Wisconsin Genealogy Trails
Winnebago County, Wisconsin
Biographies
J-Z


Heman B. Jackson
OSHKOSH - HEMAN B. JACKSON is a native of Naperville, Illinois, which place at the time of his birth consisted of a "handful of huts," and was a mere settlement among the savages who then roamed through that country, watered by the Dupage river.  He was born on the 24th of July, 1837, and is the son of William Jackson and Lucy, nee Babbitt. His father, a blacksmith by trade, was a man of moderate means, and his mother was an earnest Christian; both were much respected in their community. While Heman’s boyhood presents few phases in distinction from that of other boys, it was yet marked by an earnestness and determination that were very notable, and which have characterized his maturer life and deeds. In his boyhood at school he became early noted for his declamatory powers, and seemed to be a natural and forcible speaker, and to possess that quality and manner of speech and action which stirs the emotions of the listener. He generally came to the front on what was then called "exhibition day" at school. As a boy he had many warm friends whom he always stood ready to befriend, ardently and forcibly, if necessary, when he believed them to be right – and it was not difficult to convince him that they were right. Of these qualities in the boy many of his school-fellows, - including the author of this sketch, - have a painful remembrance; in fact they always preferred to be on his side when the matter was to be fought out. He never knew when he was whipped, and would never cry "enough." This spirit which so signally marked him as a boy has become characteristic in his legal practice. The more difficult the case the more it claims his attention, until victory usually crowns his work. Opposition is only the signal for greater effort.
The subject of this sketch was educated in the seminaries at Warrenville and Elgin, Illinois, and later, he attended the Western Reserve College at Hiram, Ohio. He states, with pride, that he succeeded in attending college by means of his own personal efforts and the practice of the most rigid economy. While at college he boarded himself at an expense not exceeding seventy-five cents per week. At the close of his studies there he engaged in teaching two terms of district school, and then began the study of law with Messrs. Joslin and Gifford at Elgin, Illinois.
At the early age of twenty years he was admitted to the Illinois bar in 1857. Going from Elgin to Crystal Lake, Illinois, he first "hung out his shingle" there. That field proving too limited for his energies and ability, he removed in the spring of 1859 to his present home in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, and entered upon a practice of his profession which has since become very extensive and remunerative, and in which he has gained a wide reputation as a successful and skillful attorney. The present firm of Jackson and Halsey was formed in 1865, and is widely and worthily known. Mr. Jackson was admitted to practice in all the courts of record in Illinois while a resident of that State. In 1863 his practice first called him to the bar of the supreme court of Wisconsin, and in the same year he was admitted to the United States circuit and district courts. His practice is general, and largely in the supreme court. A reference to the court reports shows that in a large majority of his cases he has been successful. He is an ardent and earnest advocate, and zealously makes his client’s cause his own. He presses the salient point of his case in an impassioned and forcible manner that can only come from the heart and an honest purpose. His manner as an advocate is that of a man who means what he says. Before attempting to induce others to think his client’s cause is just, he first convinces himself and then speaks forcibly what he really believes. At the opening of the war he was deeply interested in the Union cause, and, prompted by his ardent nature, and a disposition which has always induced him to make the cause he espoused his own, he was among the very first to enlist for the war. On the 21st of April, 1861, he enlisted at Oshkosh, and entered the army as second lieutenant of Company E, 2d Regiment Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. Afterward he was promoted to a position on the staff of General W. T. Sherman. He acted in the capacity of staff–officer at the battle of Bull Run, and continued on General Sherman’s staff until on account of a serious and permanent injury he was compelled to quit the service during the same year. This was regretted the more by himself and his friends for the reason that he had already attained a position in the line of promotion which afterward placed his chief on the very pinnacle of military fame. Nothing remained for him on leaving the army but to resume his legal practice, which he did at the same place from which he entered the service.
In politics he was reared a democrat, but since attaining his majority he has been identified with the republican party.
Mr. Jackson never held any public office, with the exception of such as was connected with the practice of the law. He was twice elected city attorney of Oshkosh. In 1864 he became district attorney, and was reelected to that office in 1868. In 1875 he was nominated by the republican party of his district as its candidate for member of the State legislature, but through local causes was defeated. He has always identified himself with movements tending to promote the welfare of this city.
Previous to the great fire of Oshkosh in 1875 he had erected several large blocks, which, together with millions of property of his neighbors, were destroyed. He suffered then a severe loss in property, but none in energy or native pluck. Since that time he has continued his building operations to some extent, still having great faith in the future growth and prosperity of his city.
He has always joined heartily with his fellow-citizens in public enterprises inaugurated for the benefit of Oshkosh. He was one of the original incorporators of the Wisconsin and Lake Superior Railroad Company, organized for the purpose of building a railroad north from Oshkosh. His public spirit has ever kept him foremost among those who sought to promote the public good by supplying public libraries, establishing lecture courses, etc.  He is now in the prime and vigor of life, and emphatically a man of action, and those who best know him have reason to believe that his record will become brighter, and his life one of more marked success in the future than in the past.
Mr. Jackson was married on the 14th of June, 1862, to Miss Annett L. Harwood, by whom he has three daughters.
Such is a brief outline of the early life history of one who, beginning without means, educating himself by his own work, relying upon his own resources, has established himself among strangers in the practice of the law, and worked his way up step by step, until he has already achieved an enviable reputation as a lawyer, and reached a position of high public regard and social standing, and is living in the enjoyment of an ample fortune, surrounded by all the comforts of a happy home, but who, still believing that life is action and that work is the normal condition of all, is pressing on to new achievements. [Source: The US Biographical Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Volume (1877); transcribed by Glenda Stevens]

Heman B. Jackson
Heman B. Jackson, Oshkosh, is a native of Naperville, Illinois, which place at the time of his birth consisted of a handful of huts, and was a mere settlement among the savages, who then roamed through that country. H. B. Jackson was born on July 24, 1837, and is the son of William and Lucy Babbitt Jackson. He was educated in the seminaries at Warrenville and Elgin, Illinois, and later he attended the Western Reserve College at Hiram, Ohio. He states, with pride, that he succeeded in attending college by means of his own personal efforts, and the practice of the most rigid economy. While at college he boarded himself at an expense not exceeding seventy-five cents per week. At the close of his studies there he engaged in teaching two terms of district school, and then began the study of law with Joslin and Clifford, at Elgin, Illinois.  At the early age of twenty years he was admitted to the Illinois bar, in 1857. Going from Elgin to Crystal Lake, Illinois, he first hung out his shingle there. That field proving too limited for his youthful aspirations, he removed in the spring of 1859 to his present home in Oshkosh, and entered upon a practice of his profession, which has since become large and remunerative. The firm of Jackson & Halsey was formed in 1865, and that of Jackson & Thompson in 1880, Mr. Halsey going out and A. E. Thompson coming in. Mr. Jackson was admitted to practice in all the courts of record in Illinois, while a resident of that state. In 1863 his practice first called him to the bar of the supreme court of Wisconsin, and in the same year he was admitted to the United States circuit and district courts. A reference to the court reports shows that in a large majority of his cases he has been successful. He is an ardent and earnest advocate, and zealously makes his client’s cause his own. At the opening of the war he was deeply interested in the Union cause, and prompted by his patriotic nature he was among the very first to enlist for the war, which was on April 21, 1861, at Oshkosh, and entered the army as second lieutenant of Company E, Second regiment Wisconsin volunteer infantry. Afterward he was promoted to a position on the staff of General W. T. Sherman. He acted in the capacity of staff-officer at the battle of Bull Run, and continued on General Sherman's staff until, on account of a serious and permanent injury, he was compelled to quit the service during the same year. This was the more regretted for the reason that subsequent events of the war placed his chief on the very pinnacle of military fame. Nothing remained for him on leaving the army but to resume his legal practice, which he did at the same place from which he entered the military service. He was twice elected city attorney of Oshkosh. In 1864 he became district attorney, and was reelected to that office in 1868. In 1875 he was nominated by the republican party of his district as its candidate for member of the state legislature, but through local causes, was defeated.  Previous to the great fire of Oshkosh in 1875, he had erected several large blocks, which, together with millions of property of his neighbors, were destroyed. He has ever kept foremost among those who bought to promote the public good by supplying public libraries, establishing lecture courses and in other ways. Mr. Jackson was married on June 14, 1862, to Miss Annett I. Harwood, by whom he has three daughters. [The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin History and Biography, by Parker McCobb Reed (1882); Transcribed for Genealogy Trails by Tammy Clark]

David V. Jennings
DAVID V. JENNINGS (Dem.) was elected to the assembly in 1912 when but 25 years of age and in 1914 was elected to the senate, being the youngest member of both houses at that time. He was reelected to the senate in 1918, receiving 3,873 votes to 1,503 for A. H. Sibilsky (Soc). Born in Keshena, Shawano county, Jan. 19, 1887, he attended the common schools there and moved to Milwaukee with his parents in 1900, graduated from the Marquette academy in 1904, the University in 1907 and the Law School in 1911 and engaged in the real estate and mortgage loan business, but later became chief examiner for the Milwaukee county civil service commission, which position he still holds. [Source: The Wisconsin Blue Book (1919) page 464; transcribed by FoFG mz]

Henry Johnson
STATE TREASURER
HENRY JOHNSON, now serving his fourth consecutive term as State Treasurer, has been a public servant for the last 40 years. Born in Denmark, he attended the common schools in that country and emigrated to Wisconsin in 1873, at the age of 19 years, arriving in Oshkosh without a cent on May 16. He immediately went to work on a farm at $7 per month in the summer, but worked for his board in the winter while attending school. He then went to Shawano where he worked until 1879 when he was married and settled in Oconto county where he cleared and cultivated a large farm, engaged in the lumber business and built a warehouse at Suring. His first public office was as treasurer of his school district, then as justice of the peace, town assessor, treasurer and chairman. He was elected to the assembly in 1900, 1902, and 1904, was assistant state treasurer for six years under Andrew Dahl and succeeded him in office, being elected in 1912 and was re-elected in 1914, 1916 and 1918. [Source: The Wisconsin Blue Book (1919) page 452; transcribed by FoFG mz]

James C. Kerwin
James C. Kerwin, Neenah, was born in the town of Menasha, Wisconsin, May 4, 1850, his parents being Michael and Mary Kerwin. He lived at Menasha during the early part of his life, worked on his father's farm, attended the high school of that place from which he graduated from a regular course, and his education was finally completed at the State University. He studied law with A. L. Collins, Menasha, and graduated at the law school of the university. Previously admitted to the bar at the circuit court of Dane county, he was admitted to the supreme court in 1875, and to the United States district court by Judge Charles E. Dyer, July 10, 1878, at the Oshkosh term of that year. Since his admission he has applied himself, with unremitted energy, to the practice of his profession at Neenah, having no partner. [The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin History and Biography, by Parker McCobb Reed (1882); Transcribed for Genealogy Trails by Tammy Clark]

JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT
JAMES C. KERWIN is the oldest member of the Wisconsin Supreme court in point of years, having been born May 4, 1850, in the town of Menasha, Winnebago county. He was educated in the common schools of his native town and the Menasha high school from which he was graduated a few years after the close of the Civil War. He immediately took up the study of law and later attended the law school of the University of Wisconsin, from which he was graduated in 1875 and at once began to practice in Neenah, the seat of many large paper mills and headquarters of a number of big lumber companies. For 12 years he served as city attorney of Neenah at a time when the city was beginning to make permanent improvements and so judiciously did he handle the legal part of the municipal work that he was re-elected time and again until he finally was compelled to refuse the office longer because of his enormous private practice. He was elected to the Supreme court in 1904 and re-elected without opposition in 1914. [Source: The Wisconsin Blue Book (1919) page 454; transcribed by FoFG mz]

