Barney
Town of Hartford
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 578, submitted by Mary Saggio.

DR. M. L. BARNEY, dental surgeon, Hartford; is the son of Leverett and Emeline (Wing) Barney; was born in Geauga Co., Ohio, Oct. 2, 1842; came to Dodge Co., Wis., in 1865; studied dentistry with Dr. R. C. Newton, of Sheboygan Falls, in whose office he spent two years. In 1868, he came to Hartford, and established himself. He was married in Hartford, Dec. 22, 1867, to Miss Paulina Green daughter of Lewis and Susan (Streeter) Green; Mrs. Barney was born in Portage Co., Ohio; they have four children—Mont L., Gad W., Frederick A. and Clara A


Samuel Stebbins Barney
West Bend
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 551, submitted by Mary Saggio.

SAMUEL S. BARNEY, of the law firm of Barney & Kuechenmeister, son of John and Adeline A. (Knox) Barney, was born in the town of Hartford, Washington Co., Wis., Jan. 31, 1846, and is said to be the oldest living white person born in that town. His parents were New England people, who came to Wisconsin in 1842, and located at Prairieville, now Waukesha. October, 1845, they moved to Town 10, Range 18, now Hartford. S. S. was educated at Lombard University, Galesburg, Ill. On completing his course, in the fall of 1867, he engaged as Principal of the High School of Hartford, which position he held five years. In the summer of 1871, he moved to West Bend, and commenced the study of law in the office of Frisby & Weil, of West Bend. During the first year of his law studies, they were pursued during vacations at Hartford, and at leisure hours while teaching. Was admitted to the bar in March, 1873, and to the Supreme Court in May, 1874, at which time he became a partner of the law firm of Frisby, Weil & Barney, which connection was continued until October, 1879, when he withdrew, and formed a partnership with Mr. I. N. Frisby, under the firm name of Frisby & Barney; this partnership was dissolved in the fall of 1880, by mutual consent; on December 1 of this year, the existing partnership of Barney & Kuechenmeister was formed. Mr. Barney was Superintendent of Schools of Washington Co. four years, commencing Jan. 1, 1876. Was married, May 18, 1876, at West Bend, to Miss Ellen S. McHenry, daughter of Col. D. and Sarah (Hurlbut) McHenry; Mrs. Barney was born in New York; two children were born to them—John and Sarah C.

Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin History and Biography, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed publisher (1882) transcribed by Susan Geist

SAMUEL STEBBINS BARNEY, West Bend, is a native of Wisconsin, and was born at Hartford, Washington county, January 31, 1846. His father, John Barney, and also his mother, whose maiden name was Adeline A. Knox, were of New England parentage. Mr. Barney received his education at Lombard University, Galesburg, Illinois. He studied law at West Bend, Wisconsin, in the office of Frisby & Weil, and was admitted to the bar in the spring of 1871. For five years, from 1874 to 1879, he was a member of the firm of Frisby, Weil & Barney, associated as a partner in the firm with which he studied. He is now the senior member of the firm of Barney & Kuechenmeister, at West Bend. Mr. Barney was four years the county superintendent of school, of Washington county, his term of office having commenced January 1, 1876.

Source: "A Biographical congressional directory From the 1st ( 1774) to the 62nd (1911) Congress"; By United States Congress; Publ. 1918; Transcribed for Genealogy Trails by Andrea Stawski Pack


Barney, Samuel Stebbins, a Representative from Wisconsin; born in Hartford, Washington County, Wis., January 31, 1846, attended the public schools, and Lombard university, Galesburg, Ill.; taught in the high school in Hartford for four years; began the study of law in West Bend in 1870 and was admitted to practice in 1873; superintendent of schools of Washington county 18761880; delegate in the Republican national convention in Chicago; elected as a Republican to the Fifty-fourth, Fifty-fifth, Fifty-sixth, and Fifty-seventh Congresses (March 4, 1895-March 3, 1903); appointed judge of the Court of Claims, Washington, D. C, in 1904.

Source: "Herringshaw's National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States", by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar

Barney, Samuel Stebbins, educator, lawyer, jurist, congressman, was born Jan. 31, 1846, in Hartford, Wis. He was educated in the public schools and at Lombard university of Galesburg, Ill.; and taught in the high school of Hartford for four years. From 1873 he practiced his profession at West Bend, Wis. He filled the office of superintendent of schools of Washington county in 1876-1880. In 1895-1903 he was a representative from Wisconsin to the fifty-fourth, fifty-fifth, fifty-sixth and fifty-seventh congresses; and declined a re-nomination. Since 1905 he has been an associate judge of the United States court of claims at Washington, D.C.


George L. Bastian
West Bend
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 551, submitted by Mary Saggio.

GEORGE L. BASTIAN, general blacksmithing, wagon and carriage-making; shop established in 1871; employs three men. Mr. Bastian was born in that part of the town of West Bend now Barton, Wis., Jan, 26, 1849; son of Joseph and Elizabeth Bastian; the father was from Stromberg and the mother from Wintersheim, Germany, and came to America in 1844. The subject of this sketch learned his trade in young America, beginning in 1864 and serving three years; worked in the wagon-shop one year; then came to West Bend Village and worked a few months; next went to Savannah, Ill., where he worked at his trade two years; at the expiration of that time he went to Prairie du Chien, where he remained a few months; then, in 1871, he returned to West Bend and opened his present shop. He was married in the town of Barton, Jan. 9, 1872, to Miss Anna Winkler, daughter of Phillip Winkler; Mrs. Bastian was born on Long Island Sound, N. Y.; they have one child (by adoption) Hanna Mayer Bastian, adopted in 1873.


Jacob Bastian, Jr.
West Bend
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 551, submitted by Mary Saggio.

JACOB BASTIAN, Jr., farmer and agent for the sale of farm machinery, Sec. 16; P. O. West Bend; son of John Jacob and Elizabeth (Braun) Bastian; was born in Cleveland, Ohio, Nov. 19, 1844; came to Wisconsin with his parents in 1845, and direct to the town of West Bend, where they made their home on Sec. 14. Mr. Bastian has served six terms as Constable, and is serving in that capacity at this writing. He was married in the town of Trenton, Feb. 26, 1867, to Miss Margaret Arnet, daughter of Henry and Catharine (Arnet) Arnet. Mrs. Bastian was born in Bavaria, Germany; they have three children—Henry, Jacob and George. In 1868, he located on his present farm, Sec. 16, where he owns 60 acres, 20 of which are in the town of Barton.


