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Part 4

liarly Irish appellation.  If he was German, his name was doubtless Jost, that is Yost, the German j being pronounced yot.  The writer is therefore of the impression that this first settler on the upper Opequon was named Yost Heit , the word heit being a frequent termination of German words.  He is also born out in this idea by the fact that one at least of Hite's descendants was known as Yost Hite. Be this as it May, the man known as Joist Hite came from York, Pennsylvania, in the year 1732, bringing with him his three sons-in-law, and following in his wake a number of others, making in all about sixteen families.  The old gentleman having first choice, settled on the Opequon, five miles south of where Winchester now stands, and upon the great Indian highway to the upper valley, which was afterward enlarged, macadamized, and is now known as the Valley Turnpike.  Jacob Chrisman, one of his sons-in-law, proceeded two miles farther south, on the same road, and settled at a spring, the place being still knows as Chrisman's Spring; another son-in-law, George Bowman, moved still farther south on Cedar Creek; whilst the other, Paul Froman, located several miles west of Bowman on the same stream.  Peter Stephens and several others settled at what is now Stephens City, but which was at first known as Stephensburg, then Newtown, and Newtown-Stephensburg.  Stephens founded the town in conjunction with several others, and named it after himself.  Robert McKay, William Duff and Robert Green were three other heads of families who came with Hite.  McKay settled on Crooked Run, about nine miles southeast of Stephensburg, and Duff and Green, who subsequently obtained a grant in connection with Hite, for one hundred thousand acres additional land, located their portion of the tract east of the Blue Ridge, and settled over there.  Their respective families becoming among the leading citizens of that section, and one of their mutual descendants, Gen. Duff Green, attaining considerable eminence.  Some of the descendants of Jost Hite became prominent citizens throughout the valley, one of them, Col. Hite, being a gallant Revolutionary officer, and another, who settled in the lower part of the valley, became wealthy, whilst still another is named as one of the three gentlemen who built the first Episcopal Church south of the Potomac in the valley, the other two being Morgan Morgan and Dr. Briscoe.

As stated previously Richard Ap Morgan having obtained a large grant of land on the Potomac in the vicinity of the old Packhorse Ford, and at what is now Shepherdstown, he was soon followed after his settlement there by a number of persons, to whom he sold various tracts, some of whose descendants retain possession of those first purchases to the present time.  In 1734 Robert Harper settled at the junction of the two rivers, Potomac and Shenandoah, and established a ferry, which he ran for many years, and to which picturesque locality he has left his name.  Thomas Shepherd also came about this time, and, obtaining possession of the German settlement, Mecklenburg, re-christened it after himself, Shepherdstown, but the village was not organized by law till 1762.  Also came about this time to the same vicinity William Strope, Israel Friend, Thomas and William Forrester, Thomas and Van Swearingen, Edward Lucas, James Foreman, John Lemon, Jacob Hite (a son of Jost Hite), Richard Mercer, Thomas Rutherford, Edward Mercer, Jacob Vanmeter and a brother, Robert Stockton, Robert Buckles, John and Samuel Taylor, John Wright, and several others whose names cannot now be recalled.

Col. Robert Carter, afterward known as "King Carter," of Stafford, in 1730 obtained from Gov. Gooch a grant of sixty-three thousand acres of land running from just below the forks of the Shenandoah along that river for about twenty miles, but for many years this immense tract of valuable land contained upon it not one actual settler, it being farmed, or at least attended to, by overseers and slaves of the Colonel, who was an exceedingly rich man, being possessed of much other property.