Charles E. Kremer
A native son of Wisconsin and a scion of one of the sterling pioneer families of this commonwealth, Mr. Kremer is well entitled to recognition in this publication, though he is not a resident of the state but is found numbered among the representative members of the bar of Chicago, the great metropolis of the west.  Charles Eduard Kremer was born in the city of Oshkosh, Winnebago county, Wisconsin, on the 23nd of December, 1850, at which time the attractive metropolis and judicial center of the county, his native city, was a mere village and the center of prosperous lumbering operations. He is a son of Michael J. and Agatha (Leins) Kremer. the former of whom was born on the Hof Fensterseifen, near the city of Maien, West Prussia, in 1823, and the latter of whom was born in the village of Eutingen, in the famous Black Forest district of the kingdom of Wurtemberg, Germany, in 1827. The father, who is still living, celebrated his ninetieth birthday anniversary in the present year, 1913, his cherished and devoted wife having passed to the life eternal in 1900. Their marriage was solemnized in Milwaukee and of their three children the older of the two living is he whose name initiates this review; Julia E. is the wife of Charles W. Karst and they reside at Lakeland, Florida.
Michael J Kremer was reared to adult age in his native land, where he received the advantages of the common schools and where also he learned the trade of millwright. In 1848, when about twenty-four years of age, he severed the ties that bound him to home and fatherland and set forth to seek his fortunes in America. Wisconsin was at that time receiving a large and worthy influx of pioneers from Germany, and Mr. Kremer has ever considered himself fortunate that he made this state his destination and the stage of his energetic and productive activities. He first located in Milwaukee, where he continued to be employed at his trade until his marriage, soon after which he removed to Oshkosh, in 1849, to number himself among the early settlers of that now opulent and attractive city. After there working at his trade for a short time he engaged in the manufacturing business. Later he became superintendent of a foundry and machine shop, and he continued to be actively and effectively identified with business and industrial interests at Oshkosh and Milwaukee until 1874, since which time he has lived elsewhere. In the climacteric period culminating in the Civil war he was a staunch abolitionist and for years he was a zealous supporter of the cause of the Republican party. Ever since the founding of the Socialist party he has been one of its staunchest adherents and has many times been a candidate for office under it.
To the public schools of Oshkosh Charles E. Kremer is indebted for his early educational discipline, and that he made good use of his opportunities is shown by the fact that at the age of eighteen years he proved himself eligible for pedagogic honors. After teaching successfully in the district schools for a year he turned his attention to mercantile pursuits and then to the study of law, under the effective preceptorship of Henry H. and George C. Markham, who were then leading members of the Milwaukee bar. He applied himself with characteristic energy and appreciation and thus made substantial progress in his absorption and assimilation of the science of jurisprudence. He was admitted to the bar in Milwaukee in October, 1874, and in the following April he was also admitted to practice before the supreme court of Wisconsin. In 1875 he was admitted to the bar of Illinois. Since 1883 he has been admitted to practice in the supreme court of the United States.
For nearly forty years Mr. Kremer has been engaged in the active practice of his profession in the city of Chicago, where he established his residence in May, 1875, and where he has confined his attention largely to maritime law, in which he has become a recognized authority. He has long controlled a large and important practice and retains a clientage of representative order. He has high standing at the bar of the great western metropolis and is one of the loyal and progressive citizens of his adopted city. He is also a ship owner and lectures on maritime law in the law department of the University of Chicago, as does he also in the Chicago Kent College of Law and the John Marshall Law School. In 1908 he received from the Chicago Kent College of Law the honorary degree of LL. B. In his home city he is a valued and honored factor in the educational work of his profession and he commands strong vantage-ground in the confidence and esteem of his confreres at the bar, as well as of all others with whom he has come in contact in the varied relations of a significantly active and useful career. He is actively identified with the Illinois Bar Association and the Cook County Bar Association, as well as the Chicago Law Club. He was the founder of the Chicago Yacht Club and has ever taken a lively interest in maritime sports and shipping. He is a stalwart and effective advocate of law reforms. He is a member of no church or religious society. In his home city he is a member of the Union League Club, and his continued interest in and loyalty to his native state are shown by his close affiliation with the Wisconsin Society of Chicago, in which he is chairman of the committee on membership.  On the 2nd of May, 1877, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Kremer to Miss Margaret A. Collins, who was born at Oswego, New York, and the one child of this union is a daughter, Jean, who is now married to Scott W. Prime, a native of Wisconsin, who has returned to his native state and is now living in Milwaukee. [Source: "WISCONSIN, ITS STORY AND BIOGRAPHY 1848-1913", pub. 1914, by Ellis Baker Usher - Submitted by Barb Ziegenmeyer]

A. H. F. Krueger
A. H. F. KRUEGER (Dem.), of Neenah, was born July 21, 1823, in Crivity, Mechlenberg Schwerin, Germany; had a common school education; is a miller; came to the United States in 1848, and to Wisconsin in 1851; has held various local officers; was elected assemblyman for 1880, receiving 1,010 votes, against 901 for G. F. Pratt, Republican, and 143 for J. B. Russell, Greenbacker. [Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1880) transcribed by RuthAnne Wilke]

A. H. F. KRUEGER (Dem.), of Neenah, was born July 21, 1823, in Crivitz, Mechlenberg Schwerin, Germany; had a common school education; is a miller; came to the United States in 1848, and to Wisconsin in 1851; has held various local offices; was mayor of Neenah in 1876 and ’78; was elected assemblyman for 1880; was an unsuccessful candidate for the same position in 1881, and was elected member for 1882, receiving 997 votes against 622 for C. P. Northrop, republican, 159 for Geo. W. Bradley, greenbacker, and 39 for Albert Smith, prohibitionist. [Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1882), pgs. 563-564; transcribed by Mary Saggio]

Florian Lampert
FLORIAN LAMPERT (Rep.) was elected a member of the Sixty-fifth and Sixty-sixth congresses at the same time, in November 1918, being chosen to succeed James H. Davidson (deceased) and at the same time being elected for the regular term. He was born July 8, 1863 in West Bend and was educated in the public schools and then engaged in the mercantile business in Oshkosh. He was sheriff of Winnebago county in 1897 and 1898, comptroller of the city of Oshkosh from 1893 to 1896 and was commissioner of the city from 1914 to 1918. He was nominated to congress at the primary election in September 1918 and had no opposition at the special primary for the unexpired term. [Source: The Wisconsin Blue Book (1919) page 458; transcribed by FoFG mz]

Hans Larson
HANS LARSON, who is conducting an extensive farm in Harwood Township, Cass County, has accumulated his wealth single-handed, and is a striking example of what can be accomplished by strict business methods and industrious habits. He has risen to an assured position among his fellow men by his integrity and honesty, and is now enjoying a happy home and financial success, and resides in section 10, Harwood Township.  Our subject was born in Denmark, October 1, 1850. His father died when Mr. Larson was but thirteen years of age, and he remained in his native country about four years thereafter, and when seventeen years of age came to America with his widowed mother. They made their home in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, and after two years our subject went to Dakota. He located at Fort Randall in the spring of 1870, and was employed for one year there, and the spring of 1871 went to Cass County and entered claim to land, as a "squatter's claim," on which he has since resided with the exception of thirteen months when he was employed in different capacities on the Northern Pacific Railroad. He has followed farming entirely with that short exception, and on his home farm has erected a complete set of commodious and substantial buildings, and his holdings now amount to eight hundred and thirty-eight acres of land. He follows general farming, and is classed among the substantial men of his calling in Harwood Township.
Our subject was married in Fargo, January 11, 1881, to Miss Julia Harrison. Mrs. Larson was born in Norway, and came to America with her parents when she was an infant, and was reared in Iowa County, Wisconsin. Three children born to Mr. and Mrs. Larson died in infancy, and three are still living. The deceased children bore the names Lulu, James and Maud, and the surviving children are named as follows: Josephine C., William H. and Lulu L. Mr. Larson is a true and public-spirited citizen, and ably seconds all projects which tend to the protection and up building of the financial interests of his community. He has served as a member of the township board of supervisors, and lends his influence for good local government. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and Ancient Order of United Workmen. [Source: History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Laurel Durham]

Henry Larson
HENRY LARSON is proprietor of one of the well-regulated farms which form so large a part of the wealth of Gardner township, Cass county. It is located in section 12, and he also owns lands in Wiser and Harwood townships and is recognized as one of the leading farmers of the county. On his home estate he has placed substantial and commodious buildings and made various arrangements for the easy disposition of the crops and the comfort of the inhabitants. He is industrious, intelligent and possessed of untiring energy and is highly esteemed throughout that locality.  Our subject was born near the city of Maribo, Denmark, April 5, 1845, and was reared on a farm and remained there till after he attained his majority. He emigrated to America in the spring of 1866, landing at Quebec, from whence he proceeded to New York, and then went to Oshkosh, Wisconsin, where he resided until 1870. He then went to South Dakota and remained one year and then located in North Dakota, taking land as a "squatter’s claim," in what is now Harwood township, Cass county, and there lived till the fall of 1873, when he returned to Oshkosh. He remained in Wisconsin till the spring of 1878, and then located permanently in Dakota, entering claim to land as a homestead and tree claim in Gardner township, Cass county, where he has since resided. He is now the owner of one section and a quarter of land in Gardner, Wiser and Harwood townships, and is known as an agriculturist who is conducting an extensive business. He has given his attention wholly to farming since taking up his residence in Dakota and has acquired a thorough knowledge of his calling and met with eminent success. His home farm is well improved and he enjoys a pleasant country home.  Our subject was married, in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, to Ellen Connors, a native of Ireland. Mrs. Larson died in Fargo, North Dakota, in 1885, leaving one son, Arthur. Mr. Larson was married to Miss Carrie Maddison, in Fargo, North Dakota, December 2, 1887. Mrs. Larson was born in Norway, January 3, 1852. Six children have been born to this union, as follows: Frank, Charles, Albert, Mary, William and John. Mr. Larson is an earnest worker for the welfare of his community and has been a member of the board of supervisors of Gardner township for many years. He is strong in his convictions and keeps abreast of the times in all matters of a public nature and lends his influence for good local government. [Source: History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Kim Mohler]

P. V. Lawson
P. V. Lawson, Menasha, though not a native of Wisconsin, became one of its inhabitants during his early life, and acquired in this state the greater part of his education. He is the son of P. V. and Elizabeth Lawson, and was born in Corning, New York, November 1, 1853. As has been said he received his education in Wisconsin, being a graduate of the literary and law departments of the State University, and he also read law at Madison, with William F. Vilas. On July 10, 1877, he was admitted to practice in the Circuit courts, on August 28, of the same year, to the supreme court of the state, and in September following to the United States courts. He has been settled in practice at Menasha, without a partner, and has filled the respective offices of supervisor in the county board and court commissioner of the third circuit.  For a lawyer so young in years and practice Mr. Lawson has an uncommonly large law library, to which he is constantly adding rare and valuable works, and is starting out in his profession under the roost favorable auspices. Settling down, as he has, at the place of his early home, is evidence that those who have known him always can be relied upon to entrust to him their legal business, and it is safe to say his practice so far has been satisfactory and is increasing. [The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin History and Biography, by Parker McCobb Reed (1882); Transcribed for Genealogy Trails by Tammy Clark]