John Jacob Bastian, Sr.
Town of Barton
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 710, submitted by Mary Saggio.

JOHN JACOB BASTIAN, Sr., Barton; son of Sebastian and Christine Bastian; was born in Rhine Province, Prussia, Feb. 26, 1817; learned the tanner's trade. Was married, Feb. 3, 1844, to Miss Elizabeth Braun, daughter of Peter and Christine Braun. In 1844, they came to America; made their home in Cleveland, Ohio, till August, 1846, when they moved to Washington Co., and settled on wild land, on Sec. 14, town of West Bend, now a part of the village of West Bend. Mr. Bastian and family were the first Germans to locate within the present limits of the village of West Bend; after one year's residence at this place, they moved to the town of Barton, Sec. 8, where they still live. Six children were born to them—John Jacob, the eldest, was born in Cleveland, Ohio; married Margaret Arnet, and is now a resident of the town of West Bend. Emma was the wife of Mathias Baes, and died March 26, 1878, leaving three children. George L. married Mary Winkler, and is a blacksmith of West Bend; Henry C. married Catharine Glass, and is a resident of the town of Barton, has five children; Herman, married to Mary Paff, has one child, resides at West Bend; H. Augustus married Magdalene Holemass, and is a wagon-maker of West Bend. Mr. Bastian had purchased 200 acres of land on Sec. 8, but has deeded all to his children except 8 acres, which he reserves for a homestead. He has served six years as Treasurer of the town of Barton, being the first German to hold that office; has also served as Assessor one year.


Joseph Bauer
West Bend
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 552, submitted by Mary Saggio.

JOSEPH BAUER, farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. West Bend; settled in the county in 1855; has 214 acres of land. He is the son of John and Elizabeth Bauer; was born in Rhine, Bavaria, Germany, May 1, 1843, and came to the United States, and directly to Wisconsin, in 1855, making his home in the town of West Bend. He was married, Jan. 18, 1870, at the village of West Bend, to Miss Gertrude Wagner, a daughter of Phillip and Ann M. Wagner; have eight children, seven sons and one daughter— John, Stephen, Henry, Phillip, Frank, Peter, George and Katie, the two last being twins. Mr. Bauer has served as a member of Board of Supervisors for the town of West Bend two years.


Henry Baumgartner
Town of Richfield
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 732, submitted by Mary Saggio.

HENRY BAUMGARTNER, proprietor of saloon, and junior partner of the firm of Schuster & Baumgartner, manufacturers of cheese, Richfield; the latter business was established in the fall of 1881; capacity of factory, 60,000 pounds of cheese annually. Mr. B. was born in Baden, Germany, July 11,1840; is the son of Victor and Mary Baumgartner; he came to America with his parents in 1846, and located in Germantown, Wis.; lived there till 1856, when he came to the town of Richfield, Washington Co., and settled on a farm; Jan. 12, 1876, he moved to the village of Richfield and engaged in the saloon business; in the fall of 1881, he formed a partnership with Leonard Schuster, in the cheese business. He was married, in Germantown, Jan. 7, 1863, to Miss Catharine Mereckel, daughter of George Mereckel; Mrs. Baumgartner was born in Germantown, Wis.; they have five children—Leonard, Annie, Lena, Margaret and Henry; they have lost three sons and one daughter—John, aged 3 months; Charles, 3 years; Jacob, 2 years; Mary Ann, died in childhood.


Alfred G. Becker
Source: The Wisconsin Blue Book (1919) page 505; submitted by FoFG mz

ALFRED G. BECKER (Rep.), a member of the assembly committee on public welfare, was born on a farm in the town of Addison, Washington county, Aug. 24, 1887. He was educated in the district and parochial school and the Hartford high school and after teaching four years in Washington county engaged in dairy farming and the breeding of pure bred Holstein cattle. He served as chairman of his town for four years and was elected to the assembly in 1918, receiving 2,184 votes to 1,298 for John A. Schwalbach (Dem.) and 1,106 for John Schubert (Soc).


Edward Reed Blake
Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1883) page: 483; transcribed by Tammy Clark

EDWARD REED BLAKE (Dem.), of Port Washington, was born in Franklin, Mass., November 28, 1844; received a common school and commercial college education; is a general merchant, lumber and grain dealer; came to Wisconsin in 1848 and settled at Port Washington; enlisted as private in Co. H., 24th Wis. Vol. Inf., August 13, 1862; promoted color sergeant July 21, 1863; 1st lieutenant, June 2, 1864; participated in the battles of Perryville, Ky., Stone River, Tenn., Chicamauga, Mission Ridge, Dundridge, Rockyface Ridge, Resaca, Calhoun, Adairville, Dallas, Lost Mountain, Kenesaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, Siege of Atlanta, Jonesboro, Lovejoy Station, Spring Hill, Franklin, Nashville and the pursuit of Hood’s army of Lexington, Ala.; was mustered out June 10, 1865; has been school director since 1879; was member of assembly in 1874, and was elected state senator in 1882 without opposition.


Dr. Otto Boesewetter
West Bend
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 552, submitted by Mary Saggio.

DR. OTTO BOESEWETTER, veterinary surgeon, was born in Saxony, Germany, Feb. 18, 1840. Began his education in his native land; came to the United States with his father, and directly to Milwaukee, Wis., in 1854; spending one year in that city, he then came to the town of West Bend in 1855, where his father purchased 400 acres of land; remaining only one year in West Bend, he then went to St. Louis, Mo., where he studied for the profession of veterinary surgeon. In the spring of 1861, at the first call for volunteers for the late war, he enlisted in Co. C, 9th Ill. V. I. After one month's service, he was detailed to the Western Department as 1st Assistant Veterinary Surgeon under Dr. Volintin; was discharged in 1862 for disability. He returned to Illinois, and was married in Ogle Co. June 19, 1862, to Miss Sophia Runkwitz, daughter of Charles and Dorothea Runkwitz. Mrs. B. was born in St. Clair Co., Ill.; they have had eight children, of whom four only are living—Oscar (deceased), Johanna, Richard (deceased), Emma, Albina (deceased), Thekla (deceased), Edward and Hattie. The Doctor practiced his profession in St. Clair Co., Ill., until 1868, when he moved to West Bend and established a hospital, which is the only one in the county; since locating here, he has by successful treatment of the cases intrusted to him, acquired a reputation that has extended his practice far beyond the limits of his own county. The Doctor has served as Coroner of Washington Co. eight years. The Doctor's father was a physician and surgeon, and practiced twenty-eight years in Germany previous to coming to America in 1854. He practiced one year in Milwaukee, one at West Bend, and then moved to St. Louis, Mo.; a short time ago, he met with an accident that disabled him for active service; at that time, he had been in the practice of his profession fifty years, and was considered a skillful and successful physician.