The fine plantation known as Long Meadows, was opened about 1740 by one of Jost Hite's sons, Isaac, and about the same time John Lindsay and James Lindsay settled at Long Marsh between Berryville and the Bullskin.  In 1743 two or three persons came in from New Jersey, among whom was Isaac Larue, who also settled on the Marsh, and at the same time came Christopher Beeler, who located not far from Larue.  The following year Joseph Hampton and two sons came from the eastern shore of Maryland and began a settlement on Buck Marsh, near where now stands Berryville.  There is a tradition among the older residents of Clarke County that Hampton and his sons lived the first season of their residence in the hollow of a large sycamore tree, which tree was pointed out for many years afterward, but has now entirely disappeared.  Joseph Carter came from Bucks County, Penn., in 1743, and made a settlement about five miles east of Winchester, on the Opequon.  A fine spring was near where Carter settled and it was a favorite camping ground of the Indians.  William and John Vestall made a settlement at a very early date about six miles east of Charlestown.  While they were building a stone house they were attacked by Indians and driven across the Shenandoah to the mountain.  When they returned one of them brought a yellowish stone from across the river, which marks the point where they had left of building in consequence of the attack.  This house still stands, but the inscription on one end has been partially obliterated, which has given rise to a dispute as to the name being Vest, Vesta, or Vestal.  The author, however, has found in the "List of Surveys made by George Washington for the Lord Fairfax" the name three times occurring, Vestall.

Most of the settlements along the Bullskin Creek, and at, and above the head of that stream, were made not earlier than about 1760, among the first being the Allemongs and Rileys.  Later still, Ralph Wormly purchased a grant of thirteen thousand acres of land immediately adjoining "king" Carter's domain, for which he paid only five hundred guineas.  This tract was sold at auction in Williamsburg, and Col. Washington, who had surveyed the land and knew its value, advised Wormly to purchase it.  This splendid tract of land, which included some of the fines acres of Jefferson, passed from the possession of the Wormlys many years ago.  A great deal of the best land of the entire Lower Shenandoah Valley remained untouched, the settlers preferring the larger streams and locating near the mountains.  Among the earliest settlers of this region at the time of the organized of Frederick County, appear the following names, in addition to those already given:  The Russells, Whites, Blackburns, Newells, Frys, Wilsons, Hoges Allens, Glasses, Calmes, Kerfoots, Helmes, Vances, Porteus, Steermans, Newports, Johnstons, Burdens, McMahons, Harts, Penningtons, McCrachans, etc.  These names comprise several nationalities: Germans, Irish, Scotch, Welsh and English.  In addition to these a colony of Baptists, consisting of fifteen families, came from New Jersey in 1742 and located in the vicinity of where now is Gerrardstown, in Berkeley County, the settlement taking its name from a Baptist Minister, Rev. John Gerrard, who formed the first Baptist organization in the valley, the society shortly afterward building their first church.

As heretofore stated a number of persons had obtained grants of land from the governor and the colonial legislature before Fairfax discovered that he might claim all the territory beyond the Blue Ridge west and north of the head of the Rappahannock to the head of the Potomac, or some stream that helped to form that river, and the manner in which he first came to the knowledge that the Potomac did not head in the Blue Ridge, is said to be as follows:  A hunter named Howard on one of his expeditions crossed the Alleghany Mountains from the valley, and being of an adventurous spirit constructed a canoe and went down the Ohio River, where he was made prisoner by the French and sent to France, whereupon, being released, he made his way to England and came to the knowledge of Lord Fairfax, to whom the hunter described the splendid country between the two great chains of mountains.  His lordship then made application to the crown for an extension, or rather, a re-limitation of his grant, which was conceded, and he forthwith began selling, or granting away bodies of land already settled upon or help by right of grant from Gov. Gooch.  Some of the settlers submitted to the exactions of Fairfax and paid him nominal sums, but sturdy old Jost Hite rebelled against any such high-handed proceeding and refused to pay a ha'penny to the Scotch laird, so the proprietor of the Northern Neck entered a caveat against Hite, which resulted in a suit at law instituted in 1736 by Hite, McKay, Green, and Duff against Lord Fairfax, which cause was only finally settled in 1786, just fifty years after its entrance upon the docket, in favor of the heirs of the plaintiffs, Hite et als, the original contestants being all dead.  A large sum of money from rents, quit-rents and profits, and considerable land was recovered.