Christian Linde, M.D.
OSHKOSH - Christian Linde, a native of Copenhagen, Denmark, was born on the 19th of February 1817. He graduated at the Royal University of Copenhagen in 1837, and attended the hospitals there till 1S42, when he had to leave on account of political difficulties.  He immigrated to the United States, and on the 17th of July arrived in Wisconsin, and purchased two hundred and eighty acres of land, where the Insane Asylum now stands, near Oshkosh. His intention was to engage in farming, hunting and trapping, and not to engage in the practice of his profession. During the next four years he endeavored to give his attention to his farming interests, but was called to Green Bay so often, to attend to professional duties, that, in 1846, he left his farm and established himself at that place, and engaged in his profession. In the following year, having sold his farm, he removed to Oshkosh; his present home, and purchased a tract of land where the city now stands. During the next two years he was engaged in active practice, and at the expiration of that time began hunting, trapping, speculating, and dealing in furs. He employed himself in this manner till 1858, in the meantime attending to his professional work; and, being the only surgeon then in northern Wisconsin, was called upon to perform some most difficult surgical operations. In 1858 he discontinued his other business, and resuming his practice at Oshkosh, has since given it his chief attention.
A prominent and enterprising man, he has always taken a leading part, and now stands among the foremost of his profession in Wisconsin. During the late Civil War he was examining surgeon for Winnebago County. Dr. Linde was, at one time, president of the Winnebago County Medical Society, is now an active member of the State Medical Society, and also of the American Medical Association, and has been chosen as a delegate to the medical convention to be held at Philadelphia during the present year (1876).  His career throughout has been marked by perseverance and public-spiritedness; and, settling in Wisconsin at an early day, as he did, his name is coupled with many incidents of interest connected with the history of that State. In 1842 he was the only surgeon in northern Wisconsin, E. B. Wolcott being the only other one in the State. He was, in truth, one of the pioneers, and found, in his new home, ample opportunity to gratify his natural taste for hunting, trapping, and other kindred occupations connected with pioneer life. He helped to cut the first road from Oshkosh to Fond du Lac ; and, beginning thus when the State was new, he has grown up with it, and in his practice has kept pace with the growth of other improvements.  His political views are democratic; and he is not identified with any church organization. Dr. Linde was married in 1843, to Miss Sarah Dickinson, who died in 1849, leaving one son. This son, a promising physician, is a graduate of Rush Medical College, of Chicago, and is now in partnership with his father, the firm being C. and F. H. Linde. On the 15th of May, 1858, Dr. Linde married his second wife. Miss Huldah Henning, by whom he has one son and three daughters.  Such is a brief outline of the life-history of one who, by his own exertions, has risen from comparative obscurity to a position of high social standing and public trust, and made for himself a name that shall live in the memories of all who have known him. [Source: The US Biographical Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Volume (1877) transcribed by Vicki Bryan]

Albert Jule Mase
Albert Jule Mase, assistant foreman of the Chicago & Northwestern Railway roundhouse, and a musician of more than ordinary skill, was born in Winnebago county, Wis., on Nov., 1877. He is a son of Frederick William and Caroline Esther (Minn) Mase, the former of 'whom was born on Sept. 16, 1841, and the latter on Jan. 4, 1846. His paternal grandparents, Frederick John and Mary (Carroll) Mase, came to Wisconsin from Prussia in 1855. The grandfather was a wagonmaker by vocation, and his son, the father, was a miller and the inventor of the apple separator.. The father served in Company D, of the Twenty-second Wisconsin infantry for a period of twenty-two months during the Civil war, and was engaged in sharp fights with his company at the siege of Atlanta and earlier engagements.. Albert J. Mase, the subject of this review, attended the public schools of Oshkosh, Wis., until he was seventeen years of age. His first work was as a traveling representative for the Neehan Advertising Company, with whom he remained three years, and then with the Wells Comedy Company as a musician. For several years now he has been in the employ of the Chicago & Northwestern Railway Company, and the confidence they feel in him is evidenced by the promotion to the important position which he is now occupying. From 1899 to 1902 he was a member of Company F, Second infantry, Wisconsin National Guard, and received an, honorable discharge when his term of enlistment expired. In political belief Mr. Mase is a stanch Republican, but has never aspired to public office. His religious relations are with the Congregational church, of which he is a zealous and devout member. On Nov. 26, 1906, Mr. Mase was united in marriage to Miss Lorine Gibson, a daughter of John and Katherine (Kornell) Gibson, of Canada. The issue of this marriage has been one son, Roger. Mr. Mase himself is one of six survivors of the nine children born to his parents. His musical ability wins him much praise wherever he is known, and in the natural expectancy life a brilliant career lies before him.  [Source: Memoirs Of Milwaukee County From The Earliest Historical Times Down To The Present, Including A Genealogical And Biographical Record Of Representative Families In Milwaukee County, Vol II; Transcribed By Gary M. Wysocki]

William Frazer McArthur
William Frazer McArthur, Neenah, was born at Cornwall, Ontario, April 17, 1852. He was educated at the schools of Cornwall and Montreal; pursued his legal studies in the offices of Burke & Kilbourn, Malone, New York, and J. C. Kerwin, Neenah, Wisconsin, and also in the law school of the State University in the classes of 1876 and 1877. He was admitted to practice at Oshkosh, September 24, 1877 when he settled at Neenah, and has kept a law office in that city since that time. [The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin History and Biography, by Parker McCobb Reed (1882); Transcribed for Genealogy Trails by Tammy Clark]

John McDonnell
John McDonnell, Oshkosh, was born in the town of Vinland, Winnebago county, Wisconsin, November 25, 1857. We received a common school education. Early in life he decided upon following the profession of law, and entered, as a student, in a law office at Oshkosh. He was admitted to the bar in the circuit court of Wisconsin in the year 1880, and is now practicing his profession in the city of Oshkosh. [The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin History and Biography, by Parker McCobb Reed (1882); Transcribed for Genealogy Trails by Tammy Clark]

Charles L. Medberry
CHARLES L. MEDBERRY, proprietor of one of the finest farms of Cass county, is an early settler of Addison township, and his name is closely connected with the advancement and development of the agricultural interests of his community. He entered Dakota with a firm determination to succeed, and is now one of the substantial men of his calling, and is highly respected by his fellow men. Our subject was born in Saratoga Springs, New York, August 1, 1841. His parents, Abner H. and Alma C. (Bartlett) Medberry, were natives of New York, and the father was a farmer. He removed to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1852, and from there to Dodge county, Wisconsin, where he died in 1877, the mother passing away the same year. Our subject was one of four sons and is the only one in North Dakota. He was reared and educated in Wisconsin and there engaged in farming and followed the same there, and was also an engineer at Oshkosh, Wisconsin, until 1878. In that year he went to Cass county, North Dakota, and purchased railroad land in section 7 of Addison township, where he has since resided. He owns a section of land, on which he has placed modern improvements, and he enjoys the comforts of rural life. Mr. and Mrs. Medberry are the parents of two sons and one daughter, named as follows: Lynn C., Bertrand and Maude R. Mr. Medberry is a man who keeps pace with the times and is interested in the welfare of his community, but has never sought nor filled public office, preferring to lend his influence in other directions for the upbuilding of the public good. He cast his first presidential vote for Lincoln, and has advocated the principles of the Republican party since that date.  [Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Maggie Saggio]

James H. Merrill
James H. Merrill, Oshkosh, was born at Batavia, Genesee county, New York, February 9, 1S46. His father, James D. Merrill, was a leading lawyer at that place. In 1849 Mr. Merrill’s father removed to Milwaukee, where, in 1850, he was appointed, by his life-long friend President Fillmore, postmaster. The subject of this sketch, in 1863, entered the United States navy, serving on the U. S. S. Eastport, of the Mississippi squadron, and participated in the siege of Vicksburg, and the disastrous Red river expedition. After serving his time he was discharged and returned home, and subsequently enlisted in Company B, of the Forty-seventh Wisconsin infantry, and remained in the service till the close of the war, when he commenced the study of law in New York city, and was admitted to the bar at Elkhorn, this state, September 22, 1868, by Judge Lyon, then the circuit judge of the first circuit, and now on the supreme bench. In 1869 Mr. Merrill entered upon practice at Winneconne where he remained nearly seven years, during which time he was repeatedly elected president of the town board, and president of the village of Winneconne. In 1875 he removed to Oshkosh, where he has since practiced, having served the city two years as city attorney. [The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin History and Biography, by Parker McCobb Reed (1882); Transcribed for Genealogy Trails by Tammy Clark]

John Mulva
While claiming no gifts of prophetic order, the present able and popular mayor of the city of Oshkosh, Winnebago county, gives denial, through the high esteem in which he is held in his native place, to all possibility of any figurative application of the scriptural statement that ''a prophet is not without honor save in his own country." He has given a most progressive and effective administration as chief executive of the municipal government of Oshkosh, where his service in this capacity has not been limited to that of his present term. He has been one of the most influential factors in connection with city affairs during more than a decade and no citizen holds more secure place in popular confidence and esteem.  John Mulva was born in Oshkosh on the 22nd of February, 1860, and is a son of Patrick and Ann (Martin) Mulva, both of whom were born in Ireland. They were numbered among the sterling pioneers of Wisconsin, as is evident when it is stated that they came to this state in 1850. They first located in Milwaukee, where they remained until 1854, when they removed to Oshkosh, where they passed the residue of their lives, the father having here been actively engaged as a laboring man for many years and having been a citizen whose sterling character and genial and kindly personality won to him unqualified popular esteem. He died in the year 1905, and his cherished wife was summoned to the life eternal on the 20th of April, 1912, both having been devout communicants of the Catholic church. Of the seven children two sons and four daughters are living, the present mayor of Oshkosh having been the second in order of birth.
Public schools of Oshkosh afforded Mayor Mulva his early educational advantages and he was graduated in the high school as a member of the class of 1878. In the following year he was graduated in the Oshkosh Business College, after which he was for two years in the employ of the Joseph P. Gould Manufacturing Company, one of the leading industrial concerns of his native city at that time. For ten years thereafter he was a valued attaché of the Conley Lumber Company, with which he was promoted to the responsible office of superintendent, in 1884. Upon resigning this office he went to Davenport, Iowa, where he remained one year, in the employ of the George Otte Company, manufacturers of sash, doors and blinds. He then returned to Oshkosh, where he entered the employ of S. Radford & Brothers, in the same line of enterprise. He became superintendent for this concern and continued the able and valued incumbent of this office until the spring of 1912, since which time his entire time and attention have been virtually engrossed by his executive duties in the mayoralty and his private business interests.
As a young man, Mr. Mulva began to take a deep interest in public affairs of a local order and his loyalty to his native city has ever been of the most insistent type. He has been an influential factor in the ranks of the Democratic party and has given effective service in behalf of its cause, the while he has served as delegate to its conventions in his home county for a score of years, as well as to its state conventions in Wisconsin. He served continuously as president of the city council from 1895 to 1900, in which latter year the council elected him mayor, to fill out the unexpired term of James H. Merrill, who died while in office. In the regular city election of 1901 Mr. Mulva rolled up a most gratifying majority at the polls and became mayor of the city through popular support. In 1903 he was re-elected and his service continued until 1908. Public appreciation of his prior administrations led to his being again called to the mayoralty in the election of 1912, and his record in this office has been one most creditable to himself and of great value to the city, which now has the commission form of government. Mr. Mulva served continuously as representative of the third, ninth, sixth and thirteenth wards in the city council from 1888 to 1900, and initiated his work as a member of this municipal body when he was twenty-eight years of age. Both in an official capacity and through private influence and enterprise, Mr. Mulva has put forth the most zealous and effective efforts in promoting the civic and material progress and prosperity of his home city and his public spirit has been on a parity with his loyalty and high civic ideals. He is a stockholder and director of the South Side Exchange Bank, of which he served as vice-president from 1898 to 1900, and he has been specially active and successful in the handling of and improving of local real estate. He was one of the principal figures in effecting the organization of the Oshkosh Loan & Investment Company, of which he was secretary, and this concern, during its eighteen years of active operations, exercised most important and benignant functions in enabling those in moderate financial circumstances to obtain homes of their own. Mr. Mulva has in an individual way improved much local realty and has made a specialty of extending financial loans in connection with home building, his operations in this line having been effective in furthering the material and social welfare of Oshkosh and in assisting those whose resources were such that otherwise they would not have been able to become home-owners, -—a condition greatly to be desired in every community. He is also a stockholder in the Oshkosh Trust Company.  The mayor of Oshkosh clings to the religious faith in which he was reared and is a communicant of the Catholic church, the great mother organization of all Christendom. He is affiliated with the Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks, the Catholic Knights of America, the Knights of Columbus, the Independent Order of Foresters and the Fraternal Order of Eagles.  The attractive home of Mayor Mulva is known for its generous hospitality and ideal relations, and has a gracious chatelaine in the person of Mrs. Mulva. On the 22nd of November, 1894, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Mulva to Miss Mary Fitzsimmons, daughter of M. J. Fitzsimmons, a representative citizen of Fond du Lac, this state. [Source: "WISCONSIN, ITS STORY AND BIOGRAPHY 1848-1913", pub. 1914, by Ellis Baker Usher - Submitted by Barb Ziegenmeyer]