Peter Boden
West Bend
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 552, submitted by Mary Saggio.

PETER BODEN, Sheriff of Washington Co., Wis., proprietor of Germania Hall, Billiard and Sample Rooms; was born in Prussia July 25, 1829; son of John and Margaret (Schmal) Boden; came to the United States, and directly to Wisconsin, in 1843, with his parents; located in Germantown, Washington Co.; three years later, came to West Bend and engaged in farming. Was married in the town of Barton, Nov. 12, 1853, to Miss Margaret Deutsch, daughter of Michael and Margaret (Stein) Deutsch; they have had five children, of whom only two are living—George P. is Under Sheriff of Washington Co., residence, West Bend; John died when 7 years of age; Susan died when 5 years old; Mathias P. is a clerk in B. Goetter's store, West Bend; Peter died when 3 years of age. Mr. Boden was Supervisor of Barton two years; moved to West Bend and served as Village Trustee four years; was Under Sheriff during 1874 and 1875—Under Sheriff to Louis Miller; was elected Sheriff in 1880 for the years 1881 and 1882.


Peter Boden
West Bend
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 552, submitted by Mary Saggio.

PETER BODEN, farmer, Sec. 18; P. O. Aurora; has 180 acres of land; was born in Prussia Sept. 2, 1833; son of Joseph and Lena Boden; came to America in 1853, and direct to Washington Co., Wis., and settled on his present farm. Mr. Boden was married at West Bend April 20, 1857, to Chriwa Bever. Mrs. Boden is a native of Germany; they have eight children—Joseph, John, Lena, Susanna, Peter, Catharine. Margaret and Anna.


Michael Bohan
West Bend
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 553, submitted by Mary Saggio.

MICHAEL BOHAN, editor of the West Bend Democrat, was born in College Hill, parish of Templemore, County of Tipperary, Ireland, June 22, 1832; son of Michael and Annastasia (Russell) Bohan; came to the United States with his parents in May, 1846, located in the town of Hartford, Washington Co., and engaged in farming. He received an academic education at Notre Dame, Ind.; was engaged in teaching from 1851 to 1859; during 1859-60, served as Deputy Clerk of the County Board of Supervisors, Washington Co.; was elected Clerk of the County Board for the term of 1861-62, and re-elected each successive term until 1871, and during his term of office made his home at West Bend; he then purchased an interest in the Fond du Lac weekly Journal and Star job office. During the Greeley campaign he ran a daily called the Daily Journal; continued his connection with this office until the fall of 1873, when he accepted the position of Financial Clerk in the office of the Secretary of State, Peter Doyle, and held that position four years; was then elected Engrossing Clerk of the Assembly. After the close of the session of 1878, he accepted the agency for a school-book publishing company; during the year 1879, he was traveling in the mining regions of Colorado, in the interest of a collection agency; on his return from the West, he acted as shipping-clerk for a Chicago lumber firm until Nov. 12, 1880, when he accepted his present position as editor of the West Bend Democrat. Mr. Bohan was married, at Milwaukee, Sept. 2, 1872, to Miss Elizabeth Claire Baker, of West Bend, daughter of Joseph and Martha (Boddington) Baker. Mrs. Bohan was born in Birmingham, England, in 1849, and came to the United States with her parents in 1854. They have three children—Arthur M., Edmund R. and Martha B.


Michael Bohan, Sr.
Town of Hartford and West Bend
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 552, submitted by Mary Saggio.

MICHAEL BOHAN, Sr. (deceased), was born at College Hill, parish of Templemore, County of Tipperary, Ireland, in 1788. Was married, in 1820, to Annastasia Russell, of the parish of Templetoukey, in the same county. Mr. Bohan was a farmer by occupation, and an earnest Liberal and "Repealer" in politics, being a warm supporter of Daniel O'Connell. In 1846, he immigrated to the United States, being the first farmer of family known to have undertaken the enterprise in that locality. He reached Wisconsin in May, 1846, and located in Washington Co., Town 10, Range 18, afterward called Hartford, where he continued to reside till the date of his death, which occurred April 3, 1864. He left a family of five sons and four daughters—the eldest, Ann, is now Mrs. Francis Russell, of Minnesota; next, John, resides at Ozaukee, Wis.; Daniel is a resident of Minnesota; Michael died in his childhood; Bridget, now Mrs. P. Russell, of Minnesota; Catharine, now Mrs. M. Stapleton, of Trenton, Dodge Co., Wis.; Michael, of West Bend, Wis.; Thomas, of Mankato, Minn.; Mary, now Mrs. P. Filand of Minnesota, and Edward, also of Minnesota. The mother, Mrs. Bohan, died Feb. 8, 1873, at Mankato, Minn. Mr. Bohan, though never active in political matters in his adopted home, was still a very prominent member of the community in his neighborhood, being always in the front in educational matters; was an honored and respected citizen, whose memory is cherished by a large circle of relatives and friends.


Henry Bohn, Sr.
West Bend
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 553, submitted by Mary Saggio.

HENRY BOHN, Sr., farmer, residence Sec. 25; P. O. West Bend; son of Henry and Catharine Bohn; was born in the Rhine country, Bavaria, Oct. 20, 1809. Was married, Jan. 13, 1831, to Miss Catharine Mueller, daughter of John and Elizabeth Mueller; they have had seven children of whom five are living—Eliza, now Mrs. M. Gayhart, of Appleton, Wis.; Catharine, now Mrs. John Wittemann, of the town of West Bend; Anna Mary, now Mrs. F. Lorenz, also of West Bend; Henry, Jr., married to Izora E. Wright, daughter of George W. Wright, Jan. 30, 1872, and resides in the town of West Bend. Mr. Bohn, Sr., came to America with his family in 1854, and located in the town of West Bend. Henry Bohn, Jr., and wife have three children—Henry, Frank J. and Charles G. In the spring of 1881, he was elected a member of the Board of Supervisors for the town of West Bend.