The litigation brought about by Fairfax retarded to a very large degree the early settlement of the lower valley, for immigrants from other colonies who wished to settle here, upon finding the state of affairs, moved farther up the valley on to the grant of Lord Beverly, which comprised Augusta County.  This is the reason why the upper valley was more tickly populated at an early day than the Lower Shenandoah Valley.

As a matter of interest and for the better preservation of the names of some of the earliest settlers of this portion of the valley, the following field notes of George Washington, who surveyed much of the land belonging to Lord Fairfax in the Northern Neck, are herein printed.  These field notes of his surveys of a large number of tracts of land are copied from one of Washington's "field books," entitled, "A Journal of my Journey over the Mountains, began Friday, the 11th of March, 1747-48."  The list contains only those surveys within the bounds laid out by this work, with a few exceptions, and many of the names will be very familiar to the residents of this region.  It will be seen the list is arranged alphabetically, and the names of those who acted as markers, chain-carriers, and assistants are given.  Of course the annexed surveys are not all that Washington made in this section, but they are, possibly, all that are now known to exist.  The G. W. Fairfax mentioned in the surveys was George William Fairfax, son of William Fairfax, of Belvoir on the Potomac nearly opposite Mount Vernon.  G. W. Fairfax and G. Washington were about the same age, and both were employed by Lord Fairfax to survey a portion of his immense estate.  Following is the list:

John Anderson, a tract of land surveyed for on Long Marsh, adjoining John Vance's land, October 19, 1750.  He assisted as chain man in survey of two several tracts of land for Isaac Foster, October 22, 1750.  Anderson's land adjoined Robert Fox's.

Jonathan Arnold, a tract of land surveyed for on N. River of Cacapon, April 20, 1750.  His land adjoined that of David Wood's.  he acted as marker in the survey.  April 21, in survey of land for Robert Lindsay he was the marker.

Capt. Thomas Ashby kept a house of entertainment and a ferry on the Shenandoah River, above Burwell's Island, 1748.  It is presumed that from him came the name of Ashby's Gap in the Blue Ridge.

Henry Ashby served as chain man, in survey of land, for G. W. Fairfax on Long Marsh March 15, 1748.  March 29 he assisted as chain man in survey of land on the south fork of south branch for Michael Stump.

Robert Ashby assisted as marker in survey for G. W. Fairfax on Long Marsh March 15, 1748.  Had survey made of a tract of land for himself adjoining Carter's line, and the Fairfax road of 346 acres October 27, 1750.  He served as marker.  His land adjoined lands of Robert Fox.

William Baker, a tract of land on Lost River of Cacapon, surveyed for November 10, 1749.  His land adjoined lands of Barnaby McHandry.

Col. ______ Blackburn owned land and lived on Long Marsh, Frederick County, adjoining lands of William Johnston before March 15, 1748.  His lines cited in surveys of this date.

Henry Bradshaw had lands on Bullskin adjoining lands of Lawrence Washington, August 24, 1750.  Lines referred to in said survey.

Capt. Marquis Calmes, a tract of land on south side of Bullskin, surveyed for November 3, 1750, he himself serving as marker in this survey of 1,170 acres.

Maj. Andrew Campbell, one of the justices of Frederick County, owned land and resided about twenty-five miles northwest of Winchester, on the road to Old Town, in Maryland.  George Washington and G. W. Fairfax stopped with him over night, March 17,1748.

Jacob Camperlin, mentioned in connection with the survey of a tract of land for Hannah Southerd October 29, 1750, which adjoined lands of G. W. Fairfax, Robert Ashby and Widow Jump.

Peter Camerlin, referred to as the late, who widow Hannah Southerd, for whom a survey of land was made October 29, 1750, had resided there.

Samuel Camperlin, mentioned in the notes of the survey of land for Hannah Southerd October 29, 1750, was resident and owner of land.
Francis carney served as a marker in a survey of land for Capt. George Neavil, adjoining Morrison's patent, October 30, 1750, on Long Marsh.