Clark M. Perry
CLARK M. PERRY (Rep.) was elected to the assembly in 1918 with more than four times as many votes as were cast for his two opponents. He received 1,821 votes to 303 for Albert Gertsch (Soc.) and 91 for Ellsworth Fuller (Pro.). He was born in Winnebago county, July 27, 1872, was educated in the common school and Oshkosh high school and then became a contracting decorator. He served as supervisor in 1912-13-14-15 and has been a member of the local board of state civil service examiners since its organization. He has always taken a keen interest in civic matters and is author of the bill introduced in 1919 creating the city manager plan of municipal government. [Source: The Wisconsin Blue Book (1919) page 507; transcribed by FoFG mz]

Frederic Augustus Pike, A. B., LL. B.
Born at Oshkosh, Wisconsin, July 16, 1863. Fitted at the Oshkosh high school, and entered U. W. ancient classical course in 1881, graduating four years later. Was a member of Adelphia and of the Chi Psi fraternity. During the year 1886-87 he attended the Columbian Law School at Washington, D. C, and the following year the U. W. Law School, graduating from the latter in 1888. Since that time Mr. Pike has practiced law in St. Paul. From 1886-88 he was a first lieutenant and acting adjutant of the Second regiment, Wisconsin National Guard; 1892-93, a member of the common council of St. Paul; and 1893-95, assistant city attorney. On December 4, 1895, Mr. Pike married Miss Stella N. Sheldon, a graduate of Carlton (Minn.) College, and has one child. [Source: The University of Wisconsin: its history and its alumni (1836 – 1900) Edited by Reuben Gold Thwaites -pages 732-736 (1900) transcribed by FoFG mz]

Sawyer Piletus
PIILETUS, SAWYER, of Oshkosh, was born at Whiting, Vermont, September 22, 1816; received a public school and business education; came to Wisconsin in 1847; and engaged in the lumber business; was a member of the legislature in 1857 and 1861; was mayor of Oshkosh in 1863 and 1864; was elected to the thirty-ninth, fortieth, forty-first, forty-second and forty-third congresses; was a delegate to the Republican National Convention at Chicago in June, 1880; was elected United States Senator January 26, 1881, as a republican, to succeed Angus Cameron, receiving 98 votes in joint legislative convention against 29 for James G. Jenkins, democrat, 1 for C.D. Parker, democrat and 2 fro C.C. Washburn, republican. His term of office will expire March 4, 1887.  [Source: Blue Book of the State of Wisconsin for (1882) page 521; transcribed by Tammy Clark]

Herman A. Porath
HERMAN A. PORATH (Rep.) was born in Germany, Oct. 19, 1863, and came with his parents to the town of Winchester, Winnebago county in 1866. He was raised on the farm, attended the common schools and then learned the carpenters' trade and has been a contractor and builder for years. He was a district school officer from 1898 to 1913 and has been town treasurer of Vinland since 1908. He has a son in the service and himself took a prominent part in the Liberty Loan campaigns. He was elected to the assembly in 1918, receiving 1,367 votes to 1,135 for William Grimes (Dem.). [Source: The Wisconsin Blue Book (1919) page 507; transcribed by FoFG mz]

John Proctor
NEENAH - The subject of this sketch sprang from good New England patriotic stock. His grandfather, Elisha Proctor, commanded a company in the Concord fight, April 19, 1775. Mr. Proctor has in his possession the sword used on that day; it was made in England in 1745. In form it is perfectly straight, and runs almost to a point, and is an odd looking implement of death, compared with swords of modern manufacture. The maternal great-grandfather of our subject, Colonel Gage, was a prominent officer in the French and Indian War.
John, the son of Benjamin and Anna (Lambert) Proctor, was born in Rowley, Massachusetts, March 30, 1818. His father, a student of the celebrated Dr. Waterhouse, of Cambridge, was an eminent physician of Rowley, and was succeeded in the medical practice by his son Charles, the two practicing in that town for eighty-five consecutive years.  John was educated at Dummer Academy, Newbury, the oldest institution of the kind in the State, being incorporated in 1756. He commenced teaching in his eighteenth year, following that profession for twenty years. During the last five, he was at the head of the old West Honesdale Academy, Pennsylvania, an institution which he found in an attenuated state, and which he raised to a high degree of popularity. By reason of impaired health he was obliged to leave it, and in December, 1856, removed to Wisconsin, purposing to go upon a farm; but in February following he settled at Neenah, forming a partnership with Edward Smith in the manufacture of flour. For twenty years they have been operating the Winnebago Mills — there being six other mills of the same kind in the same city — and have done a steady, reliable and remunerative business, no firm in Neenah having a more honorable reputation.  In his younger days Mr. Proctor was a very active politician. In sentiment he was a conscientious and ardent whig, and for three consecutive years, 1847, 1848 and 1849, represented the town of Rowley in the State legislature. In 1866 and 1867 he was in the assembly of Wisconsin, being sent there by his republican friends. He made a wise and prudent legislator, and, during the latter session, was one of the most influential members in the lower house.
Mr. Proctor is a member of the Presbyterian Church, the superintendent of its Sunday school, and a very active man in different branches of Christian and benevolent work. The poor have no better friend in Neenah than he. In his Christian and charitable labors he has a thorough sympathizer and cooperator in his, wife, who was a daughter of Myron Phelps, of Lewiston, Illinois, and to whom he was married June 10, 1858. They have had seven children and lost two. Mrs. Proctor is a well educated woman, and is ardently devoted to the interests of her home, and is a thoroughly devoted Christian wife and mother.  Mr. Proctor has often been urged to accept other offices besides those which he has held, but of late years has uniformly declined everything of the kind. He prefers the quiet and peace of domestic life to the excitement of public positions, and is quite willing to leave such places to men more ambitious of such honors. In his private sphere, probably no man in Neenah is more useful, and none is more highly esteemed by his fellow citizens than John Proctor. [Source: The US Biographical Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Volume (1877) transcribed by Vicki Bryan]

William Bishop Rea
William Bishop Rea, a high esteemed citizen and successful business man of Ashland, Wis., was born in Cumberland county, Pa., Sept. 14, 1847. He is a son of John Allen and Elizabeth (Bishop) Rea, both of whom were born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania. The father of John A. Rea was born in Scotland. In early life he learned the stone mason’s trade and after his settlement in Pennsylvania, he devoted himself to his calling and numerous buildings were erected by him. When about seventy years of age, he was fallen upon by a horse which he was riding, resulting in injuries that caused his death. John A. Rea learned the saddlery trade in his youth, following it at Newburg and during the Civil war he contracted heavily to provide government supplies, employing seventy-five or more persons in his business. He passed a busy life, was uniformly successful and was much esteemed for his many excellent qualities. He was a Democrat in politics and during President Buchanan’s administration was appointed and served as postmaster of Newburg. He died at the age of seventy-two years. Mrs. Elizabeth Rea died at the age of sixty-three years. To Mr. and Mrs. Rea were born three sons and two daughters. Melissa Jane, now Mrs. Mowery, of Newville, Pa., is the only survivor besides her brother, William B. Rea.
The boyhood of William Bishop Rea was spent in Newburg, where he received his elementary education. He was living there during the progress of the battle of Gettysburg and although distant thirty miles, the roar of the guns was clearly hard and the smoke was distinctly visible to the eye. When twenty years of age he accepted a clerical position in a general store at Newburg, where he remained until 1871, when he came West and located in Oshkosh, Wis., obtaining employment in a crockery store and later in the "Empire House," kept by his uncle Mr. Rea. Subsequently he went to Appleton, Wis., thence to Fond du Lac, and in 1886 located in Ashland, where he dealt in groceries for a time. He subsequently turned his attention to the real estate business and dealt largely in city property, as well as timber and farming lands, in which business he is now engaged. In 1901 he was appointed city assessor for two years and gave a large share of his personal attention to the duties of that office. To this position Mr. Rea brought to bear capabilities that can only be acquired by one who has a broad knowledge of the real estate business.  Mr. Rea was united in marriage with Carrie A. French, their union having been consummated in 1879. Mrs. Rea is a daughter of Rev. Charles French, a Presbyterian clergyman, who died in Ashland in 1902, aged eighty-three years. Mrs. Rea was born at Melbourne, near Montreal, Canada, and came to the United States with her parents during her childhood. To Mr. and Mrs. Rea three children have been born, Carrie A., Edith E. and Leslie J. The last named died at the age of fourteen months. The family is identified with the Presbyterian Church and its members are prominent in social circles. Mr. Rea is secretary of Ashland Lodge, No. 558, B. P. O. E., and enjoys the confidence and esteem of a wide circle of friends and acquaintances. [Source: Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Lake Region (1905) Transcribed by: Glenda Stevens]

George H. Read

OSHKOSH

 

George Hoye Read, a son of William and Mary (Hoye) Read, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, January 13, 1819. Both his paternal and maternal ancestors were from the north of Ireland.

William Read, a bookbinder by trade, moved with his family to New York City in 1824. There George attended a graded school until about seventeen, when he commenced to learn his father's trade. He worked at it in New York until about 1835. During that year the family visited Ohio, and in 1837 settled at Buffalo, New York. There George was engaged in bookbinding and in publishing books and periodicals until June 1853, when he settled in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Purchasing the Qshkosh "Courier," a weekly democratic paper, he published it for ten years, acting in the capacity of political editor. In February 1854, when the city had only about four thousand inhabitants, a daily edition was started, and kept up for about six years, showing in its columns very commendable industry and editorial ability. It was the first daily started in Oshkosh, and was a bold venture.

Though having only a common school education, Mr. Read has, from early life, been a great reader. He has kept well posted on current events, a fact which has prompted his success as a journalist.

Soon after settling in Oshkosh he began to deal in real estate, and in 1863, when he sold out the "Courier," he engaged in land operations more extensively, and has been quite successful in that line. He has also, for several years, been engaged in insurance in connection with his other business.

Mr. Read is a member of the democratic State central committee, and quite active and prominent in his party. He is not himself an office seeker, and will work untiringly to elect his friends to office. He did consent to run for alderman some years ago, and when once in the council he was kept there eight years.

Mr. Read is a Royal Arch Mason. He is a member of no church, but is partial to the Episcopal form of worship.