Joseph Bohn
Town of Polk
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 716, submitted by Mary Saggio.

JOSEPH BOHN, farmer, Sec. 1; P. O. Cedar Creek; has 142 acres of land; was born in Bavaria, Germany, May 16, 1823, and is the son of Henry and Catharine (Wine) Bohn; he came to America in 1853; stopped a few months at Detroit, Mich., then came to the town of Polk and settled on Sec. 10, where he continued to reside till 1867, when he removed to his present farm on Sec. 1. He was married in Germany in May, 1845, to Miss Elizabeth Bernhardt; they have twelve children, four of whom were born in Germany, the others in the United States; the eldest—Eliza (is the wife of Mr. H. V. Hicks, of Iowa), Catharine (is the wife of Stephen Lang, of the town of West Bend), Henry, Joseph, Mary (the wife of Valentine Engelhardt, of St. Lawrence, Washington Co.), Frank, Gertrude, John, Peter, Louisa and Benjamin.


Phillip J. Brissel
Town of Polk
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 716, submitted by Mary Saggio.

PHILLIP J. BRISSEL, farmer, Sec. 10; P. O. Cedar Creek; has 95 acres of land; settled in the county in 1848; was born in the Rhenish Province of Hesse-Darmstadt, Nov. 5, 1822; he is the son of Phillip and Eva Brissel, and was brought up a farmer in his native country; in 1843, on the eve of the breaking-out of the revolution, he left Germany and emigrated to the United States; came directly to the town of Polk; he was employed for several years in various occupations, and, in 1859, he purchased and occupied his present farm on Sec. 10. He was married in the town of Polk Dec. 25, 1852, to Miss Catharine Benz, daughter of Henry Benz; she was born in the same province as her husband; they have had five children, of whom four are living—Henry, Louisa (died when 4 years of age), George, Mary and John. Mr. Brissel was elected Chairman of the town of Polk, in 1876, and was reelected in 1876-77-78 and 1880, having served five terms.


Charles A. Bruederle
West Bend
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 553, submitted by Mary Saggio.

CHARLES A. BRUEDERLE, editor and manager of the Deutscher Beobachter, a weekly Democratic German paper, published every Friday, at West Bend, by William F. Weber. This paper was established in October, 1880, and has a circulation of 500 copies. Mr. Bruederle was born in Landau, Bavaria, Germany, Feb. 14, 1854; came to America in 1865, with his mother and family, and direct to Fond du Lac, Wis.; learned the printer's trade in the office of the Fond du Lac Zeitung, published by Theo Friedlander; in 1878, he published a Greenback paper at Fond du Lac, called the Freie Volks Presse; established a branch office at Watertown, with a paper called the Watertown Volks Stimme, and another at New Holstein, called the New Holstein Wochenblatt; the business at Fond du Lac was continued two years; the others, being campaign papers, were short lived; in October, 1880, he engaged in his present enterprise.


S. H. Brunner
Town of Polk
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 716, submitted by Mary Saggio.

S. H. BRUNNER, farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. Cedar Creek; has 56 acres; is a native of Bucks Co., Penn.; is the son of Henry and Elizabeth Brunner, and was born Nov. 4, 1817; when quite young he accompanied his parents to the State of New Jersey, where they resided some time; next lived in the State of New York, and afterward returned to Pennsylvania, and resided in Philadelphia. He was married in Easton, Penn., in 1855, to Miss Anna M. Geitler; they have six children—William W., Andrew J., Anna M., Alvina and Emma; Lehman H. died in childhood. Mr. Brunner and family moved to .New York, and from there came to Madison, Wis., in 1856; remained there only a short time, and then moved to the town of Hartford, Washington Co.; located on Sec. 1; after a residence of seven years on that farm, he moved to another in the same town, and from there to his present place of residence in 1863. Mr. Brunner has served one term as Chairman of the town of Polk; the children were all born in Wisconsin.


John Buch
Town of Polk
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 717, submitted by Mary Saggio.

JOHN BUCH, proprietor of hotel, Cedar Creek; has 80 acres of land lying a half mile south of the village; he is a native of Rhino Province, Prussia; is the son of Adam and Katie Buch, and was born Sept. 12, 1836; he emigrated to America in 1857, and came directly to the town of Polk, where he settled on 40 acres of land in Sec. 10; he followed farming till 1863, when he went to Chicago and spent four years clerking in a grocery store; he then returned to the town of Polk, sold his 40 acres, and purchased the 80 acres which he now owns on Sec. 2. He was married in Schleisingerville, in 1858, to Miss Lizzie Kelser, who was a native of Germany; they had two children—Katie and John. Mrs. Buch died early in 1868. Mr. Buch married Miss Kone Frees, daughter of John Frees, July 4, 1868; she is a native of Germany; they have five children—Joseph, Peter, Charles, Jacob and Rosa. In 1875, Mr. Buch moved to Cedar Creek and purchased the Cedar Creek House, still retaining his farm; he served as Treasurer of the town of Polk in 1876; has served one term as Treasurer of School District No. 1, and is now on the second.


John Buckreus
Town of Hartford
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), pages 578-579, submitted by Mary Saggio.

JOHN BUCKREUS, carpenter and joiner, and Assessor of the town of Hartford, residence in the village; was born in Bavaria, Germany, Feb. 29, 1828; is the son of Samuel and Margaret Buckreus. He learned the carpenter's trade with his father in his native country, also learned the glazier's trade. In 1849, he came to America, arriving in New York City September 5; he proceeded to Honesdale, Penn., where he opened a cabinet-shop, and continued that business four years, when he was burned out; he then came to Milwaukee in November, 1853, and from there to Hartford, Washington Co.; made his home on Sec. 25 about a year and a half, and then moved to the village where he has since resided and carried on the business of carpenter and builder; he was elected and served one year as Treasurer of the town of Hartford; he was next elected Assessor in 1879, and re-elected in 1880-81; is now serving his third term. He was married, Nov. 1, 1849, in Pennsylvania, to Miss Eva Geiger, daughter of John Geiger. They have six children—Agnes, Mary and Lizzie (twins), Margaret, John and Rosa. Margaret is now Mrs. Peter Schwartz, of Hartford.


John Burckhardt
West Bend
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 553, submitted by Mary Saggio.