Thomas Carney served as chain carrier in survey for Maj. Lawrence Washington on Bullskin, August 24 and 25, 1750.

Richard Carter owned large tracts on Long Marsh, adjoining Samuel Isaacs and John Anderson's, October 19, 1750.

John Collins had settled on land in the vicinity of Moorefield before 1748.  Washington and G. W. Fairfax stayed over night with him April 9, 1748 en route homeward from South Branch surveys.  Collinsville, in Frederick County, possibly perpetuates the name of this pioneer family. 

Thomas Colston owned land on Long Marsh near Fairfax county road October 19, 1750.  His lands adjoined Isabelle Jump's and John Vance's.

John Cozin, or Cuzin, owned land and resided on Long Marsh in March, 1748.  His house referred to in survey of land for Thomas Lofton October 17, 1750, and in which survey he was a chain carrier.  And October 18, 1750, chain man in survey for G. Smith.  And same day marker in a survey of tract for himself which adjoined Smith's and Lofton's land.

William Crawford, chain man in survey of land for Richard Stephenson, and William Davis on Bullskin, August 20, `750.  August 21, 1750, chain man in survey for Lawrence Washington.  August 24 and 25 chain carrier for same parties.  October 19 served as chain carrier in survey for John Vance.  Was this person the same as Col. William Crawford of the Revolution? [It undoubtedly was, as he was born and raised in what was then Frederick County.] - Ed. 

Col. Thomas Cresap of Old Town, Md., visited by Washington en route to Patterson Creek, while surveying for Lord Fairfax, March 21, 1748.  Owing to a storm he was delayed several days at Cresap's where he met a party of thirty Indians returned from was in the South with one scalp.

Ralph Croft was chain carrier in survey of a tract of land for John Anderson, October 19, 1750.  He was also chain carrier in survey of land for Isaac Foster, October 22, 1750.

Nathaniel Daughily owned land on Long Marsh.  His corner is mentioned in survey for Patrick Rice, October 23, 1750.

William Davis, lands surveyed for, and Richard Stephenson, on a branch of the Bullskin, August 20, 1750, adjoined the lands of Lawrence Washington.

G. W. Fairfax owned lands on Long Marsh.  Adjoined lands of Pennington, Johnston and John Cozens, 1748.  March 15, 1748, had surveyed for 3,023 acres on Long Marsh.

Thomas Lord Fairfax, baron of Cameron, the proprietary owner of the Northern Neck, estimated to contain 5,700,000 acres, reserved 10,000 acres in his manor of "Greenway Court,| about twelve miles southeast of Winchester.  Sold his lands, giving fixed time, on a small annual ground rent.

Isaac Foster served as chain carrier October 19, 1750, in survey for John Anderson.  His land adjoined that of John Vance's.  October 22, 1750, had surveyed a tract of land for himself adjoining John Anderson and John Vance.

Robert Fox, a tract of land surveyed for of 1,216 acres, October 29, 1750, which adjoined Robert Ashby's in Carter's line.  He served as marker himself.

James Genn, one of the licensed surveyors in 1748, of Frederick County.

George Hampton was chain carrier in survey of a tract of land for Isabella Jump October 19, 1750 on Long Marsh.

Joseph Hampton, marker in survey of a tract of land on Long Marsh for Isabella Jump, October 19, 1750.

Richard Hampton served as chain carrier in survey of land for Capt. George Neavil, October 30, 1750; chain man in survey of land for John Madden, October 24, 1750, and October 30, chain carrier in survey of a tract of land for Capt. George Neavil.

Henry Harris owned a tract of land, where he resided, near the Manor Line, 1748, adjoining the lands of Widow Wolf, Frederic County.

Joshua Haynes owned lands on Bullskin and adjoined lands of Capt. George Johnston August 28, 1750, and was marker in survey of lands for Capt. George Johnston.