His wife was Caroline M. Steward, of Buffalo, New York. They were married April 20, 1842, and have no children. Mrs. Read has a taste for landscape painting, and still gratifies that taste to some extent. She has fine literary taste, and makes good use of their fine library of rare and select books. [Source: The US Biological Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Volume (1877) transcribed by Vicki Bryan]

Albert J. Richter
As an agriculturist who is gaining a good support by tilling the soil of Eddy county, and incidentally laying aside a competence for future years, there is no better representative than the gentleman above named. He has been a resident of township 148, range 65, for many years, and has a host of friends who accord him words of commendation for his earnest efforts and honest industry.  Our subject was born in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, May 1, 1864, and was a son of Gotlieb and Henrietta (Bernt) Richter, both of whom were natives of Germany. His father was left an orphan when eight years of age, and he came to America in 1860 and followed farming in Wisconsin, but was a brewer by trade.  Mr. Richter was the third in a family of eight children, and was reared in the city and on the farm and attended the city schools in his native place, and at the age of sixteen years began work for himself. He spent nine winters in the lumber woods of Wisconsin, and also on the log drives, and learned the stone mason s trade, which he also followed. He went to North Dakota in 1887 and settled in Eddy county, on section 15, in township 148, range 65, and built a claim shanty 12x18 feet. He had but twenty-five cents when he arrived in New Rockford, and the first few years he hired a little farming done on his place. He has fought prairie fires many times, and in 1888 lost his household goods by this agency, and on another occasion saved himself by finding an alkali spot free from the fire. He followed grain and stock raising and also worked at his trade, and now has a farm of three hundred and twenty acres, one hundred of which is under cultivation, and he annually operates about six hundred and forty acres of land. He has a well-improved estate, and in consideration of the fact that he has gained his possessions with his own labors and no means with which to make a start aside from this, his success is remarkable.
Our subject was married, in 1888, to Miss Lona Starks, who was born and raised in Wisconsin. Mrs. Richter s father, Morgan Starks, was born in New York, and was a Yankee. Seven children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Richter, as follows: Bessie, born July 1, 1889; Otto, born October 21, 1891; Etta, deceased; Guy, born October 1, 1893; Ida, born September 20, 1894; Vivian, born February 10, 1897; and Pearl, born July 2, 1899, all of whom were born in Dakota. Mr. Richter served as assessor four years, and takes an active interest in public affairs of local importance. He is a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Knights of Maccabees. Politically he is a Democrat. [Source: History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Sally Masteller]

Peter Roberts
PETER ROBERTS occupies a prominent place as a well-to-do and progressive member of the farming community of Foster county, and he has a fine farm in township 147, range 67. He is now retired from active labors and has accumulated a competence to tide him through his declining years. Our subject was born in Wales, in 1844, and was a son of David and Mary Roberts, both of whom were natives of Wales. His father was one of the early settlers of Wisconsin, and took government land there. He spent the last of his career in his native land, and the mother of our subject died in Wisconsin at the age of eighty-three years. Mrs. Roberts' maiden name was Hughs. The Hughs family was quite a prominent family of England and were professional men, bankers, etc.   Mr. Roberts was the fourth in a family of nine children and at the age of three years came to America with his parents and was reared on a farm in Wisconsin. He was given a good common-school education and attended two terms at Lawrence University at Appleton, Wisconsin. He began for himself at the age of sixteen years and after hiring out one year followed lumbering eight years and traveled from Warsaw, Wisconsin, to St. Louis, Missouri, for many years, and while raft pilot made seven dollars per day. He began farming in Winnebago county, Wisconsin, in 1871, and owned eighty acres of land, part of which was timber land. He made this a pleasant home and from the farm gained a comfortable competence, and when he disposed of his interests there was able to begin in Dakota with some means. He went to Foster county, North Dakota, in 1883, and entered claim to land as a pre-emption and tree claim in township147, range 67, and erected a house and small barn. He had about four thousand dollars and had all necessary machinery and began farming on an extensive scale. He and his children now own together seven hundred and twenty acres of land, on which he has erected a complete set of substantial buildings. His farm is within two miles of the station and a school building is erected on the land, and he has one and a half acres of forest trees and plenty of good water. Mr. Roberts was stricken with paralysis after completing arrangements for the economical conduct of the farm and the enjoyment of his fortune, and for the past two years has been an invalid and the farm has been in charge of his sons since 1897.  Our subject was married in 1870 to Miss Matilda Edwards, of Welsh descent. Mrs. Roberts' father, Hugh Edwards, was a farmer by occupation. The following children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Roberts: M. Louisa, Edward W. and M. Pierce. The youngest child died in infancy. Mrs. Roberts was an invalid for ten years and her death occurred in 1892. Mr. Roberts has always taken an active interest in the welfare of his community and has held numerous township offices. Politically he is a Populist and is a man of worth and highly esteemed by his fellow men. [Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Renae Capitanio]

Richard C. Russell
Oshkosh - The subject of this sketch, a native of Sunderland, Massachusetts, was born on the 21st of April, 1829, and is the son of Alvin Russell and Sarah nee Marsh. His father, a wagon-maker by occupation, was a man of moderate means, much respected by all who knew him. Richard's early life represented few marked phases, he receiving a good education at Amherst, and after closing his studies, spent four years in mercantile pursuits at that place. His health, however, becoming impaired, he removed to the West in 1856, and established himself at Oshkosh, Wisconsin, in the grain business. Remaining thus engaged until 1865, he conducted a good business, shipping both East and South, and made it financially successful. In 1865, having accumulated sufficient capital, under the firm name of Russell, Leach and Co., he erected a saw-mill at Manistee, Michigan, and for three years engaged in manufacturing and shipping lumber. Closing out his milling interest, he, in 1870, established a private bank in Oshkosh, and the following March, with a capital of one hundred thousand dollars, organized the Union National Bank, with D. S. Libbie as president, and himself as cashier and general manager. In the destructive fire of 1873 their building was burned, but all the assets having been saved, the bank opened for business the next day and was again conducting a prosperous and substantial business. Aside from his banking interests, Mr. Russell is still concerned in mercantile pursuits, and also largely connected with real-estate operations.
Politically, he is identified with the republican party, and has been honored by his fellow-citizens with trustworthy positions. In 1863 he was elected superintendent of public instruction, and reelected in the following year, and in this capacity rendered most efficient service in organizing the public schools of his city. In 1864-65 he represented his district in the State legislature.
In his religious communion, he is associated with the Congregational church.
He has traveled somewhat extensively over the United States, and the practical knowledge of men and things thus gained, combined with his fine executive and financial abilities, have enabled him to turn circumstances to the interests of his business, and to make it in every way successful.
He was married in July, 1858, to Miss Maggie F. Reardon, and by her has two daughters and one son.
His present business and social standing is wholly due to his own effort, and he may most appropriately be called a self-made man. While he has been deeply engrossed in his business affairs, he has yet given much time to reading and self-culture, and by constant effort has developed a noble character that does not fail to impress all with whom he has to do with a sense of his merit and genuine worth. [Source: The US Biographical Dictionary and Portrait Galley of Eminent Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Volume (1877) transcribed by Vicki Bryan]

Thomas P. Russell, M.D.
OSHKOSH - The subject of this biography, a native of Windsor County, Vermont, was born in the town of Bethel, April 19, 1827. His parents, Thomas P. and Martha (Cotton) Russell, were of patriotic stock, both his paternal and maternal grandparents having fought bravely in the struggle for independence. Young Russell worked on a farm and attended a district school until he was about sixteen, when he spent two or three terms at the Royalton Academy. He was in the employ of the Vermont Central Railroad Company about four years, surveying at first, and afterward acting in the capacity of conductor. He commenced reading medicine in 1848 at East Randolph, with Dr. Walter Carpenter; later attended lectures at Woodstock, and graduated in 1852. After practicing at Weston, in his native county, two years, he removed to Wisconsin, and settled in Oshkosh, where he has been in practice ever since, except when serving his country on the tented field. In May 1861, he became assistant surgeon of the 2d Regiment Wisconsin Infantry, but resigned in about four months and returned to Oshkosh. In May, 1862, he went out as surgeon of the 1st Wisconsin Cavalry, but, by reason of severe illness in the winter of 1862-3, he left the army again and returned home, with no expectation of living a year. He, however, recovered, and has continued the medical practice with unabated zeal. He makes a specialty of surgery, and has a wide circuit and a very extensive practice.
Dr. Russell is a close student, and pays considerable attention to sciences collateral to medicine and surgery. The microscope is now one of his favorite studies, and as a microscopist it is doubtful if he has more than one or two equals in the State.  Dr. Russell is a member of the Wisconsin State Medical Society, and of the United States Medical Association. He was a delegate to the World's Medical Congress, which met in Philadelphia in the autumn of 1876.
In politics he was a democrat until the opening of the rebellion in 1861; since then he has acted with the republicans. He accepts no political offices, but steadily and closely adheres to his professional studies and practice. He attends the Episcopal Church.  Dr. Russell has a second wife. His first was Miss Myra Francis Egerton, of East Randolph, Vermont, whom he married in 1853; she died without issue two years later. His present wife was Miss Sophia Edgarton, of Oshkosh; their union occurred in 1865. They have one child living, and have lost two. [Source: The US Biological Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Volume (1877) transcribed by Vicki Bryan]

Hon. Philetus Sawyer
OSHKOSH - The subject of this sketch, a native of Vermont, was born in Rutland, September 22, 1816. He is the son of Ephraim and Polly (Parks) Sawyer, who moved to Essex County, New York, when Philetus was only one year old. There his early youth was spent on his father's farm, in his father's blacksmith shop and in a neighboring sawmill, with about three months' annual attendance at a district school, in which the simplest rudiments of earning were taught. At the age of seventeen he pledged his father one hundred dollars for the remainder of his minority, and from his wages in a saw-mill, in about two years, canceled this obligation, spending at the same time two more winters in the district school. After a short time he operated the mill on contract with good success, and in the autumn of 1847, with about two thousand dollars in his pocket, the fruit of his own industry, he removed to Wisconsin and settled on a farm in Fond du Lac County. Two years of half crops satisfied him that his fortune did not he in farming. The Wolf River pinery, twenty miles north, was at that time attracting considerable attention, and in December, 1849, Mr. Sawyer removed to Algoma, then the nucleus of a village and now a part of the city of Oshkosh. The next spring he took a sawmill, which he operated on a contract for a time, and not long afterward rented it, and in 1853 purchased it, in company with Messrs. Brand and Orcott, of Fond du Lac. Three years afterward Mr. Orcott retired from the firm, and in 1862 Mr. Sawyer became sole proprietor of the property and business, paying Mr. Brand seventy thousand dollars and the amount he put in for his interest. The business had been carefully managed, and had proved a marked success. About two years afterward Mr. Sawyer took his only son, Edgar P. Sawyer, into partnership with him, and during the thirteen years they have been together they have accumulated a fortune of more than half a million dollars. This has all been done by careful attention to business conducted on the strictest rules of honor and integrity. He has always made his contracts definite and clear; hence has had few misunderstandings and no lawsuits. He has always been lenient toward debtors, careful to oppress no one, and among businessmen has a reputation for correct practices as well as principles. He has a large interest in the First National Bank of Oshkosh.
Mr. Sawyer has been a favorite with the people in the municipality of the city, and in both the assembly and congressional districts. He was member of the legislature in 1857 and 1861; mayor of the city in 1863 and 1864; a member of congress from 1865 to 1875, when he peremptorily declined a sixth nomination. Nearly all those ten years in congress he was on the committee on commerce, and, though not the chairman, did the leading work. By his untiring efforts large appropriations were secured for the improvement of harbors in his district. For six years he had charge of all the appropriations for rivers and harbors in the United States. He was always very attentive to the wants of his constituents. During all the time he was in congress Mr. Sawyer was noted as a worker rather than speaker, and probably no member was more diligent than he.
In politics, Mr. Sawyer was originally a "barnburner" or free-soil democrat, but since 1856 has acted with the republican party. During the rebellion no man in Oshkosh gave more time or money to aid in carrying on the war than he. He labored with untiring zeal and patriotism, and his earnest pleas and generous contributions swelled the volunteer bounty funds. In promoting religious and benevolent causes his donations are always generous. In many ways he has contributed and is contributing to the prosperity of this city.
Mr. Sawyer and his son have a heavy interest in the Sawyer Manufacturing Company, which is engaged in the manufacture of threshing machines, his son having full charge of their interests in the enterprise. He uses his money freely for the development of local interests, and no man here is more public-spirited. He has an interest in the Menomonee River Lumber Company, which has a yard and office in Chicago.
In 1842 Mr. Sawyer was married to Miss Malvina M. Hadley, of Essex County, New York. They have had five children, three of whom, the son already mentioned and two daughters, are now living. The elder daughter, twenty-one years of age, was educated at Vassar College. [Source: The US Biographical Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Volume (1877) transcribed by Vicki Bryan]

PHILETUS SAWYER, of Oshkosh, was born at Whiting, Vermont, September 22, 1816; received a public school and business education; came to Wisconsin in 1847, and engaged in the lumber business; was a member of the legislature in 1857 and 1861; was mayor of Oshkosh in 1863 and 1864; was elected to the thirty-ninth, fortieth, forty-first, forty-second and forty-third congresses; was a delegate to the Republican National Convention at Chicago in June, 1880; was elected United States Senator January 26, 1881, as a republican, to succeed Angus Cameron, receiving 98 votes in joint legislative convention against 29 for James G. Jenkins, democrat, 1 for C. D. Parker, democrat, and 2 for C. C. Washburn, republican. His term of office will expire March 4, 1887. [Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1883) Transcribed by Rhonda Hill]