JOHN BURCKHARDT, proprietor of livery and sale stable; business established in 1874; capital invested, $2,500. Mr. B. was born in the village of West Bend July 12, 1849; son of John and Katharine (Schenkal) Burckardt; received a common-school education, and spent his early years in his father's hotel, the Farmer's Home, at West Bend, which they kept for twenty-five years. In 1870, they traded the hotel property with Dr. Ottli for other property. In 1868, Mr. John B. started a soda-water factory; this was the first of the kind in the place; continued this business till 1874, when he sold out and engaged in his present business. Mr. Burckardt was married, in September, 1878, to Augusta Horn, daughter of Frederick Horn, of Jackson, Washington Co., where Mrs. B. was born; they have two children—Laura and John. Mr. B. has served as Constable three terms.


H. K. Butterfield
Town of Hartford
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 579, submitted by Mary Saggio.

H. K. BUTTERFIELD, attorney at law, Hartford; is the son of W. H. and Caroline {White) Butterfield; was born in Horicon Aug. 27, 1857; received his education at the high school of Horicon, and at the State University at Madison; went to Memphis, Tenn., and spent two years as a law student in the office of his uncle, Judge James O. Pierce, of the Circuit Court of Shelby Co.; having passed a regular examination before Judges W. R. McDowell and J. E. R. Ray, of the Chancellor and Criminal Courts, he was admitted to the bar in the spring of 1879; he then returned to Wisconsin and practiced law with District Attorney James B. Hays, of Horicon; was with him two years, and then in June, 1881, he came to Hartford and established himself in the practice of his profession at that place. When only 23 years of age, he was a candidate for District Attorney of Dodge Co. on the Republican ticket; he made a good run, and but for his party being in a hopeless minority would have been elected.


Dr. J. Warren Cameron
West Bend
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 553, submitted by Mary Saggio.

DR. J. WARREN CAMERON, physician and dental surgeon; son of Richard and Jane (Youngs) Cameron; was born in Chautauqua Co., N. Y., July 6, 1846. In the summer of that year, he came with his parents to Walworth Co., Wis.; when 3 years of age, he removed with his family to Sun Prairie, Dane Co., where he received a common-school education. In 1876, he commenced the study of medicine at the Hahnemann Medical College of Chicago (a homoeopathic institute); took a two-years' course of lectures and received his diploma in 1878. He then established himself in practice at Waukon, Iowa, where he remained until Sept. 3, 1879, when he came to West Bend and entered upon the practice of his profession, practicing both in medicine and dentistry. He was married, May 23, 1881, at West Bend, to Miss Emma M. Lange, daughter of Jacob and Amelia Lange. Mrs. Cameron was born in St. Louis, Mo.


Clement C. Campbell
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Renae Donaldson

CAMPBELL Clement C, St Paul. Res 220 Nelson av. Minister of religion. Born Dec 25 1851 in Waushara county Wis, son of Rev D A and Electa L (Soper) Campbell. Married Aug 16, 1883 to Elizabeth J Laning. Educated in public schools Pine River Wis and graduated B S Ripon (Wis) College 1882; Chicago Theological Seminary 1882-84; Yale Theological Seminary 1884-85; B D same 1885; town supt of schools Granby Conn 1885-1890; pres Northern Wis Home Missionary Society and trustee Ashland Academy 1894-98; treas Wis Convention 1903-1904; held pastorates in Congregational churches in Granby Conn 1885-90; Nacedah Wis 1890-91; Antigo Wis 1891-98; Hartford Wis 1898-1901; Madison Wis 1901-1904 and has been pastor of Plymouth Congregational church St Paul 1904 to date.


James Carrel
Town of Kewaskum
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 728, submitted by Mary Saggio.

JAMES CARREL, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Kewaskum; was born at Waltham, Addison Co., Vt., in 1822, where he resided till 1843; he was educated at Castleman Academy, Rutland Co.; came to Washington Co. in the spring of 1848, and settled on his present farm, which he purchased of H. S. Crass, then a resident of Milwaukee. His wife was formerly Louisa Sherbonnow, born in Vermont, of French descent; they have four children—Louisa, now Mrs. Daniel McQueen; Adella and Estella (twins), and Emma. Mr. Carrel is one of the prominent men of Kewaskum; he has held several town offices; he was Town Clerk for several years; he is the present Chairman of the Town Board, a position he has held since 1873; has also been Chairman of the County Board of Washington Co. for the last four years.


David Casey
Town of Kewaskum
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 728, submitted by Mary Saggio.

DAVID CASEY, farmer, Sec. 19; P. O. Kewaskum; son of Daniel Casey, who was born in County Cork, Ireland, in 1808; came to this country in 1835, settled in Boston, Mass., and removed to Milwaukee in 1849; he was engaged in railroad construction for many years; he purchased a farm in the town of Kewaskum in 1849, where he settled in 1852; he died July 8, 1881. David was born in Boston in 1836; he now owns the homestead farm. Has been Deputy Sheriff for several years. He is unmarried; his parents have had five children—three living—David, Johanna and Ellen.


Chris Coerper
Town of Hartford
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 579, submitted by Mary Saggio.

CHRIS COERPER, blacksmith, wagon and carriage maker, Hartford; manufactures about twenty wagons and buggies annually; deals in wood and coal, and is proprietor of a stone-quarry situated in the village, which he has operated two years; established his business in Hartford in 1861. Mr. Coerper was born in Bavaria, Germany, Jan. 8, 1832; son of Conrad and Christine (Waechter) Coerper. Learned the blacksmith trade in his native country; came to the United States in 1851, and located in Milwaukee; in 1855, he opened a shop for himself in the blacksmithing, wagon and carriage business, which he carried on until 1861, when he came to Hartford and established his present business. He was married in Milwaukee, Nov. 17, 1855, to Miss Magdalena Gross; they have had eight children —John C., married to Miss Addie Johns, and residing in Hartford; Lena, now Mrs. John G. Liver, of Hartford; Henry J., Edward, George, William, Christopher (deceased), Arthur. Mr. Coerper was one of the leading citizens in the organization of the first fire department, and was elected Foreman of the Hook and Ladder Company, which position he has held to this date, with the exception of two years.


Thomas Cooney
Town of Hartford
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 579, submitted by Mary Saggio.