Solomon Hedges had settled on Patterson Creek, some forty miles from its mouth.  He was one of the justices of the peace for Frederick County.  Washington and Fairfax camped there March 26, 1748.  He had neither knives nor forks on his table at supper.

Henry Hendricks, chain man in survey of Isaac Pennington's patent, October 23, 1750, and waste land adjoining.

Captain _____ Hite had settled on land near Winchester.  Washington left his baggage there while he went to different places to prosecute his surveys.  March 14, 1748.

George Horner laid warrant for 200 acres of land in Frederick County in 1748.

Joseph Howt (from New England, possibly it is the same person given as James How) had warrant (1748) for 400 acres of land in Frederick County.

Samuel Isaac, a tract of land surveyed for on Long Marsh October 22, 1750.  His land adjoined those of Isaac Pennington. October 24, 1750, was marker in survey for Jeremiah Wood, whose land adjoined his own.

"Joe's Hole," a name given to a place of some local note, is mentioned in survey of a tract of land for John Madden October 24, 1750, on Long Marsh.

John Johnson, chain carrier in survey of land for Capt. George Johnstone on Bullskin August 28, 1750.

Abram Johnstone owned land and resided on Patterson Creek, fifteen miles from its mouth, March 25, 1748.

Capt. George Johnston, a tract of land surveyed for on south side of Bullskin August 28, 1750.  Adjoined lands of G. W. Fairfax and Robert Ashby. 

Thomas Johnston owned lands on Long Marsh adjoining G. W. Fairfax's lands March 1748.  Line referred to in survey of Thomas Lofton.

William Johnston owned lands on Long Marsh.  Joined lands of Col. Blackstone, 1758.

Thomas Jones, chain carrier in survey of land for Capt. George Johnstone on Bullskin August 28, 1750.

Isabella Jump, widow, a tract of land surveyed for on Long Marsh October 19, 1750, near the Fairfax county road.  Adjoins lands of Hannah Southerd.

John Keith, chain carrier in survey of land for Henry Enoch April 23, 1750, and on the same day was chain man in survey of land for John Newton.

T. Keys had settled and owned lands adjoining lands of Lawrence Washington in 1750.  His line mentioned in survey of L. Washington's survey August 24, and 25, 1750.

Samuel Kinsman laid warrant in Frederic County for 400 acres, 1748.

James Kinson laid warrant on Lost River for 400 acres of land, 1748.

John Lindsey, marker in survey of land for John Madden, October 24, 1750, on Long Marsh.

Thomas Lofton, a tract of land surveyed for on Bullskin, October 17, 1750.  He served as marker October 18, 1750; acted as chain carrier in survey for G. Smith on Long Marsh.

Thomas Lofton, Jr., carried chain in survey of land for John Cosine on the Long Marsh, October 18, 1750.

Timothy McCarty, chain carrier in survey for Lawrence Washington on Bullskin August 26, 1750.

Thomas McClahan, chain man in survey of land for Jeremiah Wood on the Long Marsh, October 24, 1750.

Dr. James McCormick patented land on Bullskin, adjoined Capt. George Johnstone's August 28, 1750.  His line mentioned in the survey of Capt. Marquis Calmes, November 3, 1750, in whose survey he acted as chain carrier.

Darby McKeaver, Sr., laid warrant for 400 acres of land in Frederick County, 1748.  April 10, 1750, land survey of tract on Cacapon in Frederick County surveyed 412 acres.  Same day surveyed waste land between Darby McKeaver and son divided between them.

Daniel McKelduff, marker in survey of land on branch of Bullskin August 20, 1750, for Richard Stephenson and William Davis.  Marker in survey for Maj. Lawrence Washington August 21 to 23, 1750.
 
John Madden, a tract of land surveyed for at "Joe's Hole" on Long Marsh, near the Fairfax road, October 24, 1750.

Patrick Matthews had taken up land on south side of Bullskin adjoining survey of Capt. George Johnstone before August 28, 1750, when his line was referred to.

John Miller, marker in survey for John Anderson on Long Marsh October 19, 1750, and marker in survey October 22, for Isaac Foster, and same day marker in survey for Samuel Isaac.