Eber Simpson
EBER SIMPSON (Rep.) is the father of two noted University athletes, Capt. George L. Simpson, in France, and Eber Simpson, Jr., Medical Reserve Corps, and father-in-law of another, Arlie Mucks. He was born in Ellenburg, N. Y., Aug. 8, 1863, but came to Eureka, Winnebago county with his parents in 1865, and was educated in the common schools. After the death of his father in 1873, he supported himself, working on a farm, in a grocery, general shops, woodenware, shingle mill in the woods and Oshkosh Fire department. He was alderman from 1896 to 1904, sheriff in 1905-6 and served on the Republican ward, county and state central committees. Was three times delegate to the state convention. He was elected to the assembly in 1918, receiving 1,511 votes to 556 for Rudolph T. Schuttler (Soc.) and 115 for Theron Shove (Pro.). [Source: The Wisconsin Blue Book (1919) pages 507-508; transcribed by FoFG mz]

George E. Sutherland
George E. Sutherland (Rep.), was born September 14, 1843, in Burlington, Otsego county, N. Y., came to Wisconsin in 18x5, settled at Waukau, Winnebago county; graduated from Amherst College in 1870; is a lawyer; enlisted as private in Company A, First Regiment New York Light Artillery, September 30, 1862; served in that company in the army of the Potomac until July, 1864; was in an engagement at Chambersburg, Penn., when the rebels captured and burned that city in 1864; commissioned as captain by President Lincoln July 23, 1864, and was sent to Kentucky to recruit colored troops. Assigned to the command of the 13th U. S. C. Artillery, and on October 13, 1864, in an engagement at Eddyville, Ky., was wounded and taken prisoner. After escape from imprisonment, commanded the ports of Caseyville and Owensboro, Ky. Was commissary of subsistence at Smithland, and sat on a military commission and court martial at Camp Nelson and Lexington, Ky. Settled in business at Ripon in 1871, where he was city attorney in 1872 and ’73, and in 1874 went to Fond du Lac. He was elected state senator for 1880 and ’81, by a vote of 3,161 against 2,474 for T. K. Gillett (Democrat), and 297 for E. B. Ingram (Greenbacker). [Source: Blue Book of Wisconsin (1880) transcribed by Rhonda Hill]

Truman H. Thatcher
Truman H. Thatcher, residing on section 31, township 130, in Hudson township, is one of the successful pioneer farmers of Dickey county. He entered that region when it was a wild country, and has aided in transforming it into one of the thriving agricultural districts of the state. His farm bespeaks careful management and persistent efforts and strict attention to business, and he enjoys a liberal reward, surrounded by the comforts of a model rural home. Our subject was born in Sharon, Vermont, January 28, 1851. His father, Norman Thatcher, was a native of Vermont and was a soldier in the Civil war. He enlisted in Company C, Tenth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and served three years, and was captain of his company. He was wounded in action, and died in Menasha, Wisconsin, from disease contracted in the army. The mother of our subject, who bore the maiden name of Mary Ann Robinson, was a native of Vermont, and is now living in Menasha. Four children were born to this worthy couple, two sons and two daughters, our subject being the third child and first son.  Truman H. Thatcher resided in his native town until six years of age, when his parents removed to Menasha, Wisconsin, in 1857, and there he attended school and grew to manhood. He then secured a team and was engaged in the transfer business until 1883, in which year he went to Dickey county, North Dakota, and entered a pre-emption claim to one quarter-section of land upon which the village of Ginelph is now located. He subsequently sold this property, and has at present four hundred acres of choice land, which is well improved and fully stocked.  Our subject was married in Wisconsin, June 25, 1872, to Miss Phoebe Ann Smith, who was born in New York, November 12, 1850. Mrs. Thatcher went to Wisconsin when a child with her parents and lived on a farm near Neenah. Mr. and Mrs. Thatcher are the parents of one daughter, Maud, now Mrs. J. D. Root, of Enderlin, North Dakota. Mr. Root is in the railway mail service, running between Enderlin and Portal. Mr. Thatcher is a member of Masonic Lodge, No. 187, of Menasha, Wisconsin, and is also a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, and Mrs. Thatcher is a member of the Eastern Star. Our subject is the present chairman of the township board, and is a member of the board of school directors. He is an ardent worker for the better interests of his community, and he merits his high standing in his community. Politically he is a Republican. [Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Janice Louie]

Albert E. Thompson
Albert E. Thompson, Oshkosh, was born in the town of Pleasant Valley, now Princeton, Wisconsin, October 28, 1850, his parents being John C. and Catherine M. Thompson. Having completed his education at Ripon College he entered the office of J. M. Fish, at Princeton, as a student at law in April, 1869. On the completion of his law studies he was admitted to the bar at Dartford in June, 1870, and immediately entered into the practice of law with Mr. Fish, at Princeton, which connection continued until April, 1879, when Mr. Thompson moved to Oshkosh, where he formed a partnership with H. H. Jackson, which continues to the present time—1882. While residing at Princeton, he was president of that village in 1875, and from that time until leaving the place he was a member of the county board of supervisors, of which he was chairman during the last two years of his serving on the board. [The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin History and Biography, by Parker McCobb Reed (1882); Transcribed for Genealogy Trails by Tammy Clark]

John C. Thompson
As one of the representative members of the bar of his native state and as one of the prominent and influential citizens of Oshkosh, Winnebago county, Mr. Thompson is well entitled to specific recognition in this publication. He was born at Princeton, Green Lake county, Wisconsin, on the 28th of April, 1872, and is a son of John C. and Catherine ]\I. (Cameron) Thompson, who came to Wisconsin in 1849. He whose name initiates this review is indebted to the public schools of Wisconsin for his earlier educational discipline, which was supplemented by four years at Ripon College, at Ripon, this state, and he later attended the University of Wisconsin, at Madison. In preparation for the work of his chosen profession, Mr. Thompson was matriculated in the Wisconsin college of Law, at Madison, and in this institution he was graduated as a member of the class of 1893, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. He was admitted to the bar of his native state and in July of the same year he opened an office in Oshkosh, where he has since been engaged in the active practice of his profession and where he has gained high standing as a versatile advocate and well fortified counselor, with the result that he has long retained a representative clientage and has been identified with much of the important litigation before the courts of this section of the state.  Mr. Thompson is a man of distinctive intellectual attainments and high literary appreciation, and his study and research have been carried into a wide sphere. He is a life member of the Wisconsin State Historical Association, one of the most vital and admirable organizations of the kind in the Union, and he is also identified with the American Bar Association, and the National Geographical Society. He has been one of the most ardent and effective of workers in behalf of the cause of the Republican party, and served for six years as chairman of the Republican county committee of Winnebago county, an office in which he showed much skill and discrimination in maneuvering the political forces at his command. He served four years as chairman of the county board of supervisors, and during this time was an insistent advocate of progressive policies, with due conservatism in the administration of county affairs. He was also for a time a member of the Oshkosh board of education. Mr. Thompson is a stockholder in a number of banking institutions in his home state, besides which he is a member of the well known firm of Thompson, Pinkerton & Jackson, attorneys at law of Oshkosh. In the year 1899 was solemnized the marriage of Ir. Thompson to Miss Mabel A. Gile, a former resident of Neenah, Wisconsin, and they have three children, namely: John C, Jr., Robert R. and Barbar S. Thompson. [Source: "WISCONSIN, ITS STORY AND BIOGRAPHY 1848-1913", pub. 1914, by Ellis Baker Usher - Submitted by Barb Ziegenmeyer]

Harvey Griswold Turner
Conspicuous among those sterling citizens who have left a clearly defined and benignant impress upon the history of Wisconsin was Judge Harvey Griswold Turner, who was long numbered among the representative members of the bar of the state and whose influence was potent in the furtherance of civic and material progress. He was a member of one of the honored pioneer families of Wisconsin and a scion of lines long and prominently identified with the annals of American history. He attained to the span of three score years and ten, allotted by the psalmist, and passed the closing days of his long and useful life in apartments in the Plankinton House, Milwaukee, where his death occurred on the 22nd of November, 1893. In a publication of the province assigned to the one at hand there is all of consistency in according a tribute to the memory of this honored citizen, together with a brief review of his personal career and family history.  Harvey Griswold Turner was born at East Oswego, Oswego county, New York, on the 7th of June, 1822, and was a son of Joseph and Mary (Griswold) Turner. Representatives of the Turner family were numbered among the earliest settlers of Connecticut, and to members of the family is attributed effective aid in bringing about the enactment of the famous and historic "Blue laws" which still remain on the statute books of that New England commonwealth. Representatives of the name went from Connecticut into Vermont, and from the latter state went forth the founders of the New York branch of the family.
Joseph Turner, father to him to whom this memoir is dedicated, was born in Vermont, and became one of the pioneers of the Empire state. He served as a valiant soldier in the war of 1812, and in 1839 he came west and numbered himself among the pioneers of the Territory of Wisconsin. He established his home at Prairieville, the nucleus of the present city of Waukesha, and became one of the prominent and influential citizens of the pioneer community. Wisconsin was admitted to statehood in 1848 and he had the distinction of serving as a member of the first state senate, besides which he was a member of the first board of supervisors of Waukesha county and its first chairman, in the organization of which he took a prominent part. He was closely concerned with the early development and progress of that county, but finally removed to Winnebago county, where he became one of the founders of the present attractive little city of Menasha, where he the remainder of his life. His name and also that of his noble wife merit enduring place on the roll of the honored pioneers of Wisconsin.
Harvey G. Turner gained his early educational advantages in the schools of his native city, and he was about seventeen years of age at the time of the family removal to Wisconsin, where he met with his full quota of experiences in connection with conditions and associations of the pioneer epoch. He remained at Prairieville (now Waukesha) until 1842, when he removed to Milwaukee and entered the law- office of the firm of Finches & Lynde, under whose able preceptorship he continued his study of the law until he proved himself eligible for admission to the bar, a desideratum to which he attained in 1844. In initiating the active practice of his profession he established his home in Grafton. Washington county, a town that is now in Ozaukee county, and soon afterward he was elected to the office of district attorney of the county. When but twenty-four years of age he was a delegate to the convention that framed the constitution under which Wisconsin was admitted to statehood, and in 1851-2 he was a prominent and valued member of the state senate. In 1853 there came further evidence of popular confidence and esteem in his election to the office of Judge of the County Court of Ozaukee county, an incumbency which he retained for four years.  In 1861 Judge Turner abandoned the practice of his profession and removed with his family to New York city, where he was engaged in business pursuits for about two years. With the exception of this interim he gave his attention continuously to the practice of law for nearly half a century, and he held a position of prominence at the bars, in tune, of Washington, Ozaukee, Manitowoc and Milwaukee counties.   Judge Turner was emphatically and insistently a Democrat in politics and he was long numbered among the leaders in the councils of his party in Wisconsin. In 1854 he was a candidate for congress, as representative of the Third Congressional district, his opponent was Hon. John B. Macy, of Fond du Lac. He met with defeat, owing to normal political exigencies. It may incidentally be noted that at that time the Third congressional district comprised that portion of Wisconsin lying between the Milwaukee county line and Lake Superior. For nine years prior to his death. Judge Turner resided with his only son in Milwaukee. He was a man of distinctive professional and intellectual ability, strong in his convictions and yet ever kindly and tolerant in his judgment of others. He did well his part in the upbuilding of a great commonwealth and his memory will long be cherished in that state which was the scene of his activities for many long years. Judge Turner was a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity in this state and was one of the valued and honored members of the Old Settlers' Club of Milwaukee.  As a young man Judge Turner was united in marriage to Miss Emeline Griswold Teall, who was born in Fairfield, Herkimer county, New York, on the 4th of May, 1826, and who was called to the "land of the leal" in 1887. William J. Turner, of whom specific mention is made on other pages of this work, is the only child of Judge Turner and his wife. An adopted daughter, Mrs. H. C. Richards, resides at Manitowoc, Wisconsin.  Mrs. Turner was a daughter of Colonel William and Rhoda (Conant) Teall, and both Judge and Mrs. Turner were in line of descent from Governor Griswold, one of the early governors of Connecticut. Colonel William Teall was a son of Joseph Teall, who was a member of the body guard of General Washington in the War of the Revolution, and who received in recognition of his military services, a large grant of land in Herkimer county, New York. Much of this land is still in the possession of his descendants and upon the same is situated the attractive village of Fairfield, where Mrs. Turner was born.
Colonel William Teall came with his family to the west about the year 1827 and at Michigan City, Indiana, he established the largest mercantile business west of Buffalo, New York. He also owned and operated the first line of stages between Buffalo and Michigan City, which latter place was one of considerable importance at the time, Chicago being little more than a straggling village. In these early pioneer days Colonel Teall acquired large tracts of land in Wisconsin, but a few years later he met with reverses which compelled him to sacrifice a large part of his holdings. He early established his home at Port Washington, this state, and there he continued to reside until his death, which took place in 1875. He was a man of fine ability and sterling character, and he did much to further the civic and industrial development of Wisconsin. [Source: "WISCONSIN, ITS STORY AND BIOGRAPHY 1848-1913", pub. 1914, by Ellis Baker Usher - Submitted by Barb Ziegenmeyer]