THOMAS COONEY, farmer. Sec. 29; P. O. Hartford; has 40 acres of land; is a native of Kildare, Ireland; was born near Dublin, Sept. 8, 1833; he is the son of Richard and Mary Cooney. In 1854, he emigrated to the United States, spending six months in the city of New York, and then came to Wisconsin and located in the town of Hartford with his parents. In March, 1862, he enlisted in United States Navy; served three years and four months; during a large portion of the time, he was stationed at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. He was married in Hartford, Oct. 15, 1866, to Miss Mary Grady, daughter of Michael Grady. They have six children—Mary, Eliza, Richard, James, William and Anna.


Hon. Hopewell Coxe
Town of Hartford
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), pages 579-580, submitted by Mary Saggio.

HON. HOPEWELL COXE (deceased); was born in Northumberland, Northumberland Co., Penn., June 28, 1812; son of Samuel Coxe; he received a common-school education, and in 1832 commenced the study of law with Judge Ellis Lewis, of Williamsport, Penn., a man of prominence in the legal profession of that place. Mr. Coxe was admitted to the bar in 1838, and in 1839 entered upon the practice of his profession in Williamsport in company with Robert Fleming; in 1842, he removed to the State of Kentucky, where he spent some three years; in the spring of 1845, he came to Wisconsin, first stopping a short time in Milwaukee, and then proceeding to Cedarburg, Washington Co., in 1846; in the fall of that year, he was elected County or Probate Judge of Washington Co.; was re-elected, and held the office eight years; he is said to have tried the first law suit in Cedarburg, holding his court in the schoolhouse; he was elected as one of the Representatives of Washington Co. (which then included what is now Ozaukee), in the Constitutional Convention of 1846, and served on the Committee on Suffrage and Elective Franchise; possessed of more than average abilities, he proved an influential member of that body, and was highly respected by his associates; after the State government was established, Mr. Coxe served in the Assembly; during the session of 1857, he represented the southern district of Washington Co.; in 1852, he removed from Cedarburg to Hartford, where he purchased a farm adjacent to the village, and devoted considerable attention to fruit growing; he opened an office in the village, and practiced his profession until the time of his death, which occurred June 16, 1864. Mr. Coxe was married in Milwaukee, June 9, 1847, to Miss Amelia Ludwig, daughter of Henry and Wilhelmina (Gluer) Ludwig. They had three children—the eldest, Charles H. was married, Nov. 18, 1874, to Miss Laura Peck, and resides in Hartford; the second, Josephene, is the wife of Judge H. W. Sawyer; the youngest son, H. D., is living at home. Mrs. Coxe makes her home in the village of Hartford.


I. S. Crowfoot
Town of Hartford
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 580, submitted by Mary Saggio.

I. S. CROWFOOT, proprietor of apiary, and manufacturer of apiarian supplies; dealer in bees and queens, Hartford; commenced in the bee business in 1856; was the first to introduce the Italian bees into this part of the country; has had as many as 900 swarms at a time; in the past year lost 500 swarms, the season having been generally disastrous to bees; he is now restocking rapidly. In 1880, he built a steam factory for the manufacture of bee-hives and apiarian supplies. He was born in Norfolk, England, in 1834, and, in the fall of the following year, came with his parents to the United States; made their home in Oswego Co., N. Y., till 1845, then moved to the town of Rubicon, Dodge Co., Wis., where Mr. C. continued to reside till 1861, when he moved to Hartford; lived in this place four years; then returned to Rubicon. He was married, April 30, 1868, at Hartford, to Miss Mary Bowen, daughter of George Bowen. Mrs. Crowfoot was born in Erie, N. Y. They have an adopted child, a daughter, named Stella. Mr. Crowfoot returned to Hartford in the spring of 1880, and engaged in the manufacture of apiarian supplies.


William S. Davis
Town of Barton
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 710, submitted by Mary Saggio.

WILLIAM S. DAVIS, of the firm of Woodford & Davis, proprietors of steam saw and planing mill, Young America, town of Barton; was born in the town of Verona, Oneida Co. N. Y., June 23, 1831; son of William and Sally (Quimby) Davis. Mr. D. came to Washington Co. in May, 1850, and made his home in Waubeka, now Ozaukee Co.; in 1851, he came to Young America and engaged in the saw-mill business. He was married, in Barton, Feb. 27, 1858, to Miss Emily J. Bidwell, daughter of Luther and Lydia Bidwell. Mrs. Davis is a native of the State of New York. Two children were born to them—Charles W. (deceased; and Cora Emily. Mrs. Davis died July 14, 1869. Mr. Davis formed the existing partnership with Mr. Woodford in 1864. He was married, at Fond du Lac, Dec. 24, 1871, to Miss Amelia B. Wicker, who died fifteen months after her marriage (May 31, 1873). Mr. Davis was married again, April 27, 1875, at Sparta, to Mrs. Frances M. Brooks, widow of Frank Brooks, and daughter of Ebenezer and Julia U. Avery. Mrs. Davis was born in Chicago. They have one child, a daughter— Hannah M.


John Debano
Town of Trenton
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 727, submitted by Mary Saggio.

JOHN DEBANO, farmer, Sec. 7; P. O. West Bend; born in Niagara Co., N. Y., in 1845; the family came to Wisconsin in 1854, and bought their present farm of 86 acres, then all wooded. He was married, in 1875, to Margaret Buffer, who was born in Wisconsin; there are three children—Elizabeth, Louisa and Joseph.


Walter Demmon
West Bend
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 554, submitted by Mary Saggio.

WALTER DEMMON, farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. West Bend; date of settlement November, 1846; has 213 acres; was born in Jefferson Co., N. Y., Feb. 28, 1812; when 3 years of age, he went with his parents to Onondaga Co., remaining there two years, the family then moved to Wayne Co. He was married in the town of Wolcott of that county, Feb. 1, 1838, to Miss Hilyann Cox, daughter of Lewis and Effie Cox. Mrs. Demmon was born in Rockland Co., N. Y. Mr. D. and family came to Wisconsin in February, 1846, and, in November of that year, located on the site of his present farm. Thirty-five years of patient labor has made a well-cultivated farm and comfortable home. He has served eleven years as Justice of the Peace; Chairman of the town six or seven years; was elected the first Town Assessor of West Bend, and re-elected the following year. Mr. and Mrs. D. have been blessed with ten children, of whom nine are living—Elias H., married to Jennie Luscomb, residing at Omro; Joseph W., married to Maryette Rose, also living at Omro; Lucy A.; Mary, now Mrs. Charles H. Potter, of the town of West Bend; Clarissa; Daniel, married to Sarah Churchill and living at Eau Claire; Millard, married to Ella Potter, also of West Bend; Horace, married to Annie Clapham, of the same town; Malinda at home, and George F., deceased.