______ Morris's patent adjoined lands of Maj. Lawrence Washington, as determined by survey to both August 22 to 23, 1750.  Also mention is made of Morris's patent in survey of Capt. George Neavil, October 30, 1750.

Edward Musgrove, a tract of land surveyed for on Shenandoah, August 16, 1750.  Adjoins lands of William Vestall.

John Musgrove, marker in survey for Edward Musgrove on Shenandoah River, August 16, 1750, and which adjoined his own patented lands.

Ned Musgrove, marker in survey of lands for Edward Musgrove, August 16, 1750.

Capt. George Neavil, a tract of land surveyed for on Long Marsh adjoining Morris's patent, north side of Fairfax road, October 30, 1750.

Capt. Isaac Pennington  has procured land about sixteen miles below Winchester on Bullskin before 1748.  George Washington lodged with hi the first night he was out as a surveyor in the valley.  His lines mentioned in survey of lands for Thomas Lofton, October 17, 1750.  A tract of land surveyed for adjoining his own patent on Long Marsh, October 23, 1750.  He served as his own marker of the line.

Andrew Pitts, patent for land on Bullskin, August 20, 1750, adjoins the survey of Richard Stephenson and William Davis, August 20, 1750, and is also referred to in surveys of Maj. Lawrence Washington, August 21 and 23, 1750.

Charles Polk, supposed to have resided in the vicinity of Williamsport in Maryland, had land under cultivation in 1748.  George Washington and G. W. Fairfax stopped with him March 20, 1748.

Hugh Rankon, chain man in survey of land on Bullskin for Maj. Lawrence Washington, August 26, 1750.

Patrick Rice, a tract of land surveyed for on north side of Long Marsh, October 23, 1750.  He served as marker on the line.

Capt. Thomas Rutherford had settled upon lands on the Bullskin, adjoining surveys of Maj. Lawrence Washington, August 24 and 25, 1750.

Ruben Rutherford served as chain carrier in survey of lands on Shenandoah for Edward Musgrove, August 16, 1750.

James Rutlidge, horse jockey, had taken up land on South Branch, about seventy miles above its mouth.  George Washington and G. W. Fairfax stopped with him over night, March 28, 1748.

Stephen Sebastian, chain man in survey of land for Isabella Jump on Long Marsh, October 19, 1750.

John Sheely, chain carrier in survey of land for Hannah Southerd, October 29, 1750, and chain man in survey of land for Robert Fox on the same day.

Walter Sherley had lands on the Bullskin adjoining lands of Maj. Lawrence Washington, August 24 and 25, 1750.  His line mention in this survey.

George Smith, chain carrier in survey of land for Thomas Lofton, on Long Marsh, October 17, 1750.  He also owned land, as his line is referred to in survey of John Cozins, October 18, 1750, and in whose survey he was marker.  A tract surveyed for himself October 18, 1750, on Long Marsh.

Hannah Southerd a tract of land surveyed for on Long Marsh, October 29, 1750.  Her lands adjoined those of Robert Ashby and Widow Jump.

Stephen Southerd, chain carrier in survey of land for Robert Ashby on Long Marsh, October 27, 1750, and marker in survey for Hannah Southerd, October 29, 1750.

Richard Stephenson, a tract of land surveyed for him and William Davis on the north branch of Bullskin, August 20, 1750.  His land adjoined that of Maj. Lawrence Washington.

Richard Taylor, chain man in survey on Long Marsh for Maj. L. Washington, March 14 and 15, 1748.  March 29, 1748, chain carrier in survey for Michael Stump, on south branch.

Robert Taylor, chain carrier in survey of land for George W. Fairfax, on Long Marsh, March 15 and 16, 1748, of 3,023 acres.

Lewis Thomas, chain man in survey of land on Bullskin for Richard Stephenson and William Davis, August 20, 1750.  And again chain carrier in survey for Maj. Lewis Washington, August 21 and 22, 1750.