James M. Tusten
In whatever vocation engaged the successful man is the persistent man. This gentleman has gained his possessions single-handed and is the owner of one of the fine farms of Gardner township, Cass county, and resides on section 25. He is highly respected for his industry, energy and integrity, and well merits his success as an agriculturist.  Our subject was born in Green Lake county, Wisconsin, September 14, 1852, and was raised on a farm and received a common-school education. He resided in his native state till the spring of 1885, when he went to North Dakota, having spent two years in Fond du Lac county, and two years in Waushara county, and two and a half years in Winnebago county, following farming in each location. He purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land when he settled in North Dakota, the tract being in section 25, in Gardner township, on which he has since resided. He has erected a complete set of substantial farm buildings and is now the owner of one and a half sections of well-improved land, on which he follows general farming.  Our subject was married in Waushara county, Wisconsin, to Miss Martha A. Spoor, a native of that county. Two children have been born to bless the home of Mr. and Mrs. Tusten, upon whom they have bestowed the following names: Mabel E. and Edna M. Mr. Tusten is active in public affairs, and has served as assessor of Gardner township for the past three years. He is a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen and Brotherhood of American Yeomen. [Source: History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Kim Mohler]

De Witt C. Van Ostrand
NEENAH - In the young cities of Wisconsin are found many eminently successful men, who, beginning in obscurity, have worked their way slowly but steadily up to a competency, if not to independence, and to a high and commanding position in society, locating in a town, in many cases, when it was in an embryotic state, and having no capital other than a good character, a sound constitution, a resolute heart, and a willingness to do any kind of respectable work which should offer itself. Of this class are three fourths of the leading men, the merchants and manufacturers of Neenah. De Witt Clinton Van Ostrand, of the firm of Smith, Van Ostrand and Leavens, the great stove manufacturers, is a son of Aaron Van Ostrand, a trader, and Elizabeth nee Collins. He was born at Liverpool, near Syracuse, New York, October 4, 1827, and is therefore just approaching his fiftieth birthday. He lost his father when four or five years old. He lived on a farm until he was about seventeen years old and then attended an academy at Evans Mills a few terms, and afterward went to Hinsdale, New Hampshire, and worked about three years in a woolen factory.
In May, 1850, he removed to Neenah and started a small chair factory, which he conducted one year. He afterward worked in a storehouse a few months; ran a Durham boat a short time between Grand Chute (now Appleton) and Neenah, with Indians and half-breeds to propel it; the next season, in company with A. H. Cronkite, had the contract for portaging goods from Kaukauna, through Neenah, to Oshkosh and Fond du Lac, all merchandise for those points in those days being thus transported. He acted two years as chief clerk in a hardware store owned by Mr. Cronkite. In September, 1855, in company with Hiram Smith, he commenced merchandizing, and continued it nearly three years; he was engaged in the manufacture of flour three years, in company with Mr. Cronkite; and later, spent about seven years at El Dorado, Fond du Lac County, milling and merchandizing, in partnership with James K. Scribner; returning to Neenah, he, with Hiram Smith, purchased the Neenah paper mills, the first manufactory of the kind built there, and operated them for seven years. During that time they bought an interest in the Neenah stove works, in connection with Mr. H. P. Leavens, and these three gentlemen now own the foundry and are manufacturing between five and six thousand stoves annually. Messrs. Smith and Van Ostrand have also an office on Cedar Street, and are engaged to some extent in the loan business.  In 1865, while residing in Fond du Lac County, Mr. Van Ostrand represented that county in the lower house of the legislature. He was afterward re-nominated, but declined to run. At an early day in Neenah, before it became a city, he was president of the village two years. He was on the school board about three years, and acted as its clerk. He heartily sympathizes with every enterprise calculated to advance the educational, moral or material interests of the city.
He is a member of the Presbyterian Church.
On the 4th of March, 1856, he was married to Miss Eliza Wheeler, of Neenah. They have four children.
Mr. Van Ostrand has a dark hazel eye; an open, frank expression of the face ; his hair quite a gray, the only indication of fifty winters. He is five feet eight inches in height, weighs one hundred and sixty five pounds, and has a symmetrical, well-proportioned physique. [Source: The US Biographical Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Volume (1877) transcribed by Vicki Bryan]

Peter Vredenburgh
Peter Vredenburgh (Rep.), of Winneconne, was born in Kingston, Ulster county, New York, January 28, 1836; received a common school education; is a farmer by occupation; came to Wisconsin in 1850, and settling at Winneconne, has resided there ever since; has held various local offices and was elected to the assembly of 1883, receiving 1,158 votes, against 872 for J. N. Stone, democrat, 223 for E. W. Clark, prohibitionist, and 147 for G. W. Bradley, greenbacker. [Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1883), page 507; transcribed by Susan Geist]

Thomas Wall
Thomas Wall, (Dem.), of Oshkosh, was born in the city of Lockport, N. Y., May 4, 1840; received a common school education; is by occupation a lumberman; came to Wisconsin in 1855 and settled at Oshkosh; was a member of assembly in 1873, and ’76 and in 1877; was elected state senator in 1882, receiving 3,833 votes against 2,772 votes for C. B. Blark, republican, 779 for Charles Vessey, prohibitionist, and 104 for D. R. Bean, greenbacker. [Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1883), page 479; transcribed by Vicki Bryan]

William Wall
William Wall (Rep.) of Oshkosh, Winnebago county, was born in Lockport, Niagara county, New York, May 9, 1836; received a common school education; is by occupation a lumberman; came to Wisconsin in 1854, and settled in Oshkosh; was first lieutenant of company C, 21st regiment Wisconsin volunteers, promoted to captain, and attached to Gen. J. C. Starkweather's staff as acting assistant adjutant general; was in all the battles in which the 21st regiment participated; elected to the assembly for 1879, and re-elected for 1880, receiving 977 votes against 591 for R. J. Weisbrod, Democrat, and 143 for J. R. Holland, Greenbacker. [Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1880) transcribed by RuthAnne Wilke]

Ganem W. Washburn
Ganem W. Washburn, Oshkosh, a cousin of the notable Washburn brothers, was born at Livermore, Maine, October 29, 1823. He was the son of Kenel and Elia K. Washburn. After thorough preparation he was sent as student to Bowdoin College, Maine, at which institution he completed the regular course of four years, and graduated in the year 1845.  The young man having determined to follow the profession of the law, commenced his studies in his father’s office, at Livermore, and afterward continued them with Israel Washburn, Orano, Maine, who was subsequently governor of that state. In the year 1847 he was admitted to the bar at Paris, Oxford county, Maine.  Coming west and settling in Oshkosh, Mr. Washburn at first commenced the practice of law alone, but afterward became associated with Gabriel Bouck, and continued the partnership from 1850 to 1857.  Mr. Washburn has been state senator, county judge of Winnebago county, and circuit judge of the tenth circuit. [Source: The Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, by Parker McCobb Reed, Milwaukee; P. M. Reed Publisher (1882) transcribed by Vicki Bryan]

Leslie E. Waterman
Leslie Emerson Waterman is one of the enterprising and successful business men of West Superior who have contributed largely toward the phenomenal upbuilding of that remarkable city. He is a native son of Wisconsin and a fair type of the class of citizens whose energy and foresight have developed the various industries for which that Commonwealth is famous.  Mr. Waterman was born at Fisk Corners, Winnebago county, Nov. 9, 1849, and is a son of Joel and Belinda (Joslyn) Waterman, natives of the Green Mountain State, who were among the early pioneers of Wisconsin. His grandfather, Abraham Waterman, was born in Rhode Island and came of Welsh ancestors. He was a veteran of the Revolutionary was, and his son Joel did military duty during the war of 1812. In 1842 the latter went to Illinois, whither he removed his family the following year, settling in McHenry county. Four years later he came to Wisconsin, locating in Winnebago county about the time the first house was built in Oshkosh. He took up government land there and also engaged in merchandising and lumbering to some extent. In 1856 he became one of the pioneers of Chippewa Falls, where he did considerable logging and operated a sawmill for some years. He and his sons also built the "Waterman Hotel" at that place, which was conducted by members of the family until 1883. In 1877 he resigned his interests there and went to Fort Worth, Texas, where he built another hotel and carried on the same until 1884, at which date he sold and removed to Fayetteville, Ark., where he still owns a fine farm, though in recent years he and his wife have spent much of their time at Superior. Though they have reached the ages of eighty-four and seventy-eight years, respectively, they still enjoy a fair degree of health and are intelligent and entertaining people to meet, excellent examples of the contentment which results from the cultivation of industrious habits and exemplary characters. Mr. Waterman was born at Royalton, Vt., and his wife at Waitsfield, in the same State. She is a daughter of Hooker Joslyn, who was born at Wethersfield, Vt., served in the war of 1812, and in 1847 removed to McHenry county, Ill., where he died a few years later. His father, Joseph Joslyn, served in the Continental army. Lucia Davidson, who became the wife of Hooker Joslyn and the mother of Mrs. Waterman, was a native of Hartland, Vermont.  Besides the subject of this notice, Mr. and Mrs. Waterman are the parents of three daughters and one son, as follows: Lillian (Mrs. Charles George), of Superior; Jessie (Mrs. Robert Seymour), of the same place; Louisa Eugenia (Mrs. A.B. Manahan), of Pasadena, Ca.; and Luzerne, of Carleton, Neb. The posterity of this worthy couple also includes fourteen grandchildren.  Leslie E. Waterman spent most of his boyhood at Chippewa Falls, where he became associated with his father in the hotel and afterward carried on the same in conjunction with his brother. He subsequently dealt in pine lands at that place and is still interested in that line of business. Since 1887 he has made his headquarters at West Superior, although he did not take up residence here until two years later. Upon locating at this place he invested in real estate quite extensively and has given much attention to the improvement of his property. In 1892, in conjunction with W. E. McCord, he erected a substantial three-story brick building which is one of the principal business blocks of the city. From time to time he has built a number of residences, and he still does a general real-estate business. It has been his policy to improve his city property as fast as practicable, thereby adding to the growth and general prosperity of the town. His excellent judgment and strict business integrity have caused him to be recognized as one of the foremost citizens of Superior. While taking a wholesome interest in all worthy public undertakings he does not concern himself with political agitation, but supports the principles of the Republican party. He and his family are connected with the Presbyterian church.
Mr. Waterman was married Sept. 30, 1876, to Miss Fannie Rossiter, who was born at Fort Howard, Wis. Their only surviving child is a daughter named Lucile. [Source: Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Lake Region (1905) transcribed by Nina Kramer]