John C. Denison
Town of Hartford
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 580, submitted by Mary Saggio.

JOHN C. DENISON, of the firm of Wheelock, Denison & Co., Hartford; is the son of Daniel and Susan (Cunningham) Denison, and was born Aug. 7, 1832, in Hampton, Windham Co., Conn.; spent his early years on a farm; when 16 years of age, he began teaching school; he next took a business course in the Leicester Academy. In the fall of 1854, he went to Beardstown, Ill., where he spent the winter in teaching school; spent the following summer in Bloomingdale, and, in the fall of 1855, came to Hartford and engaged as book-keeper with the firm of Wheelock, Kneeland & Co.; in 1857, he was taken into the firm as a partner, and the firm name changed to Wheelock, Denison & Co. Mr. Denison was married, at Neosho, Dodge Co., Aug. 10, 1859, to Miss Eliza Goodenough, daughter of Aaron and Cynthia (Durbon) Goodenough. Mrs. Denison was born in Darien, Genesee Co., N. Y., Aug. 10, 1840. They have had three children—Alice was born June 6, 1864, and died Oct. 16, 1867; Carrie was born April 8, 1870; Johnnie. Aug. 6. 1878.


Franz Deutsch
West Bend
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 554, submitted by Mary Saggio.

FRANZ DEUTSCH, undertaker, manufacturer of and dealer in furniture; business established in 1868. Mr. Deutsch was born in Prussia Aug. 24, 1826; is the son of Michael and Margaret (Stein) Deutsch; learned his trade in his native country; came to America in 1846, and direct to the town of West Bend, Washington Co., Wis., and engaged in farming. In 1868, he started the business in which he is now engaged, while he has still kept his farm of 60 acres. He was married in West Bend in 1854 to Elizabeth Licht, daughter of Michael and Eva Licht; twelve children were born to them, of whom only six are living—Mattie, John, Frederick, Barbara, Jacob and Anna. Mrs. Deutsch died March 10, 1875; Dec. 6, of the same year, Mr. Deutsch was married to Mrs. Johanna Lorentz, widow of Emanuel Lorentz; three children were born of this marriage—George, Mary and Frank. Mr. Deutsch has served fourteen years as Supervisor of the town of West Bend, and twelve years as Deputy Sheriff.


Phillip Dhein
Town of Germantown
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 735, submitted by Mary Saggio.

PHILLIP DHEIN; P. O. Rockfield; was born in the town of Germantown May 12, 1834, being the first white male born in this town. His parents immigrated to America in 1842 and settled in Sec. 8, in Germantown, being some of the first settlers in the town. Mr. Dhein has lived on the old homestead all his life. He is the present Treasurer of the Germantown Insurance Company, a substantial institution in the county, with a capital of $250,000. Mr. Dhein married Miss Elizabeth Schowalter, Oct. 15, 1872; he has three children; the oldest son, Philip, is 7, his daughter Ida 5, and John 3 years of age. His father died in 1865, at the age of 51, and his mother, who still lives, is 60 years of age, and enjoys excellent health.


Charles Dreher
Town of Hartford
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 580, submitted by Mary Saggio.

CHARLES DREHER, cigar manufacturer, Hartford; he is the son of Dennis and Catharine (Wintle) Dreher; was born in Milwaukee March 6, 1859; when 8 years of age, came to Washington Co., village of Fillmore, and, when 14 years old, began learning the trade of cigar-maker with his brothers, and continued in their employ till June, 1880, when he came to Hartford and commenced in his present business. He was married, Oct. 12, 1880, at Belgium, Ozaukee Co., to Miss Marinana Hubing, daughter of Anton and Christiana Hubing. Mrs. Dreher was born in Ozaukee Co.


Phillip G. Duerwaechter
Town of Germantown
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 735, submitted by Mary Saggio.

PHILLIP G. DUERWAECHTER, was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, in 1847. He came to America with his parents in 1857. His father settled on Sec. 25, Germantown. Afterward he removed to Schleswig, Manitowoc Co., where he remained until 1862, when he set out for himself, engaging in different kinds of business, and traveled several years, until his return to his old home in Germantown, in1871, when he commenced the lumber business, and, in 1880, he added the manufacture of agricultural implements; he is a very successful business man. He has been elected Town Clerk four years, which position he still holds. He married Miss Mary Diefenthaler in 1873; he has two sons; the eldest, JohnAdam, 6, and Arthur 2 years of age. His father died July 16, 1874, at the advanced age of 81 years.


Henry P. Eames
Town of Kewaskum
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), pages 728-729, submitted by Mary Saggio.

HENRY P. EAMES, farmer; son of Philip and Beulah (Messenger) Eames; was born in Berkshire Co., Mass., Nov. 29, 1815. Was married, Jan. 1, 1845, at Peru, Berkshire Co., to Miss Elmira Thompson, daughter of Daniel and Abigail Thompson. Mrs. Eames was born in Berkshire Co. In October, 1853, Mr. Eames and family moved to Washington Co., Wis., and located near Myers' Mill, town of North Bend, now Kewaskum. Mr. J. H. Myers, a single man, had built a log house near the river bank, which was the only habitation of what is now the thriving village of Kewaskum. Mr. Eames rented this house of Mr. Myers and occupied it till the following spring, when, having erected a commodious frame house on the opposite side of the road, he moved into it, and has continued to make it his home. This was the first frame dwelling in the town, and, having undergone some repairs and improvements, is still one of the best. The house is situated on the south side of Main street, directly opposite West Water street. Mr. J. H. Myers and H. P. Eames made the first plat of the village of Kewaskum. Mrs. Eames was instrumental in organizing the first Sunday school in the village, which was accomplished in 1855, Mrs. Eames being the first Superintendent. They have one son—Charles, living at home. They have a farm of 40 acres, situated adjacent to the village.


John A. Eckstein
West Bend
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 554, submitted by Mary Saggio.