Nathaniel Thomas had taken up lands on the Bullskin, adjoining lands of Maj. Lewis Washington on Bullskin, August 24 and 25, 1750.  His lines referred to in survey.

Owen Thomas, marker in survey of land for G. Smith on Long Marsh, October 18, 1750.

John Urton, chain carrier in survey of land for Isaac Pennington on Long Marsh, October 23, 1750, and same day in survey for Patrick Rice.  October 27, 1750, chain bearer in survey for Robert Ashby, and 29th chain carrier in survey of land for Hannah Southerd, and same day in survey for Robert Fox.

Alexander Vance, marker in survey for John Vance, for land on Long Marsh, October 19, 1750.

John Vance, a tract of land on Long Marsh, surveyed October 19, 1750.  His land adjoins that of John Anderson and also that of Isaac Foster.

Henry Vanmeter had taken up land on the south branch before 1748, and resided there when George Washington was making these surveys, April 6, 1758.

John Vestall had settled upon lands on the Shenandoah before 1750 - his line is cited in survey for Mr. Edward Musgrove, August 16, 1750, for whom he served as chain carrier.

William Vestall  had settled upon lands on the Shenandoah prior to 1750.  His line is referred to in survey of land for Edward Musgrove, August 16, 1750.

Samuel Waker [Walker] resided upon patented land on the Bullskin; his line is referred to in survey for Maj. Lawrence Washington, August 21 and 24, 1750.  Was this the person whose name has been given to a creek in Augusta County?

Maj. Lawrence Washington, a tract of land surveyed for on the Bullskin, August 21 to 23.  These lands adjoining lands of Mr. Worthington, Mr. Davis and Gershom Keys, August 24 and 25; a farther survey for on the Bullskin, which adjoined Robert Worthington's patent - and the lands of Henry Bradshaw, August 26, 1750, surveyed for the vacancy between Worthington's lines near Smith's Glade.

William Wiggons, marker in survey of land for Thomas Wiggons, April 24, 1750, and same day served as chain bearer in survey of land for Isaac Dawson.

Jeremiah Wood, chain carrier in survey of land for John Madden on Long Marsh, October 24, 1750.  The same day had a survey of a tract for himself adjoining Carter's line, and also Samuel Isaac's.

Robert Worthington resided on patented lands on the Bullskin.  His land adjoined and is referred to in survey for Maj. Lawrence Washington, August 21 to 23, 1750.  He was marker in this survey for L. Washington, August 26, 1750.  Served as chain carrier in survey of land for Capt. Marquis Calmes, November 3, 1750.


CHAPTER V.
ORGANIZATION OF FREDERICK COUNTY.
APPONTMENT OF OFFICERS-FIRST COURT IN 1743-JAIL, PILLORY, STOCKS, AND WHIPPING POST-ORDINARIES LICENSED-FIRST ARREST-KING'S ATTORNEY-A PRIMITIVE MINISTER-LIST OF PRICES FOR TAVERN KEEPERS-SEVERE SENTENCES-FIRST GRAND JURY AND PRESENTMENTS-DUNCAN OGULLION-THE FIRST DEED-SOME EARLY LAND TRANSFERS-VESTAL'S IRON WORKS-FIRST COUNTY LEVY-INSJUTICE AND INHUMANITY-ARRIVED OF Lord Fairfax-FIRST COURT HOUSE-LIST OF EARLY ROADS.

For several years after the erection of Frederick County by act of the General Assembly in November, 1738, there was no sufficient population in all the vast section comprising at that time Shenandoah, a portion of Page, Warren, Frederick, Clark, Berkeley, Jefferson and Morgan Counties, and all the territory due west of them, to justify the appointment of county officers and the setting in motion of the wheels of government for the valley district as a separate institution 
Source : History of the Lower Shenandoah Valley, Counties of Frederick, Berkeley, Jefferson and Clarke, by J.E. Norris, 1890, pp. 56 - 70.

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