Sidney Harry Waterman
The city of Cumberland, Barron Co., Wis., is one to be particularly congratulated in its chief executive, Hon. Sidney H. Waterman, a man of energy, tireless effort in the cause of public good, and one who has the city’s best interests at heart.  Mr. Waterman was born in Windsor county, Vt., Dec. 23, 1844, son of Harry and Diana (Johnson) Waterman, both of Windsor county, where they lived and died, and where their six children were born as follows: Emily, who is now a resident of Hanover, N. H.; Martha, deceased, Sidney, deceased; Sidney H.; Frederick, a real estate man of Elk River, Minn.; and Frank, of Buffalo, who works on the Erie railroad as conductor. Until he was seventeen years of age Sidney H. Waterman attended the home schools, and then went to Oshkosh, where he worked in various sawmills until 1882. In 1865, he was united in marriage with Miss Maria L. Howard, of Oshkosh, daughter of R. L. Howard, a Baptist preacher. The following children have come to this marriage: Albert H., secretary of the Miller Waterman Co. store at Cumberland, married Anna Miller, and has five daughters, Abbie, Gertrude, Elinor, Isabella and Frances; Alice married Timothy Olcott, of Ashton, Iowa, a banker and has three children, Sidney, Harvey and Ethel; Grace married W. J. Boyden, a merchant at Cumberland, and has two children, Sidney and Louisa; Marian is attending the State University at Madison. These children were all educated in the home and high schools, and are very intelligent and popular young people.   In March, 1882 Mr. Waterman came to Cumberland, and operated the Beaver Lake Lumber Co. mill for about twenty-two years under a contract. In 1903 the Miller & Waterman Company purchased what is known as the Company’s Store in Cumberland and Mr. Waterman is now the vice-president of the company. He is president of the Cumberland Telephone Company. He has a large cranberry marsh in Burnett county, Wis., consisting of 125 acres, which is very profitable.  In politics Mr. Waterman is a Republican, and for seven years has acted as mayor of Cumberland, giving the people a clean, honorable and business like administration. He has also served upon the county board, and is a man who leads in whatever he undertakes. He is a member of the Blue Lodge, No. 223, F. & A. M., and of Lodge No. 303, I. O. O. F., both of Cumberland. Mrs. Waterman is a consistent member of the Methodist Church, and a very charming and gracious lady. [Source: Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Lake Region (1905) Transcribed by: Glenda Stevens]

Andrew J. Webster
MENASHA:  The subject of this sketch was born at Cabot, Washington County, Vermont, January 24, 1829, a few weeks before the first inauguration of President Jackson. His father. Alpha Webster, being a great admirer of "Old Hickory," named his son after the incoming President. The grandfather of Andrew was a revolutionary patriot and soldier, and his widow lived and drew a pension until her hundredth year. When she settled in Washington County she not only went thither on foot, but on snowshoes, drawing a child on a hand-sled. The log cabin which her husband put up was one of the earliest built in the town of Cabot. Andrew passed his boyhood and youth on his father's farm, and at the age of twenty-one began life for himself. Going to St. Johnsbury he worked one year for E. and T. Fairbanks, but abandoning his purpose of becoming a scale manufacturer, he made up his mind to become a machinist. He worked at that trade about five years in Manchester and Nashua, New Hampshire, and Burlington, Vermont. In 1855 he removed to Wisconsin, and worked another year at his trade in Racine, and the next March began a small though safe business in the little village of Menasha. He started a spoke factory in a shop about twenty-four by thirty-six feet, he being at first not only sole proprietor, but the only workman. In a short time, however, he began to extend his business by Manufacturing wagon and carriage material in general, and thus required greater facilities and more help. Beginning with a capital of less than five hundred dollars, and more than half of that borrowed money, he could not expect to rush business the first few years. Business, however, gradually multiplied on his hands; his industry and energies began to be more and more liberally rewarded; and in 1861, in order to increase the capital and again enlarge his premises, and be able to meet the increasing demand for his wares, he took a partner, Mr. P. V. Lawson, an excellent mechanic, who, like Mr. Webster, had accumulated some means by the closest application to his trade.  Their business has gradually extended and exhibited a growth which reflects the highest credit upon the energy, enterprise and business ability of its proprietors. Their shops and yards in Menasha cover about ten acres of ground, and their business employs usually from one hundred and sixty to one hundred and eighty men, and yields an annual product of about two hundred thousand dollars, including a half interest in a spoke factory at Depere, which employs about twenty-five additional workmen. In their Menasha shops is the most improved machinery to be found in the world. Two competing railroads run a sidetrack under the eaves of their shops; they have a United States canal within sixty feet of their buildings, and a thousand feet of dock, with every facility for shipping at all seasons.
In politics Mr. Webster is a republican, but has no ambition for official honors, preferring the quiet of his legitimate business. In his religious sentiment he is a Universalist; is a man of warm and benevolent feelings, and a kind neighbor.
On the 6th of November, 1855, he was married to Miss Helen F. Vance, of Cabot, an acquaintance of his youth. They have an adopted son, Edward M. Webster, a bright lad of twelve years.  Mr. Webster is closely approaching his fiftieth year, yet would be taken for a man under forty-five. Though a very hard worker he is a man who has done a great deal of hard work, both mental and physical, but has always taken good care of himself and maintained excellent habits. His aim has been to make the most of his powers and build up a noble manhood, an ambition which has been crowned with abundant success. [Source: The US Biographical Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Volume (1877) transcribed by Vicki Bryan]

Hiram W. Webster
HIRAM W. WEBSTER (Rep.), of Omro, was born January 10, 1824; had a common school and academic education; came to Wisconsin in 1848, and settled at Omro; has held various local offices; was elected assemblyman for 1879, and re-elected for 1880, receiving 604 votes, against 484 for S. Ostertag, Democrat, and 206 for W. L. Strond, Greenbacker. [Source: Wisconsin Blue Book (1880) transcribed by RuthAnne Wilke]

Charles A. Weisbrod
Charles A. Weisbrod, a native of Prussia, was born at Simmern, in the Department of Coblentz, on the 5th of April, 1824, and is the son of Phillip W. Weisbrod and Catherine née Mayer. His father, a baker by trade, was an energetic and enterprising man, and became a well-to-do land-owner. After completing his primary education, Charles attended the Gymnasium at Treves, and afterward the Polytechnic School and University at Berlin for three years and six months. He early developed a taste for professional life, and during the first three years after leaving school employed his time in civil engineering, and also spent three years as lieutenant of engineers in the reserve. In 1849, being then twenty-five years of age, he immigrated to the United States and settled at his present home in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Having decided to enter the legal profession, he at once began the study of law, giving himself with vigor to his work till 1852, when he was admitted to the bar. He at once began the practice of his profession, and laid the foundations of his present extensive and influential business. Aside from his professional duties, he has held many positions of responsibility and public trust. In 1854 he was elected clerk of the circuit court for a term of two years. He was also alderman during a period of five years, beginning with 1853. In 1867 he was elected school commissioner; was a member of the Baltimore convention in 1872, and participated in the nomination of Horace Greeley for president; in 1874 was appointed, and in 1876 reappointed, one of the board of regents of the State Normal Schools.
The present firm of Felker and Weisbrod was formed in 1866, and by prompt and energetic action its business has become one of the largest in northern Wisconsin, and each year adds largely to its increase. While they do a general law business, they have given special attention to bankrupt cases, in which they have been very successful, and in several instances have paid the creditors in full, with interest.
In his religious views Mr. Weisbrod is liberal, and not connected with any church organization. In politics he is identified with the democratic party, but is liberal in his views, and always exalts the man above the party.
He was married on the 18th of April, 1849, to Miss Elizabeth F. Goetz, by whom he has three sons and four daughters. His son Albert W. Weisbrod graduated from Michigan University in 1870, and afterward spent two years in Europe in the study of law, and upon his return home was admitted to the bar at Oshkosh in 1874. On the 1st of January, 1875 he took an interest in his father’s business, and is at present a member of that successful firm.
Mr. Weisbrod, beginning life with little means, has gradually worked his way from comparative obscurity to a position of high social standing and public regard; and in the success that has attended him presents an example of integrity, energy and enterprise well worthy of emulation. He possesses excellent personal and social qualities; and while he is highly respected by all who know him, he is most esteemed by those who know him best. He is surrounded with all the comforts of a happy home, and lives in the enjoyment of an ample competence. [Source: The US Biographical Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Volume (1877) transcribed by Denise Moreau]

Colonel Charles Wolcott
OSHKOSH - Among the early settlers and enterprising citizens of Oshkosh, none deserves a more honorable mention than the subject of this sketch, known throughout Winnebago County, Wisconsin, as Colonel Wolcott. He is descended from the celebrated Wolcott family of Connecticut. From a reference to the early history of the United States we find that one member of this family was a signer of the Declaration of Independence; another was secretary of the United States Treasury, and two others were governors of the State of Connecticut.  His mother, whose maiden name was Loomis, also belonged to a highly honorable family. Professor Loomis, of Yale College, has published a large genealogical work on the Loomis family, from which we learn that several of its members were officers in the revolutionary army, and that some of our leading scholars bear that name.  Talcott Wolcott, the father of our subject, was one of the principal ship-merchants of Hartford, Connecticut, being engaged in the West India and South American trade.
Charles was born February 17, 1811, in Hartford, and was educated in the excellent graded schools of his native city. He moved to Ohio in 1834, and read law with Governor Tod, of Warren, and was admitted to the bar in that place in 1836, Settling at Wooster, Wayne County, he practiced there until 1850, when he removed to Oshkosh, Wisconsin.
While in Ohio, Colonel Wolcott had the command of a regiment of cavalry for twelve  years, and from 1841 to 1846 was a member of the house of representatives and senate of Ohio.  On settling in the little village of Oshkosh, twenty-seven years ago, Colonel Wolcott resumed his legal practice, and continued it until about 1864, dealing also, during this time, largely and successfully in real estate. He owns the beautiful brick and stone block on the southeast corner of Main and Algoma streets, one of the best business localities in the city, and besides has other property in Oshkosh. Public spirited and generous he has always been among the foremost in all public interests and improvements.  Colonel Wolcott was one of the founders of the Episcopal Church in Oshkosh, and drew up its articles of association, and is the only living member of the church who signed those articles. He is one of the vestrymen, and is highly esteemed by all. As a citizen, he is upright and exemplary, and is well known as a gentleman of refined tastes and polished manners.  In politics Colonel Wolcott has always been a democrat, but for many years has not been an active politician.
His wife was Miss Ellen Rdwards Plummer, daughter of Dr. Nathaniel Plummer, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, a prominent man of the State. They were married August 19, 1836, and have no children. Mrs. Wolcott is an accomplished lady, on whose face time has shrunk from making any but the slightest furrows. Like her husband, she has much of the vivacity of youth. She carefully cultivates the Christian virtues, and no lady in Oshkosh is more highly esteemed. [Source: The US Biographical Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Wisconsin Volume (1877) transcribed by Vicki Bryan]

Holmes Wyman
HOLMES WYMAN, a successful agriculturist of Grand Forks county, whose home is on section 22, Union township, was born in Syracuse, New York, September 18, 1834. When he was sixteen years of age he accompanied his parents to Wisconsin, and with them located on a farm in Winnebago county. Here he lived until 1857, when he went to Henry county, Illinois, and engaged in farming near Woodhull. There he remained from 1857 to 1881. In the spring of the latter year he came to Grand Forks county. North Dakota, and filed a homestead claim to the tract of land where he now lives in section 22, Union township. He is the owner of one hundred and sixty acres of the best land in the county, and has it well improved and equipped with all modern conveniences for farm work.  Mr. Wyman was married in Woodhull, Illinois, to Miss Alary B. Clark, a native of Ohio, and to this union eight children have been born, as follows : Wilson L. : Clarence O. ; Adeha E.. now the wife of Clark W. Holmes, of whom mention will be found on another page ; Charles L. ; Alta M., now the wife of Robert Thompson ; Eva L., now the wife of Otto Gaulke; Leonard H. and Walter E. Mr. Wyman has been active in public affairs of a local nature, and was the first township clerk of Union township. [Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by BZ]


PREVIOUS PAGE OF BIOS - HOME

Wisconsin Genealogy Trails
© Copyright by Genealogy Trails