JOHN A. ECKSTEIN, lessee of the West Bend Mills; son of Christopher and Kunigunda Eckstein; was born in Milwaukee Feb. 20, 1850, and May 1, 1851, came to West Bend with his parents. He received a common-school education, and took a regular course in the Commercial College of Bryant, Stratton & Spencer, of Milwaukee. On his return from Milwaukee in 1865, he engaged with Mann & Eckstein, millers at West Bend; was in the employ of that firm till its dissolution, and subsequently with his father as partner in the mill till 1875; he then rented the mill and has run it to this spring, when the dam was carried away in the great flood; at this writing the dam is being rebuilt, and he will soon have the mill in operation again. Mr. Eckstein was married Feb. 24, 1879, at Milwaukee, Wis., to Anna Kohout, daughter of Viet Kohout, Sr.; they have one child—Phillipine M. Mr. E. was elected Justice of the Peace in the spring of 1881 for two-years' term.


Michael Eisenmann
Town of Barton
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 710, submitted by Mary Saggio.

MICHAEL EISENMANN, proprietor of the Milwaukee House, Barton; the business was established in 1857 by his father, Frank Eisenmann. Mr. E. is a native of Bavaria, Germany; was born Nov. 30, 1838, and, in 1852, came to America with his parents (Frank and Theresa Eisenmann); made his home in Milwaukee, and with his father engaged with Bradley & Metcalf, boot and shoe manufacturers, and continued in their employ three years; then moved to Barton, in 1855, and worked with his father at shoemaking till 1868, when he engaged in his present business of hotel-keeping. He was married, Nov. 25, 1861, at Barton, to Miss Anna Urschlitz, daughter of Peter Urschlitz. Mrs. Eisenmann is a native of Bohemia. They have had thirteen children, of whom ten are living—Gertrude, Mary, Theresa (deceased), Joseph, Frank (deceased), Frank, Susie, Anna, John, Matilda, Rosa, Phillip and Catharine. Mr. Eisenmann was Town Treasurer of Barton in the years 1873-74-75, Justice of the Peace two years, and Town Clerk for the years 1878-79-80-81.


George M. Engelhard
West Bend
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 554, submitted by Mary Saggio.

GEORGE M. ENGELHARD, boot and shoemaker, West Bend, Wis.; son of George M. Engelhard; was born in Bavaria, Germany, Dec. 31, 1819; served a regular apprenticeship of three years at his trade in his native country; then worked as a journeyman in various places till 1845, when he came to the United States. Remained in New York City a few months, then went to New Jersey, was there a year, and then returned to New York. He next engaged as colporteur for the American Tract Society with headquarters at the city of Rochester, N. Y.; continued this connection four years; he then returned to New York, and went from there to Brooklyn, where he worked at his trade three years. In 1856, he came to West Bend, Wis., and engaged in business for himself, where he has continued to this writing (1881). Mr. E. was married, Jan. 7, 1849, in the city of New York, to Miss Sophia L'Homme, daughter of Louis L'Homme. Mrs. Engelhard was born in France; they have eight children, of whom all but the youngest have been school teachers—Sophia M. is now Mrs. L. E. Adams, of Chicago, Ill.; Catharine H., now Mrs. Martin Blackmunn, of Trenton, Washington Co.; M. Georgine; George P. is of the firm of Chandler & Engelhard, publishers, Chicago, Ill. He was recently married to Miss Carrie E. Scroggin, and resides at Chicago; Sarah, now Mrs. Richard B. Salter, attorney at law, of Colby, Wis.; Fermine, Hortense and Samuel L. at home.


Jacob Engmann
West Bend
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), pages 554-555, submitted by Mary Saggio.

JACOB ENGMANN, farmer and proprietor of Mineral Spring, Sec. 15; P. O. West Bend; is the son of Balthasar and Margarette Engmann; was born in Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, May 21, 1825; learned the brewer's trade, and came to the United States in 1848; made his home one year in Williamsburg, N. Y., where he worked at his trade. In 1849, he came to West Bend and engaged with Mr. Goetter in the brewery; continued at this work five years, when he went on to a farm in the town of Barton. After two years' residence on the farm at Barton, he returned to West Bend, and spent one year in Mr. Goetter's employ; he then went to the village of Pigville, Germantown; here he kept hotel and farmed three years. His next venture was in the brewery and saloon business at Waukesha, where he continued till 1871, when he came to West Bend and bought his present farm. Finding the brook formed by the numerous springs on his place suitable for the culture of "trout," he has improved the stream and stocked it with that fish. His noted mineral springs are situated one mile due west from the West Bend Court House. Full descriptions and analysis of the springs are given in the history of the town of West Bend, as well as an account of his trout-raising enterprise. He was married at West Bend May 19, 1851, to Elizabeth Immel, daughter of Peter Immel, who was born in Bavaria; they have two adopted children— Applonia and Emma, the elder of whom is now Mrs. William Miller, of West Bend.


Thomas Ewing
Town of Hartford
Source: History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin, Western Historical Company (1881), page 580, submitted by Mary Saggio.

THOMAS EWING, farmer and proprietor of saw-mill, Sec. 21; P. O. Hartford; settled in the county in the spring of 1847; he is the son of Alexander and Elizabeth (Fenstamaker) Ewing; was born in Trumbull Co., Ohio (now Mahoning Co.), April 22, 1827; in the spring of 1847, he came to Wisconsin in company with Mr. William Shannon (now a resident of Ohio), and made his home in Town 10 north, Range 18 east (now Hartford). For about ten years after coming to this place, he worked at his trade; then, in company with Mr. O. C. Bissell, he purchased the saw-mill situated on the Rubicon, Sec. 21, of Joel F. Wilson, E. R. Nelson and George C. Rossman; the new proprietors rebuilt and improved the mill in 1858, and, in 1862, Mr. Ewing bought out Mr. Bissell and has since continued the business alone. The mill is what is known as circular saw-mill, is run by water-power, and, when in good repair, cuts 6,000 feet of hardwood lumber running ten hours; he next bought a farm, situated on Secs. 21 and 22; has at this writing 135 acres. He was married, at Milwaukee, in the fall of 1868, to Miss Eunice Towle, daughter of Simon Towle; they have one son—A. C. Ewing. Mr. Ewing's nephew, Mr. Charles U. Boley, has been brought up by him, having been an inmate of the family about fifteen years. Mr. Ewing is one of the genial, whole-souled pioneers of the West, the representative of a type that is now only occasionally met with in this section of the country.


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